Newspaper Archive of
The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
Lyft
May 11, 1999     The Ortonville Independent
PAGE 36     (36 of 62 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 36     (36 of 62 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
May 11, 1999
 

Newspaper Archive of The Ortonville Independent produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




I Page 18 Spring & Summer 1999 Big Stone Lake Region History, Nature, Camping abound at Meadowbrook, Bonanza State Par The Meadowbrook and Bonanza area state parks along Big Stone Lake are popular tourist attractions that are open from April through December. Meadowbrook is located aproximately seven miles north- west of Ortonville along Highway 7, and Bonanza is located 18 1/4 miles northwest of Ortonville. The area around Big Stone Lake State Park abounds with granite quarries. According to modern scientists, it is the oldest of all rock formations. The top three inches of exposed stone contains the fossil remains of sharks' teeth, skeletons, and other parts. Many and varied are the fos- sil remains of other animals that have been located in this region. The fact that the giant bison, much larger than the modern buffalo, once roamed this area is mutely testified by its scattered teeth, skulls and bones. In addition, fossil remains and imprints of snails, clams and other inhabitants of the sea have been found in fields that are now many feet above the level of the lake. This would seem to indi- cate that much, if not all, of this area was once submerged. Traces of Vikings, mooting Hartford Beach Indian Villages (continued from page 17) bzrlain Island a short dis- tance up the lake, and one at the head where Browns Valley, MN, is now located. A large village was locat- ed on the bluff overlooking the present-day Hartford Beach. This latter village was described and sketched for the Stephen Long expe- dition, which visited the area in 1823. Gabriel Renville and Red Iron, noted Slsseton chiefs, were born at villsges on Big Stone Lake. These men, together with such teachers as Akipa, Little Paul, John Otherday, Greyfoot and stones, metal spears, and runic writings have all been found in the park, as well as the skeletal remains of the now famous "Browns Valley Man". The skeletal remains of the Browns Valley Man were found in a nearby gravel pit, and give visitors proof of the area's ancient inhabitants. Many of the artifacts that are found in the park can be traced back to the stone age - arrow- heads, knives, tomahawks and hammers. Needless to say, all of these discoveries will not be made in the park, but relics do exist through the area and the park offers a base from which to carry out the search. The Visitor Center provides a place to gath- er testimony of the past and to preserve it. It interprets the past history of man in the state of Minnesota and in North America, providing a source of wisdom for the future. Joanne Svendsen, new man- ager at the Big Stone Lake State Park, stated that use of the park has increased well over 100 per- cent over the last three or four years, and since this year water levels are down, park use should be better than ever. Campsites are provided with water and toilet facilities at the park. Tables and parking areas are available for picnicking, and trails provide diverse opportuni- ties to experience the park and participate in nature. Where appropriate, boat launching and swimming facili- ties have been developed for water sports. Winter activities at the park include ski touring and snow shoeing. Snowmobiling is per- mitted in some parks only in des- ignated areas and posted trails under conditions considered ade- quate for park protection by the park ranger or manager. Schools and other groups are encouraged to use state parks for environmental educational activ- ities, and park visitors can acquaint themselves with the natural uniqueness of the park by participating in the park natural- ists programs, focussed on con- serving the area's resources. For more information on the park facilities and activities con- tact Joanne Svendsen, Big Stone State Park Manager at (320) 839-3663 or the Department of Natural Resources Division of Parks and Recreation at (612) 296-6157. Standing Buffalo, opposed the great Santee Sioux uprising under Little Crow in 1862. With the support of most of the Sisseton and Wahpe- ton bands, they succeeded in saving the lives of numer- ous captives of the hostiles during the conflict. Take a Hike The memories of the past are preserved in the state park at Hartford Beach. Hiking trails are provided to all of the historical sites which are interpreted for the visitor's interest. The plant life found at Big Stone Lake is a mixture of forest and prairie species. The variety is abundant, ranging from morel mush- rooms in the spring to bright red dusters .f jack- in-the-pulpit in the fall, from dogwood in the spring to he brilliant wahoo in the fall. Many species of furbear- ere that brought the early traders to Big Stone Lake have disappeared, but mink, beaver, white-tailed deer, chipmunks, fox, mar- mats (woodchucks), rac- coons, squirrels and an oeea- sional bobcat may still be seen in the state park. Good lhing Big Stone Lake yields respectable catches of northern pike, perch, cat- fish, bass and bullheads for summer fishermen and has gained a reputation as one of the top walleye lakes in the Upper Midwest. The hundreds of sh shacks" that turn the lake into a BIG STONE LAKE STATE PARK offers not only ing, but a host of other activities, all along the beautiful Big Stone Lake. Above is new Park Joanne Svendsen, who invites all to see what the park to offer. THIS SIGN stands near pioneer graves at Beach State Park. Hiking trails begin Photo. fishing village each winter when ice fishermen appear attest to the quality of year round angling opportuni- ties. Modern facilities are available at the camp- ground, picnic and areas. Seasonal or es are required for vehicles entering the and an additional required for visitors camp there. We fix everything but marriages... We send those problems to the preachers! LAWN MOWERS -STRING TRIMMERS -ALL SMALL MOTORS ICE AUGERS -POST HOLE DIGGERS -SEWING MACHINES HONDA SALES & SERVICE ON ENGINES Hours: Monday thru Saturday, 8:30 a.rn. to 5:00 p.m. Mini Motor Repair Main Street - Big Stone City, SD Charles Frevert, owner Phone (605) 862-860 I Page 18 Spring & Summer 1999 Big Stone Lake Region History, Nature, Camping abound at Meadowbrook, Bonanza State Par The Meadowbrook and Bonanza area state parks along Big Stone Lake are popular tourist attractions that are open from April through December. Meadowbrook is located aproximately seven miles north- west of Ortonville along Highway 7, and Bonanza is located 18 1/4 miles northwest of Ortonville. The area around Big Stone Lake State Park abounds with granite quarries. According to modern scientists, it is the oldest of all rock formations. The top three inches of exposed stone contains the fossil remains of sharks' teeth, skeletons, and other parts. Many and varied are the fos- sil remains of other animals that have been located in this region. The fact that the giant bison, much larger than the modern buffalo, once roamed this area is mutely testified by its scattered teeth, skulls and bones. In addition, fossil remains and imprints of snails, clams and other inhabitants of the sea have been found in fields that are now many feet above the level of the lake. This would seem to indi- cate that much, if not all, of this area was once submerged. Traces of Vikings, mooting Hartford Beach Indian Villages (continued from page 17) bzrlain Island a short dis- tance up the lake, and one at the head where Browns Valley, MN, is now located. A large village was locat- ed on the bluff overlooking the present-day Hartford Beach. This latter village was described and sketched for the Stephen Long expe- dition, which visited the area in 1823. Gabriel Renville and Red Iron, noted Slsseton chiefs, were born at villsges on Big Stone Lake. These men, together with such teachers as Akipa, Little Paul, John Otherday, Greyfoot and stones, metal spears, and runic writings have all been found in the park, as well as the skeletal remains of the now famous "Browns Valley Man". The skeletal remains of the Browns Valley Man were found in a nearby gravel pit, and give visitors proof of the area's ancient inhabitants. Many of the artifacts that are found in the park can be traced back to the stone age - arrow- heads, knives, tomahawks and hammers. Needless to say, all of these discoveries will not be made in the park, but relics do exist through the area and the park offers a base from which to carry out the search. The Visitor Center provides a place to gath- er testimony of the past and to preserve it. It interprets the past history of man in the state of Minnesota and in North America, providing a source of wisdom for the future. Joanne Svendsen, new man- ager at the Big Stone Lake State Park, stated that use of the park has increased well over 100 per- cent over the last three or four years, and since this year water levels are down, park use should be better than ever. Campsites are provided with water and toilet facilities at the park. Tables and parking areas are available for picnicking, and trails provide diverse opportuni- ties to experience the park and participate in nature. Where appropriate, boat launching and swimming facili- ties have been developed for water sports. Winter activities at the park include ski touring and snow shoeing. Snowmobiling is per- mitted in some parks only in des- ignated areas and posted trails under conditions considered ade- quate for park protection by the park ranger or manager. Schools and other groups are encouraged to use state parks for environmental educational activ- ities, and park visitors can acquaint themselves with the natural uniqueness of the park by participating in the park natural- ists programs, focussed on con- serving the area's resources. For more information on the park facilities and activities con- tact Joanne Svendsen, Big Stone State Park Manager at (320) 839-3663 or the Department of Natural Resources Division of Parks and Recreation at (612) 296-6157. Standing Buffalo, opposed the great Santee Sioux uprising under Little Crow in 1862. With the support of most of the Sisseton and Wahpe- ton bands, they succeeded in saving the lives of numer- ous captives of the hostiles during the conflict. Take a Hike The memories of the past are preserved in the state park at Hartford Beach. Hiking trails are provided to all of the historical sites which are interpreted for the visitor's interest. The plant life found at Big Stone Lake is a mixture of forest and prairie species. The variety is abundant, ranging from morel mush- rooms in the spring to bright red dusters .f jack- in-the-pulpit in the fall, from dogwood in the spring to he brilliant wahoo in the fall. Many species of furbear- ere that brought the early traders to Big Stone Lake have disappeared, but mink, beaver, white-tailed deer, chipmunks, fox, mar- mats (woodchucks), rac- coons, squirrels and an oeea- sional bobcat may still be seen in the state park. Good lhing Big Stone Lake yields respectable catches of northern pike, perch, cat- fish, bass and bullheads for summer fishermen and has gained a reputation as one of the top walleye lakes in the Upper Midwest. The hundreds of sh shacks" that turn the lake into a BIG STONE LAKE STATE PARK offers not only ing, but a host of other activities, all along the beautiful Big Stone Lake. Above is new Park Joanne Svendsen, who invites all to see what the park to offer. THIS SIGN stands near pioneer graves at Beach State Park. Hiking trails begin Photo. fishing village each winter when ice fishermen appear attest to the quality of year round angling opportuni- ties. Modern facilities are available at the camp- ground, picnic and areas. Seasonal or es are required for vehicles entering the and an additional required for visitors camp there. We fix everything but marriages... We send those problems to the preachers! LAWN MOWERS -STRING TRIMMERS -ALL SMALL MOTORS ICE AUGERS -POST HOLE DIGGERS -SEWING MACHINES HONDA SALES & SERVICE ON ENGINES Hours: Monday thru Saturday, 8:30 a.rn. to 5:00 p.m. Mini Motor Repair Main Street - Big Stone City, SD Charles Frevert, owner Phone (605) 862-860