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May 13, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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Forgive us if we play arm-chair quarterback here a bit...in regards to the last two games that our Minnesota Twins played with Boston. What a lousy job of man- agement in both...one a loss (which should have been a win), the other a win by the hair of their skinny-skin chins. Saturday's loss should have been a win. Starting pitcher Santana (used to throwing but a few innings in relief)should have been pulled after he showed signs of fatigue in the fifth inning, and before he was left in to give go-ahead runs. And in Sunday's win, %8, in which the Twins were leading by 9-1 well into the game, starting "big-money-boy" Brad Radke, was again left in too long, as was reliever LaTroy Hawkins, and ace-reliever Eddie Guordado, too, wasleft in way too Iong...nearly resulting in a loss. Even if the ace doesn't have his stuff, shouldn't he be pulled? So there...you have our two-bits worth of second-guessing! We erred in a story last week here on our meeting Jeff Grimm of Plymouth in the metro area. We men- tioned his grandfather as being Walt Grimm, which is incorrect. Jeff is a grand nephew of Walt. The late Herman and Vera Grimm were Jeff's grandparents. Thanks to Marcella Stotesbery for setting us straight on this! Recently, a group gathered at our County Historical Museum here to scan through a 167 page booklet titled CAMP PAPERS....LAGERZEITUNGEN...a compilation of German POW news- papers at Camp Algona, Iowa, from 1944 to 1946. On page 116 of the book, there was a part about the German POW camp in Ortonville, located next to the former Big Stone Canning Company. We remember it well (we were age 14 at the time), the men slept in hastily-erected barracks, and the men were used for picking sweet corn. They never came into town...but worked in the fields and otherwise were confined to their bar- racks. That portion of the above book about Ortonville, reads as follows: From Our Branch Camps Branch Camp #11, Ortonville/Minnesota On 10 July we left Camp Algona--as always in such situations, with mixed feelings and with the question, "What will be waiting for us?" But, it was better than we thought--even though the grass was tall and the sparrows had built nests in our new accommo- dations. A short time later the lawn- mower was humming and the intrud- ers fled the barracks. The following Sunday another 71 men rolled in from Camp Atlanta in Nebraska. We moved the beds a little closer togeth- er so everyone had room to lay their tired heads down. We are working with 111 men in the field and the corn canning plant. The plant is straight across from us; only the road that connects the towns of Ortonville with Big Stone divides us. The bor- der marker for Minnesota and South Dakota sits outside our door. To be exact, the border runs right through the middle of our mess hallmso that half is in Minnesota and the other half is in South Dakota. The corn is late this year, but I do not believe anyone is upset that he cannot go to work right away. In the meantime, we enjoy the green hills that rise from the river valley; also, the famil- iar call of the train sounds from the railroad tracks. We send greetings to all comrades and hope to see you soon. We recall some of the prisoners expressed concern that, when the war ended, they would have liked to remain here. ***** Some nostalgia today from good friend Tuck Nolop, Wayzata dentist, as he renews his paper. "Jim, it's always great to hear from you...we have a alot of histo- ry. My mother's first job before she attended the University of Minnesota was working for your father Lem at The Independent. Chick Zweiner did the sports then...and encouraged Evie to be a sports reporter. Chick's son, Chuck, taught youth golf and got the Hasslens (Dave and Chops) along with Jack Blink and myself into the game. We all went on to play college golW' 25 LB. BEEF BUNDLE 20 LB. PORK BUNDLE ;49.95 S25.95 Things are buzzin' in the WANT ADS City Council will move location of meetings to Senior Center At a regular meeting of Ortonville's City Council on Monday, councilmembers voted on a motion to relocate future meetings to Ortonville's Senior Citizen's Center. Because the current location in Ortonville's City Offices does not facilitate large crowds, councilmem- bers suggested moving the regular meetings to the upstairs of the senior center. Another concern of councilmem- bers was that it is often difficult to hear speakers during the meeting in the current location, because of a loud air conditioner. Mayor Dave Dinnel also expressed concerns about the ease of televising meetings. Because of noise coming from large meetings, furnaces and air conditioners running, Mayor Dinnel felt it may disturb the recording of regular council meetings. It was a consensus of the councilmembers that by holding future meetings in the senior citizen's building, it may ease in the videotaping of the meetings. Ortonville's City Council members voted on the motion to relocate city council meetings to the Senior Citizen's Center. The motion carried. Council members also proclaimed the week of May 11-17 as National Police Week, and May 15 as Peace Officers' Memorial Day, to coincide with the Congress and President Bush's recent designation of the dates. During this week, Mayor Dinnel calls upon all patriotic, civic and edu- cational organizations to observe the week of May 11-17 as Police Week, with appropriate ceremonies and observances in which all people may join in commemorating law enforce- ment officers, past and present. Furthermore, he calls upon all citi- zens of Ortonville to observe Thursday, May 15 as Peace Officers Memorial Day in honor of those law enforcement officers who, through their courageous deeds, have made the ultimate sacrifice in service to their community or have become dis- abled in the performance of duty, and recognize and pay respect to the sur- vivors of our fallen heroes. In other action, councilmembers voted to accept the Park Board's rec- ommendation that Kelsey Henningson be hired as this year's Summer Recreation Director. Additionally, councilmembers accepted the recommendation from the Park Board that City crews make repairs on the Ortonville Pool, includ- ing patching trouble spots and flaking paint. NATIONAL POLICE WEEK is the week of May 12, with Peace Officers' Memorial Day falling on May 15. Ortonville's City Council voted to proclaim National Police Week and Peace Officers' Memorial Day at their regular meetinl on Tuesday. Above, Ortonville Police Cheif Curt Hormann is pictured with Ortonville Mayor Dave Dnnnel, showing Ortonville Police Department's newest patrol vehicle. County Commissioners address Solid Waste Recycling issues Big Stone County Board of Commissioners met with Environmental Officer Darren Wilke in a ,regular meeting on Tuesday to discuss Solid Waste Assessments. According to Wilke, he has reviewed budget needs that could be covered with a solid waste assess- ment. Wilke claims Big Stone County is known to surrounding areas for having excellent services overall, and hopes to continue providing the ser- vices in the future. He said that Big Stone County is currently spending approximately $27-30,000 annually on recycling costs. About 50 percent of the coun- ty's businesses are participating in Solid Waste Management, and advised the board that in order to con- tinue providing the current level of UMVRDC May meeting The Upper Minnesota Valley Regional Development Commission will hold its regular meeting on Monday, May 19, at the Appleton Civic Center. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. service to these businesses, assess- ments would be necessary. Wilke also noted that in order to have assessments, a county ordinance must be drafted and a public hearing would be held. Board members discussed possible fee assessments that would assist the county in offsetting costs of continu- ing the current Waste Management service level. A motion was made to draft the ordinance based upon money needed to keep the program going, and a public hearing date was set for June 17 at 10 a.m. Board members also discussed the request by Main Street Industries in Clinton to raise pay from $6 to $7 an hour for work done in maintaining parks. Commissioner Lane spoke in sup- port of the pay increase, as Main Street Industries is a program that supports members of the county who may not have other means of obtain- ing finances. A motion was made, and carried, to increase pay rates from $6 to $7 dollars an hour for Main Street Industries. In other action, a new Big Stone County permit fee schedule was propsed by Darren Wilke, and a motion was made to accept the new fee schedule, which would offset county costs. Commissioners voted in favor of the motion. Government Program now offers 100% financing for =el homes in small towns and rural areas of Moderate income families living in rural areas now have the home of their dreams- affordably. Valid only in towns population, outside large metro areas - or in the country on • New Homes • Existing The home you choose can be of any size or design - income, credit worthiness and the appraised value of the • 100% financing now • You must have adequate and dependable income • You must have reasonably good credit. • After purchase, you must occupy the dwelling. FREE 12 page report- "Secrets of Smart Homebuyel /f you're interested in owning your own home ca//now - Fast, easy and free pre-qualification over the phone. Jamie Mittelstaedt Call Today Midstate Mortgage OrtonviUe www.midstatemortgage.net Pro Auto broken into, vandalized A break in at Pro Auto, on west Highway 12, in Ortonville, occurred late Friday or early Saturday. According to Ortonville Police Chief Curt Hormann, tires, rims and stereo equipment were stolen from the building. Additionally, four vehicles were vandalized. The break-in occured through the show room window, located on the west side of the building. Hormann said there was roughly $1,900 in stolen merchandise. Dollar amount for the damage is currently unknown, but is a sizeable amount, according to Hormann. Pro Auto is offering a reward to anyone who has to the incident. They one who knows break in to stop in or c 00ummage =stor=cal Big Stone Society will be rummage sale 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Many household including two new electric grill, and other items tion. The sale will be former water plant on first street next UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA The Division of Neuroscience conducting studies investigating nervosa as a gastrointestinal medication and care provided). begun to realize that you have lost over these behaviors? Call Laurie at: 612-626-4034 or "TA]KZLT M'ZCI'W'='B n HOURS: Mon.-Fd. 8AM-5:30PM; Sat. 8AM-SPM ORTONVILLE, MN PHONE (320) 839-2653 .....::,: 00!i!ii00i00iill tiii00i00iii00!i!!iiiiii0000!ii00iii00iii!!iii0000iiiiiiiiiiill 00iiii$0000k]*[ii!i!iieORiK!iiiiiieHOPSiiiiiiii!iiil Pioneer's Own - Per Lb. I Locally Grown Beef - Per Lb. SUMMER -- I QUARTERS SAUSAGE ............... $2.79 OR SLOES ............... $1.49 Locally Grown Pork- Per Lb. Per Lb. $2 .ALF A.OG ................. 89ข OE. TU.KEY ........ YOUR GRADUATION HEADQUARTERS! Plan now and order your roast beef, pork or ham, fruit salad & assorted salads. BUFFALO AVAILABLE ~ WE ACCEPT EBT CARDS KARl: 11 • 4 lower GA tickets • 4 Dome Dogs • 4 soft drinks • 2 Dairy Queen ฎ Buy- One-Get-One Free Blizzard ฎ Flavor Treat coupons • 2 Twins Scorecards Great giveaways on Saturdays including:. • Dairy Queen ฎ Twins Cap Night (August 2) • A.J. Pierzynski Bobblehead Doll Night presented by Hormel (September 6) See twinsbaseball.com for a full promotions list. 612-33-TWINS Metrodome prosontod by Mildl Athletic • Interactive ga, food and • Cities 97 on the PlaZa Page 2  INDEPENDENT TuesdaY' Forgive us if we play arm-chair quarterback here a bit...in regards to the last two games that our Minnesota Twins played with Boston. What a lousy job of man- agement in both...one a loss (which should have been a win), the other a win by the hair of their skinny-skin chins. Saturday's loss should have been a win. Starting pitcher Santana (used to throwing but a few innings in relief)should have been pulled after he showed signs of fatigue in the fifth inning, and before he was left in to give go-ahead runs. And in Sunday's win, %8, in which the Twins were leading by 9-1 well into the game, starting "big-money-boy" Brad Radke, was again left in too long, as was reliever LaTroy Hawkins, and ace-reliever Eddie Guordado, too, wasleft in way too Iong...nearly resulting in a loss. Even if the ace doesn't have his stuff, shouldn't he be pulled? So there...you have our two-bits worth of second-guessing! We erred in a story last week here on our meeting Jeff Grimm of Plymouth in the metro area. We men- tioned his grandfather as being Walt Grimm, which is incorrect. Jeff is a grand nephew of Walt. The late Herman and Vera Grimm were Jeff's grandparents. Thanks to Marcella Stotesbery for setting us straight on this! Recently, a group gathered at our County Historical Museum here to scan through a 167 page booklet titled CAMP PAPERS....LAGERZEITUNGEN...a compilation of German POW news- papers at Camp Algona, Iowa, from 1944 to 1946. On page 116 of the book, there was a part about the German POW camp in Ortonville, located next to the former Big Stone Canning Company. We remember it well (we were age 14 at the time), the men slept in hastily-erected barracks, and the men were used for picking sweet corn. They never came into town...but worked in the fields and otherwise were confined to their bar- racks. That portion of the above book about Ortonville, reads as follows: From Our Branch Camps Branch Camp #11, Ortonville/Minnesota On 10 July we left Camp Algona--as always in such situations, with mixed feelings and with the question, "What will be waiting for us?" But, it was better than we thought--even though the grass was tall and the sparrows had built nests in our new accommo- dations. A short time later the lawn- mower was humming and the intrud- ers fled the barracks. The following Sunday another 71 men rolled in from Camp Atlanta in Nebraska. We moved the beds a little closer togeth- er so everyone had room to lay their tired heads down. We are working with 111 men in the field and the corn canning plant. The plant is straight across from us; only the road that connects the towns of Ortonville with Big Stone divides us. The bor- der marker for Minnesota and South Dakota sits outside our door. To be exact, the border runs right through the middle of our mess hallmso that half is in Minnesota and the other half is in South Dakota. The corn is late this year, but I do not believe anyone is upset that he cannot go to work right away. In the meantime, we enjoy the green hills that rise from the river valley; also, the famil- iar call of the train sounds from the railroad tracks. We send greetings to all comrades and hope to see you soon. We recall some of the prisoners expressed concern that, when the war ended, they would have liked to remain here. ***** Some nostalgia today from good friend Tuck Nolop, Wayzata dentist, as he renews his paper. "Jim, it's always great to hear from you...we have a alot of histo- ry. My mother's first job before she attended the University of Minnesota was working for your father Lem at The Independent. Chick Zweiner did the sports then...and encouraged Evie to be a sports reporter. Chick's son, Chuck, taught youth golf and got the Hasslens (Dave and Chops) along with Jack Blink and myself into the game. We all went on to play college golW' 25 LB. BEEF BUNDLE 20 LB. PORK BUNDLE ;49.95 S25.95 Things are buzzin' in the WANT ADS City Council will move location of meetings to Senior Center At a regular meeting of Ortonville's City Council on Monday, councilmembers voted on a motion to relocate future meetings to Ortonville's Senior Citizen's Center. Because the current location in Ortonville's City Offices does not facilitate large crowds, councilmem- bers suggested moving the regular meetings to the upstairs of the senior center. Another concern of councilmem- bers was that it is often difficult to hear speakers during the meeting in the current location, because of a loud air conditioner. Mayor Dave Dinnel also expressed concerns about the ease of televising meetings. Because of noise coming from large meetings, furnaces and air conditioners running, Mayor Dinnel felt it may disturb the recording of regular council meetings. It was a consensus of the councilmembers that by holding future meetings in the senior citizen's building, it may ease in the videotaping of the meetings. Ortonville's City Council members voted on the motion to relocate city council meetings to the Senior Citizen's Center. The motion carried. Council members also proclaimed the week of May 11-17 as National Police Week, and May 15 as Peace Officers' Memorial Day, to coincide with the Congress and President Bush's recent designation of the dates. During this week, Mayor Dinnel calls upon all patriotic, civic and edu- cational organizations to observe the week of May 11-17 as Police Week, with appropriate ceremonies and observances in which all people may join in commemorating law enforce- ment officers, past and present. Furthermore, he calls upon all citi- zens of Ortonville to observe Thursday, May 15 as Peace Officers Memorial Day in honor of those law enforcement officers who, through their courageous deeds, have made the ultimate sacrifice in service to their community or have become dis- abled in the performance of duty, and recognize and pay respect to the sur- vivors of our fallen heroes. In other action, councilmembers voted to accept the Park Board's rec- ommendation that Kelsey Henningson be hired as this year's Summer Recreation Director. Additionally, councilmembers accepted the recommendation from the Park Board that City crews make repairs on the Ortonville Pool, includ- ing patching trouble spots and flaking paint. NATIONAL POLICE WEEK is the week of May 12, with Peace Officers' Memorial Day falling on May 15. Ortonville's City Council voted to proclaim National Police Week and Peace Officers' Memorial Day at their regular meetinl on Tuesday. Above, Ortonville Police Cheif Curt Hormann is pictured with Ortonville Mayor Dave Dnnnel, showing Ortonville Police Department's newest patrol vehicle. County Commissioners address Solid Waste Recycling issues Big Stone County Board of Commissioners met with Environmental Officer Darren Wilke in a ,regular meeting on Tuesday to discuss Solid Waste Assessments. According to Wilke, he has reviewed budget needs that could be covered with a solid waste assess- ment. Wilke claims Big Stone County is known to surrounding areas for having excellent services overall, and hopes to continue providing the ser- vices in the future. He said that Big Stone County is currently spending approximately $27-30,000 annually on recycling costs. About 50 percent of the coun- ty's businesses are participating in Solid Waste Management, and advised the board that in order to con- tinue providing the current level of UMVRDC May meeting The Upper Minnesota Valley Regional Development Commission will hold its regular meeting on Monday, May 19, at the Appleton Civic Center. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. service to these businesses, assess- ments would be necessary. Wilke also noted that in order to have assessments, a county ordinance must be drafted and a public hearing would be held. Board members discussed possible fee assessments that would assist the county in offsetting costs of continu- ing the current Waste Management service level. A motion was made to draft the ordinance based upon money needed to keep the program going, and a public hearing date was set for June 17 at 10 a.m. Board members also discussed the request by Main Street Industries in Clinton to raise pay from $6 to $7 an hour for work done in maintaining parks. Commissioner Lane spoke in sup- port of the pay increase, as Main Street Industries is a program that supports members of the county who may not have other means of obtain- ing finances. A motion was made, and carried, to increase pay rates from $6 to $7 dollars an hour for Main Street Industries. In other action, a new Big Stone County permit fee schedule was propsed by Darren Wilke, and a motion was made to accept the new fee schedule, which would offset county costs. Commissioners voted in favor of the motion. Government Program now offers 100% financing for =el homes in small towns and rural areas of Moderate income families living in rural areas now have the home of their dreams- affordably. Valid only in towns population, outside large metro areas - or in the country on • New Homes • Existing The home you choose can be of any size or design - income, credit worthiness and the appraised value of the • 100% financing now • You must have adequate and dependable income • You must have reasonably good credit. • After purchase, you must occupy the dwelling. FREE 12 page report- "Secrets of Smart Homebuyel /f you're interested in owning your own home ca//now - Fast, easy and free pre-qualification over the phone. Jamie Mittelstaedt Call Today Midstate Mortgage OrtonviUe www.midstatemortgage.net Pro Auto broken into, vandalized A break in at Pro Auto, on west Highway 12, in Ortonville, occurred late Friday or early Saturday. According to Ortonville Police Chief Curt Hormann, tires, rims and stereo equipment were stolen from the building. Additionally, four vehicles were vandalized. The break-in occured through the show room window, located on the west side of the building. Hormann said there was roughly $1,900 in stolen merchandise. Dollar amount for the damage is currently unknown, but is a sizeable amount, according to Hormann. Pro Auto is offering a reward to anyone who has to the incident. They one who knows break in to stop in or c 00ummage =stor=cal Big Stone Society will be rummage sale 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Many household including two new electric grill, and other items tion. The sale will be former water plant on first street next UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA The Division of Neuroscience conducting studies investigating nervosa as a gastrointestinal medication and care provided). begun to realize that you have lost over these behaviors? Call Laurie at: 612-626-4034 or "TA]KZLT M'ZCI'W'='B n HOURS: Mon.-Fd. 8AM-5:30PM; Sat. 8AM-SPM ORTONVILLE, MN PHONE (320) 839-2653 .....::,: 00!i!ii00i00iill tiii00i00iii00!i!!iiiiii0000!ii00iii00iii!!iii0000iiiiiiiiiiill 00iiii$0000k]*[ii!i!iieORiK!iiiiiieHOPSiiiiiiii!iiil Pioneer's Own - Per Lb. I Locally Grown Beef - Per Lb. SUMMER -- I QUARTERS SAUSAGE ............... $2.79 OR SLOES ............... $1.49 Locally Grown Pork- Per Lb. Per Lb. $2 .ALF A.OG ................. 89ข OE. TU.KEY ........ YOUR GRADUATION HEADQUARTERS! Plan now and order your roast beef, pork or ham, fruit salad & assorted salads. BUFFALO AVAILABLE ~ WE ACCEPT EBT CARDS KARl: 11 • 4 lower GA tickets • 4 Dome Dogs • 4 soft drinks • 2 Dairy Queen ฎ Buy- One-Get-One Free Blizzard ฎ Flavor Treat coupons • 2 Twins Scorecards Great giveaways on Saturdays including:. • Dairy Queen ฎ Twins Cap Night (August 2) • A.J. Pierzynski Bobblehead Doll Night presented by Hormel (September 6) See twinsbaseball.com for a full promotions list. 612-33-TWINS Metrodome prosontod by Mildl Athletic • Interactive ga, food and • Cities 97 on the PlaZa Page 2  INDEPENDENT TuesdaY'