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May 13, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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Editorial comment Hagen grandson delivers ' what the Doctor ordered i i @2003 Rochesler Post-Bulletin Co. L.L,C. Ed Fischer Syndicate nscher@postbulletin,com Chad Shultis of St. Louis Park, grandson of Big Stone City's Lula Hagen, has been selected to sing in the choir of the European Music Festival Stuttgart for five weeks in August and September, and as a mem- ber of the Minnesota Chorale. As a member of the Minnesota Chorale, Shultis performed a solo in their holiday concert, which was directed by Dec Severinsen, former band leader on the "Tonight Show". Upon learning Shultis would be performing a solo, Severinsen said, "boy you better be good," and Shultis could not tell if he was joking or seri- ous. But, the Aberdeen native delivered just what the Doctor ordered. After the final of three performances of the holiday concert, Severinsen told Shultis, "You know you've got a good voice, don't you?" Severinsen is the principal pops conductor of the Minnesota Orchestra. He holds the same title with three other orchestras. During the European Music Festival, Shultis will be performing under the direction of Grammy win- ner Helmuth Rilling, who organized the German group in 2001. While in Germany, the internation- al choir will be performing Mahler's Second Symphony and Brahms 'German Requiem', as well as a cap- pella pieces and other choral works. Shultis is a graduate of Aberdeen Central High School and Northern State University, both in Aberdeen, SD. He majored in vocal music edu- cation, and is currently teaching pri- yate lessons at Edina High School and works part-time in the sheet music department at Groth Music in I 2 3 4 14 i ZO .3 : 24 27 32 33 37 44 46 51 52 53 56 6O 83 Clues ACROSS I. Nancy __, teen detective 5. WWII submarine i0. Droop 14. Taunt 15. Wall 16. Split 17. Deteriorated 18. In a way, was quiescent 19. Metal shackle 20. 13th letter of Hebrew alphabet 21. Inquisitorial 22. Devoid of ideas or intelligence 23. Tributary of the Mobile River 25. "Ally McBeal" character 27. Pretend falsely 28. Chitchats 32. Coffee 35. Medium for communication 36. Express pleasure 37. Riding horse 38. Urticaria 39. Peak 40. Eccentric shaft 41. Craps winner 42. With no protection or shield 43. Being an exception 45. Humbug 46. Coil 47. Jazz group member 51. Burn with a hot liquid 54. Magpies 55. Auto 56. Cloak 57. Money lender 59. Deride 5 3 7 3 19 15 I 18 1, u----T- i--- t I -IIIIIII ->9 33 31 -IIIIIII 8 g 5( i 51 ..... b 6! I I 30. Domestic 31. Cast off hair, skin or feathers 32. European freshwater fish 33. Amounts of time 34. Summer or boot 35. Being in competition 38. A person who inherits some title or office 39. Expresses pleasure 41. Missile type 42. Launched Apollo 44. Oblong cream puff 45. Supported 47. To pour a drink 48. Very coldly 49. Marten of N. Asian 54 I I s, 56 -- --F- 61 W- -- - 60. Small ladies' bag 61. Former U.S. coin worth $10 62. Earthen pot 63. Never 64. Woolen clothing fabric 65. Bleached Clues DOWN 1. Mystery play for one 2. The brightest star in Orion 3. Fluid accumulation in tissues 4. Take in marriage 5. Loathsome 6. Tree of lowland C. America 7. Comply 8. Any high mountain forests 9. Vietnamese offensive 50. Go on foot 10. Removed from the 51. Type of gun city's center 52. Small shed 11. Monetary unit of Italy 53. A mark placed 12. River in England above a vowel 54. Call out 57. Disappear beyond the horizon 58. Nictitating mem- brane of a horse 59. The most exalted being oI'PI ,lpI xlulv 13. Self-replicating protein molecule 21. Naive person 22. Content 24. Divulge a secret 25. Bearing a heavy load 26. Wading bird 28. Compel with a mallet 29. A woman's hip-length jacket ,i,i ^ l,O,, I i,io by the late . George P. We,,ner D.D. (Edi. note: Following is one of a series of articles by the late son of an Evangelical minister who moved his family to Odessa from Minneapolis, living there from 1931 to 1934. Your're reading his memories of life in a small Minnesota town as written to his granddaughter Elissa Kiskaddon. The author was born in 1917 in Sleepy Eye and lived in Blue Earth and Minneapolis before moving to Odessa. One of his classmates in Odessa was Rev. Dr. Ihno Janssen, now retired in Walnut Creek, Cal. Some of the memories are from when the author was a volunteer in mission on the island of Sumatra. Rev. Wemer passed away late in the year 2000. Tales from Odessa... "THE PARSONAGE COOKING SYSTEM" In these modern times of microwave ovens, electric and gas ranges that have timer clocks to start and stop a cooking process, it is hard to imagine anything as primitive as my stepmother's cooking stove. This large black beast sat squat against the wall in our kitchen and devoured almost as much wood, though cut into smaller pieces, as our furnace in the basement. From the back spouted a thick chimney pipe that connected to the same brick chimney that drained smoke upward from the furnace. If the furnace was the heart of the home, warming its creatures like blood being pumped to the body's extremities, so the cook stove was the stomach nouri, shing the body with Minnesota grown vegetables and grains, provender from its fertile fields. It was George's task to feed this stove with split wood from the wood- pile by the garage. Wood was insert- ed into the fire box through a front door or from the top by lifting off one of the round lids. The ashes were scraped out from beneath the grate with a long rod. This was as messy as removing ashes from the furnace because the light wood ash drifted over the linoleum floor and dust spread all over the kitchen. This daily task did not exact- ly "make my day" as they say. Above the stove was a warming oven where cooked food could be ***** kept warm before serving. On the right of the stove was a reservoir of water also warmed by circulating air from the fire box. This was the only hot water we had in the house, good for doing the dishes, etc. The cooking surface was a series of round lids that could be lifted up with a handy little toot that fit into notches in the lids. One of these lids was a concentric series of ever small- I er lids that could be removed to a pan I could be placed directly over the fire. I To control the heat on the cooking surface, two methods could be used, neither of which were effective. One was to put in less wood in the fire box, a chancy business and surely one not designed to make quick change in temperature• The other method was to slide open and shut a damper in front of the fire box. These little slits permitted more or less air to enter the fire chamber causing the fire to burn more or less brightly. Also there was a damper on the chim- [ ney pipe to control the smoke flow. Supposedly if the smoke could not escape as fast, the fire would burn less intensely. This was a hazardous control because smoke could escape into the kitchen and spread through the house. This kitchen stove could not be used during the hot Minnesota sum- mers. It would have been intolerable to endure its heat, so most houses. including ours, had a summer kitchen, a small room attached to the kitchen in which the cooking was done during the summer, (continued next week) i Bloomington. He is the son of Dave and Julie ASEMENT Shultis of Aberdeen, SD, and the WALLS STRAIGHTENED grandson of Lula Hagen of Big Stone 8'rRAIGI[III Buckling Walls   City, SD. "DRY UP Wet Basements  .,. Don't ( Open house for • Helped many that thought their ':' / Sweat It Lillian Streich's 80th s.ution was beyond hope.    3. An open house will be held in Call and we wlil give you nmnes of ...  -'L,===.,...,,.,= honor of Mrs. Elden (Lillian) Streich people we have helped near you. on her 80th birthday on Saturday, May 24 at the Bellingham Auxiliary rooms from 5 to 9 p.m. Everyone is welcome. No gifts please. Correction: In last week's issue of The Ortonville Independent, fish weights for Sunday's MTT tournament win- ners were incorrect. Sunday's first place team of Johnson/Trout had a total weight of 11.10, second place Oakes/Dittel had 6.56, and Horn/Lee had 6,00. The Independent staff apol- ogizes for the incorrect information. INDEPENDENT WANT ADS PAY ONCE AGAIN... MANY THANKS Recent new and renewal sub- scribers to The Independent which we gratefully acknowledge with thanks for your loyalty: Kim Kiancke Lac qui Parle SWCD Loren Clark Lac qui Parle Broadcasting Co. Inc. Dori Moore Deann Magee Alford Hanson Jr. Robert Logan Liilian Furland Bernice Brown Orrin Scholberg Pat Redenius Justina Hiebert Terrenee Gere Earl Dikstaal Carol Lind Lois Nitz M/Mrs, Lloyd Rens Elda Hyatt Dick Brown Betty Saeger Don Hinneberg Emil Van Erem Suzanne Sehmidt Virginia Thymian Craig Randleman David Ellingson Raymond Schuelke Justin Schoiberg Warren Block Sandra Josephson Marlowe Klepel Kathleen Karels Norma Wittnebel Orvin Vaage Kenneth Adelman Mike Schultz Melvin Loesehke Shoan Loeschke Winifred O'Leary Margaret Klefsaas Glen Klefsaas Bart Heck Ray Bergeson A,.,,., o o Just Enjoy It , : : 1-800"348-6247 f' % -":" ' :' [ l / ,.s,.,., w,., co..o,,,o 00Lo. \\; . ry poasement.com o: o "o "" o :"   ..--j Lantis and Kefauver exchange vows Kristina Lantis and Joshua Kefauver were united in marriage on Friday, March 14, 2003 at Audubon Park in New Orleans, LA. Their attendants were Laura Lantis of Brookings, SD and Matthew Kefauver of Baltimore, MD. The bride is the daughter of Jeffery and Kathie Lantis of Big Stone City, SD. Kris is a graduate of The College of St. Benedict and Tulane University's School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. She is cur- rently working with the U.S. Agency for International Development in Washington, DC. The groom is the son of David and' Mary Kefauver of Madisonville, TN. Josh is a graduate of the University of. Tennessee and Tulane University's School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. He is currently a program manager for Farmworker Health Services, Inc. in Washington, DC.. The couple will be residing in Asmara, Eritrea in East Africa, The Inde f eet JAMES Publisher / Editor and Office Computer and EMILEE ( Compositor ! BETH Reporter / F BILL TIM Camera [ NANCY MELANIE Tues., May 13, 2003 Continuing Published Ever Periodicals Postage paid = fl $30.00 per year Parle, Traverse Minnesota, Grant in South counties All others, $38.00 Postmaster: The Ortonville Ortonville, NEW RATE ALL SL A FEBRUARY 1 Big Stone, La˘ Grant and Roberts February ........... 30,00 March ................ 27,50 April .................. 25,00 May ................... 22.50 June .................. 20.00 July ................... 1750 ALL February ........... 34.00 March ................ 31,24 April .................. 28,40 May ................... 25.56 June .................. 22.72 July ................... 19.88 AND February ........... 38.00 March ................ 34.87 April .................. 31.70 May ................... 28.53 June .................. 25.38 July ................... 22.19 The Publisher changes or nnt logsen the omissions in tisement is the issue the advertisement. (humh notes ads Pictures - 5 News- Friday Classified ads - (Any ad brought in to classify.) A A Thursda A Friday: A Holidays Letters to the munity issues writers should Independent and/or condense aper also h letters that are t it might be held i Letters I printed or address Addresses and not be published. Letter writers selves to one I keep letter brief, words, and tc The Ortonville determining what i is news is based If an zation char sidered you charge, paper. Without cease to xist. receives for paper used in Increases. and a small Advertising crops products to the and and plows dealer. Without particular ness. We advertising our decision, A News: Our fully and staff's opinions opinion page A Editorials: fpage, rom other late thinkin readers. tor are her own of other expressed in tions may b own views, eral interest. Phone 839-3761 sifled Ortonville Page 4 00INDEPENDENT TuesdaY' Editorial comment Hagen grandson delivers ' what the Doctor ordered i i @2003 Rochesler Post-Bulletin Co. L.L,C. Ed Fischer Syndicate nscher@postbulletin,com Chad Shultis of St. Louis Park, grandson of Big Stone City's Lula Hagen, has been selected to sing in the choir of the European Music Festival Stuttgart for five weeks in August and September, and as a mem- ber of the Minnesota Chorale. As a member of the Minnesota Chorale, Shultis performed a solo in their holiday concert, which was directed by Dec Severinsen, former band leader on the "Tonight Show". Upon learning Shultis would be performing a solo, Severinsen said, "boy you better be good," and Shultis could not tell if he was joking or seri- ous. But, the Aberdeen native delivered just what the Doctor ordered. After the final of three performances of the holiday concert, Severinsen told Shultis, "You know you've got a good voice, don't you?" Severinsen is the principal pops conductor of the Minnesota Orchestra. He holds the same title with three other orchestras. During the European Music Festival, Shultis will be performing under the direction of Grammy win- ner Helmuth Rilling, who organized the German group in 2001. While in Germany, the internation- al choir will be performing Mahler's Second Symphony and Brahms 'German Requiem', as well as a cap- pella pieces and other choral works. Shultis is a graduate of Aberdeen Central High School and Northern State University, both in Aberdeen, SD. He majored in vocal music edu- cation, and is currently teaching pri- yate lessons at Edina High School and works part-time in the sheet music department at Groth Music in I 2 3 4 14 i ZO .3 : 24 27 32 33 37 44 46 51 52 53 56 6O 83 Clues ACROSS I. Nancy __, teen detective 5. WWII submarine i0. Droop 14. Taunt 15. Wall 16. Split 17. Deteriorated 18. In a way, was quiescent 19. Metal shackle 20. 13th letter of Hebrew alphabet 21. Inquisitorial 22. Devoid of ideas or intelligence 23. Tributary of the Mobile River 25. "Ally McBeal" character 27. Pretend falsely 28. Chitchats 32. Coffee 35. Medium for communication 36. Express pleasure 37. Riding horse 38. Urticaria 39. Peak 40. Eccentric shaft 41. Craps winner 42. With no protection or shield 43. Being an exception 45. Humbug 46. Coil 47. Jazz group member 51. Burn with a hot liquid 54. Magpies 55. Auto 56. Cloak 57. Money lender 59. Deride 5 3 7 3 19 15 I 18 1, u----T- i--- t I -IIIIIII ->9 33 31 -IIIIIII 8 g 5( i 51 ..... b 6! I I 30. Domestic 31. Cast off hair, skin or feathers 32. European freshwater fish 33. Amounts of time 34. Summer or boot 35. Being in competition 38. A person who inherits some title or office 39. Expresses pleasure 41. Missile type 42. Launched Apollo 44. Oblong cream puff 45. Supported 47. To pour a drink 48. Very coldly 49. Marten of N. Asian 54 I I s, 56 -- --F- 61 W- -- - 60. Small ladies' bag 61. Former U.S. coin worth $10 62. Earthen pot 63. Never 64. Woolen clothing fabric 65. Bleached Clues DOWN 1. Mystery play for one 2. The brightest star in Orion 3. Fluid accumulation in tissues 4. Take in marriage 5. Loathsome 6. Tree of lowland C. America 7. Comply 8. Any high mountain forests 9. Vietnamese offensive 50. Go on foot 10. Removed from the 51. Type of gun city's center 52. Small shed 11. Monetary unit of Italy 53. A mark placed 12. River in England above a vowel 54. Call out 57. Disappear beyond the horizon 58. Nictitating mem- brane of a horse 59. The most exalted being oI'PI ,lpI xlulv 13. Self-replicating protein molecule 21. Naive person 22. Content 24. Divulge a secret 25. Bearing a heavy load 26. Wading bird 28. Compel with a mallet 29. A woman's hip-length jacket ,i,i ^ l,O,, I i,io by the late . George P. We,,ner D.D. (Edi. note: Following is one of a series of articles by the late son of an Evangelical minister who moved his family to Odessa from Minneapolis, living there from 1931 to 1934. Your're reading his memories of life in a small Minnesota town as written to his granddaughter Elissa Kiskaddon. The author was born in 1917 in Sleepy Eye and lived in Blue Earth and Minneapolis before moving to Odessa. One of his classmates in Odessa was Rev. Dr. Ihno Janssen, now retired in Walnut Creek, Cal. Some of the memories are from when the author was a volunteer in mission on the island of Sumatra. Rev. Wemer passed away late in the year 2000. Tales from Odessa... "THE PARSONAGE COOKING SYSTEM" In these modern times of microwave ovens, electric and gas ranges that have timer clocks to start and stop a cooking process, it is hard to imagine anything as primitive as my stepmother's cooking stove. This large black beast sat squat against the wall in our kitchen and devoured almost as much wood, though cut into smaller pieces, as our furnace in the basement. From the back spouted a thick chimney pipe that connected to the same brick chimney that drained smoke upward from the furnace. If the furnace was the heart of the home, warming its creatures like blood being pumped to the body's extremities, so the cook stove was the stomach nouri, shing the body with Minnesota grown vegetables and grains, provender from its fertile fields. It was George's task to feed this stove with split wood from the wood- pile by the garage. Wood was insert- ed into the fire box through a front door or from the top by lifting off one of the round lids. The ashes were scraped out from beneath the grate with a long rod. This was as messy as removing ashes from the furnace because the light wood ash drifted over the linoleum floor and dust spread all over the kitchen. This daily task did not exact- ly "make my day" as they say. Above the stove was a warming oven where cooked food could be ***** kept warm before serving. On the right of the stove was a reservoir of water also warmed by circulating air from the fire box. This was the only hot water we had in the house, good for doing the dishes, etc. The cooking surface was a series of round lids that could be lifted up with a handy little toot that fit into notches in the lids. One of these lids was a concentric series of ever small- I er lids that could be removed to a pan I could be placed directly over the fire. I To control the heat on the cooking surface, two methods could be used, neither of which were effective. One was to put in less wood in the fire box, a chancy business and surely one not designed to make quick change in temperature• The other method was to slide open and shut a damper in front of the fire box. These little slits permitted more or less air to enter the fire chamber causing the fire to burn more or less brightly. Also there was a damper on the chim- [ ney pipe to control the smoke flow. Supposedly if the smoke could not escape as fast, the fire would burn less intensely. This was a hazardous control because smoke could escape into the kitchen and spread through the house. This kitchen stove could not be used during the hot Minnesota sum- mers. It would have been intolerable to endure its heat, so most houses. including ours, had a summer kitchen, a small room attached to the kitchen in which the cooking was done during the summer, (continued next week) i Bloomington. He is the son of Dave and Julie ASEMENT Shultis of Aberdeen, SD, and the WALLS STRAIGHTENED grandson of Lula Hagen of Big Stone 8'rRAIGI[III Buckling Walls   City, SD. "DRY UP Wet Basements  .,. Don't ( Open house for • Helped many that thought their ':' / Sweat It Lillian Streich's 80th s.ution was beyond hope.    3. An open house will be held in Call and we wlil give you nmnes of ...  -'L,===.,...,,.,= honor of Mrs. Elden (Lillian) Streich people we have helped near you. on her 80th birthday on Saturday, May 24 at the Bellingham Auxiliary rooms from 5 to 9 p.m. Everyone is welcome. No gifts please. Correction: In last week's issue of The Ortonville Independent, fish weights for Sunday's MTT tournament win- ners were incorrect. Sunday's first place team of Johnson/Trout had a total weight of 11.10, second place Oakes/Dittel had 6.56, and Horn/Lee had 6,00. The Independent staff apol- ogizes for the incorrect information. INDEPENDENT WANT ADS PAY ONCE AGAIN... MANY THANKS Recent new and renewal sub- scribers to The Independent which we gratefully acknowledge with thanks for your loyalty: Kim Kiancke Lac qui Parle SWCD Loren Clark Lac qui Parle Broadcasting Co. Inc. Dori Moore Deann Magee Alford Hanson Jr. Robert Logan Liilian Furland Bernice Brown Orrin Scholberg Pat Redenius Justina Hiebert Terrenee Gere Earl Dikstaal Carol Lind Lois Nitz M/Mrs, Lloyd Rens Elda Hyatt Dick Brown Betty Saeger Don Hinneberg Emil Van Erem Suzanne Sehmidt Virginia Thymian Craig Randleman David Ellingson Raymond Schuelke Justin Schoiberg Warren Block Sandra Josephson Marlowe Klepel Kathleen Karels Norma Wittnebel Orvin Vaage Kenneth Adelman Mike Schultz Melvin Loesehke Shoan Loeschke Winifred O'Leary Margaret Klefsaas Glen Klefsaas Bart Heck Ray Bergeson A,.,,., o o Just Enjoy It , : : 1-800"348-6247 f' % -":" ' :' [ l / ,.s,.,., w,., co..o,,,o 00Lo. \\; . ry poasement.com o: o "o "" o :"   ..--j Lantis and Kefauver exchange vows Kristina Lantis and Joshua Kefauver were united in marriage on Friday, March 14, 2003 at Audubon Park in New Orleans, LA. Their attendants were Laura Lantis of Brookings, SD and Matthew Kefauver of Baltimore, MD. The bride is the daughter of Jeffery and Kathie Lantis of Big Stone City, SD. Kris is a graduate of The College of St. Benedict and Tulane University's School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. She is cur- rently working with the U.S. Agency for International Development in Washington, DC. The groom is the son of David and' Mary Kefauver of Madisonville, TN. Josh is a graduate of the University of. Tennessee and Tulane University's School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. He is currently a program manager for Farmworker Health Services, Inc. in Washington, DC.. The couple will be residing in Asmara, Eritrea in East Africa, The Inde f eet JAMES Publisher / Editor and Office Computer and EMILEE ( Compositor ! BETH Reporter / F BILL TIM Camera [ NANCY MELANIE Tues., May 13, 2003 Continuing Published Ever Periodicals Postage paid = fl $30.00 per year Parle, Traverse Minnesota, Grant in South counties All others, $38.00 Postmaster: The Ortonville Ortonville, NEW RATE ALL SL A FEBRUARY 1 Big Stone, La˘ Grant and Roberts February ........... 30,00 March ................ 27,50 April .................. 25,00 May ................... 22.50 June .................. 20.00 July ................... 1750 ALL February ........... 34.00 March ................ 31,24 April .................. 28,40 May ................... 25.56 June .................. 22.72 July ................... 19.88 AND February ........... 38.00 March ................ 34.87 April .................. 31.70 May ................... 28.53 June .................. 25.38 July ................... 22.19 The Publisher changes or nnt logsen the omissions in tisement is the issue the advertisement. (humh notes ads Pictures - 5 News- Friday Classified ads - (Any ad brought in to classify.) A A Thursda A Friday: A Holidays Letters to the munity issues writers should Independent and/or condense aper also h letters that are t it might be held i Letters I printed or address Addresses and not be published. Letter writers selves to one I keep letter brief, words, and tc The Ortonville determining what i is news is based If an zation char sidered you charge, paper. Without cease to xist. receives for paper used in Increases. and a small Advertising crops products to the and and plows dealer. Without particular ness. We advertising our decision, A News: Our fully and staff's opinions opinion page A Editorials: fpage, rom other late thinkin readers. tor are her own of other expressed in tions may b own views, eral interest. Phone 839-3761 sifled Ortonville Page 4 00INDEPENDENT TuesdaY'