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May 13, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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May 13, 2003
 

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d ,, o ' t " Tuesday, May 20th at 7:30 00Mentorina Partnership of Bellingham Auxiliary nesota studies risky behavior ooO,. Auxiliary Unit #441 held their State. Joyce read a letter sent by Kelly b,j!s for many of today's on time I1. ''aes tobacco use, vie- "18,451 children in foster care and ''pregnancy and academic other out-of-home placements Dorothy Vangsness ;Y'l t CUrriculum devel- iF e!'ntrm g Par t nhe:shxi;a ! !t a;vcate fort jL,n.g, 43 million young 'v hired 'States were pre- ea !ow probability of Sible, high-function- I 2000. However, discovered a remedy : mentoring. ve Study conducted by Ventures, an action- Public policy and pro- )rnent organization, iElrultees are less likely to 1 ks and alcohol, less U 'iene and more likely '= school attendance i !!'mic performance. believe the road to gin with a conversa- Certain risky behaviors for reentering in as determined in part by ' Tracts: lpren live in single- ,B0% of single-par- are mothers) dren under age six live arent(s) 'klren are arrested for children receive ce school lunch "21 children and youth commit suicide *20 percent of eighth graders scored below basic math level The above facts were published in the Children's Defense Fund's publi- cation Minnesota Kids: A closer look - 2002 Kids Count Data Book, Minneapolis, MN. "We are not a perfect society and even those communities that think nothing bad can happen within city limits are seeing statistics that point to problems with teen smoking and drinking, teen pregnancy, crime and other risky behaviors," says Karl Davis, executive director, Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota. "It's not always easy to talk about things like sex, drinking and smoking with our young people, but it's some- thing that needs to be done so the next generation doesn't limit the choices it has in life by making poor choices now," adds Davis. Davis also claims that many time, the most difficult step in starting a mentoring relationship is acknowl- edging that there is a need in the com- munity. "There are warning signs that require action and there is a great net- work of mentoring organizations in Minnesota helping everyday people reach out to those in need," she says. The Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota suggests that following before opening up to you -Be honest-provide the mentee with accurate and factual information -Be patient-allow the mentee ade- quate time to talk -Listen attentively-understand where they are coming from and what they need to know -Create "talking moments"-Iook for opportunities to discuss risky behaviors -Use tools to help explain-discuss plots or scenes from the mentee's favorite TV shows -Discuss choices and conse- quences-identify all outcomes for positive and negative choices For people who are hesitant to help troubled teens or simply don't know where to start, the Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota has created a kit to aid mentors. What the Connection? is a five-set curriculum that contains information and activi- ties for both the mentor and mentee. The manual assists adults with com- munication and goal setting in five focus areas: smoking and smokeless tobacco, drugs, sex, violence and alcohol. In addition to information on the focus areas, the curriculum gives mentors tools to help mentees "make the connection" between the focus areas and their daily lives, so they can make safe, healthy and informed deci- sions. What the Cotmection? is avail- able through the Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota's website es are born to teen these touch points form the founda- www.mentoringworks.com, or by fi,, tion of a strong reentering relation- calling the organization at (612) 370- urne, d reports of child ship: 9180. :il'dr -Create an Open Environment- ,; t ourwebsiteatwww.ortonviUeindependenF ) 612-33-TWINS twinsbaseball.com iperAmerica sDay _KMs' tickets Only $2 each 4 kids, 14 and under, for $2 each PUrchased adult Day coupon Particlpatin8 locatiOns) "RUN for kids Lerner Publishing 'ta Read 'EJm" Book Day All kids receive a free book every Sunday Other great giveaways virtually every Sunday Including:. Affinity Plus Federal Credit Union A.J, Pierzynski Bat Day (Juy 6) Corey Koskle Bobblehead Doll Night presented by Hormel (August 3) Old Dutch Foods Photo Pennant Day (September 7) See twinsbaseball.com for a full promotions list. v The Twins IExpedence on the Metrodome Plaza IXmnted by MaJeMk: AtMM Free interactive games! Free ice cream for kids courtesy of Edy's and Rainbow Foods Free pregame autographs for kids monthly meeting on Monday May 5 at 7:30 pm with 23 members and 3 guests present. Carol Olson started out with the program "A Tribute to Mothers". First, Rachael Borgerson, read a poem "God Bless You Mother" Second the members sang "Faith of Our Mothers". Third, Chelsea Haugen, had a reading "A Grandmother ls Someone Special". Fourth, Ruth Larson sang "The Poppy of Sacrifice". Terry Johnson gave a prayer and Carol Olson read a poem "Life Is A Garden". To conclude the program, Carol, Rachael and Chelsea gave each member a petunia plant. It was a very nice program. President Terry opened the meeting with the pledge to the flag. We sang the 1st stanza of our National Anthem. The chaplain gave a prayer and the Preamble was read by all. The secretary and treasurer reports were read and approved and placed on file. Correspondence was read. President asked for all bills. Marion Maatz told about being a donor and passed materials around. President Terry presented a pin to Marion for all her work with membership. Marion presented Auxiliary pins to the following members: 25 year pins to: Dana Hanson, Kendra Hanson, Terry Johnson, Sharon Kirchberg, Heidi Kittleson, Dawn Larson, Eunice Mork, Barb Jahn. 50 year pin to: Sis. thanked everyone who helped with the chicken supper. We served 117 and will be giving a check for $470 to Dialysis Center at Orlonville. OLD BUSINESS: President Terry passed around the rulers we ordered for the school children and the new silverware that was ordered. Grave markers were ordered. A motion was made and seconded to purchase a silverware caddy and some new utility utensils. Motion carried. Poppy Day will be Saturday May 17th. Anyone who can help with the poppies are to meet at Arlene Karels' at 9:00 am. Be sure to wear your poppy. We will meet on Tuesday May 20th at the Auxiliary room at 10:00 am to get the crosses ready for Memorial Day. This is Teacher Recognition week. President Terry said she will bake cookies fbr the teachers. Motion made and seconded to send $75.00 to Friendship Ventures. Memorial Day program at the school on May 26th at 10:30 am. There will be a steak fry at the clubrooms that evening. President Terry thanked the May servers Violet Borgerson, Marlys Redepenning and Barb Jahn. June servers are Alice Stolpman, Terry Boy born Apr. 30 to Brian Hamann's Brian and Carri Hamann of Ortonville announce the birth of their son, Keegan Michael, born April 30, 2003. tie weighed eight Ibs., three ounces and was 22 inches long. Grandparents are Ron and Linda Chase of Clinton and Ray and Irene Hamann of Ortonville. Great Grandparents are Ella Sackreiter of Milbank and Marlys Chase of Clinton. QUALITY CLOCK REPAIR Antique Mantle 400 Day Anniversary Striking Chiming CRAIG RANDLEMAN ORrONVILLE, iN 320-839-2357 Minnesota Clockmaker - Watchmaker Call After 6 p.m. for Estimates Celebrating 100 Years........ 2003 is the lOOth Year of the Clinton State Bank ........ To begin the celeation of our Centennial year, we are giving away $100 cash each month of 2003. Kathy Morrill of Clinton was our April winner of $100 Cash. [ Clinton State Agency, Inc. Secretary, Zelda Kohl is pictured above with Kathy Morrill, who was the April winner of $100. Zelda has been employed as the Secretary at Clinton State Agency, Inc. for 21 years. Zelda and her husband Don are lifelong Big Stone County residents and have resided in rural Clinton on Big Stone Lake for 33 years. They have three grown children, Scott, Brock and Donnette. The Kohls also have eight grandchildren. Congratulations Kathy from all of us at the Clinton State Bank Sign up in our lobby for $100 cash to be given away May 31. Your Community Bank for Nearly 100 Years! Clinton State Bank FI llI'ITHE BANK THAT uNDERsTANDS ' J ../  .... ,: 320-325-5401 .  13, 2003 ......... " INDEPENDENT Page 3b d ,, o ' t " Tuesday, May 20th at 7:30 00Mentorina Partnership of Bellingham Auxiliary nesota studies risky behavior ooO,. Auxiliary Unit #441 held their State. Joyce read a letter sent by Kelly b,j!s for many of today's on time I1. ''aes tobacco use, vie- "18,451 children in foster care and ''pregnancy and academic other out-of-home placements Dorothy Vangsness ;Y'l t CUrriculum devel- iF e!'ntrm g Par t nhe:shxi;a ! !t a;vcate fort jL,n.g, 43 million young 'v hired 'States were pre- ea !ow probability of Sible, high-function- I 2000. However, discovered a remedy : mentoring. ve Study conducted by Ventures, an action- Public policy and pro- )rnent organization, iElrultees are less likely to 1 ks and alcohol, less U 'iene and more likely '= school attendance i !!'mic performance. believe the road to gin with a conversa- Certain risky behaviors for reentering in as determined in part by ' Tracts: lpren live in single- ,B0% of single-par- are mothers) dren under age six live arent(s) 'klren are arrested for children receive ce school lunch "21 children and youth commit suicide *20 percent of eighth graders scored below basic math level The above facts were published in the Children's Defense Fund's publi- cation Minnesota Kids: A closer look - 2002 Kids Count Data Book, Minneapolis, MN. "We are not a perfect society and even those communities that think nothing bad can happen within city limits are seeing statistics that point to problems with teen smoking and drinking, teen pregnancy, crime and other risky behaviors," says Karl Davis, executive director, Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota. "It's not always easy to talk about things like sex, drinking and smoking with our young people, but it's some- thing that needs to be done so the next generation doesn't limit the choices it has in life by making poor choices now," adds Davis. Davis also claims that many time, the most difficult step in starting a mentoring relationship is acknowl- edging that there is a need in the com- munity. "There are warning signs that require action and there is a great net- work of mentoring organizations in Minnesota helping everyday people reach out to those in need," she says. The Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota suggests that following before opening up to you -Be honest-provide the mentee with accurate and factual information -Be patient-allow the mentee ade- quate time to talk -Listen attentively-understand where they are coming from and what they need to know -Create "talking moments"-Iook for opportunities to discuss risky behaviors -Use tools to help explain-discuss plots or scenes from the mentee's favorite TV shows -Discuss choices and conse- quences-identify all outcomes for positive and negative choices For people who are hesitant to help troubled teens or simply don't know where to start, the Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota has created a kit to aid mentors. What the Connection? is a five-set curriculum that contains information and activi- ties for both the mentor and mentee. The manual assists adults with com- munication and goal setting in five focus areas: smoking and smokeless tobacco, drugs, sex, violence and alcohol. In addition to information on the focus areas, the curriculum gives mentors tools to help mentees "make the connection" between the focus areas and their daily lives, so they can make safe, healthy and informed deci- sions. What the Cotmection? is avail- able through the Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota's website es are born to teen these touch points form the founda- www.mentoringworks.com, or by fi,, tion of a strong reentering relation- calling the organization at (612) 370- urne, d reports of child ship: 9180. :il'dr -Create an Open Environment- ,; t ourwebsiteatwww.ortonviUeindependenF ) 612-33-TWINS twinsbaseball.com iperAmerica sDay _KMs' tickets Only $2 each 4 kids, 14 and under, for $2 each PUrchased adult Day coupon Particlpatin8 locatiOns) "RUN for kids Lerner Publishing 'ta Read 'EJm" Book Day All kids receive a free book every Sunday Other great giveaways virtually every Sunday Including:. Affinity Plus Federal Credit Union A.J, Pierzynski Bat Day (Juy 6) Corey Koskle Bobblehead Doll Night presented by Hormel (August 3) Old Dutch Foods Photo Pennant Day (September 7) See twinsbaseball.com for a full promotions list. v The Twins IExpedence on the Metrodome Plaza IXmnted by MaJeMk: AtMM Free interactive games! Free ice cream for kids courtesy of Edy's and Rainbow Foods Free pregame autographs for kids monthly meeting on Monday May 5 at 7:30 pm with 23 members and 3 guests present. Carol Olson started out with the program "A Tribute to Mothers". First, Rachael Borgerson, read a poem "God Bless You Mother" Second the members sang "Faith of Our Mothers". Third, Chelsea Haugen, had a reading "A Grandmother ls Someone Special". Fourth, Ruth Larson sang "The Poppy of Sacrifice". Terry Johnson gave a prayer and Carol Olson read a poem "Life Is A Garden". To conclude the program, Carol, Rachael and Chelsea gave each member a petunia plant. It was a very nice program. President Terry opened the meeting with the pledge to the flag. We sang the 1st stanza of our National Anthem. The chaplain gave a prayer and the Preamble was read by all. The secretary and treasurer reports were read and approved and placed on file. Correspondence was read. President asked for all bills. Marion Maatz told about being a donor and passed materials around. President Terry presented a pin to Marion for all her work with membership. Marion presented Auxiliary pins to the following members: 25 year pins to: Dana Hanson, Kendra Hanson, Terry Johnson, Sharon Kirchberg, Heidi Kittleson, Dawn Larson, Eunice Mork, Barb Jahn. 50 year pin to: Sis. thanked everyone who helped with the chicken supper. We served 117 and will be giving a check for $470 to Dialysis Center at Orlonville. OLD BUSINESS: President Terry passed around the rulers we ordered for the school children and the new silverware that was ordered. Grave markers were ordered. A motion was made and seconded to purchase a silverware caddy and some new utility utensils. Motion carried. Poppy Day will be Saturday May 17th. Anyone who can help with the poppies are to meet at Arlene Karels' at 9:00 am. Be sure to wear your poppy. We will meet on Tuesday May 20th at the Auxiliary room at 10:00 am to get the crosses ready for Memorial Day. This is Teacher Recognition week. President Terry said she will bake cookies fbr the teachers. Motion made and seconded to send $75.00 to Friendship Ventures. Memorial Day program at the school on May 26th at 10:30 am. There will be a steak fry at the clubrooms that evening. President Terry thanked the May servers Violet Borgerson, Marlys Redepenning and Barb Jahn. June servers are Alice Stolpman, Terry Boy born Apr. 30 to Brian Hamann's Brian and Carri Hamann of Ortonville announce the birth of their son, Keegan Michael, born April 30, 2003. tie weighed eight Ibs., three ounces and was 22 inches long. Grandparents are Ron and Linda Chase of Clinton and Ray and Irene Hamann of Ortonville. Great Grandparents are Ella Sackreiter of Milbank and Marlys Chase of Clinton. QUALITY CLOCK REPAIR Antique Mantle 400 Day Anniversary Striking Chiming CRAIG RANDLEMAN ORrONVILLE, iN 320-839-2357 Minnesota Clockmaker - Watchmaker Call After 6 p.m. for Estimates Celebrating 100 Years........ 2003 is the lOOth Year of the Clinton State Bank ........ To begin the celeation of our Centennial year, we are giving away $100 cash each month of 2003. Kathy Morrill of Clinton was our April winner of $100 Cash. [ Clinton State Agency, Inc. Secretary, Zelda Kohl is pictured above with Kathy Morrill, who was the April winner of $100. Zelda has been employed as the Secretary at Clinton State Agency, Inc. for 21 years. Zelda and her husband Don are lifelong Big Stone County residents and have resided in rural Clinton on Big Stone Lake for 33 years. They have three grown children, Scott, Brock and Donnette. The Kohls also have eight grandchildren. Congratulations Kathy from all of us at the Clinton State Bank Sign up in our lobby for $100 cash to be given away May 31. Your Community Bank for Nearly 100 Years! Clinton State Bank FI llI'ITHE BANK THAT uNDERsTANDS ' J ../  .... ,: 320-325-5401 .  13, 2003 ......... " INDEPENDENT Page 3b