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The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
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May 19, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
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May 19, 1921
 

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THURSDAY, MAY 19, 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE $ ii i.i ii ,i ...i ii The Ortonville Independent PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY by the Farmers & Merchants Printing Co. A. B. Kaercher, President Frank Harris, Vice-president L. E. Lundgren, Secretary Walter Dinnell, Treasurer BOARD OF DIRECTORS A. S. Halls John Kaercher John Witte Walter Dinnell Chester Olson L.E. Lundgren Frank Harris Grace F. Kaercher A. B. Kaercher L. A. Kaercher - Managing Editor Cyrus Erickson Associate Editor Entered as second-class matter lIay 18, 1929, at the post office at Ortonville, Minn., under the Act of March 3, 1879. SUBSCRIPTION $2.00 PER YEAR Advertising Rates on Application i Foreign Advet:tisiug Representative THE AMERICAI PRESSASSOCIATION [ GROW FOODS AT HOME. Now the Department of Agricul- ture is issuing an appeal to raise all foods at home to as great extent as possible. Increased transportation costs is the most important factor in bringing forth this appeal. The transportation costs, they say, will prevent shipments of the more moderate-priced fresh fruits and vege- tables which are purchased by the growers of single crops or specialties for use in their own haines, and the lack of a market for special products in turn will be a blow to the buying capacity of the growers of these spe- cialties. The American farmer is not going to be able this year to pay freight on water, and water makes up a large part of fresh fruits and vgetables. The answer is that he must grow his own table food. He must study the possibilities of substitution. This ap- plies to vegetables, f/salts, poultry, eggs, and dairy products which must be transferred from commercial channels to home consumption if they are to come within the reach of the average family. No little saving can be made by having a garden no matter how small. If living costs sem to mount too high it would be well to estimate what benefits would be derived from the growing of many of the commodi- ties which have to be shipped in. It is only another way to reduce costs to a lower figure, and still find enjoy- ment in it. BOOST ORTONVlLLE. Other towns in Minnesota are in- stituting a plan which Ortonville might well follow. That is the ad- vertising of what we have as sum- mer recreation facilities. There is no necessity that one should tints on what Ortonville has to of- fer to awaken the people to the fact that we have things. They are obvi- .ous to all who live here or to those who have been here. It is to thoe who have not been here that these things should be told. No modesty should hinder this. If small towns, located in the northern lar f the state and having a com- bination post office and general store; a land office and an old hotel, have the audacity to picture vivid scenes of their self-styled play grounds which con- sist for the most part of burnt-over lands, what should prevent us from elling others about Ortonville and Big Stone Lake. It is necessary to ballyhoo to get a good crowd inside the tent. You also have to toot helicon yourself for no one will do it for you. If the commercial club is defunct, then let same other organization take i upon itself to do this work. If no ether organization will do it, then a temporary organization having this as its sole purpose, should be put under way. No matter who will be the one to do it it should be done and done soon. NO CHANGE IN GRAIN GRADING. "Secretary of Agriculture Wallac has denied the appeal of delegates representing Minnesota and other llorthwest farmers that the system of grading grain be changed. His de- il:vi.gas aanseUeseedofJUS:on::entleeY s. which have been held at Washington. The change is not justified as he sees it, and he gives out the follow- ing reasons for not granting the de- mands of the representatives: Frequent changes in grades and tandards are highly undesirable and should be made only after there in- estigation has shown them to be oth justified and needed. The grain standards act requires that notice of changes be given out not less than ninety days in advance on their effective date. Changes made to apply to the crop of this year should become effective not later than Au- gust 15 for spring wheat and still earlier for garlicy wheat; and even then some would have begun to move v many contracts therefore would e been made. Terefore changes ect]ve by year must be announced lramediately.  _ I have been in omce but a short 'tithe--much too short to give this matter the study its importance de- tands, particularly from the Stand- .Pwint of the wheat grower. I am not lling to order changes which I do ot of my own knowledge feel are ful- JY justified and will be helpful to the Producer and will promote more sat- isfactory marketing of our wheat, to know what stamp the new adminis- 1 That Secretary Wallace would re- i tration would give the university, will fuse to sanction a change was little / feel reassurred.--Minneapolis "Daily expected by the agricultural interests / News. of the northwest. The change in sys- 1 tem had been recommended by the / It yet remains for the first person Minnesota Farm Bureau Federation to name something that puts more life and by a resolution passed by the into a crowd than a peppy band. No 1921 session of the Minnesota legis- one has so far offere(t anything that lature, will take its place and produce the The hope in this matter lies in his assurance that the question will not be dropped with this announcement of denial. He has promised further investigation and the system of grad- ing grain asked for may yet be "inau- gurated. DISCOVER TRUTH AND TELL IT. Democratic and practical. That is certain to be the verdict on the in- augural address of Lotus D. Coifman, new president of the University of Minnesota. He proved his democracy by stress- ing the principle of intellectual liber- ty, the right to discover truth and tell it, and the principle that the univer- sity is the servant of the many, not the few. That he is practical he proved by a concrete program of usefulness to the state. He would connect the uni- versity like one vast dynamo with the everyday work of khe people until it helps in the solution of all public prob- lems from the prevention of wheat rust and white pine blister to the building of roads and the harnessing of water. He would have the law school co- operate with the judiciary; the en- gineering schools with private labora- tories, and all departments of research with the corresponding public enter- prises. The results of research he would have written in popular form and pub- lished for the benefit of the whole people. How far-reaching this would be is plain when we remember that private organizations require their research men to sign contracts that they will not publish the results of their work, so that discoveries may be kept secret for the benefit of the privileged few. His whole attitude is summed in the phrase, "A republic of minds." His idea is that a university is no longer a school merely; it is a republic of minds dedicated to the study of the problems of life; a group of citizens of the world, not engaged in any pro- paganda, but interested in the affairs of men; a republic that knows no limitations of time and no geographi- cal boundaries, bent on making a bet- ter world to live in. It is a big program, the only thing worthy that name of education. Peo- ple who have been waiting anxiously same bouyant effect. The concerts which the Ortonvflle ban(l gave on Market Day are weighty proof of this, and makes that band a valuable organization in this town. The whole town should back them in apprecia- tion of their contribution. "Who owns the air?" is the ques- tion flashed in the headlines of a daily paper of this week, and the sug- gestion has been made that the ques- tion be referred to the present-day wizard, Thomas A. Edison. After Mr. Edison has answered this. if he does, it might be well to have him determine whether or not South Da- kota owns half of Big Stone and Traverse lakes. There is no charity equal to the charity that.is charitable to the un- charitable. T OBITUARY @ $ Gustave A. Lindstrom. Gustave kindstrom, son of Mr. and Mrs. L. W. Lindstrom of Prior, died last Thursday, May 12, after an in- termittent illness lasting close to five years. Pneumonia which he con- traeted recently was the immediate cause of his death. Gustave Lindstrom who was twen- ty-two years old at the time of his death, was born February 20, 1899 in Prior at the home where his parents now live. About'five years ago he showed signs of failing health,, and about two years ago he was taken to the Bethesday hospital in St. Paul. He stayed there about seven months, returning from there a year ago last August. Since that time he had stay- d at his home in Prior. Funeral services were held Sunday, May 15, interment being made in the Swedish Lutheran cBmaery three miles west of Clinton. The Rev. L. J. Lundquist of Wheaton conducted the services. He is su,ived by his father and mother, two brothers, Leonard'-and Luther A., and three sisters, Mrs. Edna Paulson, Agnes, and Ellis. All with the exception of Luther who is away attending school were present at the funeral. i i ii In a new L.U TRIKE 10 cigarettes for 10 ors Handyand convenient; try them. Dealers now carry both sizes : 10 for I0 cts; 20 for 20 cts. It's Toasted There's more to a home than dollars and cents No one can measure the cash value of a happy home. Its the biggest thing in life. If you are living in cramped and uncomfortable quarters, if you have been planning for a home when conditions become right--then see us today. rhe delay in new building has forced building material prices downward at a tremendous elig. Manufacturers, caught with big stocks on hand, have had to turn them over almost at cost. We have taken advantage of the situation and as a result we are able to show you substantial reductions on practically every item we carry--mason's supplies, roofing, Beaver Board many of our priqes compare favorably with those of 1914. This is a good time to see us. With our city short fi, fty homes people can't delay much longer in their new building. Demand will stimulate pmces; manufacturers will again trek a legitimate profit; and we can again expect increased building costs. In the meantime we offer you a home--and at a price that eamnot fail to please you...If you will vail or phone us, we will be glad to go into detail. Geier Lumber Company Ortonville, Minn. @ ] LEGAL NOTICES I @ ..... g. NOTICE OF MORTAGAE FOR" CLOSURE SALE. Default having been made in the conditions of a certain mortgage, con- taining a power of Sale, dated Febru- ary 21, 1918, and duly recorded in the office of the Register of Deeds of Big Stone County, Minn.. March 23, 1918 at 9 o'clock a. . in Book 53 of Mort- gages on page 110. whereby M. Ferch and Julia Ferch, his wife, C. J. Ferch and Matilda Ferch, his wife, C. F. Ferch and Emma Ferch, his wife, mortgagors, mortgaged to The State Bank of Correll, now Farmers & Mer- chants State Bank, mortgagee, the Southeast Quarter (S.E.) of the Southeast Quarter (S.E.]A) of Section Twenty-one (21), Township One Hun- dred Twenty-one (121), Range Forty- four (44), Big Stone County, Minne- sota, by which default the Power of Sale has become operative, and no ac- tion or proceeding at law having been I will be forclosed and said premises I sold at public auction, by the Sheriff t of said county, or his deputy, on Sat-] urday, June 25, 1921, at 10 o0clock a. I m. at the front door of the Court i House in Ortonvil]e, in said county, to pay said debt, interest, attorney's fees, an([ disbursements allowed by law. Dated May 10, 1921. Farmers & Merchants State Bank of Correll, Mortgagee. A. B. Kaercher, Attorney Ortonville, Minn. Obeyed Orders. "Did you deliver my message to Mr. Smith, Tommy?" asked the manager to the new office boy. "No sir," replied Tommy "He was out. and his office was locked up." "Why didn't you wait for him as I cold you to do ?" " " s'r There was a notice on the door, . 1 , [ saying 'Return immediately,' so It came back here as quickly as I could, t instituted to recover the debt secured sir." thereby, or any part thereof, and there is claimed to be due on said mortgage Mother"Who ever taught you to at the date hereof the sum of Two use that drea(lful word?" [ Thousand Seven Hundred Thirty-eight Tommy--"Santa Claus, mama." I and eighty-nine one hundredths Mother--"Santa Claus ?" ] ($2738.89) Dollars. Tommy--"Yes, mama, when he fell / Now, Notice Is Hereby Given, That ox era chair in my bedroom on Christ- I by virtue of said pwer, said mortgage mas _eve."--Li e ] SHOE REPAIRING I/ MODEL SHOE SHOP Iit At Jr GEO. S. NELSON, Prorietor Ill t I[11[ 0000tlCH00LIN " has orercomo-t/00 commomm00. catzsos of tire trouble NUMBER 3 MISFIT TUBES Ordinary t u b e s are" simply straight pieces of tubing which must be forced by inflation into the ring-shape of the casing. This results in wrinkles which in turn lead to pinched and torn tubes. Michelin Tubes, on the other hand, are made ring-shaped like the inside of the casing itself, and hence fit perfectly without wrinkling or stretching. Naturally Miche- lin Tubes last longer. ' Let us show you the difference in shape and wearing qualities between Michelins and all other makes. Pufahl's Garage !:,[ FORD PARTS AND FORD ACCESSORIES Separated or Insulated The plates in your bat- tery may be merely sepa- rated or they may be in- sulated. If insulated with Willard Threaded Rubber Insula- tion, your old-time wood- separator battery worries are over. It's a satisfaction.to know that Threaded Rubber In- sulation does.not puncture, check, warp. crack or car- bonizc-- No bills for wood-separa- tor replacement with the Willard Threaded Rubber Battery. Threaded Rub- bcr Insulation outlasts the battery plates. Harris & Wilson Ortonville, Minn. LA Wilhrd Batteries Increase yur sales thru the advertising columns of this RUNABOUT $395 f. o. b. DetrOit - If your salesmen spend unproductive time going from pros- pect to prospect, because of slow transportation, it is money lost.. Slow transportation robs them of part of their time--time that might just as well be turned into sales. A Ford Runabout furnishes quick transportation at the low- est possible cost. By equipping your salesmen with Ford car you will enable them to devote more energy to selling goods. J. Arthur Matthews & Company Ortonville, Minnesota, THURSDAY, MAY 19, 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE $ ii i.i ii ,i ...i ii The Ortonville Independent PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY by the Farmers & Merchants Printing Co. A. B. Kaercher, President Frank Harris, Vice-president L. E. Lundgren, Secretary Walter Dinnell, Treasurer BOARD OF DIRECTORS A. S. Halls John Kaercher John Witte Walter Dinnell Chester Olson L.E. Lundgren Frank Harris Grace F. Kaercher A. B. Kaercher L. A. Kaercher - Managing Editor Cyrus Erickson Associate Editor Entered as second-class matter lIay 18, 1929, at the post office at Ortonville, Minn., under the Act of March 3, 1879. SUBSCRIPTION $2.00 PER YEAR Advertising Rates on Application i Foreign Advet:tisiug Representative THE AMERICAI PRESSASSOCIATION [ GROW FOODS AT HOME. Now the Department of Agricul- ture is issuing an appeal to raise all foods at home to as great extent as possible. Increased transportation costs is the most important factor in bringing forth this appeal. The transportation costs, they say, will prevent shipments of the more moderate-priced fresh fruits and vege- tables which are purchased by the growers of single crops or specialties for use in their own haines, and the lack of a market for special products in turn will be a blow to the buying capacity of the growers of these spe- cialties. The American farmer is not going to be able this year to pay freight on water, and water makes up a large part of fresh fruits and vgetables. The answer is that he must grow his own table food. He must study the possibilities of substitution. This ap- plies to vegetables, f/salts, poultry, eggs, and dairy products which must be transferred from commercial channels to home consumption if they are to come within the reach of the average family. No little saving can be made by having a garden no matter how small. If living costs sem to mount too high it would be well to estimate what benefits would be derived from the growing of many of the commodi- ties which have to be shipped in. It is only another way to reduce costs to a lower figure, and still find enjoy- ment in it. BOOST ORTONVlLLE. Other towns in Minnesota are in- stituting a plan which Ortonville might well follow. That is the ad- vertising of what we have as sum- mer recreation facilities. There is no necessity that one should tints on what Ortonville has to of- fer to awaken the people to the fact that we have things. They are obvi- .ous to all who live here or to those who have been here. It is to thoe who have not been here that these things should be told. No modesty should hinder this. If small towns, located in the northern lar f the state and having a com- bination post office and general store; a land office and an old hotel, have the audacity to picture vivid scenes of their self-styled play grounds which con- sist for the most part of burnt-over lands, what should prevent us from elling others about Ortonville and Big Stone Lake. It is necessary to ballyhoo to get a good crowd inside the tent. You also have to toot helicon yourself for no one will do it for you. If the commercial club is defunct, then let same other organization take i upon itself to do this work. If no ether organization will do it, then a temporary organization having this as its sole purpose, should be put under way. No matter who will be the one to do it it should be done and done soon. NO CHANGE IN GRAIN GRADING. "Secretary of Agriculture Wallac has denied the appeal of delegates representing Minnesota and other llorthwest farmers that the system of grading grain be changed. His de- il:vi.gas aanseUeseedofJUS:on::entleeY s. which have been held at Washington. The change is not justified as he sees it, and he gives out the follow- ing reasons for not granting the de- mands of the representatives: Frequent changes in grades and tandards are highly undesirable and should be made only after there in- estigation has shown them to be oth justified and needed. The grain standards act requires that notice of changes be given out not less than ninety days in advance on their effective date. Changes made to apply to the crop of this year should become effective not later than Au- gust 15 for spring wheat and still earlier for garlicy wheat; and even then some would have begun to move v many contracts therefore would e been made. Terefore changes ect]ve by year must be announced lramediately.  _ I have been in omce but a short 'tithe--much too short to give this matter the study its importance de- tands, particularly from the Stand- .Pwint of the wheat grower. I am not lling to order changes which I do ot of my own knowledge feel are ful- JY justified and will be helpful to the Producer and will promote more sat- isfactory marketing of our wheat, to know what stamp the new adminis- 1 That Secretary Wallace would re- i tration would give the university, will fuse to sanction a change was little / feel reassurred.--Minneapolis "Daily expected by the agricultural interests / News. of the northwest. The change in sys- 1 tem had been recommended by the / It yet remains for the first person Minnesota Farm Bureau Federation to name something that puts more life and by a resolution passed by the into a crowd than a peppy band. No 1921 session of the Minnesota legis- one has so far offere(t anything that lature, will take its place and produce the The hope in this matter lies in his assurance that the question will not be dropped with this announcement of denial. He has promised further investigation and the system of grad- ing grain asked for may yet be "inau- gurated. DISCOVER TRUTH AND TELL IT. Democratic and practical. That is certain to be the verdict on the in- augural address of Lotus D. Coifman, new president of the University of Minnesota. He proved his democracy by stress- ing the principle of intellectual liber- ty, the right to discover truth and tell it, and the principle that the univer- sity is the servant of the many, not the few. That he is practical he proved by a concrete program of usefulness to the state. He would connect the uni- versity like one vast dynamo with the everyday work of khe people until it helps in the solution of all public prob- lems from the prevention of wheat rust and white pine blister to the building of roads and the harnessing of water. He would have the law school co- operate with the judiciary; the en- gineering schools with private labora- tories, and all departments of research with the corresponding public enter- prises. The results of research he would have written in popular form and pub- lished for the benefit of the whole people. How far-reaching this would be is plain when we remember that private organizations require their research men to sign contracts that they will not publish the results of their work, so that discoveries may be kept secret for the benefit of the privileged few. His whole attitude is summed in the phrase, "A republic of minds." His idea is that a university is no longer a school merely; it is a republic of minds dedicated to the study of the problems of life; a group of citizens of the world, not engaged in any pro- paganda, but interested in the affairs of men; a republic that knows no limitations of time and no geographi- cal boundaries, bent on making a bet- ter world to live in. It is a big program, the only thing worthy that name of education. Peo- ple who have been waiting anxiously same bouyant effect. The concerts which the Ortonvflle ban(l gave on Market Day are weighty proof of this, and makes that band a valuable organization in this town. The whole town should back them in apprecia- tion of their contribution. "Who owns the air?" is the ques- tion flashed in the headlines of a daily paper of this week, and the sug- gestion has been made that the ques- tion be referred to the present-day wizard, Thomas A. Edison. After Mr. Edison has answered this. if he does, it might be well to have him determine whether or not South Da- kota owns half of Big Stone and Traverse lakes. There is no charity equal to the charity that.is charitable to the un- charitable. T OBITUARY @ $ Gustave A. Lindstrom. Gustave kindstrom, son of Mr. and Mrs. L. W. Lindstrom of Prior, died last Thursday, May 12, after an in- termittent illness lasting close to five years. Pneumonia which he con- traeted recently was the immediate cause of his death. Gustave Lindstrom who was twen- ty-two years old at the time of his death, was born February 20, 1899 in Prior at the home where his parents now live. About'five years ago he showed signs of failing health,, and about two years ago he was taken to the Bethesday hospital in St. Paul. He stayed there about seven months, returning from there a year ago last August. Since that time he had stay- d at his home in Prior. Funeral services were held Sunday, May 15, interment being made in the Swedish Lutheran cBmaery three miles west of Clinton. The Rev. L. J. Lundquist of Wheaton conducted the services. He is su,ived by his father and mother, two brothers, Leonard'-and Luther A., and three sisters, Mrs. Edna Paulson, Agnes, and Ellis. All with the exception of Luther who is away attending school were present at the funeral. i i ii In a new L.U TRIKE 10 cigarettes for 10 ors Handyand convenient; try them. Dealers now carry both sizes : 10 for I0 cts; 20 for 20 cts. It's Toasted There's more to a home than dollars and cents No one can measure the cash value of a happy home. Its the biggest thing in life. If you are living in cramped and uncomfortable quarters, if you have been planning for a home when conditions become right--then see us today. rhe delay in new building has forced building material prices downward at a tremendous elig. Manufacturers, caught with big stocks on hand, have had to turn them over almost at cost. We have taken advantage of the situation and as a result we are able to show you substantial reductions on practically every item we carry--mason's supplies, roofing, Beaver Board many of our priqes compare favorably with those of 1914. This is a good time to see us. With our city short fi, fty homes people can't delay much longer in their new building. Demand will stimulate pmces; manufacturers will again trek a legitimate profit; and we can again expect increased building costs. In the meantime we offer you a home--and at a price that eamnot fail to please you...If you will vail or phone us, we will be glad to go into detail. Geier Lumber Company Ortonville, Minn. @ ] LEGAL NOTICES I @ ..... g. NOTICE OF MORTAGAE FOR" CLOSURE SALE. Default having been made in the conditions of a certain mortgage, con- taining a power of Sale, dated Febru- ary 21, 1918, and duly recorded in the office of the Register of Deeds of Big Stone County, Minn.. March 23, 1918 at 9 o'clock a. . in Book 53 of Mort- gages on page 110. whereby M. Ferch and Julia Ferch, his wife, C. J. Ferch and Matilda Ferch, his wife, C. F. Ferch and Emma Ferch, his wife, mortgagors, mortgaged to The State Bank of Correll, now Farmers & Mer- chants State Bank, mortgagee, the Southeast Quarter (S.E.) of the Southeast Quarter (S.E.]A) of Section Twenty-one (21), Township One Hun- dred Twenty-one (121), Range Forty- four (44), Big Stone County, Minne- sota, by which default the Power of Sale has become operative, and no ac- tion or proceeding at law having been I will be forclosed and said premises I sold at public auction, by the Sheriff t of said county, or his deputy, on Sat-] urday, June 25, 1921, at 10 o0clock a. I m. at the front door of the Court i House in Ortonvil]e, in said county, to pay said debt, interest, attorney's fees, an([ disbursements allowed by law. Dated May 10, 1921. Farmers & Merchants State Bank of Correll, Mortgagee. A. B. Kaercher, Attorney Ortonville, Minn. Obeyed Orders. "Did you deliver my message to Mr. Smith, Tommy?" asked the manager to the new office boy. "No sir," replied Tommy "He was out. and his office was locked up." "Why didn't you wait for him as I cold you to do ?" " " s'r There was a notice on the door, . 1 , [ saying 'Return immediately,' so It came back here as quickly as I could, t instituted to recover the debt secured sir." thereby, or any part thereof, and there is claimed to be due on said mortgage Mother"Who ever taught you to at the date hereof the sum of Two use that drea(lful word?" [ Thousand Seven Hundred Thirty-eight Tommy--"Santa Claus, mama." I and eighty-nine one hundredths Mother--"Santa Claus ?" ] ($2738.89) Dollars. Tommy--"Yes, mama, when he fell / Now, Notice Is Hereby Given, That ox era chair in my bedroom on Christ- I by virtue of said pwer, said mortgage mas _eve."--Li e ] SHOE REPAIRING I/ MODEL SHOE SHOP Iit At Jr GEO. S. NELSON, Prorietor Ill t I[11[ 0000tlCH00LIN " has orercomo-t/00 commomm00. catzsos of tire trouble NUMBER 3 MISFIT TUBES Ordinary t u b e s are" simply straight pieces of tubing which must be forced by inflation into the ring-shape of the casing. This results in wrinkles which in turn lead to pinched and torn tubes. Michelin Tubes, on the other hand, are made ring-shaped like the inside of the casing itself, and hence fit perfectly without wrinkling or stretching. Naturally Miche- lin Tubes last longer. ' Let us show you the difference in shape and wearing qualities between Michelins and all other makes. Pufahl's Garage !:,[ FORD PARTS AND FORD ACCESSORIES Separated or Insulated The plates in your bat- tery may be merely sepa- rated or they may be in- sulated. If insulated with Willard Threaded Rubber Insula- tion, your old-time wood- separator battery worries are over. It's a satisfaction.to know that Threaded Rubber In- sulation does.not puncture, check, warp. crack or car- bonizc-- No bills for wood-separa- tor replacement with the Willard Threaded Rubber Battery. Threaded Rub- bcr Insulation outlasts the battery plates. Harris & Wilson Ortonville, Minn. LA Wilhrd Batteries Increase yur sales thru the advertising columns of this RUNABOUT $395 f. o. b. DetrOit - If your salesmen spend unproductive time going from pros- pect to prospect, because of slow transportation, it is money lost.. Slow transportation robs them of part of their time--time that might just as well be turned into sales. A Ford Runabout furnishes quick transportation at the low- est possible cost. By equipping your salesmen with Ford car you will enable them to devote more energy to selling goods. J. Arthur Matthews & Company Ortonville, Minnesota, THURSDAY, MAY 19, 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDEN'r PAnE The Or tonvifie Independent PUBLISHED EVERy THURSDA by the Farme & blerc,hant printhg Co. A. B, Kaeher, PresMent Frank Harr Vlee.pt L* F Lundgr, Srety Walter DIone[], Tasm BOARD OF DIRECTORS A. S. Halls John Kaercher John Witte Walter Dinner Chester ninon L.E. Lundgren Frank Hnis Grace F. Kaelher A. B. Kaeher Erkk  Aiate Edito Entered as enndl ttel Hay 18, 1920, at the post office al Oltonville Minn., under the Act el March 8, 1879. SUBSCRIPTION $2.00 PER YEAR Advertlming Rates on Application emeA eassstaT]oN CfROW FOODS AT HOME. Now the Department ot Agricul- ture is ssulng an appeal ts raise all foods at home to  gat extent as psesible. Increased transpertatlon sts ia the most important factor in bnnging forth tbls appeal. The transportation eost, hey say, will pvent shipments of the mo modbe-prid resb fits and vege- tables which  purchased by the ger of single crops or speciatties for  in their o hraea. d the lk cf a market for special products isftory marketing of our whL [to knnw xhat stamp the new admlnis- l ,Z, be folnd and said pmmis  i .... That Sectary Wll would re- I tration 'n.,d give the uiversJty, will LEGAL NOTICES ] I snhl at pub,lc auction, by the Sheriff ].|  a i m____ " of id county or his deputy, on Sat expeeted by the agricoltu nterts N OS '   ...... o  a of th nnrthwes ae ehuge n sys -- CL UR SALE  at th frt dn nf h Cnart tem hd been comended by te t yet remns fo th firs persn Df,t hang been ade n the oe u Oten, n said nnty, t Mneta Farm na Fdratn tc ne snethg tbat pats  f cnd,nns n  crtm tggnn pay ad deb Lnterst attoey  by a tin pasd by the nt a ewd thn  peppy bn N tanning a pner nf ale. dated Febrn  . aud disbusement slinked b I 12 ssseu nf e Mnnscta eglne hs so far ffered anythn tha ry 2 9, and dy eorded  tha e I ' take ts p nd podu the f nf the Reste ef Deeds f Bgl Dted My 10 121 Th bpe ths hs The Stone Cat, Mnn Mreh 2 9 I Fers & Merchants  l]d st  o'cc   n nnk 5 nf Mor ! state k f Cnrre, I assrn tt he qesten , not wbc h O,nne band gave on be dreped wth t annoneent Market Day are eghty pcf of gages n pge 0herey H Feeh Mertgage nvetgatenf denaL HeandhasthePrmdsysten rter th  d aes tbat d a uhe orgaatndz nthstwn Thwhe a J  F  b e C J Fe  A  Kaece Att r ey gr  ad Ma Fh h wfc C F ng  sked fnr ay yet be nau town she, bc te n appe ! Ferch Emm Fe hs f, Otv M thi n,rtgagnrs nrgaged tn The State Obeyed vd uted. DISCOVEAND TELl. IT.[ Dratie and praetit. That i L "Who one the r ?" is the ques- certain to be the verdict on the in- tlnn flashed in the head]rues of a augural addles of Lotus D, Coffm daib' paper of this week, and the sag- new psident of the University o gestio, hs been made that the ques- Minnesota. tion be referred to the psent-day sity is the ant of the many, not kota ns half of Big Stone and He prnl his democry by stash- wizard, Thomas A. linn. After mg the pl'ncip]e of intellectual libor- Mr. Edison has answered this, if he ty. the right to discover tth ad tell ds.  might be well to have him it. and the pnelple that the univer determme ,bether or not South Da- the few. i Traverse hdws. That he is practical he pved by a connote pgrm of usefulne to, There is no eharlty equal to the the tate He weuM nnect the unl charitr thats charitable to the un- rsity like one vast dynamo with th ehatabe. t]ank of Coli, now Farmers & Mer- "Did you deliver my message to Mr chants State Bank, mortgage, the Smlth, Tommy?" askl the manage Southeast Quartet" (S,E.4) of th to the new om boy Southeast Quaer (S.E,) of Seetlo "No sh. '' plied Tommy "He was wenty-ne (21), Township One Hun. out, amt his omee was locked up." dd Twenty one (121), Range Forty- "Why didn't you wait for him as four (44). Bi Stone Cety. MJn.e- old you to do?" ot, by which default the Power nl "The was a otce on the door, sir, :ale has become operative, and no ae sa#ng 'Retu immediately,' so I inn or prnedinz at law hang b= came bk here a quickly  I could, nsituted to recover the debt secure( sir." theby, or any part thereof, and the is elalmed to be due on id mortgag Mather'Who ev taught yo t at the (late he.of the sum of Two use that dadfl wnrd" q?nsad Seven Hundred Thirty-eight Tnmmy--"Santa Claus, ma." and eighty-nine one hundredths Mother--"Santa Claus?" ($73S.89) Dollars. Tommy--"Yes, mama, when he fell NOW, Notlee Is Hereby Given. That or a halr in my bedroom on Christ. by .rtue of said por, d mortgage mas eve."--Life. SHOE REPAIRING MODEL SHOE SHOP vt GEe, S. NELSON, Priet ever)day work of e people until it helps in the solution of all public prnb- ]e from the prevention of wheat rust and white pine blister to the building of ads and the haessin of water He would have the law school el operate with the Judielary; the en- gmeenng hIs with pivate labors. toes, d a] departments of a tshe the spoading public enter. s* The results  eah he wont ave wtten in popular form and pub. OBITUARY i Gnstave A. Lindstrn Gustave klndstrem, sen of Mr. and M. L* W. Lindstm of Prior, died last Thumday, May 12, ater an in- teittent illness Iasting elo to five yeam. Pneumonia which he con- tracted ntly w the immediate u of his death. Gusta Lindstm who was tn- in turn will be a blow to the buy ug ty-two yrs old at the time of his apacity of the growers of these sp ]ished for the benefit of the whol( eath, w born Febry 2O. 1899 in ati* peOpl How f-ching this wnuk Pnr at the home whe his paste The American faer s not going be. s piton when .we mher that i now ]t. Abontfl yea ago he to he able this  to pay fight on private organlzaUe que tkelr showed signs of faiing heath, and ar men to s!gn ntracts that about two ye ago he w taken partWater'ofdfshWaterfrutmkand UPvgemblea large ey wdl not pubhsh the results of o be Betheay hosp tan St. Pan The aer is that he must grow h s er work, so that d,scovenes may be He syed the about seven mont owntae food. He mus sudy he kept t for the benefit of the ung fomthe ayear ago possibilities of sub no This ap- pnlett f* Augus Since that tin ke had stay- plies to vegetables, fits, podtry, ttis whole attitude is summed n the ed at h s home in Prior. eggs. and dairy pdunt whch must phe "A publie of minds." His "l ' em held S d "de " ' . . Funera se w un ay be transferd from eoeal . . ly 5, mterm t , g e 1 , a is that a university s no longer " n he'n mad "n th a school mealy; It Is a pUb]lc of S .ed'sh L the e th Sels to home eansumptinn if they minds dedicated to the tudy of the  ' . ran ry am to eome within the rch of the reborn r . . miles west of Chnton.eme  Rev, L arage fmi* p s of fie, a group .of ean j. Lundqnlst of Wheaten ennducte h NO lile savng  be made by of the word. not engage] n any pr the er ang a garden no matter how pagoda, but interested in he affdrs s s.. . of men"  br th t kn n He s lved by his father and a ..................... limitation s of tP ................................... mL.snal n ighit wouldbewe be estate ealboundaries, bent on making a bet" Luther A., and thee  ers, rs what benefits WOul d be derived from te r wor d to ve n Edna Paulssn, Agnes, and Ellis AI the growing of my of the mmodi- ties which have to be shipped in. It It is a big pmgtam, the only thing Rh the expon of Luther who i is only another way to reduce costs to wrthy that name of education. Pe away attendlng hoo] we presen a lower flgu, and still find pnjoy, de who have bn waiting anxiously at the funeral. meat in iL BODST ORTONVILLE. Other towns in Minneta a in- stituting a plan which Ortonv e ight ll follow. That s the ad- vertising of hat we have  sum- met reeation flitie  There is no necessity that one should ]fiate nu what Ortonville has to of- er to awaken the pple to the fact that we have things. They  obv-  to all who ]i here or to those who have been here. It i to tho ho have not been here that th thngs should be told. No modesty shou d hinder tiffs. If meJl towns, laed in the northern  the state d havng a e- .......... ...... aUCKY a land omee d tm old hote have th 1 audaty to pictu vivid snes of the r elftyled pay grounds which n sist for the most par of buter i uu Itf to do ths work. If no ]ands, what should pvent  fm telling nthers about Orlonville and KHI ....... - STR! tt ia Receary to ballyhoo to get a ood crOWd iide the bent. You also have to toot helicon you--ll for no one Will de t fr ynt L t If the eomer club is defet, hen let  other oganition take rer organitio n will do it, th a temporary orgazaon hang ths ua- s SOle puRoo, should be put dr vy. No matter who dil be the o to do tt it shnul be de and MICHELIN TUBES NUMBER must be forced by inflation into the ring-shape of the casing, This sults in wlinkies which in tu lead to pinched and tom tubes. Michelin Tubes, on the other hand, am made ring-shaped like the imtde of the easlvg taelf, ar hee fit perfny without wrinkling or stretching. Naturally Miehe- lin Tubes last monger* "Let tt show you the diffeuce in shape and wearing quaties betn MieheBus d all other makes. , Pufah!:s oGarsage 1 FO O PAR'IS F 0 CHANG |N GRAIN GRADIN,t  d, denied the appeal of delegates presentmg Minnesota ad other zearthwest farmers that the sy em of grading grai n be ehart. His de* allowing a e Of feln which have been held at WMhlngtem eerie change is not tifled  he s it, and he gves out the faliow- g reasons for not grthg the de- . ands of the ptatls: Frequt chaises n gr and *tarMardz tu e highly undeniable a]l ZhOuld b e made only after thorn in. veatigatioa has shown them to be bth justified and needed. Th grain standards t requires hat noti of changes be glv t ot be than ninety da's In advance their effectivedste. Changes made apply to the crop of this year shOuld eome effecti not later than Au-  1 1 spring wheat and s ?]1 fo r gliey wheat; and even m some would have begun n move i many contrasts therefore woad e bee n made, erefo changes U by year must  lotucd rodinte y I have bn in Of flee but a short Zamueh too ort to gve thin rotter the study its importtmee de- xls, particularly from the ktand- emt f the when grower I am not isg te odr nzea wm I do t of my owa ]mowledge feel are ful. Juafid and 11 be hetpul to the riuer at mill promote more mr- 10 cigarettes forlo Handy and convenient; try Chem. Dealers now carry both sizes: 10 for 10 el; 20 for 20 st;. It's Toasted There's more to a home than dollars and cents NO e'n meun the h val of n happy hem ltn ,te biggest thing L-gf If ynu n II,dn In mped and mfoItable qurter it you have been pln.nlng for a home when nditio become right--then e  today. The delay t n tm,tun has foed building material prises downward at a tmendo elFp* Manufaeturere caught with big stocks on hand, have had to t them over almost at st. We trove taken advantage of the atti d am a rult we a able to eh y sulttisl redtls  prawnally mazy of oar pri m favorably with th of lS14. This is grad time to e With r ty short ./ty banes peeple  delay much longer in their new hutld4nmg. Demnd will stimulate !d; manactnet*s 11 aain k a let4timate profit; and we In the mntlnle we offer yl a Ime--d at a pe that be glad to ge Into detail Geier Lumber Company Separated or , Insulated The plates in your bet- tery may be nmrely sepa- rated or they m be n- If insulated with Willa Threaded Rubber Insula- tion, 3'our old-te wood- are over. that Threaded Rubber In- uintlon does.not ptmcture, check, war@, mack or car- nizc-- No bil1 for wood-mpara- or replacement with the |l Willard Threaded Rubber I Battery. Threaded Rub- bcr Insulation outlasts the battery pint, Harris & Wilson II Ortonville, Minn. Willard ' Batteries ' Increase r sales thru the advertising columns of this paper. RUNABOUT $395 f. o. bl Detrdit . If your salesmen spend unproductive time going from proe- pect to prospect, because of slow transportation, it is money lost.. Slow transportation robs them of part of their time--time that mght just as well be turned into sales. A Ford Runabout furnishes quick transportation at the low- est possible cost. By equipping your salesmen with Ford cars, you will enable them to devote more energy to selling goods. J. Arthur Matthews & Company Ortonvme, Minnesota. THURSDAY, MAY 19, 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE $ ii i.i ii ,i ...i ii The Ortonville Independent PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY by the Farmers & Merchants Printing Co. A. B. Kaercher, President Frank Harris, Vice-president L. E. Lundgren, Secretary Walter Dinnell, Treasurer BOARD OF DIRECTORS A. S. Halls John Kaercher John Witte Walter Dinnell Chester Olson L.E. Lundgren Frank Harris Grace F. Kaercher A. B. Kaercher L. A. Kaercher - Managing Editor Cyrus Erickson Associate Editor Entered as second-class matter lIay 18, 1929, at the post office at Ortonville, Minn., under the Act of March 3, 1879. SUBSCRIPTION $2.00 PER YEAR Advertising Rates on Application i Foreign Advet:tisiug Representative THE AMERICAI PRESSASSOCIATION [ GROW FOODS AT HOME. Now the Department of Agricul- ture is issuing an appeal to raise all foods at home to as great extent as possible. Increased transportation costs is the most important factor in bringing forth this appeal. The transportation costs, they say, will prevent shipments of the more moderate-priced fresh fruits and vege- tables which are purchased by the growers of single crops or specialties for use in their own haines, and the lack of a market for special products in turn will be a blow to the buying capacity of the growers of these spe- cialties. The American farmer is not going to be able this year to pay freight on water, and water makes up a large part of fresh fruits and vgetables. The answer is that he must grow his own table food. He must study the possibilities of substitution. This ap- plies to vegetables, f/salts, poultry, eggs, and dairy products which must be transferred from commercial channels to home consumption if they are to come within the reach of the average family. No little saving can be made by having a garden no matter how small. If living costs sem to mount too high it would be well to estimate what benefits would be derived from the growing of many of the commodi- ties which have to be shipped in. It is only another way to reduce costs to a lower figure, and still find enjoy- ment in it. BOOST ORTONVlLLE. Other towns in Minnesota are in- stituting a plan which Ortonville might well follow. That is the ad- vertising of what we have as sum- mer recreation facilities. There is no necessity that one should tints on what Ortonville has to of- fer to awaken the people to the fact that we have things. They are obvi- .ous to all who live here or to those who have been here. It is to thoe who have not been here that these things should be told. No modesty should hinder this. If small towns, located in the northern lar f the state and having a com- bination post office and general store; a land office and an old hotel, have the audacity to picture vivid scenes of their self-styled play grounds which con- sist for the most part of burnt-over lands, what should prevent us from elling others about Ortonville and Big Stone Lake. It is necessary to ballyhoo to get a good crowd inside the tent. You also have to toot helicon yourself for no one will do it for you. If the commercial club is defunct, then let same other organization take i upon itself to do this work. If no ether organization will do it, then a temporary organization having this as its sole purpose, should be put under way. No matter who will be the one to do it it should be done and done soon. NO CHANGE IN GRAIN GRADING. "Secretary of Agriculture Wallac has denied the appeal of delegates representing Minnesota and other llorthwest farmers that the system of grading grain be changed. His de- il:vi.gas aanseUeseedofJUS:on::entleeY s. which have been held at Washington. The change is not justified as he sees it, and he gives out the follow- ing reasons for not granting the de- mands of the representatives: Frequent changes in grades and tandards are highly undesirable and should be made only after there in- estigation has shown them to be oth justified and needed. The grain standards act requires that notice of changes be given out not less than ninety days in advance on their effective date. Changes made to apply to the crop of this year should become effective not later than Au- gust 15 for spring wheat and still earlier for garlicy wheat; and even then some would have begun to move v many contracts therefore would e been made. Terefore changes ect]ve by year must be announced lramediately.  _ I have been in omce but a short 'tithe--much too short to give this matter the study its importance de- tands, particularly from the Stand- .Pwint of the wheat grower. I am not lling to order changes which I do ot of my own knowledge feel are ful- JY justified and will be helpful to the Producer and will promote more sat- isfactory marketing of our wheat, to know what stamp the new adminis- 1 That Secretary Wallace would re- i tration would give the university, will fuse to sanction a change was little / feel reassurred.--Minneapolis "Daily expected by the agricultural interests / News. of the northwest. The change in sys- 1 tem had been recommended by the / It yet remains for the first person Minnesota Farm Bureau Federation to name something that puts more life and by a resolution passed by the into a crowd than a peppy band. No 1921 session of the Minnesota legis- one has so far offere(t anything that lature, will take its place and produce the The hope in this matter lies in his assurance that the question will not be dropped with this announcement of denial. He has promised further investigation and the system of grad- ing grain asked for may yet be "inau- gurated. DISCOVER TRUTH AND TELL IT. Democratic and practical. That is certain to be the verdict on the in- augural address of Lotus D. Coifman, new president of the University of Minnesota. He proved his democracy by stress- ing the principle of intellectual liber- ty, the right to discover truth and tell it, and the principle that the univer- sity is the servant of the many, not the few. That he is practical he proved by a concrete program of usefulness to the state. He would connect the uni- versity like one vast dynamo with the everyday work of khe people until it helps in the solution of all public prob- lems from the prevention of wheat rust and white pine blister to the building of roads and the harnessing of water. He would have the law school co- operate with the judiciary; the en- gineering schools with private labora- tories, and all departments of research with the corresponding public enter- prises. The results of research he would have written in popular form and pub- lished for the benefit of the whole people. How far-reaching this would be is plain when we remember that private organizations require their research men to sign contracts that they will not publish the results of their work, so that discoveries may be kept secret for the benefit of the privileged few. His whole attitude is summed in the phrase, "A republic of minds." His idea is that a university is no longer a school merely; it is a republic of minds dedicated to the study of the problems of life; a group of citizens of the world, not engaged in any pro- paganda, but interested in the affairs of men; a republic that knows no limitations of time and no geographi- cal boundaries, bent on making a bet- ter world to live in. It is a big program, the only thing worthy that name of education. Peo- ple who have been waiting anxiously same bouyant effect. The concerts which the Ortonvflle ban(l gave on Market Day are weighty proof of this, and makes that band a valuable organization in this town. The whole town should back them in apprecia- tion of their contribution. "Who owns the air?" is the ques- tion flashed in the headlines of a daily paper of this week, and the sug- gestion has been made that the ques- tion be referred to the present-day wizard, Thomas A. Edison. After Mr. Edison has answered this. if he does, it might be well to have him determine whether or not South Da- kota owns half of Big Stone and Traverse lakes. There is no charity equal to the charity that.is charitable to the un- charitable. T OBITUARY @ $ Gustave A. Lindstrom. Gustave kindstrom, son of Mr. and Mrs. L. W. Lindstrom of Prior, died last Thursday, May 12, after an in- termittent illness lasting close to five years. Pneumonia which he con- traeted recently was the immediate cause of his death. Gustave Lindstrom who was twen- ty-two years old at the time of his death, was born February 20, 1899 in Prior at the home where his parents now live. About'five years ago he showed signs of failing health,, and about two years ago he was taken to the Bethesday hospital in St. Paul. He stayed there about seven months, returning from there a year ago last August. Since that time he had stay- d at his home in Prior. Funeral services were held Sunday, May 15, interment being made in the Swedish Lutheran cBmaery three miles west of Clinton. The Rev. L. J. Lundquist of Wheaton conducted the services. He is su,ived by his father and mother, two brothers, Leonard'-and Luther A., and three sisters, Mrs. Edna Paulson, Agnes, and Ellis. All with the exception of Luther who is away attending school were present at the funeral. i i ii In a new L.U TRIKE 10 cigarettes for 10 ors Handyand convenient; try them. Dealers now carry both sizes : 10 for I0 cts; 20 for 20 cts. It's Toasted There's more to a home than dollars and cents No one can measure the cash value of a happy home. Its the biggest thing in life. If you are living in cramped and uncomfortable quarters, if you have been planning for a home when conditions become right--then see us today. rhe delay in new building has forced building material prices downward at a tremendous elig. Manufacturers, caught with big stocks on hand, have had to turn them over almost at cost. We have taken advantage of the situation and as a result we are able to show you substantial reductions on practically every item we carry--mason's supplies, roofing, Beaver Board many of our priqes compare favorably with those of 1914. This is a good time to see us. With our city short fi, fty homes people can't delay much longer in their new building. Demand will stimulate pmces; manufacturers will again trek a legitimate profit; and we can again expect increased building costs. In the meantime we offer you a home--and at a price that eamnot fail to please you...If you will vail or phone us, we will be glad to go into detail. Geier Lumber Company Ortonville, Minn. @ ] LEGAL NOTICES I @ ..... g. NOTICE OF MORTAGAE FOR" CLOSURE SALE. Default having been made in the conditions of a certain mortgage, con- taining a power of Sale, dated Febru- ary 21, 1918, and duly recorded in the office of the Register of Deeds of Big Stone County, Minn.. March 23, 1918 at 9 o'clock a. . in Book 53 of Mort- gages on page 110. whereby M. Ferch and Julia Ferch, his wife, C. J. Ferch and Matilda Ferch, his wife, C. F. Ferch and Emma Ferch, his wife, mortgagors, mortgaged to The State Bank of Correll, now Farmers & Mer- chants State Bank, mortgagee, the Southeast Quarter (S.E.) of the Southeast Quarter (S.E.]A) of Section Twenty-one (21), Township One Hun- dred Twenty-one (121), Range Forty- four (44), Big Stone County, Minne- sota, by which default the Power of Sale has become operative, and no ac- tion or proceeding at law having been I will be forclosed and said premises I sold at public auction, by the Sheriff t of said county, or his deputy, on Sat-] urday, June 25, 1921, at 10 o0clock a. I m. at the front door of the Court i House in Ortonvil]e, in said county, to pay said debt, interest, attorney's fees, an([ disbursements allowed by law. Dated May 10, 1921. Farmers & Merchants State Bank of Correll, Mortgagee. A. B. Kaercher, Attorney Ortonville, Minn. Obeyed Orders. "Did you deliver my message to Mr. Smith, Tommy?" asked the manager to the new office boy. "No sir," replied Tommy "He was out. and his office was locked up." "Why didn't you wait for him as I cold you to do ?" " " s'r There was a notice on the door, . 1 , [ saying 'Return immediately,' so It came back here as quickly as I could, t instituted to recover the debt secured sir." thereby, or any part thereof, and there is claimed to be due on said mortgage Mother"Who ever taught you to at the date hereof the sum of Two use that drea(lful word?" [ Thousand Seven Hundred Thirty-eight Tommy--"Santa Claus, mama." I and eighty-nine one hundredths Mother--"Santa Claus ?" ] ($2738.89) Dollars. Tommy--"Yes, mama, when he fell / Now, Notice Is Hereby Given, That ox era chair in my bedroom on Christ- I by virtue of said pwer, said mortgage mas _eve."--Li e ] SHOE REPAIRING I/ MODEL SHOE SHOP Iit At Jr GEO. S. NELSON, Prorietor Ill t I[11[ 0000tlCH00LIN " has orercomo-t/00 commomm00. catzsos of tire trouble NUMBER 3 MISFIT TUBES Ordinary t u b e s are" simply straight pieces of tubing which must be forced by inflation into the ring-shape of the casing. This results in wrinkles which in turn lead to pinched and torn tubes. Michelin Tubes, on the other hand, are made ring-shaped like the inside of the casing itself, and hence fit perfectly without wrinkling or stretching. Naturally Miche- lin Tubes last longer. ' Let us show you the difference in shape and wearing qualities between Michelins and all other makes. Pufahl's Garage !:,[ FORD PARTS AND FORD ACCESSORIES Separated or Insulated The plates in your bat- tery may be merely sepa- rated or they may be in- sulated. If insulated with Willard Threaded Rubber Insula- tion, your old-time wood- separator battery worries are over. It's a satisfaction.to know that Threaded Rubber In- sulation does.not puncture, check, warp. crack or car- bonizc-- No bills for wood-separa- tor replacement with the Willard Threaded Rubber Battery. Threaded Rub- bcr Insulation outlasts the battery plates. Harris & Wilson Ortonville, Minn. LA Wilhrd Batteries Increase yur sales thru the advertising columns of this RUNABOUT $395 f. o. b. DetrOit - If your salesmen spend unproductive time going from pros- pect to prospect, because of slow transportation, it is money lost.. Slow transportation robs them of part of their time--time that might just as well be turned into sales. A Ford Runabout furnishes quick transportation at the low- est possible cost. By equipping your salesmen with Ford car you will enable them to devote more energy to selling goods. J. Arthur Matthews & Company Ortonville, Minnesota,