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Ortonville, Minnesota
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May 19, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
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May 19, 1921
 

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PAGE 4 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT THURSDAY, MAY 19, *' .... CORRELL NEWS } $ Mrs. Baxrie sprained her ankle last Friday. Dr. Kaufman was a Con'ell caller Wednesday. Ben Swanson arrived from Arizona last Thursday. Fred Wamsley was an Appleton vis- itor Friday between trains. Mrs. John Frizzell's father arrived from Canada Tuesday night. Duncan Barr was sick with the mea- sles the first part of this week. Mrs. Melvin Olson was an Appleton caller between trains Wednesday. Charles Barrie and family motored Ltm qui Parle park last Sunday. Chas. Barrio and family, Miss Viv- ion Vaughan and Miss Irene Blum mo- ored to Appleton Wednesday. The baseball game between Correll Ind Oakridge last Sunday resulted in a 7 to 6 score in favor of Correll. Miss Scott, Miss Bernice Hudson, For(lice Hudson and Oscar Lundberg attended the class play at Odessa Fri- day night Tho class play, "The Masonic Ring, or the Adventures of a College Bride," will be given Friday evening, May 20, beginning at eight o'clock. Q I ODESSA l -,O @ Roy Rothe was an Appleton caller Monday. Fred Bohmert is painting his but- chef shop this week. W. B. Sellin was transacting busi- ness in Ortonviile Tuesday. Edwin Menzel has been spending a few days with relatives in Minneapo- lis. Rev. and Max Melinat and sons Herman and Max autoed to Orton- ville Tuesday. The business meeting of the K. L. C. E. Society was held at the church Tuesday evening. Mrs. A. M. Semrau went to Twin Brooks, S. D., to spend the week-end with Mrs. Herman Ferber. H. H. Reindl and Frank Schuett autoed to Madison on Wednesday and Thursday to attend district court. Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Buchhol and daughter Ardis of Big Stone City, S. D., were calling on friends here Fri- day evening. The Women's Missionary Society will hold their next meeting at the home of Mrs. Emilie Za]irbock on Thursday afternoon, May 26. J. C. Wanous, Miss Ella Maves and Mr. and Mrs. John Strensrad and fam- ily autoed to Renville to spend Sun- day with Mr. and Mi. Emil Swen- Roy. Emil Mueller of St. Paul ar- rived Friday to hold Quarterly Con- forego at the Evangelical church Saturday evening nd S fore- noon . ...... "Valley Farm," the play which was given by the Seniors af the Odessa high school last Friday evening at the Village Hall was well attended an!t everybody enjoyed the manner in which the play was preseed. PLEASANT VALLEY ; Cast of Cha00:acters For Legion ?hay The Ladies' Aid met at he home of Mrs. R. E. Hipple Wednesday after- noon. lasting several days. Miss Iris Wilkinson arrived Sunday from the cities to visit her sister Miss Orrie Mtmdwiler. Several ideople from Pleasant Valle attended the Song Service held at the Methodist church in Ortonville last Sunday night. The recent frosts and rain did a great deal of harm to the apple and plum blossoms, thus making the pros- lect of a good crop very doubtful. i South Gracevilh r Mr. and Mrs. Car] Skoog and :Mr. and Mrs. Billiet called at the Arnoldi hre Sunday. Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Hopman and family visited with Mr. and Mrs. Miles Vilgon Sunday. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Lennord vis- ited with Mr .and Mrs. D. Broderick and family Sunday. Patrick Johnson, Alfred Hopman, Ted Christenson and Geo. Fleming vis- ited at the Sullivan home Sunday. Barney Shearon came here Snday from his home at Stillwater to spend :a few days at the J. Sullivan home. guests  at the Chas. Gan home Sunday were Mr. ad Mrs. Edward Gau and family, Mr. and Mrs. Wie- man, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Heidecker and family, William Pedadorf and Mrs. Pedadorf. BONANZA ' ........ (3. E. Hull of Peever, S. D., spent Sunday here fishing and boating. Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Reyelts of Camp- bell, Minnesota, were visitors at Mon- anza the past week. E. H. Doe and wife of Olivia drove up last Friday and spent the week- end with their son, Lyle. Mr. Doe re- ports that they are having,more wet weather there than here. J. H. Smith had his motor launch, "Gai Boy," repaired, nicely painted, boats on Big Stone lake. Mynherr Hertogenbosch, a rich Holland farmer ............ Chas. H. Bolsta Vrouw Hertogenboscb, his wife .................................................... Paul Beck Wilhelmina, their daughter ................................................ H. N. Tragethon Hilda, their daughter ............................................................ Willard Twee Bob Yankee, American salesman .......................................... Chic Zwiener Hans, a student of music, in love with Wilhelmina .............. Earl Miller Franz, rich farmer's son, in love with Hilda ........................ J. A. Jacobsen Katrina, rich farmer's daughter .................................... Chester Pflueger Farmer's daughters: Floyd Atha, Chester Pfiueger, Raymond Loy, Walter Elms, Freeland Pratt, Kenneth Cummens. Farmer's sons: Joe Petrick, Cyrus Erickson, Raymond Gowan, Louis Lundgren, W. A. Randall, Paul Grice. ACT I Opening Chorus-- Vet Iss Ida .............................................................................. Hertogenbosch Mother Mine .................................................................................. Wilhelmina The Spider and the Fly .......................................... Vrouw Hertogenbosch There Are Others ........................................ Hilda and Franz and Chorus Its All Over Now .................................................................................... Hilda Looking for a Girl .......................................................... Franz and Chorus Fishing ...................................... Bob Yankee and Wi]helmina and Chorus In Dremmland ............................................................................................ Hans Wooden Shoes ........................................................................................ Chorus ACT II Drum Song ............ Wilhelmina, Bob Yankee, Hertogenbosch and Chorus I'll Never Speak to You Again .................. ! She,me on You ................................................. Hilda, Wi]heLmina, Vrouw A Common Game ......................................... I Lonesome, That's All .................................................................. Wilhelmina Poppies, Red and White .................................................................... Chorus A Man In Business .................................................................... Bob Yankee When I Was Young Like You ............................................ Ffertogenbosch Nothing to Do .......................................... Bob Yankee and Hertogenbosch Finale--In Dreamland and Windmills of Holland. Miss Jacobsen, Pianist. Directed by Misses Kern and Jacobsen Vaudeville Specialties will be introduced between acts, featuring "The Dance of the Nymphs," by Vaughan Brainard and Seymour Himle of Montevideo. The dance was put on as a specialty in Monte- video and members of the local Legion Post gladly accepted the offer of Brainard and Himle to put it or as a part of the show here. - --" - - -:, --- :- :- -*'- - 1- - "-2- --:-- :- 1,; : - .= Oscar M. Briggs, Game Warden for this district, came up fram Ortonville Sunday afternoon to post the 1921 and 1922 fishing law. D. A. Clahaugh, proprietor of the Central House at Browns Valley, brot down a party of friends and spent Sunday here fishing. The Sunny Side, the Stephney, and Golden Prairie Farmers clubs witl hold their annual picnic at Bonanza Mineral Springs on Friday, June 3. A fine program is being arranged and a good time is assurred all who attend. The heavy frost of Friday and Sat- urday did considerable damage to gar- dens and orchards. Apple and plum blossoms are apparently all ozen, and indications are that there will be very little, if any, fruit grown here .this season. Work on the dock was begun the , first part of the week and it will be ready by the end of the week to ac- commodate the launches operating on Big Stone lake. Becaase of the un- usually low water leel'it was neces- sary to build a dock 132 feet long. It is long enough to accommodate at one time four of the largest launches on Big Stone lake. COMMISSIONERS HOLD IMPORTANT SESSION (continued from page 1) and the County Attorney. The bond was approved and is to take the place of a $5,000 bond which the Clinton State bank had with the Lion Bonding Company. L. P. Zimmerman appeared before the Board at the last meeting and ten- dered his resignation as Highway En- gineer, the resignation to take effect March 1. F. W. Engdahl who made application for this position ad was recommended-by the State Highway Department was appointed to fill the vacancy at a salary of $1.75 a month. His bond amounting to $3,000 was pre- sented, and having been approved by the County Attorney was accepted. Cam.missioner Knudson presented the following'resolution "to the Board: Resolved: That the Board of Com- missioners hereby authoriges ,the pur- chase of a Workmen's Compermation Policy from the London Guarantee and Accident company, subject to its terms and provisions, to protect the liability .irl i i ,i, , ..... t, " r r v* of this county under the operation of the "Minnesota Workmen's Compensa- tion Act {Chapter No. 287 of the Gen- eral Laws of 1913, of the State of Minnesota} and any of the amend- ments thereto The application of Guy Norton for rtluction in the assessed valuation of real esta was presented to the Board and upon motion it was recommended to the State Tax Cffmmission. Minnesota Inaugurates Big Good Road Program Minnesota's good roads program the Babcock plan adopted lander Amendment No. lis being launcled in a' fair and imparti.al manner and without regard te sectional lines, fall to deserve public commendatf0, The ,first move was to fits at once and alike to of che entire 7,000-mile state trunk highways by 000,000 a year into the fund maintenance and :patrol. This plan provides on each 5 to 8 mile section a constant-duty patrolman, wh team or tractor, grader, drags and otller equipment and required crew assis- tance, to put and keep every mile smooth and in good' condition for travel at all times. , New construetion and improve- ments come next. The first list of proposed contract-lettings oontains one paving job for an 18-mile exten- sion of hard surfacing on an arterial road serving nearly oa tr the state and on which gravel surface cannot be economically and about twenty and bridge undertakings in as many scattered sections of the sttte. The estimated total f fun(Is to be availlable this year or Minnesota road work is $26,333,000. It includes more than $17,500,000 at the disposal of the counties, subject to state de- partment appr0val$5,000,0O0 bf bond money, $10,843,00{} fom local taxes, and $1,650,000 from the 1-mill levy. Funds under exclusiw control of the state department will it is expected, include $6,000,000 motor vehicle taxes and $2,84,000 of federal aid. Of the grand total, about $13,850,000 is for use on trunk high- ways and nearly $12,500,000 for later- al roads or feeders. J l DO IT IN TIME. (By Rca Proctor McGee, M. D., D. D. S., Editor Oral Hygiene.) If the ordinary processes of nature were never interfered with, it would vet be necessary to extract the tem- porary teeth. They would extract themselves at the proper time. Nor- mally the roots are absorbed as the time comes for the eruption of the permanent teeth and the crown, or business end of the tooth is left hang- ing to the gum. Some day a little extra pressure removes the baby tooth and in its place there is the tip of the cusp of the permanent tooth that follows. If this natural system was always followed, a great deal of trouble would be avoided. Unfortu- nately, many causes operate to inter- fere with ature's perfect plan. If the pe]mmnent tooth does not come directly under the temporary tooth, the absorption of the root will be either incomplete or it will fail to absorb at all. Sometimes long slivers of the temporary tooth roots are left and when the crown comes off or an attempt is made to extract, these tooth pmces are left to wedge in the process between the permanent teeth. This condition always results in inflama- tion, sometimes causes serious ab- scesses, and often interferes with the effort of the permanent tooth to take its proper place in the arch. Pieces of the roots of temporary teeth should never be left in the mouth. Temporary teeth that are abscessed should always be removed rega]tless of the age of the child. When these teeth are lost before the tiptoe for their permanent successor to take their place, a retaining appliance must be made to hold the space so that the permanent tooth will not come in the wrong place. In nearly every case it is safe to give nitrous-oxide-oxygen as an anaesthetic for children. Never al- low a child to suffer any pain if you can avoid it. Either a local or a gen- eral anaesthetic should always be given.Minnesota Public Health As- sociation Journal. IDYA . 74578 Imported Black Perch- eron Stallion; Foaled April 23, 1908; Bred by M. Leroy, department of Loir et Cher. Sire: Coco 60171, and traces back to the great Picador belonging to the French Government. Dam: Rigolette 49958 At Huffman's Barn Ortonville, Minnesota and .-. at Odessa, Minnesota TERMS--To insure standing colt, $18.00. In case mare is sold following breeding fee be- comes due and payable. C. W. Merchant, Owner Handled by Emery Von Eschen, Ortonville, Minnesota. Mill Installed After some delay in getting a motor to run the new mill we are now in a position to do any kind of grinding in the coarse flour line. We will grind your grainwheat, corn, rye and buck- wheat--as coarse or as fine as you desire, and do this for 50 cents per bushel. We will be glad to weigh out the same amount in finished product that is weighed in on our scales, less the screenings. We will also have on handier sale any of this flour and meal in bulk which we will be glad to supply our custmers who do not have the grain to grind. We also do custom grinding of feed, using two separate mills. We carry at all times a full line of flour, feed, seeds, salt blocks, and hay. If you can't find what you want in this line come to The 0rt0nville Feed Ston00 First National Bank ORTONVILLE MINNESOTA I Take Notice! The windstorm came. The buildings are gone! The necessity for protecting property own. ers against loss by windstorms, tornadoes and cyclones has again been forcibly impressed on every prudent citizen by the newspaper accounts and other advices of the terrific storm of the past few days, extending over a wide area. Loss reports are coming in by every mail. We have said it before and we say it again "Always insure and have protection" Write or telephonh if you need Insuralce. By reason or having the largest bona fide paid-in-advance subseriptiom list THE INDEPENDENT offers an attractive medium for your advertisin Try it and watch for results. Headquarters For Fishing Tackle and Outdoor Sporting Goods THE satisfaction of knowing that your tackle will stand the strain of landing that ___mlIimlmlImlMMImlinMIIMIlIIImHIHImlIIIIilIHWHii00 big pike, pickerel or muskie yours if you is v s purchase your tackle from us. Baits and i i [ lures that have been used to the best advan- _= . tage in local waters are here in great variety. ? c o E The lowest possible prices prevail here: = . s s .. $2.00 to $ }' Reels .. $2.50 t056.50 RM .8.00 .... -_--= Silk Lines 75c to $2.50 Ba00ts at Popular Pnces m " I I I IIII I I II I II --. 10th STREET AT FOURTH AVENUE MINNEAPOLIS E J D ROSS & COMPANY T he Northwst's Largest and Most Beautiful Hostelry E All Rooms art Outside and Each Room hat Private Bath raWF.  ORTONVILLE General Hardware CLINTON _  75 Rooms (Private Baths) Single at $2.00--Double $3.00 323 Rooms (Private Bathsl Single at $2.50--Double $3.50 g 200 Rcms (Private Baths) Single at $3 00--Double $4.00 g Others from $4.00 to $15.00 i PAGE 4 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT THURSDAY, MAY 19, *' .... CORRELL NEWS } $ Mrs. Baxrie sprained her ankle last Friday. Dr. Kaufman was a Con'ell caller Wednesday. Ben Swanson arrived from Arizona last Thursday. Fred Wamsley was an Appleton vis- itor Friday between trains. Mrs. John Frizzell's father arrived from Canada Tuesday night. Duncan Barr was sick with the mea- sles the first part of this week. Mrs. Melvin Olson was an Appleton caller between trains Wednesday. Charles Barrie and family motored Ltm qui Parle park last Sunday. Chas. Barrio and family, Miss Viv- ion Vaughan and Miss Irene Blum mo- ored to Appleton Wednesday. The baseball game between Correll Ind Oakridge last Sunday resulted in a 7 to 6 score in favor of Correll. Miss Scott, Miss Bernice Hudson, For(lice Hudson and Oscar Lundberg attended the class play at Odessa Fri- day night Tho class play, "The Masonic Ring, or the Adventures of a College Bride," will be given Friday evening, May 20, beginning at eight o'clock. Q I ODESSA l -,O @ Roy Rothe was an Appleton caller Monday. Fred Bohmert is painting his but- chef shop this week. W. B. Sellin was transacting busi- ness in Ortonviile Tuesday. Edwin Menzel has been spending a few days with relatives in Minneapo- lis. Rev. and Max Melinat and sons Herman and Max autoed to Orton- ville Tuesday. The business meeting of the K. L. C. E. Society was held at the church Tuesday evening. Mrs. A. M. Semrau went to Twin Brooks, S. D., to spend the week-end with Mrs. Herman Ferber. H. H. Reindl and Frank Schuett autoed to Madison on Wednesday and Thursday to attend district court. Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Buchhol and daughter Ardis of Big Stone City, S. D., were calling on friends here Fri- day evening. The Women's Missionary Society will hold their next meeting at the home of Mrs. Emilie Za]irbock on Thursday afternoon, May 26. J. C. Wanous, Miss Ella Maves and Mr. and Mrs. John Strensrad and fam- ily autoed to Renville to spend Sun- day with Mr. and Mi. Emil Swen- Roy. Emil Mueller of St. Paul ar- rived Friday to hold Quarterly Con- forego at the Evangelical church Saturday evening nd S fore- noon . ...... "Valley Farm," the play which was given by the Seniors af the Odessa high school last Friday evening at the Village Hall was well attended an!t everybody enjoyed the manner in which the play was preseed. PLEASANT VALLEY ; Cast of Cha00:acters For Legion ?hay The Ladies' Aid met at he home of Mrs. R. E. Hipple Wednesday after- noon. lasting several days. Miss Iris Wilkinson arrived Sunday from the cities to visit her sister Miss Orrie Mtmdwiler. Several ideople from Pleasant Valle attended the Song Service held at the Methodist church in Ortonville last Sunday night. The recent frosts and rain did a great deal of harm to the apple and plum blossoms, thus making the pros- lect of a good crop very doubtful. i South Gracevilh r Mr. and Mrs. Car] Skoog and :Mr. and Mrs. Billiet called at the Arnoldi hre Sunday. Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Hopman and family visited with Mr. and Mrs. Miles Vilgon Sunday. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Lennord vis- ited with Mr .and Mrs. D. Broderick and family Sunday. Patrick Johnson, Alfred Hopman, Ted Christenson and Geo. Fleming vis- ited at the Sullivan home Sunday. Barney Shearon came here Snday from his home at Stillwater to spend :a few days at the J. Sullivan home. guests  at the Chas. Gan home Sunday were Mr. ad Mrs. Edward Gau and family, Mr. and Mrs. Wie- man, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Heidecker and family, William Pedadorf and Mrs. Pedadorf. BONANZA ' ........ (3. E. Hull of Peever, S. D., spent Sunday here fishing and boating. Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Reyelts of Camp- bell, Minnesota, were visitors at Mon- anza the past week. E. H. Doe and wife of Olivia drove up last Friday and spent the week- end with their son, Lyle. Mr. Doe re- ports that they are having,more wet weather there than here. J. H. Smith had his motor launch, "Gai Boy," repaired, nicely painted, boats on Big Stone lake. Mynherr Hertogenbosch, a rich Holland farmer ............ Chas. H. Bolsta Vrouw Hertogenboscb, his wife .................................................... Paul Beck Wilhelmina, their daughter ................................................ H. N. Tragethon Hilda, their daughter ............................................................ Willard Twee Bob Yankee, American salesman .......................................... Chic Zwiener Hans, a student of music, in love with Wilhelmina .............. Earl Miller Franz, rich farmer's son, in love with Hilda ........................ J. A. Jacobsen Katrina, rich farmer's daughter .................................... Chester Pflueger Farmer's daughters: Floyd Atha, Chester Pfiueger, Raymond Loy, Walter Elms, Freeland Pratt, Kenneth Cummens. Farmer's sons: Joe Petrick, Cyrus Erickson, Raymond Gowan, Louis Lundgren, W. A. Randall, Paul Grice. ACT I Opening Chorus-- Vet Iss Ida .............................................................................. Hertogenbosch Mother Mine .................................................................................. Wilhelmina The Spider and the Fly .......................................... Vrouw Hertogenbosch There Are Others ........................................ Hilda and Franz and Chorus Its All Over Now .................................................................................... Hilda Looking for a Girl .......................................................... Franz and Chorus Fishing ...................................... Bob Yankee and Wi]helmina and Chorus In Dremmland ............................................................................................ Hans Wooden Shoes ........................................................................................ Chorus ACT II Drum Song ............ Wilhelmina, Bob Yankee, Hertogenbosch and Chorus I'll Never Speak to You Again .................. ! She,me on You ................................................. Hilda, Wi]heLmina, Vrouw A Common Game ......................................... I Lonesome, That's All .................................................................. Wilhelmina Poppies, Red and White .................................................................... Chorus A Man In Business .................................................................... Bob Yankee When I Was Young Like You ............................................ Ffertogenbosch Nothing to Do .......................................... Bob Yankee and Hertogenbosch Finale--In Dreamland and Windmills of Holland. Miss Jacobsen, Pianist. Directed by Misses Kern and Jacobsen Vaudeville Specialties will be introduced between acts, featuring "The Dance of the Nymphs," by Vaughan Brainard and Seymour Himle of Montevideo. The dance was put on as a specialty in Monte- video and members of the local Legion Post gladly accepted the offer of Brainard and Himle to put it or as a part of the show here. - --" - - -:, --- :- :- -*'- - 1- - "-2- --:-- :- 1,; : - .= Oscar M. Briggs, Game Warden for this district, came up fram Ortonville Sunday afternoon to post the 1921 and 1922 fishing law. D. A. Clahaugh, proprietor of the Central House at Browns Valley, brot down a party of friends and spent Sunday here fishing. The Sunny Side, the Stephney, and Golden Prairie Farmers clubs witl hold their annual picnic at Bonanza Mineral Springs on Friday, June 3. A fine program is being arranged and a good time is assurred all who attend. The heavy frost of Friday and Sat- urday did considerable damage to gar- dens and orchards. Apple and plum blossoms are apparently all ozen, and indications are that there will be very little, if any, fruit grown here .this season. Work on the dock was begun the , first part of the week and it will be ready by the end of the week to ac- commodate the launches operating on Big Stone lake. Becaase of the un- usually low water leel'it was neces- sary to build a dock 132 feet long. It is long enough to accommodate at one time four of the largest launches on Big Stone lake. COMMISSIONERS HOLD IMPORTANT SESSION (continued from page 1) and the County Attorney. The bond was approved and is to take the place of a $5,000 bond which the Clinton State bank had with the Lion Bonding Company. L. P. Zimmerman appeared before the Board at the last meeting and ten- dered his resignation as Highway En- gineer, the resignation to take effect March 1. F. W. Engdahl who made application for this position ad was recommended-by the State Highway Department was appointed to fill the vacancy at a salary of $1.75 a month. His bond amounting to $3,000 was pre- sented, and having been approved by the County Attorney was accepted. Cam.missioner Knudson presented the following'resolution "to the Board: Resolved: That the Board of Com- missioners hereby authoriges ,the pur- chase of a Workmen's Compermation Policy from the London Guarantee and Accident company, subject to its terms and provisions, to protect the liability .irl i i ,i, , ..... t, " r r v* of this county under the operation of the "Minnesota Workmen's Compensa- tion Act {Chapter No. 287 of the Gen- eral Laws of 1913, of the State of Minnesota} and any of the amend- ments thereto The application of Guy Norton for rtluction in the assessed valuation of real esta was presented to the Board and upon motion it was recommended to the State Tax Cffmmission. Minnesota Inaugurates Big Good Road Program Minnesota's good roads program the Babcock plan adopted lander Amendment No. lis being launcled in a' fair and imparti.al manner and without regard te sectional lines, fall to deserve public commendatf0, The ,first move was to fits at once and alike to of che entire 7,000-mile state trunk highways by 000,000 a year into the fund maintenance and :patrol. This plan provides on each 5 to 8 mile section a constant-duty patrolman, wh team or tractor, grader, drags and otller equipment and required crew assis- tance, to put and keep every mile smooth and in good' condition for travel at all times. , New construetion and improve- ments come next. The first list of proposed contract-lettings oontains one paving job for an 18-mile exten- sion of hard surfacing on an arterial road serving nearly oa tr the state and on which gravel surface cannot be economically and about twenty and bridge undertakings in as many scattered sections of the sttte. The estimated total f fun(Is to be availlable this year or Minnesota road work is $26,333,000. It includes more than $17,500,000 at the disposal of the counties, subject to state de- partment appr0val$5,000,0O0 bf bond money, $10,843,00{} fom local taxes, and $1,650,000 from the 1-mill levy. Funds under exclusiw control of the state department will it is expected, include $6,000,000 motor vehicle taxes and $2,84,000 of federal aid. Of the grand total, about $13,850,000 is for use on trunk high- ways and nearly $12,500,000 for later- al roads or feeders. J l DO IT IN TIME. (By Rca Proctor McGee, M. D., D. D. S., Editor Oral Hygiene.) If the ordinary processes of nature were never interfered with, it would vet be necessary to extract the tem- porary teeth. They would extract themselves at the proper time. Nor- mally the roots are absorbed as the time comes for the eruption of the permanent teeth and the crown, or business end of the tooth is left hang- ing to the gum. Some day a little extra pressure removes the baby tooth and in its place there is the tip of the cusp of the permanent tooth that follows. If this natural system was always followed, a great deal of trouble would be avoided. Unfortu- nately, many causes operate to inter- fere with ature's perfect plan. If the pe]mmnent tooth does not come directly under the temporary tooth, the absorption of the root will be either incomplete or it will fail to absorb at all. Sometimes long slivers of the temporary tooth roots are left and when the crown comes off or an attempt is made to extract, these tooth pmces are left to wedge in the process between the permanent teeth. This condition always results in inflama- tion, sometimes causes serious ab- scesses, and often interferes with the effort of the permanent tooth to take its proper place in the arch. Pieces of the roots of temporary teeth should never be left in the mouth. Temporary teeth that are abscessed should always be removed rega]tless of the age of the child. When these teeth are lost before the tiptoe for their permanent successor to take their place, a retaining appliance must be made to hold the space so that the permanent tooth will not come in the wrong place. In nearly every case it is safe to give nitrous-oxide-oxygen as an anaesthetic for children. Never al- low a child to suffer any pain if you can avoid it. Either a local or a gen- eral anaesthetic should always be given.Minnesota Public Health As- sociation Journal. IDYA . 74578 Imported Black Perch- eron Stallion; Foaled April 23, 1908; Bred by M. Leroy, department of Loir et Cher. Sire: Coco 60171, and traces back to the great Picador belonging to the French Government. Dam: Rigolette 49958 At Huffman's Barn Ortonville, Minnesota and .-. at Odessa, Minnesota TERMS--To insure standing colt, $18.00. In case mare is sold following breeding fee be- comes due and payable. C. W. Merchant, Owner Handled by Emery Von Eschen, Ortonville, Minnesota. Mill Installed After some delay in getting a motor to run the new mill we are now in a position to do any kind of grinding in the coarse flour line. We will grind your grainwheat, corn, rye and buck- wheat--as coarse or as fine as you desire, and do this for 50 cents per bushel. We will be glad to weigh out the same amount in finished product that is weighed in on our scales, less the screenings. We will also have on handier sale any of this flour and meal in bulk which we will be glad to supply our custmers who do not have the grain to grind. We also do custom grinding of feed, using two separate mills. We carry at all times a full line of flour, feed, seeds, salt blocks, and hay. If you can't find what you want in this line come to The 0rt0nville Feed Ston00 First National Bank ORTONVILLE MINNESOTA I Take Notice! The windstorm came. The buildings are gone! The necessity for protecting property own. ers against loss by windstorms, tornadoes and cyclones has again been forcibly impressed on every prudent citizen by the newspaper accounts and other advices of the terrific storm of the past few days, extending over a wide area. Loss reports are coming in by every mail. We have said it before and we say it again "Always insure and have protection" Write or telephonh if you need Insuralce. By reason or having the largest bona fide paid-in-advance subseriptiom list THE INDEPENDENT offers an attractive medium for your advertisin Try it and watch for results. Headquarters For Fishing Tackle and Outdoor Sporting Goods THE satisfaction of knowing that your tackle will stand the strain of landing that ___mlIimlmlImlMMImlinMIIMIlIIImHIHImlIIIIilIHWHii00 big pike, pickerel or muskie yours if you is v s purchase your tackle from us. Baits and i i [ lures that have been used to the best advan- _= . tage in local waters are here in great variety. ? c o E The lowest possible prices prevail here: = . s s .. $2.00 to $ }' Reels .. $2.50 t056.50 RM .8.00 .... -_--= Silk Lines 75c to $2.50 Ba00ts at Popular Pnces m " I I I IIII I I II I II --. 10th STREET AT FOURTH AVENUE MINNEAPOLIS E J D ROSS & COMPANY T he Northwst's Largest and Most Beautiful Hostelry E All Rooms art Outside and Each Room hat Private Bath raWF.  ORTONVILLE General Hardware CLINTON _  75 Rooms (Private Baths) Single at $2.00--Double $3.00 323 Rooms (Private Bathsl Single at $2.50--Double $3.50 g 200 Rcms (Private Baths) Single at $3 00--Double $4.00 g Others from $4.00 to $15.00 i i IM&OE@S&PERS INC &LL CONTENTCOPYRIGHTEO &LLRIOHTSRESERVEO #! , C0RRENEWS .i Mrs. Brte spread her akle last l#isy. D Klmfma was a Curtal1 Wedmmdsy. Ben Swaassn arrived fr, 1eat Thursday. Fred Wamey was an Appleton sis- tter Friday betweem tins. Mrs. John Fzttell's father arrived from Canttt Ttteeday xdgttt: ales the first part 4 this w Item. Melvin Oln was an Appleton dle betwem  Wdnesday. Jrles Battle and flmlly motored to Lee qui Pe park as Sunday. Ch Barge mzd fmniIy, Miss Viv- ha Vaughan and Mi Inne Blum mo- tored to Appleton Wedsday. The buehdl gsme betweea Coenll lind Oat=trig* last Sundy nsultod i a 7 to 6 on In favor of Ooll. lfJs Stt, MLss Bei Hudt 'ordiee Hudson and Oscsr Lundberg attettded the elms play at edema Fri- day nlgh The class play, "qe Mn Ring, the Adventuzes of a College Bride," vll be given Friday eyeing, May 2O, beglnmng at ght o'elk. .T ODESSA i loy Rothe was an Appleton Ller onday. Fred Bohmert i painting his but- shop thls wek. W. B. S#llln was trsacti busi-  in Ortonvlle Tuesday. Menzel h ben sndg a few days with nlatlves u Mnao- Rev. and Max Mlna d so eman and M autoed o Orton- ne Tesday. Th business meeung of the K. L, C. E. Soeiet was held at the church Tuesday evening. Mr A. M. Semu wt ith M. He.an Ferber H H. Relnd] Thursday to attend district eour Mr. and Mrs. H. W. zlauhtr Ardi of BI Stoe City, S, D.. wen eImg o friends day evening. The Women's Missionary Will hod heir t mtin8 t the amo o frL Emile ZahrDk o Thursday aftera, ar 2& J. C. Wanous, Miss Ella Mares and fly nthd to Reaviile to send Sm,- da* with Mr. ad MA Enl rived Fdd Villag HI w mr#body enjoyed VALLey L,lbm, Aid met at 41 home Mrs. It: nn. hmtiz the e[tin to vt bee Iffds Oie Kndwller. ttet t SO ,dmr m Ortonvill lluada) night. The meeat frets gr,t dtti of  to Ium b]otgtms, tus malting the eeg  t good (fop very dobt.fuL Seeth Gracevflle . an4 Mr & T. Hopm mJy v Mr. msd a barl,les d with MZ mf bfr& D. Ilrodekk d sml ftmd. Cast of Characters For Legion Play Mherr Hertogenboch, Vnuw Hertcgeboh, his wife ................... Paul Beck Vflhelmi, thei daughter ...................................... H. N. Tgethon , Hilda, their dughtor ...................................................... Willard Bob yanks, Hs, a student of music, Ja lu with Wilhelmlna ........... EI MiIler ', Farmer's daughters: Floyd Atha, Chester Fflueger Raymond LOy, Walter Elms, Frland Pratt, Kneth Cms. Fr's so: Joe Petrick Cys El]ekn Raymond Gan. Louis Ldgren, W. A. Rda , Pau Gri. ACT 1 Opemng Cho Vat I Idt ........................................................................ Hertogenboch The Spider d the Fly ............................... V Hertogenbah The An Othe ........................... Hilda d Frz and Chos i It Air Over Now ....................................................................... ilda Looking Fishing In Dreland ............................................................. Han wooden Shoes ......................................................... Chos ACT 11 Drum Song . Wilhelmlna, Bob Ykee, Hertogenboseh aml Chos l,]l Never Speak to You Again ......... Shame ou You ...................... Hilda, Wi]he].ina, Vrouw A Common Ge ..................................... Lonesome, That's All .................................................... Wilhelmlna Poppes, Red d White ......................................................... o A Man In Biness ........................................ Bob Ykee Wben I Was Youug Like You ........................ er togenboh Nothing to Do ........................ Bob Yankee and Hltogenboh Finalln Dreanld d Widmills of Holld. Mis Josun Pianist Directed] y Misses Ke ad Jobn Vatlevlle 3peeialties will be intndud,bewn a featuring "The Dan of thp Nymphs," by Vaughan Bzair and Seymour o Montevideo. The dance w pu on  a sety in ont video d memJors of the lol Legion Pos gladly acpted the offer of Brdinard d Hlml to put it en * a part of the shew her Oar M. Bdgg, Game Warden for e up fr Ortonville Sday ateoen to pt the 1921 and 1922 flb/ng lawa D. &. Clatn. pnpetcr of te d a part of rlends and spen unday hen fishng. The Sunny aide, te Stephey, and Golden Prairie Mmell Springs en Friday, June 8. A fie gram * being arraaged and a gd time i sued al who attend. Tho hv ft of Friday ad Sat- Apple and plum ooms  apparery al 1"un, d icUtlons am that thn will be m, frt row here Work  the dock wu ben the will be  aftheekto- petering Becse of the tin- low r lr'it w i long enough to acdate at one the largest /aehes en Bg to lake, L. P. immemn m P,md at tl last Manh I. "F. w. Engdahl y the State Highway Deptmt w s of thi eomty under the the JnK Wkalem lOn &el erat Itws of 1913, of the State of Mineta) and ay uf the end- men me. The appHtioa ef Guy Norfon for rlucion in the asssed valuaUon of nat este wa and upon motion it to the State Tax Cmison Minnesota Inaugurates Big Good ROad Program Minnsota' go roL ped fits at en OOO#O9  yar manteaae ad r trator, grader, drags equipment ad tan, to put d kep sth and in good, ndtJon tvel at all tes' New tion d "imp- ts come  Thb  st of pposed ntt-lett. wums Oace one pavig Job for an 18-mile vxten- and bridge ye mo than $17#00.000 at the dpl Resolved: That m4eslevem heby "authot , dase of a Workme#s Comp*mmoe Peliey nd 4vtt4ot, to Feeteet the IIlllt 1-r11 levy. Funds und it is eed, nelude motor veZ texes d O the Srsd  ,m bb hum ..... , ..... .... g  ' 1 t ds, at the J. Sullivan ho. ['be gtms a* the Ch. Gau hem " _/ Itmaay w Xr.. arm M. gdwarc C C V a d f=i , Mr, and Mn. W- mar' ldr" 1" HeuZT H ddecke' L /  rd,f.-Wlmam Pedador a C. E. ui o Peever, S. D., epen 8unSay bee flni md boating. Mr, and Mr IL J. Reyelts of Cp- bell. rme,ta were v1to at Mo Nhe ;urti otel | sa th pt week. . t0, STIET AT FOURTH AVeNUe . H. D atd vlfe of olivia drove MINNOLt$ = t  = spent the week- | wa with their , Lle. , Doe . Fh Northoos "s Larre*t and Mot Bautiful Ho=tlry weeter there th here. t - AIFF: ,    ,. ililifllgglIHHHiti51glHHliflflllHilfl flltiHlilflililiililifllilgiiHIlll DO IT IN TIME, (By Rea plr McGee, M. D. D, D. S. Editor Oral Hygiene.) with, it ould nsary to extrt porary teeth. They wnuld proper time. Nor- mally the root an abrbea as the of the peaneut teeth d the nwn, or blness end of the tooth is left hg- mg to the gum. Some day, a little e pnun nmovos tl baby tth d in its pl thPre is the tip cusp of the Irme th avoided. ately, my us n rate to iner- fen with tu's t pl. If the ,nt tth ds not come ditLy under the tmpor tooth, the abl at all. 8ometime ong slive of the temporm tooth o an left the cro tomes off or au attempt is made to extrt, the tooth ple are left to wedge in the betwa the" lent th. "lYis eonton always results in iama- ton, sometimes cauls erious ab- r, and ofn interfns with the its pper pl in the arch. Piec of the rts of teth should nnvor be lf in meuth. Tempora hould alws b nmon annss f the ag of the child. Whpn thee toeth an Iot befu the t for their anent sucsor to take melt pla,.e, a talnng appliance must he ma to hukl tha 1 so that the prmanent tooth will not eu in the wrong pl. In nearl every ca iti safe to give m-oxle-oxyge as  aethetc for ehfldnn. Never al- Iuw a cihl to suffer ay lLa if ynu can avokl it. Either a Inca] or a gen- eral esmene should always b glven,--Minsot Public Health A soeation Joual. I00_00YA 578 Imported Black Perch- eron Stallion: Foaled April 23, 1908; Bred by M. Leroy, dcpartment of Loir et Chef. Sire: Coo 60171, a tras bk  the n Picador belongin to the French Gnvemen Dam: Rigolette 49958 At Huffman's Barn' Or tonville, Minnesota and at Odessa, Mitmesota T]RMS--To /nsun standing sold following bnedig f be- comes df d payable, C. W. Mehant, Owner Handled by Emery Veto Eschen, Or tenvifle, Minnesota. Mill Installed After some delay in getting a motor to run the new mill we are now in a position to do any kind of griading in the coarse flour line. We will grind your grain wheat, corn. rye and buck- wheat--as coarse or as fine as you desire, and do this for 50 cents per bushel. We will be glad to weigh out the same amount in finished product that is weighed in on our scales, less the screenings. We will also have on handfor sale any of this flour and meal in bulk which we will be glad to supply our custmers who do rot have the grain to grind. We also do custom grinding of feed, using two separate mills. We carry at all times a full line of flour, feed, seeds, sMt blocks, and hay. If you can't find what you want in this line come to The 0rtonville Feed Store First National Bank ORTONVILLE MINNISOTA Take Notice! The windstorrn came. The buildings are gone! The necessity for protecting property owr ers against loss by windstorms, tornado and cyclones has again been forcibly mpressed on very prudent dtizen by the newspaper accounts and other advices of the terrific storm of the , past few days extending over a wide area. Loss ! *eporte are coming in by every mail. We have said it before and we say it again "Always insure and have protection." Write or telephon if you need Insurance. lltamlwatdtfertualt Headquarters For Fishing Tackle and Outdoor Sporting Goods rIHE satisfaction Of knowing that your Jt tackle will stand the strain of landing that big pike, pickerel or muskie is yours if you purchase your tackle from us. Baits and lures that have been used to the best advan- tage in local waters are here,in great variety. The lowest possible prices" prevail here: Reels.. $2.0 t0-$630 Rods.. $2.00 to $8.00 Silk Lines 75c to $2,o0 Baits at Puhr Prices J. D. ROSS &" COMPANY ORTONVILLE General Her dwm'e CLINTON PAGE 4 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT THURSDAY, MAY 19, *' .... CORRELL NEWS } $ Mrs. Baxrie sprained her ankle last Friday. Dr. Kaufman was a Con'ell caller Wednesday. Ben Swanson arrived from Arizona last Thursday. Fred Wamsley was an Appleton vis- itor Friday between trains. Mrs. John Frizzell's father arrived from Canada Tuesday night. Duncan Barr was sick with the mea- sles the first part of this week. Mrs. Melvin Olson was an Appleton caller between trains Wednesday. Charles Barrie and family motored Ltm qui Parle park last Sunday. Chas. Barrio and family, Miss Viv- ion Vaughan and Miss Irene Blum mo- ored to Appleton Wednesday. The baseball game between Correll Ind Oakridge last Sunday resulted in a 7 to 6 score in favor of Correll. Miss Scott, Miss Bernice Hudson, For(lice Hudson and Oscar Lundberg attended the class play at Odessa Fri- day night Tho class play, "The Masonic Ring, or the Adventures of a College Bride," will be given Friday evening, May 20, beginning at eight o'clock. Q I ODESSA l -,O @ Roy Rothe was an Appleton caller Monday. Fred Bohmert is painting his but- chef shop this week. W. B. Sellin was transacting busi- ness in Ortonviile Tuesday. Edwin Menzel has been spending a few days with relatives in Minneapo- lis. Rev. and Max Melinat and sons Herman and Max autoed to Orton- ville Tuesday. The business meeting of the K. L. C. E. Society was held at the church Tuesday evening. Mrs. A. M. Semrau went to Twin Brooks, S. D., to spend the week-end with Mrs. Herman Ferber. H. H. Reindl and Frank Schuett autoed to Madison on Wednesday and Thursday to attend district court. Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Buchhol and daughter Ardis of Big Stone City, S. D., were calling on friends here Fri- day evening. The Women's Missionary Society will hold their next meeting at the home of Mrs. Emilie Za]irbock on Thursday afternoon, May 26. J. C. Wanous, Miss Ella Maves and Mr. and Mrs. John Strensrad and fam- ily autoed to Renville to spend Sun- day with Mr. and Mi. Emil Swen- Roy. Emil Mueller of St. Paul ar- rived Friday to hold Quarterly Con- forego at the Evangelical church Saturday evening nd S fore- noon . ...... "Valley Farm," the play which was given by the Seniors af the Odessa high school last Friday evening at the Village Hall was well attended an!t everybody enjoyed the manner in which the play was preseed. PLEASANT VALLEY ; Cast of Cha00:acters For Legion ?hay The Ladies' Aid met at he home of Mrs. R. E. Hipple Wednesday after- noon. lasting several days. Miss Iris Wilkinson arrived Sunday from the cities to visit her sister Miss Orrie Mtmdwiler. Several ideople from Pleasant Valle attended the Song Service held at the Methodist church in Ortonville last Sunday night. The recent frosts and rain did a great deal of harm to the apple and plum blossoms, thus making the pros- lect of a good crop very doubtful. i South Gracevilh r Mr. and Mrs. Car] Skoog and :Mr. and Mrs. Billiet called at the Arnoldi hre Sunday. Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Hopman and family visited with Mr. and Mrs. Miles Vilgon Sunday. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Lennord vis- ited with Mr .and Mrs. D. Broderick and family Sunday. Patrick Johnson, Alfred Hopman, Ted Christenson and Geo. Fleming vis- ited at the Sullivan home Sunday. Barney Shearon came here Snday from his home at Stillwater to spend :a few days at the J. Sullivan home. guests  at the Chas. Gan home Sunday were Mr. ad Mrs. Edward Gau and family, Mr. and Mrs. Wie- man, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Heidecker and family, William Pedadorf and Mrs. Pedadorf. BONANZA ' ........ (3. E. Hull of Peever, S. D., spent Sunday here fishing and boating. Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Reyelts of Camp- bell, Minnesota, were visitors at Mon- anza the past week. E. H. Doe and wife of Olivia drove up last Friday and spent the week- end with their son, Lyle. Mr. Doe re- ports that they are having,more wet weather there than here. J. H. Smith had his motor launch, "Gai Boy," repaired, nicely painted, boats on Big Stone lake. Mynherr Hertogenbosch, a rich Holland farmer ............ Chas. H. Bolsta Vrouw Hertogenboscb, his wife .................................................... Paul Beck Wilhelmina, their daughter ................................................ H. N. Tragethon Hilda, their daughter ............................................................ Willard Twee Bob Yankee, American salesman .......................................... Chic Zwiener Hans, a student of music, in love with Wilhelmina .............. Earl Miller Franz, rich farmer's son, in love with Hilda ........................ J. A. Jacobsen Katrina, rich farmer's daughter .................................... Chester Pflueger Farmer's daughters: Floyd Atha, Chester Pfiueger, Raymond Loy, Walter Elms, Freeland Pratt, Kenneth Cummens. Farmer's sons: Joe Petrick, Cyrus Erickson, Raymond Gowan, Louis Lundgren, W. A. Randall, Paul Grice. ACT I Opening Chorus-- Vet Iss Ida .............................................................................. Hertogenbosch Mother Mine .................................................................................. Wilhelmina The Spider and the Fly .......................................... Vrouw Hertogenbosch There Are Others ........................................ Hilda and Franz and Chorus Its All Over Now .................................................................................... Hilda Looking for a Girl .......................................................... Franz and Chorus Fishing ...................................... Bob Yankee and Wi]helmina and Chorus In Dremmland ............................................................................................ Hans Wooden Shoes ........................................................................................ Chorus ACT II Drum Song ............ Wilhelmina, Bob Yankee, Hertogenbosch and Chorus I'll Never Speak to You Again .................. ! She,me on You ................................................. Hilda, Wi]heLmina, Vrouw A Common Game ......................................... I Lonesome, That's All .................................................................. Wilhelmina Poppies, Red and White .................................................................... Chorus A Man In Business .................................................................... Bob Yankee When I Was Young Like You ............................................ Ffertogenbosch Nothing to Do .......................................... Bob Yankee and Hertogenbosch Finale--In Dreamland and Windmills of Holland. Miss Jacobsen, Pianist. Directed by Misses Kern and Jacobsen Vaudeville Specialties will be introduced between acts, featuring "The Dance of the Nymphs," by Vaughan Brainard and Seymour Himle of Montevideo. The dance was put on as a specialty in Monte- video and members of the local Legion Post gladly accepted the offer of Brainard and Himle to put it or as a part of the show here. - --" - - -:, --- :- :- -*'- - 1- - "-2- --:-- :- 1,; : - .= Oscar M. Briggs, Game Warden for this district, came up fram Ortonville Sunday afternoon to post the 1921 and 1922 fishing law. D. A. Clahaugh, proprietor of the Central House at Browns Valley, brot down a party of friends and spent Sunday here fishing. The Sunny Side, the Stephney, and Golden Prairie Farmers clubs witl hold their annual picnic at Bonanza Mineral Springs on Friday, June 3. A fine program is being arranged and a good time is assurred all who attend. The heavy frost of Friday and Sat- urday did considerable damage to gar- dens and orchards. Apple and plum blossoms are apparently all ozen, and indications are that there will be very little, if any, fruit grown here .this season. Work on the dock was begun the , first part of the week and it will be ready by the end of the week to ac- commodate the launches operating on Big Stone lake. Becaase of the un- usually low water leel'it was neces- sary to build a dock 132 feet long. It is long enough to accommodate at one time four of the largest launches on Big Stone lake. COMMISSIONERS HOLD IMPORTANT SESSION (continued from page 1) and the County Attorney. The bond was approved and is to take the place of a $5,000 bond which the Clinton State bank had with the Lion Bonding Company. L. P. Zimmerman appeared before the Board at the last meeting and ten- dered his resignation as Highway En- gineer, the resignation to take effect March 1. F. W. Engdahl who made application for this position ad was recommended-by the State Highway Department was appointed to fill the vacancy at a salary of $1.75 a month. His bond amounting to $3,000 was pre- sented, and having been approved by the County Attorney was accepted. Cam.missioner Knudson presented the following'resolution "to the Board: Resolved: That the Board of Com- missioners hereby authoriges ,the pur- chase of a Workmen's Compermation Policy from the London Guarantee and Accident company, subject to its terms and provisions, to protect the liability .irl i i ,i, , ..... t, " r r v* of this county under the operation of the "Minnesota Workmen's Compensa- tion Act {Chapter No. 287 of the Gen- eral Laws of 1913, of the State of Minnesota} and any of the amend- ments thereto The application of Guy Norton for rtluction in the assessed valuation of real esta was presented to the Board and upon motion it was recommended to the State Tax Cffmmission. Minnesota Inaugurates Big Good Road Program Minnesota's good roads program the Babcock plan adopted lander Amendment No. lis being launcled in a' fair and imparti.al manner and without regard te sectional lines, fall to deserve public commendatf0, The ,first move was to fits at once and alike to of che entire 7,000-mile state trunk highways by 000,000 a year into the fund maintenance and :patrol. This plan provides on each 5 to 8 mile section a constant-duty patrolman, wh team or tractor, grader, drags and otller equipment and required crew assis- tance, to put and keep every mile smooth and in good' condition for travel at all times. , New construetion and improve- ments come next. The first list of proposed contract-lettings oontains one paving job for an 18-mile exten- sion of hard surfacing on an arterial road serving nearly oa tr the state and on which gravel surface cannot be economically and about twenty and bridge undertakings in as many scattered sections of the sttte. The estimated total f fun(Is to be availlable this year or Minnesota road work is $26,333,000. It includes more than $17,500,000 at the disposal of the counties, subject to state de- partment appr0val$5,000,0O0 bf bond money, $10,843,00{} fom local taxes, and $1,650,000 from the 1-mill levy. Funds under exclusiw control of the state department will it is expected, include $6,000,000 motor vehicle taxes and $2,84,000 of federal aid. Of the grand total, about $13,850,000 is for use on trunk high- ways and nearly $12,500,000 for later- al roads or feeders. J l DO IT IN TIME. (By Rca Proctor McGee, M. D., D. D. S., Editor Oral Hygiene.) If the ordinary processes of nature were never interfered with, it would vet be necessary to extract the tem- porary teeth. They would extract themselves at the proper time. Nor- mally the roots are absorbed as the time comes for the eruption of the permanent teeth and the crown, or business end of the tooth is left hang- ing to the gum. Some day a little extra pressure removes the baby tooth and in its place there is the tip of the cusp of the permanent tooth that follows. If this natural system was always followed, a great deal of trouble would be avoided. Unfortu- nately, many causes operate to inter- fere with ature's perfect plan. If the pe]mmnent tooth does not come directly under the temporary tooth, the absorption of the root will be either incomplete or it will fail to absorb at all. Sometimes long slivers of the temporary tooth roots are left and when the crown comes off or an attempt is made to extract, these tooth pmces are left to wedge in the process between the permanent teeth. This condition always results in inflama- tion, sometimes causes serious ab- scesses, and often interferes with the effort of the permanent tooth to take its proper place in the arch. Pieces of the roots of temporary teeth should never be left in the mouth. Temporary teeth that are abscessed should always be removed rega]tless of the age of the child. When these teeth are lost before the tiptoe for their permanent successor to take their place, a retaining appliance must be made to hold the space so that the permanent tooth will not come in the wrong place. In nearly every case it is safe to give nitrous-oxide-oxygen as an anaesthetic for children. Never al- low a child to suffer any pain if you can avoid it. Either a local or a gen- eral anaesthetic should always be given.Minnesota Public Health As- sociation Journal. IDYA . 74578 Imported Black Perch- eron Stallion; Foaled April 23, 1908; Bred by M. Leroy, department of Loir et Cher. Sire: Coco 60171, and traces back to the great Picador belonging to the French Government. Dam: Rigolette 49958 At Huffman's Barn Ortonville, Minnesota and .-. at Odessa, Minnesota TERMS--To insure standing colt, $18.00. In case mare is sold following breeding fee be- comes due and payable. C. W. Merchant, Owner Handled by Emery Von Eschen, Ortonville, Minnesota. Mill Installed After some delay in getting a motor to run the new mill we are now in a position to do any kind of grinding in the coarse flour line. We will grind your grainwheat, corn, rye and buck- wheat--as coarse or as fine as you desire, and do this for 50 cents per bushel. We will be glad to weigh out the same amount in finished product that is weighed in on our scales, less the screenings. We will also have on handier sale any of this flour and meal in bulk which we will be glad to supply our custmers who do not have the grain to grind. We also do custom grinding of feed, using two separate mills. We carry at all times a full line of flour, feed, seeds, salt blocks, and hay. If you can't find what you want in this line come to The 0rt0nville Feed Ston00 First National Bank ORTONVILLE MINNESOTA I Take Notice! The windstorm came. The buildings are gone! The necessity for protecting property own. ers against loss by windstorms, tornadoes and cyclones has again been forcibly impressed on every prudent citizen by the newspaper accounts and other advices of the terrific storm of the past few days, extending over a wide area. Loss reports are coming in by every mail. We have said it before and we say it again "Always insure and have protection" Write or telephonh if you need Insuralce. By reason or having the largest bona fide paid-in-advance subseriptiom list THE INDEPENDENT offers an attractive medium for your advertisin Try it and watch for results. Headquarters For Fishing Tackle and Outdoor Sporting Goods THE satisfaction of knowing that your tackle will stand the strain of landing that ___mlIimlmlImlMMImlinMIIMIlIIImHIHImlIIIIilIHWHii00 big pike, pickerel or muskie yours if you is v s purchase your tackle from us. Baits and i i [ lures that have been used to the best advan- _= . tage in local waters are here in great variety. ? c o E The lowest possible prices prevail here: = . s s .. $2.00 to $ }' Reels .. $2.50 t056.50 RM .8.00 .... -_--= Silk Lines 75c to $2.50 Ba00ts at Popular Pnces m " I I I IIII I I II I II --. 10th STREET AT FOURTH AVENUE MINNEAPOLIS E J D ROSS & COMPANY T he Northwst's Largest and Most Beautiful Hostelry E All Rooms art Outside and Each Room hat Private Bath raWF.  ORTONVILLE General Hardware CLINTON _  75 Rooms (Private Baths) Single at $2.00--Double $3.00 323 Rooms (Private Bathsl Single at $2.50--Double $3.50 g 200 Rcms (Private Baths) Single at $3 00--Double $4.00 g Others from $4.00 to $15.00 i