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Ortonville, Minnesota
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May 19, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
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1 MAY 19, I921 " THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE 7 i i i i i ,i i i i i i i i ii ii, " Extra good growth of musk melonv ........ , ................. ;. @ The Farmers Corner DEVOTED ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF FARMERS AND FARMER&apos;S CLUBS. Highland Farmers Club. a ton--was used. Two rates of ap- There will lie a regular meeting of plication were employed, the light one Highland Farmers Club at the being 400 to 500 pounds and the heavy School on Saturday evening one 800 to 1,000 pounds. this week. An interesting program t In most cases the fertilizer was ap- been arranged. Everybocly is in-[ plied in the row by using u potato ] to attend. [planter with fertilizer attachment, ..... [ but' where this machine was not avail- |rARE HIGH AND LOW I able the furrows were opened with an PRICES OF FARM PRODUCTS] ordinary planter, from which the coy- - • ]ering disks had been removed, the The average price received by pro- fertilizer scattered by hand along the ducers of the United States for hogs bottom of the row and covered with a mundsluring forAprilthefellfirstbel°wtime since$8 perMarch,100 shallow layer of soil; then using the L916, according to a report by the United States Department of Agri- mlture. The average price for April reached the low mark of $7.86. The ighest price reached at any time was turing August, 1919, when the aver- ge was $19.30 per 100 pounds. Prices dvanced more or less steadily from • 6 to 1919, then took a rather rapid rop. dung the latter part of 1919. ,urmg 1920 the average price for each month was between $13 and $14 boutantil December,s11. when it dropped to The price of Wool in April was be- aw 18 cents, whichis the lowest since ay, 1912. In March and April, 1918, he average price of wool was 60 eats a pound. LLANT STRAWBERRY 1 BED EVERY YEAR R , • S. Mackintosh, horticulturist with :! he extension division at Univermty ys it is a good plan to arrrn set out an • , says it is a good alan to set t an everbearing straw: - , . % . ms bed should not be ke t rang in a 1- c .... P a .... v e oecause oI me sr o injury from the strawberry ev:' he says, "and it will be easier v me beds free from grass and e.eds by changing their location oc- mlonahy. Set the plants early in ,e spring in rows three to five ,feet art and the plants from 12rtubs I ches apart. Keep the flowe ked off until about the first of July. rm the end of.July until thetf:et ills the fruit, which was not uu " .tter part of October last year, the rower Will be in a position to enjoy Xawberries and cream and straw- shortcake nearly every day. beds should be well fer- With fine stable manure and Ints should be kept well wa- GRAIN EARLY TO SKIMMILK CALF calves are changed from they are ready to Small amounts of grain, be placed before them Or if they the m stanchions for milk feed- Can be put in the man- are released. Just a is all the calf will only as much should the animal will clean up. ;:rn is very palatable, and =u alone or in combination grains such as ground oats, soa oil meal. It some- ps to get the calf started on PUtting a small mount on .and muzzle when the empty is taken away. This also thOeP to sucking the ears of the next tie. After the young tapPetite for grain has in- he corn and oats can be fed many feeders continue to ground grain. good grain mixture to feed to calves is made up of 500 of ground corn, 300 pounds or Whole oats, and 100 pounds oil meal. also be placed before he time in a small rack. mixed clover and timo- [fa hay not too leafy, are start in grain and hay in- proper development of the planter with the disks replaced, the potatoes were put in the rows. The soils on which the trials were carried out were mostly sandy Icarus. The cost of the fertilizer for each bushel increase ranged from 18 cents to $1.77, with an average of 36 cents per bushel with the light application and of 51 cents a bushel with the heavy application. Excessive rainfall in the early part of 1920 and a prolonged drouth in the latter part served to reduce the in- crease in yield and consequently o raise the cost of the fertilizer for each bushel increase. SWAT AND TRAP THE FLIES Swat and trap now when the swatting trapping will do the most good. flies are those which have over and will propagate the flies thru the summer. "Trapping is more at any other time," Riley, of University the catch may be mole but it will make little stun on the total number. tion of bait is important. effective is cheap molasses di three parts of water and ferment. Next to thig is r use of fish and decayed mistake, as they attract other of flies and are not especially .as lures." Orchard and Garden Keep out all weeds before they started. It is easier and cheaper. I]ahlias may be set now. They quire cool moist weather for best de- velopment, ,So early fall as a rule gives best flowers. Geraniums and other bedding plants may be put out now. 'Many annuals may be moved to permanent quarters . Make at !east three different plant- ings of gladiolus in the garden. There are few better flowers for all pur- poses. Keep flowers of everbearing straw- berries picked until about July first. Stronger plants will result, giving more fruit in the fall. i may be had by putting a bushel or so of well rotted ,manure in the bottom of each hill. Plenty of water during" warm dry weather lso helps. ] MARKET LETTER Tuesday's Closing-- Cattle 1,900. Market closed steady, undertone on beef steers weak. Calves. 2,600. Market mostly 50c higher, best lights to packers $7.50. Hogs 8,500. Mar- ket closed about steady. Bulk $7.75 to $8.00, top $8.25, best pigs $8.75. Sheep 600. Market steady to firm. South St. Paul, Minn., May 17, 1921: Altho the market on beef steers car- ried a weak undertow, trading on opening days of the we-ek was mostly on a steady basis. Tuesday's trade was featured by the arrival of a gen- erous supply of steers of a good beef grade. Several loads cashed to pack- ers and Mineral Point feeder buyers at $8.50, with numerous lots at $8.00 and $8.25. Practically all of the com- mon and meditv beef steers sold from $8.00odown to $7.00, with very few as low as $6.50. Strictly choice fed heifers are quotable up to $8.25 or better. Packers purchased a lot of ten strictly choice cows at $7.50. Butcher she stock is relatively scarce, selling fully steady, bulk going from $5.00 to $7.00. Canner and cutter cows have remained fairly stable, sell- ing largely from $2.00 to $4.50. Bo- logna bulls *at mostly $4.50 to $5.00, extreme top $5.25. Best light veals $7.50, a few selected lots $8.04). De- sirable heavy feeder steers sell large- ly from $7.00 to $8.00, stockers under 750 pounds $6.00 to $7.00. Hog trade held mostly steady Tues- day, range $7.00 to $8.25, bulk $7.75 to $8.00, bulk desirable pigs $8.75 Sheep and lamb trade is on a strong basis, best clipped lambs Monday $10.85, clipped 111 pound yearling wethers $8.50 Tuesday. The youngster had started to tool for the first time after he cme St. Petersburg. The neighbor boy the secomt grade took him and as a as Billy got home at noon his .her was all interest to know how liked going to school in Florida. Did you like it, dear?" she asked minute he came into the room. No," he returned shortly. Nhy, what's the matter dear, 't you have a nice teacher ?" came second question. to, she don't know nothin'. Why, asked more questions than our sister." "Look here, Eben," demanded the farmer's wife, angrily "here you went and sold the cow yesterday, and new you say you haven't any money. What did you spend it on ?" "I declare Amelia," replied her hus- band meekly. "I'm darn sorry, but I just went into a estaurant and blew it all in for a befsteak." Fine wedding stationery and call- in[ cards at the Independent. iwl H i 'Poultry! Eggs! Bring your Produce to' TRAcY-SHUMAK[R (OMPANY Fair Treatment Correct Weights Right Prices of the young animal, CREAM Today 24c RTILI O-  TRIED UT IN EIGHT COUNTIES - - - fertilizers used in s male in 1920 by the univevsit, '.ent of agricu'lture, co.oper   ' . . ]p ';:" eomthe American Agricultural There s More Real Safistaction nen':P°t**- Sherh,.__..,,, ,santigr°wersPany', Mlllein'°n Anoka,theLacs,fieldSotter.Clay,°f '---- ..,__ #'°"s the Good Judge easen :rne, and Wadena counties, n at2  yield from 25 to 54 bush- In a little of the Real To- ? When the application was [l'i:d 19 to 136 bushels when the bacco Chew, than you ever fef"aS.rlzerammonia, 3heavily applied. A 3- / out of er cent 3 -.- , .to per cent, and pot- The good rmh taste, lasts so i Phoric act n , P , • i f_ Which now costs $48  , long you don't need a fresh t chew nearly as often--that's pay the following why it costs you less to chew to $10.00 per ton and heavy Brass,4¢ to 8c lwed. cent per pound. and Tires,  cent cent Per Imtmd. Brass Ooed Hose carried in Wel4ing. this chss oi tobacco. Any man who ,uses the Real Tobacco Chew will tell you W-B CUT is a long fine-cut tobacco ..... :KIGHT CUT is a short-out to WATKIN'S PRODUCTS IIIII 11 llllll III I II J J III III i ii i lili illlil li i illili ]1 i I i The Watkin's man is on the road now and will call at your place soon with a complete line of this famous and well-known goods. i Hiii Hit i i i i li i i t J. FREMMING Watkin's Retailer. Salt Barrel Salt . .. Pressed Blocks $3.50 .75 Twine Minnesota Prison Twine, per lb...12/ IF IN NEED OF TWINE Get In Your Orders At Once i:drmers [lev00t0[ & [uel (o. P Ship and Sail under the Stars and Stripes to all parts of the world OU can now travel, or ship your goods, to any par of the world on American owned and American operated ships, flying the American Flag. American ships are modern, scientifically designed and constructed, new ships built for satiactory service. American ships will car you in comfort to South America, Effgland, urope, the Mediter- ranean and the Far East. And the further from home you go, the more of a thrill you'll have to see the Stars and Stripes floating above your head. , President Hard{ng says: "We know full well we cannot sell where we do not buy and we cannot sell successfully tvhere we do not carry." | Operators of Passenger Services TM dmlral Line Pacific Mall & S. Co. 17 State St. New York, N.Y. 45 Broadway. New York. '. . Seattle to Yokohama, Kobe, Seattle to Yokohama, Ko Hongkon, Shanshai, Singa- Hongkong, Shanghai0 Singa- pore. and occasionally to pore, Tientsin. and" occasion- Manila and Hawaii. ally to Mallla and HawldL Mateen Navigation Co. U, S. Mall S. S. Co. q So. Gay St.. Baltimore, Md. 45 Broadway, New York, '. r. Baltimore to Havana, Pan- ama Canal, Los Angeles. Sa New York to Boulogne an4 Francisco, and HawaiL London. New York to Bre- men and Danzig. Emierant Muneen Steam Ship Line trvlce to Genoa and Naplk 8 . Beaver St., New York Ward Line New York to Rio de Jarto, Montivideo. and Buenos (New York and Cuba Mail 8. ![. Aires. Co.) Foot of Wall St., NeW York, N. Y, NeW York and Porto Rico S. k qew York to Havana and Co. Spanish porte Viao, La 11 Broadway, t4ew York, lq. Y. Ootmna, 8|mtmdr, ljel New York to Porto Rtc¢ Bilbao, Free Use of ' For Sale c _ouippingFdmsBOard Steel and Wood Ships and Wood Hulls add Vs. o Shppln e,. =olon Ocean - Going Tup picture films of four reds free on request o ay mayor. (To Am,la Cis Oy) postmaster, pastor or organi- eetion. An tntesting edu- Steel staamr6 m both oil eatlond picture of ships and and coal burnm. the sea. Write for Informs- Further Information may ba tton to H. Ius, Director obtained by requt snt to Ialormation Bureau, Boom the 8hip  Dlvldoa, 1|11} 911. la19. "P" Street I. W. "I 8ta.e N. W Wuhtnt- Washltton. D, C. tea. D. C For sailinp of frelSht ship to all parts of the world, write Division  Operations, Traffic Professional and Business Directory C. E. SIGLOH [or [xpert W,R,00O REPAIRING Phone 284-L Ortonville, Minn, e JOE BAYER & SON Of the Ortonville Tailoring Co. All kinds of cleaning and pressing neatly done. Suits Made to Order. Ortonville, Minn. @ JOHN SPANYERS Light Hauling of all Kinds Express and Baggage Telephone 287 Ortonville, Minr PAUL DIRNBAUER Brick Layer and Plasterer Stone Mason and All Kinds of Cement Work. Ortonville, Minn. R.F.D. k PETERSON & SON Dray Line Big Stone Lake Ice Phone 38 Ortonville, Minn ARTAH PUDER All Kinds of Plastering and Stucco Work. Big Stone City, S. Dak. Kodak [ PRINTING ENLARGING Prompt, Quality Service, Moderate Prices. THE REED STUDIO Ortonville Minn. DR. R. D. RIFENBARK OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN One block uphill fram Gunderson's Drug Store Vapor-Sulphur Cabinet Treatments (For rheumatism, nJuritis, etc.) @ F. L. BROWN THE JEWELER Ortonv.ille, Minnesota FOR TRUCK SERVICE and any kind of light and heavy draying Hausauer Bros. PHONE 268 All Orders Given Prompt Attention A. B. KAERCHER Attorney at Law Odd Fellows Building Ortonville, Mnn. DR. F. W. DUNN. Chiropractor ORTONVILLE, MINN. Xray Spinographical Laboratory 12-13-14-15-16 Shumaker Bldg. Col. Wm. Wellendorf AUCTIONEER 30 years' experience. No practic- ing on your property. Call or write me early and get in on an early date. Ortonville, Minnesota J. A. JOHNSON PIANO TUNING AND REPAIRING PHONES--Residence . 194 Furniture Store  88 All 'Work Guaranteed OrtonviIle, Minnesota. WILL FINCH Experienced Painter Phone 235-L All Work Guaranteed JOI-IN MALMQUIST Interior Decorating and Artistic Sign Painting Phone 226-I< Ortonville, Minnesota. . Ortonvill Minn. ELMER SALSBURY fHE WELL DIGGER  Fifteen Years' Exlviel R, F.D. % 1 MAY 19, I921 " THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE 7 i i i i i ,i i i i i i i i ii ii, " Extra good growth of musk melonv ........ , ................. ;. @ The Farmers Corner DEVOTED ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF FARMERS AND FARMER'S CLUBS. Highland Farmers Club. a ton--was used. Two rates of ap- There will lie a regular meeting of plication were employed, the light one Highland Farmers Club at the being 400 to 500 pounds and the heavy School on Saturday evening one 800 to 1,000 pounds. this week. An interesting program t In most cases the fertilizer was ap- been arranged. Everybocly is in-[ plied in the row by using u potato ] to attend. [planter with fertilizer attachment, ..... [ but' where this machine was not avail- |rARE HIGH AND LOW I able the furrows were opened with an PRICES OF FARM PRODUCTS] ordinary planter, from which the coy- - • ]ering disks had been removed, the The average price received by pro- fertilizer scattered by hand along the ducers of the United States for hogs bottom of the row and covered with a mundsluring forAprilthefellfirstbel°wtime since$8 perMarch,100 shallow layer of soil; then using the L916, according to a report by the United States Department of Agri- mlture. The average price for April reached the low mark of $7.86. The ighest price reached at any time was turing August, 1919, when the aver- ge was $19.30 per 100 pounds. Prices dvanced more or less steadily from • 6 to 1919, then took a rather rapid rop. dung the latter part of 1919. ,urmg 1920 the average price for each month was between $13 and $14 boutantil December,s11. when it dropped to The price of Wool in April was be- aw 18 cents, whichis the lowest since ay, 1912. In March and April, 1918, he average price of wool was 60 eats a pound. LLANT STRAWBERRY 1 BED EVERY YEAR R , • S. Mackintosh, horticulturist with :! he extension division at Univermty ys it is a good plan to arrrn set out an • , says it is a good alan to set t an everbearing straw: - , . % . ms bed should not be ke t rang in a 1- c .... P a .... v e oecause oI me sr o injury from the strawberry ev:' he says, "and it will be easier v me beds free from grass and e.eds by changing their location oc- mlonahy. Set the plants early in ,e spring in rows three to five ,feet art and the plants from 12rtubs I ches apart. Keep the flowe ked off until about the first of July. rm the end of.July until thetf:et ills the fruit, which was not uu " .tter part of October last year, the rower Will be in a position to enjoy Xawberries and cream and straw- shortcake nearly every day. beds should be well fer- With fine stable manure and Ints should be kept well wa- GRAIN EARLY TO SKIMMILK CALF calves are changed from they are ready to Small amounts of grain, be placed before them Or if they the m stanchions for milk feed- Can be put in the man- are released. Just a is all the calf will only as much should the animal will clean up. ;:rn is very palatable, and =u alone or in combination grains such as ground oats, soa oil meal. It some- ps to get the calf started on PUtting a small mount on .and muzzle when the empty is taken away. This also thOeP to sucking the ears of the next tie. After the young tapPetite for grain has in- he corn and oats can be fed many feeders continue to ground grain. good grain mixture to feed to calves is made up of 500 of ground corn, 300 pounds or Whole oats, and 100 pounds oil meal. also be placed before he time in a small rack. mixed clover and timo- [fa hay not too leafy, are start in grain and hay in- proper development of the planter with the disks replaced, the potatoes were put in the rows. The soils on which the trials were carried out were mostly sandy Icarus. The cost of the fertilizer for each bushel increase ranged from 18 cents to $1.77, with an average of 36 cents per bushel with the light application and of 51 cents a bushel with the heavy application. Excessive rainfall in the early part of 1920 and a prolonged drouth in the latter part served to reduce the in- crease in yield and consequently o raise the cost of the fertilizer for each bushel increase. SWAT AND TRAP THE FLIES Swat and trap now when the swatting trapping will do the most good. flies are those which have over and will propagate the flies thru the summer. "Trapping is more at any other time," Riley, of University the catch may be mole but it will make little stun on the total number. tion of bait is important. effective is cheap molasses di three parts of water and ferment. Next to thig is r use of fish and decayed mistake, as they attract other of flies and are not especially .as lures." Orchard and Garden Keep out all weeds before they started. It is easier and cheaper. I]ahlias may be set now. They quire cool moist weather for best de- velopment, ,So early fall as a rule gives best flowers. Geraniums and other bedding plants may be put out now. 'Many annuals may be moved to permanent quarters . Make at !east three different plant- ings of gladiolus in the garden. There are few better flowers for all pur- poses. Keep flowers of everbearing straw- berries picked until about July first. Stronger plants will result, giving more fruit in the fall. i may be had by putting a bushel or so of well rotted ,manure in the bottom of each hill. Plenty of water during" warm dry weather lso helps. ] MARKET LETTER Tuesday's Closing-- Cattle 1,900. Market closed steady, undertone on beef steers weak. Calves. 2,600. Market mostly 50c higher, best lights to packers $7.50. Hogs 8,500. Mar- ket closed about steady. Bulk $7.75 to $8.00, top $8.25, best pigs $8.75. Sheep 600. Market steady to firm. South St. Paul, Minn., May 17, 1921: Altho the market on beef steers car- ried a weak undertow, trading on opening days of the we-ek was mostly on a steady basis. Tuesday's trade was featured by the arrival of a gen- erous supply of steers of a good beef grade. Several loads cashed to pack- ers and Mineral Point feeder buyers at $8.50, with numerous lots at $8.00 and $8.25. Practically all of the com- mon and meditv beef steers sold from $8.00odown to $7.00, with very few as low as $6.50. Strictly choice fed heifers are quotable up to $8.25 or better. Packers purchased a lot of ten strictly choice cows at $7.50. Butcher she stock is relatively scarce, selling fully steady, bulk going from $5.00 to $7.00. Canner and cutter cows have remained fairly stable, sell- ing largely from $2.00 to $4.50. Bo- logna bulls *at mostly $4.50 to $5.00, extreme top $5.25. Best light veals $7.50, a few selected lots $8.04). De- sirable heavy feeder steers sell large- ly from $7.00 to $8.00, stockers under 750 pounds $6.00 to $7.00. Hog trade held mostly steady Tues- day, range $7.00 to $8.25, bulk $7.75 to $8.00, bulk desirable pigs $8.75 Sheep and lamb trade is on a strong basis, best clipped lambs Monday $10.85, clipped 111 pound yearling wethers $8.50 Tuesday. The youngster had started to tool for the first time after he cme St. Petersburg. The neighbor boy the secomt grade took him and as a as Billy got home at noon his .her was all interest to know how liked going to school in Florida. Did you like it, dear?" she asked minute he came into the room. No," he returned shortly. Nhy, what's the matter dear, 't you have a nice teacher ?" came second question. to, she don't know nothin'. Why, asked more questions than our sister." "Look here, Eben," demanded the farmer's wife, angrily "here you went and sold the cow yesterday, and new you say you haven't any money. What did you spend it on ?" "I declare Amelia," replied her hus- band meekly. "I'm darn sorry, but I just went into a estaurant and blew it all in for a befsteak." Fine wedding stationery and call- in[ cards at the Independent. iwl H i 'Poultry! Eggs! Bring your Produce to' TRAcY-SHUMAK[R (OMPANY Fair Treatment Correct Weights Right Prices of the young animal, CREAM Today 24c RTILI O-  TRIED UT IN EIGHT COUNTIES - - - fertilizers used in s male in 1920 by the univevsit, '.ent of agricu'lture, co.oper   ' . . ]p ';:" eomthe American Agricultural There s More Real Safistaction nen':P°t**- Sherh,.__..,,, ,santigr°wersPany', Mlllein'°n Anoka,theLacs,fieldSotter.Clay,°f '---- ..,__ #'°"s the Good Judge easen :rne, and Wadena counties, n at2  yield from 25 to 54 bush- In a little of the Real To- ? When the application was [l'i:d 19 to 136 bushels when the bacco Chew, than you ever fef"aS.rlzerammonia, 3heavily applied. A 3- / out of er cent 3 -.- , .to per cent, and pot- The good rmh taste, lasts so i Phoric act n , P , • i f_ Which now costs $48  , long you don't need a fresh t chew nearly as often--that's pay the following why it costs you less to chew to $10.00 per ton and heavy Brass,4¢ to 8c lwed. cent per pound. and Tires,  cent cent Per Imtmd. Brass Ooed Hose carried in Wel4ing. this chss oi tobacco. Any man who ,uses the Real Tobacco Chew will tell you W-B CUT is a long fine-cut tobacco ..... :KIGHT CUT is a short-out to WATKIN'S PRODUCTS IIIII 11 llllll III I II J J III III i ii i lili illlil li i illili ]1 i I i The Watkin's man is on the road now and will call at your place soon with a complete line of this famous and well-known goods. i Hiii Hit i i i i li i i t J. FREMMING Watkin's Retailer. Salt Barrel Salt . .. Pressed Blocks $3.50 .75 Twine Minnesota Prison Twine, per lb...12/ IF IN NEED OF TWINE Get In Your Orders At Once i:drmers [lev00t0[ & [uel (o. P Ship and Sail under the Stars and Stripes to all parts of the world OU can now travel, or ship your goods, to any par of the world on American owned and American operated ships, flying the American Flag. American ships are modern, scientifically designed and constructed, new ships built for satiactory service. American ships will car you in comfort to South America, Effgland, urope, the Mediter- ranean and the Far East. And the further from home you go, the more of a thrill you'll have to see the Stars and Stripes floating above your head. , President Hard{ng says: "We know full well we cannot sell where we do not buy and we cannot sell successfully tvhere we do not carry." | Operators of Passenger Services TM dmlral Line Pacific Mall & S. Co. 17 State St. New York, N.Y. 45 Broadway. New York. '. . Seattle to Yokohama, Kobe, Seattle to Yokohama, Ko Hongkon, Shanshai, Singa- Hongkong, Shanghai0 Singa- pore. and occasionally to pore, Tientsin. and" occasion- Manila and Hawaii. ally to Mallla and HawldL Mateen Navigation Co. U, S. Mall S. S. Co. q So. Gay St.. Baltimore, Md. 45 Broadway, New York, '. r. Baltimore to Havana, Pan- ama Canal, Los Angeles. Sa New York to Boulogne an4 Francisco, and HawaiL London. New York to Bre- men and Danzig. Emierant Muneen Steam Ship Line trvlce to Genoa and Naplk 8 . Beaver St., New York Ward Line New York to Rio de Jarto, Montivideo. and Buenos (New York and Cuba Mail 8. ![. Aires. Co.) Foot of Wall St., NeW York, N. Y, NeW York and Porto Rico S. k qew York to Havana and Co. Spanish porte Viao, La 11 Broadway, t4ew York, lq. Y. Ootmna, 8|mtmdr, ljel New York to Porto Rtc¢ Bilbao, Free Use of ' For Sale c _ouippingFdmsBOard Steel and Wood Ships and Wood Hulls add Vs. o Shppln e,. =olon Ocean - Going Tup picture films of four reds free on request o ay mayor. (To Am,la Cis Oy) postmaster, pastor or organi- eetion. An tntesting edu- Steel staamr6 m both oil eatlond picture of ships and and coal burnm. the sea. Write for Informs- Further Information may ba tton to H. Ius, Director obtained by requt snt to Ialormation Bureau, Boom the 8hip  Dlvldoa, 1|11} 911. la19. "P" Street I. W. "I 8ta.e N. W Wuhtnt- Washltton. D, C. tea. D. C For sailinp of frelSht ship to all parts of the world, write Division  Operations, Traffic Professional and Business Directory C. E. SIGLOH [or [xpert W,R,00O REPAIRING Phone 284-L Ortonville, Minn, e JOE BAYER & SON Of the Ortonville Tailoring Co. All kinds of cleaning and pressing neatly done. Suits Made to Order. Ortonville, Minn. @ JOHN SPANYERS Light Hauling of all Kinds Express and Baggage Telephone 287 Ortonville, Minr PAUL DIRNBAUER Brick Layer and Plasterer Stone Mason and All Kinds of Cement Work. Ortonville, Minn. R.F.D. k PETERSON & SON Dray Line Big Stone Lake Ice Phone 38 Ortonville, Minn ARTAH PUDER All Kinds of Plastering and Stucco Work. Big Stone City, S. Dak. Kodak [ PRINTING ENLARGING Prompt, Quality Service, Moderate Prices. THE REED STUDIO Ortonville Minn. DR. R. D. RIFENBARK OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN One block uphill fram Gunderson's Drug Store Vapor-Sulphur Cabinet Treatments (For rheumatism, nJuritis, etc.) @ F. L. BROWN THE JEWELER Ortonv.ille, Minnesota FOR TRUCK SERVICE and any kind of light and heavy draying Hausauer Bros. PHONE 268 All Orders Given Prompt Attention A. B. KAERCHER Attorney at Law Odd Fellows Building Ortonville, Mnn. DR. F. W. DUNN. Chiropractor ORTONVILLE, MINN. Xray Spinographical Laboratory 12-13-14-15-16 Shumaker Bldg. Col. Wm. Wellendorf AUCTIONEER 30 years' experience. No practic- ing on your property. Call or write me early and get in on an early date. Ortonville, Minnesota J. A. JOHNSON PIANO TUNING AND REPAIRING PHONES--Residence . 194 Furniture Store  88 All 'Work Guaranteed OrtonviIle, Minnesota. WILL FINCH Experienced Painter Phone 235-L All Work Guaranteed JOI-IN MALMQUIST Interior Decorating and Artistic Sign Painting Phone 226-I< Ortonville, Minnesota. . Ortonvill Minn. ELMER SALSBURY fHE WELL DIGGER  Fifteen Years' Exlviel R, F.D. % ]921 THE ORTO]WILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE 7 •  Extr a good leth of musk melon ........ __ -- i, e ........... • L n ........... .................... ,ro,o.i=iand t Z i of we re nd ma u the bq ttm Business Directory he Farmers Corner  ........................... , ........ , = ......................... H: ....... ......... ........ . WATKIN S PRODUCTS C:E:SlGELLbH]HRI( ANY FARMER'S CLUBS. MARIT LETTER i  SEE c eay's Closing-- is on the road now and wE ING Highland Farms   a ton__we s used. Tw o rate s of aP- Cattle 1,900. Market Closed will call at your place soon with a complete line Phone 281"L Minm I Ig eli plieatinn we employed, the light one stead) ', undertone on beef steers Drtonville ' weak. CMves. 2,600. Mket Fee Club a the being 400 o 500 pnands d the heaxT Of this famous and well-known goods. Sehl on Saturday evening one 800 to 1,000 pounds, mostly 50e higher, best llght to In most eas the Eertilir Was ap- P kers $7.50, Hags 85. Mar- plied Jn the w by using s potato ket cloned about steady. Bvlk $7.76 to $g.00, top $.25, best pigs planter with fertilir attachment, $8.75. Sheep 600. Market steady avail- to firm• HIGH AND LO W PRICES OF FARM 1 e opened with an a pce , "and it will be ease'r grass and , rows th to fi plants from 12 to 15 Keep the flower buds a position to day. fer- ept wel) wa- ai nnly  much should ele up. s very palatable, and h   oats, o ml. It some- get the calf tarted on on pry After the young grain many fele n, OUnd grain. fd to ma up cf 00 Ound corn, S0 ponds hole oats, and 100 pounds mezl. t eafy, am and hay in- ordiry planter, tram which the coy. erng disks had be removed, the by hand along the layer of soil; then using the plter th the dis pled, the patato  put in the w The east of the lertfir for eh bushel inee ranged fm 18 nts to $1.77, with an average of 36 cents per bhel with the light applitinn ,and of I cents a bhel with l heavy appllcatlo xsve rainfall in the early pa latter part seed o lu ee n yeld and nonsequently t raise the cost of the fertilizer oi eh bushel nea. SWAT AND TRAP and dll propagate th other t te." u , wm me little or sion on the total number. sffeetive is cheap molests d three parts of water d a Next t ths is decayed not espielly Orchard and Gardel Keep out all wds before they It is eier d cheaper. South St. Paul, Minn., Msy 17,1921: fled a weak undertog$, Lrding on opening days of the week was mostly on a steady basis. Tsday's trade was featured b eus supply of steers of n god bee grade. Sernl'lnads hed t pk- ers and Mineral Point feeder buyers at $8.5O. and $S.25. medi beef steers sold mm $&00.do to Sq.00, with very .50. Strietly choice quotable up to of ten strictly cho¢e news snlng fu v steady, buk going rom $5.OO to $7.O0. Caer ows have alned fairly stable, sell- ing large)y from $2.OO to $4.5O. Bo- logna buUs "at mostly $4.5O to $5.O0, extreme top $52S. Best light veals $7.5O, a few seleeted Io $8.00. De. sirable heavy feeder steer* sell large- ly flm $7.00 to $8.O0, stokers uder 750 pounds Se.00 to $7.OO. Hog trade held mostly steady Tues- day, rge $7.OO to ..5, bulk $7.75 to $8.OO, buk dirable pigs $S.75. Sheep d lamb trae  on a strong basis, best epped lbs Monday $10.85. clipped 111 pound yearling wethe $8.5O Tesday. st. Petersburg. The neighbor boy eond grade took him and as all going chonl in de?" question. Dahlias y be set now. They quire cool most weather for best d velopment. o earIy fall as a rub giv bet flowers, I "Look he, Eben," dded the Genlums and other bedding plan I farmer's fe, anrily "here ou went may be put out sow. Many l I nd ld the cow ye*terday, and w may be moved to I you say you haven't any money. Wat Make at t thee diffet planV dd u spend It on?" ings of glad,nine In the garden. The "I dect Amelia," plled her hn*- few etter flowers for all pur band meekly. "[n ds rry, but I iuet Kp fles of everbearlng it all in for a bfstnal" cked unl about $ly flt., tnger plants wll suZt, givingl Fine wedding statcely and sail- the fall. ins rds at the lndeenL J Poultry! Eggs! Bring your Produce to TRA(Y-SHUMAK[ll (OMPANY Fair Treatment • Correct Weights Right Prices s of the young anlmnl, ..... p ....... CREAM Today 24c TRIED fertilizers used • t A. J. FREMMING Watkin's Retailer. Salt Barrel Salt . . $3.50 Pressed Blocks .75 Twine Minnesota Prison Twine, per lb...12 IF IN NEED OF TWINE Get In Your Orders At Once Farmers [levatQr Fuel (o ,t: Ship and Sail under the Stars and Stripes to all parts of the worm , OU can now lvavel, or ship your goods, to yany par of the world on Amgriean owned &nd American operated ships, Sylng th American Flag. American ships are modern, scientiflcaSy designed and contsutsd, new ships built for satisfactory service. American ships will ca you in comfort to South America, Effgland. urope. the Mediter- ranean and the Far East. And the further from home you go, the more of s thrill you'll have to see the Stars and Stripes floating above your head. •  Preddent Harding says: "We know full well we cannot sell where we do not buy and we camaot sell successfully llere we do not vary," Operators of Pusenger Services" ! .... fie .... , ere s Me e Real Satishcti ""'-:':"=:'; .... ........ aY' -- " --yS the Good Judge --'£ ........ ",'*::...'.": il/e Lees, Otter- / " . } tl ¢l¢s.a./,T" .........  ¢e, Wa ily applied. A 3- J got out of the ordinary kind. ;! r et, d pot. / I_l The good rlcti taste.lasts so ....... $,s (tl  long you don't need a fresh !   ch ..... ly as oRen--that'. : w viii pay the following wh it costs you less to chew :  le}: this class of tobacco. . t* $1a0o per t .:-,,----,  W.BCUT,.,,oo, .... ,to,- B.,.,,u. .. ___ , .  Wl lkC, .... r.-.v...llleFouadry ] , ; : =KIOHTCUTitashort-tto uLleA, Prop- Phee 38 JOE BAYER & SON Of the Olville Tailoring C All kinds of cleaning d psslv atly da+ JOHN SPANYERS Light Hanllag pf all Kinds Expose and Baggao telephone 9,87 Ortnilln, Mln Breh I¥er lind Piaste Ste Man d All Elnd Iff Cemt WI Ortonvill, Min. PETERSON & SON Dray Line Big Stone Lake I Ortville, Mi ARTAH PUDER All Kinds of PlMterlng and Stu Work. Big Stone City, S* DIL Kodak DEVELOpIN. PRINTIN ENLARGING Prompt, Quality Service, Moderate Pd THE REED STUDIO Oronvlae MI. DR. E. D. RIFENBARK OSTEOPATII IC PHYSICIAN One blk u hill fr Gdeon'e g Store Vapor-Sulphur Cabine Trtmets Far rhasm, nrs, eta) F. L. BROWN THE JEWELER Or to.rills. Mimmst a FOR TRUCK SERVICE and ay kind of light and hvy drg Hausauer Bros. PHONE 268 All orders Glvea Prompt Attetrioa A. B. KAERCHER Attorney at Law D4d Feews Bulking Ortonvill*, i DR. F. W. DUNN. Chiropractor ORTONVILLF MINN, Xray Snoffraphieal Laratgr 15.13.14.15.16 Shnmak Bldg Col, Win. Wdlendorf 1 ng on yo property. Cl orl ite  I d get i on i rly dt Or tonvtlle Minnesota J. A. ]0HNSON PIANO TUNING AND IEPA1RING PHONES--Residence. 194 Ilmlture stere • $8 All Werk Gned Ortvg Met  WILL FINCH Experleneed Pater Phons .5L All Work Gtel 'JOHN MALQtnLST Itefioz Dm-ath E &rtletk Sp Pghlihtlg Or tovill¢% Mlnnez4 • ELMER SAt.BURy l WL%L DII3GEII  Odonvfll  . F. D*I You Need ll 1 MAY 19, I921 " THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE 7 i i i i i ,i i i i i i i i ii ii, " Extra good growth of musk melonv ........ , ................. ;. @ The Farmers Corner DEVOTED ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF FARMERS AND FARMER'S CLUBS. Highland Farmers Club. a ton--was used. Two rates of ap- There will lie a regular meeting of plication were employed, the light one Highland Farmers Club at the being 400 to 500 pounds and the heavy School on Saturday evening one 800 to 1,000 pounds. this week. An interesting program t In most cases the fertilizer was ap- been arranged. Everybocly is in-[ plied in the row by using u potato ] to attend. [planter with fertilizer attachment, ..... [ but' where this machine was not avail- |rARE HIGH AND LOW I able the furrows were opened with an PRICES OF FARM PRODUCTS] ordinary planter, from which the coy- - • ]ering disks had been removed, the The average price received by pro- fertilizer scattered by hand along the ducers of the United States for hogs bottom of the row and covered with a mundsluring forAprilthefellfirstbel°wtime since$8 perMarch,100 shallow layer of soil; then using the L916, according to a report by the United States Department of Agri- mlture. The average price for April reached the low mark of $7.86. The ighest price reached at any time was turing August, 1919, when the aver- ge was $19.30 per 100 pounds. Prices dvanced more or less steadily from • 6 to 1919, then took a rather rapid rop. dung the latter part of 1919. ,urmg 1920 the average price for each month was between $13 and $14 boutantil December,s11. when it dropped to The price of Wool in April was be- aw 18 cents, whichis the lowest since ay, 1912. In March and April, 1918, he average price of wool was 60 eats a pound. LLANT STRAWBERRY 1 BED EVERY YEAR R , • S. Mackintosh, horticulturist with :! he extension division at Univermty ys it is a good plan to arrrn set out an • , says it is a good alan to set t an everbearing straw: - , . % . ms bed should not be ke t rang in a 1- c .... P a .... v e oecause oI me sr o injury from the strawberry ev:' he says, "and it will be easier v me beds free from grass and e.eds by changing their location oc- mlonahy. Set the plants early in ,e spring in rows three to five ,feet art and the plants from 12rtubs I ches apart. Keep the flowe ked off until about the first of July. rm the end of.July until thetf:et ills the fruit, which was not uu " .tter part of October last year, the rower Will be in a position to enjoy Xawberries and cream and straw- shortcake nearly every day. beds should be well fer- With fine stable manure and Ints should be kept well wa- GRAIN EARLY TO SKIMMILK CALF calves are changed from they are ready to Small amounts of grain, be placed before them Or if they the m stanchions for milk feed- Can be put in the man- are released. Just a is all the calf will only as much should the animal will clean up. ;:rn is very palatable, and =u alone or in combination grains such as ground oats, soa oil meal. It some- ps to get the calf started on PUtting a small mount on .and muzzle when the empty is taken away. This also thOeP to sucking the ears of the next tie. After the young tapPetite for grain has in- he corn and oats can be fed many feeders continue to ground grain. good grain mixture to feed to calves is made up of 500 of ground corn, 300 pounds or Whole oats, and 100 pounds oil meal. also be placed before he time in a small rack. mixed clover and timo- [fa hay not too leafy, are start in grain and hay in- proper development of the planter with the disks replaced, the potatoes were put in the rows. The soils on which the trials were carried out were mostly sandy Icarus. The cost of the fertilizer for each bushel increase ranged from 18 cents to $1.77, with an average of 36 cents per bushel with the light application and of 51 cents a bushel with the heavy application. Excessive rainfall in the early part of 1920 and a prolonged drouth in the latter part served to reduce the in- crease in yield and consequently o raise the cost of the fertilizer for each bushel increase. SWAT AND TRAP THE FLIES Swat and trap now when the swatting trapping will do the most good. flies are those which have over and will propagate the flies thru the summer. "Trapping is more at any other time," Riley, of University the catch may be mole but it will make little stun on the total number. tion of bait is important. effective is cheap molasses di three parts of water and ferment. Next to thig is r use of fish and decayed mistake, as they attract other of flies and are not especially .as lures." Orchard and Garden Keep out all weeds before they started. It is easier and cheaper. I]ahlias may be set now. They quire cool moist weather for best de- velopment, ,So early fall as a rule gives best flowers. Geraniums and other bedding plants may be put out now. 'Many annuals may be moved to permanent quarters . Make at !east three different plant- ings of gladiolus in the garden. There are few better flowers for all pur- poses. Keep flowers of everbearing straw- berries picked until about July first. Stronger plants will result, giving more fruit in the fall. i may be had by putting a bushel or so of well rotted ,manure in the bottom of each hill. Plenty of water during" warm dry weather lso helps. ] MARKET LETTER Tuesday's Closing-- Cattle 1,900. Market closed steady, undertone on beef steers weak. Calves. 2,600. Market mostly 50c higher, best lights to packers $7.50. Hogs 8,500. Mar- ket closed about steady. Bulk $7.75 to $8.00, top $8.25, best pigs $8.75. Sheep 600. Market steady to firm. South St. Paul, Minn., May 17, 1921: Altho the market on beef steers car- ried a weak undertow, trading on opening days of the we-ek was mostly on a steady basis. Tuesday's trade was featured by the arrival of a gen- erous supply of steers of a good beef grade. Several loads cashed to pack- ers and Mineral Point feeder buyers at $8.50, with numerous lots at $8.00 and $8.25. Practically all of the com- mon and meditv beef steers sold from $8.00odown to $7.00, with very few as low as $6.50. Strictly choice fed heifers are quotable up to $8.25 or better. Packers purchased a lot of ten strictly choice cows at $7.50. Butcher she stock is relatively scarce, selling fully steady, bulk going from $5.00 to $7.00. Canner and cutter cows have remained fairly stable, sell- ing largely from $2.00 to $4.50. Bo- logna bulls *at mostly $4.50 to $5.00, extreme top $5.25. Best light veals $7.50, a few selected lots $8.04). De- sirable heavy feeder steers sell large- ly from $7.00 to $8.00, stockers under 750 pounds $6.00 to $7.00. Hog trade held mostly steady Tues- day, range $7.00 to $8.25, bulk $7.75 to $8.00, bulk desirable pigs $8.75 Sheep and lamb trade is on a strong basis, best clipped lambs Monday $10.85, clipped 111 pound yearling wethers $8.50 Tuesday. The youngster had started to tool for the first time after he cme St. Petersburg. The neighbor boy the secomt grade took him and as a as Billy got home at noon his .her was all interest to know how liked going to school in Florida. Did you like it, dear?" she asked minute he came into the room. No," he returned shortly. Nhy, what's the matter dear, 't you have a nice teacher ?" came second question. to, she don't know nothin'. Why, asked more questions than our sister." "Look here, Eben," demanded the farmer's wife, angrily "here you went and sold the cow yesterday, and new you say you haven't any money. What did you spend it on ?" "I declare Amelia," replied her hus- band meekly. "I'm darn sorry, but I just went into a estaurant and blew it all in for a befsteak." Fine wedding stationery and call- in[ cards at the Independent. iwl H i 'Poultry! Eggs! Bring your Produce to' TRAcY-SHUMAK[R (OMPANY Fair Treatment Correct Weights Right Prices of the young animal, CREAM Today 24c RTILI O-  TRIED UT IN EIGHT COUNTIES - - - fertilizers used in s male in 1920 by the univevsit, '.ent of agricu'lture, co.oper   ' . . ]p ';:" eomthe American Agricultural There s More Real Safistaction nen':P°t**- Sherh,.__..,,, ,santigr°wersPany', Mlllein'°n Anoka,theLacs,fieldSotter.Clay,°f '---- ..,__ #'°"s the Good Judge easen :rne, and Wadena counties, n at2  yield from 25 to 54 bush- In a little of the Real To- ? When the application was [l'i:d 19 to 136 bushels when the bacco Chew, than you ever fef"aS.rlzerammonia, 3heavily applied. A 3- / out of er cent 3 -.- , .to per cent, and pot- The good rmh taste, lasts so i Phoric act n , P , • i f_ Which now costs $48  , long you don't need a fresh t chew nearly as often--that's pay the following why it costs you less to chew to $10.00 per ton and heavy Brass,4¢ to 8c lwed. cent per pound. and Tires,  cent cent Per Imtmd. Brass Ooed Hose carried in Wel4ing. this chss oi tobacco. Any man who ,uses the Real Tobacco Chew will tell you W-B CUT is a long fine-cut tobacco ..... :KIGHT CUT is a short-out to WATKIN'S PRODUCTS IIIII 11 llllll III I II J J III III i ii i lili illlil li i illili ]1 i I i The Watkin's man is on the road now and will call at your place soon with a complete line of this famous and well-known goods. i Hiii Hit i i i i li i i t J. FREMMING Watkin's Retailer. Salt Barrel Salt . .. Pressed Blocks $3.50 .75 Twine Minnesota Prison Twine, per lb...12/ IF IN NEED OF TWINE Get In Your Orders At Once i:drmers [lev00t0[ & [uel (o. P Ship and Sail under the Stars and Stripes to all parts of the world OU can now travel, or ship your goods, to any par of the world on American owned and American operated ships, flying the American Flag. American ships are modern, scientifically designed and constructed, new ships built for satiactory service. American ships will car you in comfort to South America, Effgland, urope, the Mediter- ranean and the Far East. And the further from home you go, the more of a thrill you'll have to see the Stars and Stripes floating above your head. , President Hard{ng says: "We know full well we cannot sell where we do not buy and we cannot sell successfully tvhere we do not carry." | Operators of Passenger Services TM dmlral Line Pacific Mall & S. Co. 17 State St. New York, N.Y. 45 Broadway. New York. '. . Seattle to Yokohama, Kobe, Seattle to Yokohama, Ko Hongkon, Shanshai, Singa- Hongkong, Shanghai0 Singa- pore. and occasionally to pore, Tientsin. and" occasion- Manila and Hawaii. ally to Mallla and HawldL Mateen Navigation Co. U, S. Mall S. S. Co. q So. Gay St.. Baltimore, Md. 45 Broadway, New York, '. r. Baltimore to Havana, Pan- ama Canal, Los Angeles. Sa New York to Boulogne an4 Francisco, and HawaiL London. New York to Bre- men and Danzig. Emierant Muneen Steam Ship Line trvlce to Genoa and Naplk 8 . Beaver St., New York Ward Line New York to Rio de Jarto, Montivideo. and Buenos (New York and Cuba Mail 8. ![. Aires. Co.) Foot of Wall St., NeW York, N. Y, NeW York and Porto Rico S. k qew York to Havana and Co. Spanish porte Viao, La 11 Broadway, t4ew York, lq. Y. Ootmna, 8|mtmdr, ljel New York to Porto Rtc¢ Bilbao, Free Use of ' For Sale c _ouippingFdmsBOard Steel and Wood Ships and Wood Hulls add Vs. o Shppln e,. =olon Ocean - Going Tup picture films of four reds free on request o ay mayor. (To Am,la Cis Oy) postmaster, pastor or organi- eetion. An tntesting edu- Steel staamr6 m both oil eatlond picture of ships and and coal burnm. the sea. Write for Informs- Further Information may ba tton to H. Ius, Director obtained by requt snt to Ialormation Bureau, Boom the 8hip  Dlvldoa, 1|11} 911. la19. "P" Street I. W. "I 8ta.e N. W Wuhtnt- Washltton. D, C. tea. D. C For sailinp of frelSht ship to all parts of the world, write Division  Operations, Traffic Professional and Business Directory C. E. SIGLOH [or [xpert W,R,00O REPAIRING Phone 284-L Ortonville, Minn, e JOE BAYER & SON Of the Ortonville Tailoring Co. All kinds of cleaning and pressing neatly done. Suits Made to Order. Ortonville, Minn. @ JOHN SPANYERS Light Hauling of all Kinds Express and Baggage Telephone 287 Ortonville, Minr PAUL DIRNBAUER Brick Layer and Plasterer Stone Mason and All Kinds of Cement Work. Ortonville, Minn. R.F.D. k PETERSON & SON Dray Line Big Stone Lake Ice Phone 38 Ortonville, Minn ARTAH PUDER All Kinds of Plastering and Stucco Work. Big Stone City, S. Dak. Kodak [ PRINTING ENLARGING Prompt, Quality Service, Moderate Prices. THE REED STUDIO Ortonville Minn. DR. R. D. RIFENBARK OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN One block uphill fram Gunderson's Drug Store Vapor-Sulphur Cabinet Treatments (For rheumatism, nJuritis, etc.) @ F. L. BROWN THE JEWELER Ortonv.ille, Minnesota FOR TRUCK SERVICE and any kind of light and heavy draying Hausauer Bros. PHONE 268 All Orders Given Prompt Attention A. B. KAERCHER Attorney at Law Odd Fellows Building Ortonville, Mnn. DR. F. W. DUNN. Chiropractor ORTONVILLE, MINN. Xray Spinographical Laboratory 12-13-14-15-16 Shumaker Bldg. Col. Wm. Wellendorf AUCTIONEER 30 years' experience. No practic- ing on your property. Call or write me early and get in on an early date. Ortonville, Minnesota J. A. JOHNSON PIANO TUNING AND REPAIRING PHONES--Residence . 194 Furniture Store  88 All 'Work Guaranteed OrtonviIle, Minnesota. WILL FINCH Experienced Painter Phone 235-L All Work Guaranteed JOI-IN MALMQUIST Interior Decorating and Artistic Sign Painting Phone 226-I< Ortonville, Minnesota. . Ortonvill Minn. ELMER SALSBURY fHE WELL DIGGER  Fifteen Years' Exlviel R, F.D. %