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May 25, 1999     The Ortonville Independent
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/Louisburg )ffman was not ty Day afternoon May was called for [9th, the drawing Mrs. Thurman Benton were 7th, of Alfred Were in attendance n's Prayer Coffee morning, May hostess. tglas Gloege of lrent Gloege of ;ted at the Ned evening, May of Minneapolis, Louisburg and attended at Northridge Man., May mother and an. Borgerson, Carman, Karels, Dorothy attended the afternoon, Church, Texas, and were nner guests of dinner guests of were Mr. of Clear Lake, Scott Olson spent at home. On Stacy and home at Mrs Minnie ;uest of Mr. at the at the Melvin en Maatz of Day visitors at were Glenda Day afternoon at the Hilda Mr. and Mrs. Mrs. Ione Steve SD, Mrs. of Mobridge, r Josephson of afternoon Day. Mr. and Mrs. visited with Other. Were Mr. and ow of Coon aldenow of Zahn at her birthday and also visited 11th dinner home Larson and Dempsey Crosby and Mrs. Alfred visitors at were Roger D, gton, Violet of Dean, Pat bd Steve and visitors at aag home were and Jim were Steve Alicia, Rae and Michelle Maatz and Mr. and and family, Mother's at the Walter a celebrate Church ladies hosted their Spring Fling with the theme "Bloom Where You Are Planted" Thursday afternoon, May 13th. Over 100 ladies of the area attended. Mon., May 10th, Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Maatz visited Harold and Dorothy Schulz of Milbank. Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Borgerson spent Thurs., May 13th to Mon., May 17th with Mr. and Mrs. Craig Meyer and family at Brookings SD. Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Maatz and Daren were Mother's Day visitors of Myrtle Maatz. Laurence and Fran Rakow visited Bryan Rakow at Monarch Heights at Ortonville on Mother's Day. Tuesday evening, May I 1 th, Rose Wittnebel and Carol Maatz attended the Spring Instrumental Concert at the Ortonville High School. Thursday afternoon, Arlene Hoffman, Marilyn Streich, Norma Wittnebel, Marilyn Goetsch, and Marion Maatz visited with Myrtle Maatz at her home and celebrated her birthday. Wed., May 12th, Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Maatz took Daren Maatz out to eat in honor of his birthday. Gary, Mary Roiland and Jared, Mervin and Margaret Holstad of Spicer, Merge Broman of Kandiyohi, Ellie and Ryan Broman of Spicer were guests Mother's Day at the Pat and Tom Broman home in Spicer. Jeremiah Johnson of Marshall spent the Mother's Day weekend at home. Johnny and Clarice Borstad, Nyland, Carol and John Larson, Mark and Jessica Larson enjoyed Mother's Day dinner at DeToy's at Madison. Clara Jelle and daughter Bernice of Belleville, Wisc., arrived on Wednesday afternoon, May 12th, to visit Clara' s sister, Myrtle Kittelson. Rick and Terry Johnson and Bobby attended the Spring Band Concert Tuesday evening, May I I th, at the Ortonville High School in which Abbey participated. Alice Hansen and Ruth Hansen attended the Mother-Daughter Tea at the Madison Lutheran Home Saturday afternoon, May 8th. Lorraine Sorenson visited Noah Stone at the Madison Hospital on Thursday evening, May 6th, and Saturday afternoon, May 8th. He was a patient there Thursday to Sunday. Aimee Lund and Daren Walter, Leida and Shane Broderson spent Mother's Day weekend with Paul and Carol Lund. Sunday noon, Eleanor Lund of Madison and Eric Lund were additional family dinner guests. In the afternoon, Leida and Shane, Aimee and Daren and Carol visited Lydia Schliep at the Madison Lutheran Home. A Mother's Day brunch was held Sunday morning at the Gordon Letrud home for the Rick Johnson family, Gary and Randy Letrud, Gordon and Joyce Letrud. Wednesday afternoon, May 12th, Ihla Thomson was a guest of Olga Awards night Wednesday at BSC school A variety of awards will be presented to Big Stone City students this Wednesday, May 26, at 7 p.m. in the school gym. Members of the class of 1999 (2003) will also receive eighth grade diplomas. The public is invited, and refreshments will follow the program in the school lunchroom. Other awards include the following: basketball, cheerleading, spelling, oral interpretation, band, Girl Scouts, and academic. The American Legion will also present the 'Students of the Year' award to a graduating 8th grade boy and girl. A community sign-up for summer recreation is also planned for this night in the school lunchroom, to begin at approximately 6:30 p.m. Plan to include Tee-ball, baseball or softball for your summer plans in Big Stone City. S J. Peterson ck, Neck and tremity Care for Entire Family. Phone 320-839-2323 Tues.& Thurs. 8:____..__1__2:00; Sat. by a______ ppointrnent 215 SE 2nd Street Ortonville, MN 56278 839-2323 Home (320) 839-6246 every summer. Of course there's a lot more to the Memorial Day 1999 wild rose (Rosa arkansana) than its fragrance. The plant was widely used by Indians as a medicine and an emergency food. It's fruit, called WE MUST Logeland at the Mother-Daughter Tea rosehips, has a very high vitamin C at the Nursing Home in Dawson. content. (3 fresh rosehips = I whole REMEMBER Alice Hansen and Jean Wiegers orange!) Inflammation and diseases were Mother' s Day dinner guests at of the eyes, snowblindness, diarrhea, the Alan and Ruth Hansen home. stomach trouble, burns, swellings, Every American should Elly Nelson spent a couple days at wounds, sore throat, hives and itching home and has completed her first year are some of the conditions treated by take at ]east a moment on in college at Vermillion. She will be either the roots, petals or fruit of the t]n's Memorial Day to remember with thahksgiv- working for the summer in wild rose. ing all who died in war. Pennsylvania. White settlers put the plant to The-y fought to]areserve the Tuesday night, May 1 lth, Joyce similar uses. I have heard of rosehip Letrud attended the Spring Band jelly, and I recently came across a freeorom we enjoym Concert at the Ortonville High School recipe for rose petal jam. I wonder if America today. We dare in which Jade Letrud and Abbey it would make my toast smell like a not forget therprice they Johnson participated, country lane in the summertime? paia. Tuesday morning, Eimo and I wish I knew the Dakota song for Lorraine Sorenson were coffee guests the wild rose... I think it would Ruth Hansen attended the same deliciously intoxicating  SPINK-DOBAK POST #97 FHE AMERICAN LEGION of LeAnn Stone and Noah of touch my soul. Every summer when Madison. our country road is alive with that retirement party for Sandra Hanson on fragrance, I drink it in and meditate Wednesday evening, May 12th at the on the changing scenes of my After Five. lifetime. And though I do not know the song, I go walking with my to smell the wild roses. children and teach them to take time Mothers Day, Lorraine Sorenson was a dinner guest of Patty Agriculture now part rdi Thompson. Sunday evening, Jeff and Lori Schlueter and family were visitors of EImo and Lorraine Sorenson solution to global wa ng Steve and Jodi Jensen spent the May 15th weekend in Alexandria with Vicki and David Thomson, Tanner and Hayley. Using new soil tillage practices Allmaras found that abandoning the microbes live,"Allmaras says. "Those Ihla Thomson, Lorraine Sorenson, developed in the past 15 years, farm- moldboard plow caused increases in microbes convert the residue to a Fran Trygestad, Geraldine Blahosky ers are now responsible for a net stor- soil carbon within 10 years. He says form of carbon that readily converts attended the Spring Fling at Walter age of carbon in the soil instead of fertilizers and genetic improvements to carbon dioxide, which can escape Lutheran Church on Thursday. releasing it as carbon dioxide into the have increased grain yields and the to the atmosphere." atmosphere. Release of soil carbon amount of crop residue available to When farmers abandon the plow Native Prairie into the atmosphere is thought to con- increase soil carbon, for reduced tillage methods, they tribute to global warming. Currently, increased carbon diox- leave more residues on the soil sur- Our Natural Heritage So instead of being net producers ide levels in the atmosphere have also face or in the top four inches. "Corn of carbon dioxide, soils are now part increased plant growth and crop and sorghum farmers are returning of the soil organic matter makes soils residue available to build higher lev- about twice as much residue as they By Rosemary Hendriekson more productive, says Raymond R. els of soil carbon, Allmaras says. "But did in 1940," Allmaras says, "and An old Dakota man wanders over Allmaras, a soil scientist with the U.S. the change from moldboarding pro- they are keeping it on or near the sur- the prairie in early spring. When he Department of Agriculture's vided the opportunity for these added face. Here, the residue readily decays finds a pasque flower, he sits down Agricultural Research Service located crop residues to increase the net car- to valuable organic matter, a more sta- near the flower in the lap of'Mother in the Department of Soil, Water, and ban storage in the soil." ble carbon compound and a key part Earth." He takes out his pipe and fills Climate at the University of Here's why more carbon dioxide is of the fertile prairie soil originally it with tobacco. While he smokes he Minnesota. released to the atmosphere from the broken open by the plow." meditates on all the changing scenes "The demise of the moldboard "old fashioned" moldboard plow: The Allmaras says U.S. agriculture's of his lifetime: his childhood free as plow is responsible," Allmaras says. plow lifts and inverts an eight to 12- positive contribution to the carbon the flowers and birds, his joys and "Moldboard plowing has dropped to inch slice of soil, and also buries stub- dioxide global warming issue should sorrows, his hopes and less than nine percent of tilled land in ble and other unharvested crop be recognized when a new interna- accomplishments, and the guidance the U.S. in 1993, compared to more residue located on or near the surface, tional agreement on carbon dioxide which unseen powers have given him than 80 percent in 1980." "That places the residue deep in management is negotiated. on his way. And he believes that he In long-term experiments, the plow layer where different will be guided to the end. After finishing his pipe he rises and plucks the flower and carries it home to his MN/DOT announces Southwest grandchildren, singing as he goes the Song of the Twin Flower, which he learned as a child, and now teaches to Mi nesota1999i provements 00ran00c00i,00ren. n rn Dakotas believed that each species of flower had its own song, which Safer and smoother highways in at the junction of County Road 5 west injuries to workers, pedestrians and was "the expression of its life or the southwest 12 county area will of Willmarin late summer, withminor motorists. Ninety-eight percent of the soul". Twin-flower was one of the result from this summer's estimated delays expected there, also. And work zone fatalities were travelers. names for the pasque flower $30 million improvement program along Trunk Highway 75 south of MN/DOT's work zone safety message (Anemone patens) because each plant that was announced today by the Madison, crews will be repairing is See Orange. We're in the WORK had only two flowering stalks. It has Minnesota Department of cracks and bituminous overlay ZONE together. also been called pulsatilla, Transportation, District 8. between junction T.H. 212 and T.H. To avoid delays caused by these windflower and Easter flower. The Local improvements include Trunk 67. There will be detours for this pro- projects, motorists are encouraged to earliest of prairie wildflowers, the Highway 55 between Eden Valley and ject, which will take place in late sum- obtain information about work zones Indians used the plant for such things Kimball, where a bituminous mill and met. and detours in the following ways: as speeding delivery in childbirth? to overlay and the installation of culverts Improvements range from spot * Call for statewide recorded road treat injuries, and as a counter irritant and turn lanes will be done. The pro- repairs to complete reconstruction, condition information at 1-800-542- for rheumatism, neuralgia and similar ject will be done under traffic and Highway maintenance and construc- 0220 24 hours a day, or for the hearing illnesses, minor delays can be expected, with tion workers will be out in full force impaired call 1-800-657-3994 Medically, pasque flower has been dates of mid-May through June. this spring and summer to complete * Call for local recorded road con- used for many ailments, but only in Along Trunk Highway 212 in these projects. Motorists are remind- dition information in the Willmar, minute quantities in homeopathic Dawson, crews will be laying a bitu- ed to watch for work zones, slow Marshall and Hutchinson area at (320) remedies the plant itself is minous mill and overlay on T.H. 212 downand give workers plenty of room 235-9230 24 hours a day dangerous if taken internally. I have in the city of Dawson. This project to work. * Statewide road condition and never seen a pasque flower (though I will also be done under traffic from In the last ten years there have been other transportation related informa- do intend to go find one next spring), mid-May to mid-June, with minor 11,000 street and highway work zone tion is also available at MN/DOT's but I feel a little like the old Dakota delays expected, crashes in Minnesota. Those crashes website at www.dot.state.mn.us man when the wild roses start to Crews will be installing a turn lane have resulted in 64 fatalities and 5,500 bloom. As a girl, I remember riding my bike up and down the country m__B, ]l'JHHll... [ INDEPENDENT WANT ADS BRING QUICK RESULTS! [ rodd I lived on just so I could smell the wild roses. The fragrance was I deliciously intoxicating to me. I still love it and look for those flowers IE 4 Sut Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; Sat. 8 a.m. -5 p.m. ORTONVILLE, MN PHONE 839-2653 l'iol-b. 10- , L.bd6.a6-Per Lb, Bsj r, ....... STEAKS BEEF ROAST $4.99 $1.39 $I 59 iil i ii!iiii i ? 1/2 TOP SKIN ON ............. HOG SIRLOIN ROAST HOT DOGS Memorial Day Weekend, May 29 and 30 79 82.79 $3.59 through Steaks - Roasts - Hamburger Chops - Roasts 50 LB. BEEF BUNDLE 20 LB. PORK BUNDLE $98.95 $27.95 Labor Day Weekend, Sept. 4 and 5 SATURDAYS- 7:00 PM SUNDAYS - 9:00 AM s,oEs & QUARTERS OF BEEF. ........................ $1.34 PER LB. PIONEER, AWARD WINNING- PER LB. (note change to earlier hour) DELl . [ COUNTRY RING-- A CORDIAL WELCOME TO ALL! TURKEY. ............. 82.99 SAUSAGE .......... 82.79 First English Lutheran church Rev .cDRa;oeNI LvI HEe rl I aNNOEg OPAstor 1999 INDEPENDENT Page 5 /Louisburg )ffman was not ty Day afternoon May was called for [9th, the drawing Mrs. Thurman Benton were 7th, of Alfred Were in attendance n's Prayer Coffee morning, May hostess. tglas Gloege of lrent Gloege of ;ted at the Ned evening, May of Minneapolis, Louisburg and attended at Northridge Man., May mother and an. Borgerson, Carman, Karels, Dorothy attended the afternoon, Church, Texas, and were nner guests of dinner guests of were Mr. of Clear Lake, Scott Olson spent at home. On Stacy and home at Mrs Minnie ;uest of Mr. at the at the Melvin en Maatz of Day visitors at were Glenda Day afternoon at the Hilda Mr. and Mrs. Mrs. Ione Steve SD, Mrs. of Mobridge, r Josephson of afternoon Day. Mr. and Mrs. visited with Other. Were Mr. and ow of Coon aldenow of Zahn at her birthday and also visited 11th dinner home Larson and Dempsey Crosby and Mrs. Alfred visitors at were Roger D, gton, Violet of Dean, Pat bd Steve and visitors at aag home were and Jim were Steve Alicia, Rae and Michelle Maatz and Mr. and and family, Mother's at the Walter a celebrate Church ladies hosted their Spring Fling with the theme "Bloom Where You Are Planted" Thursday afternoon, May 13th. Over 100 ladies of the area attended. Mon., May 10th, Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Maatz visited Harold and Dorothy Schulz of Milbank. Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Borgerson spent Thurs., May 13th to Mon., May 17th with Mr. and Mrs. Craig Meyer and family at Brookings SD. Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Maatz and Daren were Mother's Day visitors of Myrtle Maatz. Laurence and Fran Rakow visited Bryan Rakow at Monarch Heights at Ortonville on Mother's Day. Tuesday evening, May I 1 th, Rose Wittnebel and Carol Maatz attended the Spring Instrumental Concert at the Ortonville High School. Thursday afternoon, Arlene Hoffman, Marilyn Streich, Norma Wittnebel, Marilyn Goetsch, and Marion Maatz visited with Myrtle Maatz at her home and celebrated her birthday. Wed., May 12th, Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Maatz took Daren Maatz out to eat in honor of his birthday. Gary, Mary Roiland and Jared, Mervin and Margaret Holstad of Spicer, Merge Broman of Kandiyohi, Ellie and Ryan Broman of Spicer were guests Mother's Day at the Pat and Tom Broman home in Spicer. Jeremiah Johnson of Marshall spent the Mother's Day weekend at home. Johnny and Clarice Borstad, Nyland, Carol and John Larson, Mark and Jessica Larson enjoyed Mother's Day dinner at DeToy's at Madison. Clara Jelle and daughter Bernice of Belleville, Wisc., arrived on Wednesday afternoon, May 12th, to visit Clara' s sister, Myrtle Kittelson. Rick and Terry Johnson and Bobby attended the Spring Band Concert Tuesday evening, May I I th, at the Ortonville High School in which Abbey participated. Alice Hansen and Ruth Hansen attended the Mother-Daughter Tea at the Madison Lutheran Home Saturday afternoon, May 8th. Lorraine Sorenson visited Noah Stone at the Madison Hospital on Thursday evening, May 6th, and Saturday afternoon, May 8th. He was a patient there Thursday to Sunday. Aimee Lund and Daren Walter, Leida and Shane Broderson spent Mother's Day weekend with Paul and Carol Lund. Sunday noon, Eleanor Lund of Madison and Eric Lund were additional family dinner guests. In the afternoon, Leida and Shane, Aimee and Daren and Carol visited Lydia Schliep at the Madison Lutheran Home. A Mother's Day brunch was held Sunday morning at the Gordon Letrud home for the Rick Johnson family, Gary and Randy Letrud, Gordon and Joyce Letrud. Wednesday afternoon, May 12th, Ihla Thomson was a guest of Olga Awards night Wednesday at BSC school A variety of awards will be presented to Big Stone City students this Wednesday, May 26, at 7 p.m. in the school gym. Members of the class of 1999 (2003) will also receive eighth grade diplomas. The public is invited, and refreshments will follow the program in the school lunchroom. Other awards include the following: basketball, cheerleading, spelling, oral interpretation, band, Girl Scouts, and academic. The American Legion will also present the 'Students of the Year' award to a graduating 8th grade boy and girl. A community sign-up for summer recreation is also planned for this night in the school lunchroom, to begin at approximately 6:30 p.m. Plan to include Tee-ball, baseball or softball for your summer plans in Big Stone City. S J. Peterson ck, Neck and tremity Care for Entire Family. Phone 320-839-2323 Tues.& Thurs. 8:____..__1__2:00; Sat. by a______ ppointrnent 215 SE 2nd Street Ortonville, MN 56278 839-2323 Home (320) 839-6246 every summer. Of course there's a lot more to the Memorial Day 1999 wild rose (Rosa arkansana) than its fragrance. The plant was widely used by Indians as a medicine and an emergency food. It's fruit, called WE MUST Logeland at the Mother-Daughter Tea rosehips, has a very high vitamin C at the Nursing Home in Dawson. content. (3 fresh rosehips = I whole REMEMBER Alice Hansen and Jean Wiegers orange!) Inflammation and diseases were Mother' s Day dinner guests at of the eyes, snowblindness, diarrhea, the Alan and Ruth Hansen home. stomach trouble, burns, swellings, Every American should Elly Nelson spent a couple days at wounds, sore throat, hives and itching home and has completed her first year are some of the conditions treated by take at ]east a moment on in college at Vermillion. She will be either the roots, petals or fruit of the t]n's Memorial Day to remember with thahksgiv- working for the summer in wild rose. ing all who died in war. Pennsylvania. White settlers put the plant to The-y fought to]areserve the Tuesday night, May 1 lth, Joyce similar uses. I have heard of rosehip Letrud attended the Spring Band jelly, and I recently came across a freeorom we enjoym Concert at the Ortonville High School recipe for rose petal jam. I wonder if America today. We dare in which Jade Letrud and Abbey it would make my toast smell like a not forget therprice they Johnson participated, country lane in the summertime? paia. Tuesday morning, Eimo and I wish I knew the Dakota song for Lorraine Sorenson were coffee guests the wild rose... I think it would Ruth Hansen attended the same deliciously intoxicating  SPINK-DOBAK POST #97 FHE AMERICAN LEGION of LeAnn Stone and Noah of touch my soul. Every summer when Madison. our country road is alive with that retirement party for Sandra Hanson on fragrance, I drink it in and meditate Wednesday evening, May 12th at the on the changing scenes of my After Five. lifetime. And though I do not know the song, I go walking with my to smell the wild roses. children and teach them to take time Mothers Day, Lorraine Sorenson was a dinner guest of Patty Agriculture now part rdi Thompson. Sunday evening, Jeff and Lori Schlueter and family were visitors of EImo and Lorraine Sorenson solution to global wa ng Steve and Jodi Jensen spent the May 15th weekend in Alexandria with Vicki and David Thomson, Tanner and Hayley. Using new soil tillage practices Allmaras found that abandoning the microbes live,"Allmaras says. "Those Ihla Thomson, Lorraine Sorenson, developed in the past 15 years, farm- moldboard plow caused increases in microbes convert the residue to a Fran Trygestad, Geraldine Blahosky ers are now responsible for a net stor- soil carbon within 10 years. He says form of carbon that readily converts attended the Spring Fling at Walter age of carbon in the soil instead of fertilizers and genetic improvements to carbon dioxide, which can escape Lutheran Church on Thursday. releasing it as carbon dioxide into the have increased grain yields and the to the atmosphere." atmosphere. Release of soil carbon amount of crop residue available to When farmers abandon the plow Native Prairie into the atmosphere is thought to con- increase soil carbon, for reduced tillage methods, they tribute to global warming. Currently, increased carbon diox- leave more residues on the soil sur- Our Natural Heritage So instead of being net producers ide levels in the atmosphere have also face or in the top four inches. "Corn of carbon dioxide, soils are now part increased plant growth and crop and sorghum farmers are returning of the soil organic matter makes soils residue available to build higher lev- about twice as much residue as they By Rosemary Hendriekson more productive, says Raymond R. els of soil carbon, Allmaras says. "But did in 1940," Allmaras says, "and An old Dakota man wanders over Allmaras, a soil scientist with the U.S. the change from moldboarding pro- they are keeping it on or near the sur- the prairie in early spring. When he Department of Agriculture's vided the opportunity for these added face. Here, the residue readily decays finds a pasque flower, he sits down Agricultural Research Service located crop residues to increase the net car- to valuable organic matter, a more sta- near the flower in the lap of'Mother in the Department of Soil, Water, and ban storage in the soil." ble carbon compound and a key part Earth." He takes out his pipe and fills Climate at the University of Here's why more carbon dioxide is of the fertile prairie soil originally it with tobacco. While he smokes he Minnesota. released to the atmosphere from the broken open by the plow." meditates on all the changing scenes "The demise of the moldboard "old fashioned" moldboard plow: The Allmaras says U.S. agriculture's of his lifetime: his childhood free as plow is responsible," Allmaras says. plow lifts and inverts an eight to 12- positive contribution to the carbon the flowers and birds, his joys and "Moldboard plowing has dropped to inch slice of soil, and also buries stub- dioxide global warming issue should sorrows, his hopes and less than nine percent of tilled land in ble and other unharvested crop be recognized when a new interna- accomplishments, and the guidance the U.S. in 1993, compared to more residue located on or near the surface, tional agreement on carbon dioxide which unseen powers have given him than 80 percent in 1980." "That places the residue deep in management is negotiated. on his way. And he believes that he In long-term experiments, the plow layer where different will be guided to the end. After finishing his pipe he rises and plucks the flower and carries it home to his MN/DOT announces Southwest grandchildren, singing as he goes the Song of the Twin Flower, which he learned as a child, and now teaches to Mi nesota1999i provements 00ran00c00i,00ren. n rn Dakotas believed that each species of flower had its own song, which Safer and smoother highways in at the junction of County Road 5 west injuries to workers, pedestrians and was "the expression of its life or the southwest 12 county area will of Willmarin late summer, withminor motorists. Ninety-eight percent of the soul". Twin-flower was one of the result from this summer's estimated delays expected there, also. And work zone fatalities were travelers. names for the pasque flower $30 million improvement program along Trunk Highway 75 south of MN/DOT's work zone safety message (Anemone patens) because each plant that was announced today by the Madison, crews will be repairing is See Orange. We're in the WORK had only two flowering stalks. It has Minnesota Department of cracks and bituminous overlay ZONE together. also been called pulsatilla, Transportation, District 8. between junction T.H. 212 and T.H. To avoid delays caused by these windflower and Easter flower. The Local improvements include Trunk 67. There will be detours for this pro- projects, motorists are encouraged to earliest of prairie wildflowers, the Highway 55 between Eden Valley and ject, which will take place in late sum- obtain information about work zones Indians used the plant for such things Kimball, where a bituminous mill and met. and detours in the following ways: as speeding delivery in childbirth? to overlay and the installation of culverts Improvements range from spot * Call for statewide recorded road treat injuries, and as a counter irritant and turn lanes will be done. The pro- repairs to complete reconstruction, condition information at 1-800-542- for rheumatism, neuralgia and similar ject will be done under traffic and Highway maintenance and construc- 0220 24 hours a day, or for the hearing illnesses, minor delays can be expected, with tion workers will be out in full force impaired call 1-800-657-3994 Medically, pasque flower has been dates of mid-May through June. this spring and summer to complete * Call for local recorded road con- used for many ailments, but only in Along Trunk Highway 212 in these projects. Motorists are remind- dition information in the Willmar, minute quantities in homeopathic Dawson, crews will be laying a bitu- ed to watch for work zones, slow Marshall and Hutchinson area at (320) remedies the plant itself is minous mill and overlay on T.H. 212 downand give workers plenty of room 235-9230 24 hours a day dangerous if taken internally. I have in the city of Dawson. This project to work. * Statewide road condition and never seen a pasque flower (though I will also be done under traffic from In the last ten years there have been other transportation related informa- do intend to go find one next spring), mid-May to mid-June, with minor 11,000 street and highway work zone tion is also available at MN/DOT's but I feel a little like the old Dakota delays expected, crashes in Minnesota. Those crashes website at www.dot.state.mn.us man when the wild roses start to Crews will be installing a turn lane have resulted in 64 fatalities and 5,500 bloom. As a girl, I remember riding my bike up and down the country m__B, ]l'JHHll... [ INDEPENDENT WANT ADS BRING QUICK RESULTS! [ rodd I lived on just so I could smell the wild roses. The fragrance was I deliciously intoxicating to me. I still love it and look for those flowers IE 4 Sut Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; Sat. 8 a.m. -5 p.m. ORTONVILLE, MN PHONE 839-2653 l'iol-b. 10- , L.bd6.a6-Per Lb, Bsj r, ....... STEAKS BEEF ROAST $4.99 $1.39 $I 59 iil i ii!iiii i ? 1/2 TOP SKIN ON ............. HOG SIRLOIN ROAST HOT DOGS Memorial Day Weekend, May 29 and 30 79 82.79 $3.59 through Steaks - Roasts - Hamburger Chops - Roasts 50 LB. BEEF BUNDLE 20 LB. PORK BUNDLE $98.95 $27.95 Labor Day Weekend, Sept. 4 and 5 SATURDAYS- 7:00 PM SUNDAYS - 9:00 AM s,oEs & QUARTERS OF BEEF. ........................ $1.34 PER LB. PIONEER, AWARD WINNING- PER LB. (note change to earlier hour) DELl . [ COUNTRY RING-- A CORDIAL WELCOME TO ALL! TURKEY. ............. 82.99 SAUSAGE .......... 82.79 First English Lutheran church Rev .cDRa;oeNI LvI HEe rl I aNNOEg OPAstor 1999 INDEPENDENT Page 5