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May 25, 1999     The Ortonville Independent
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ville Head Start holds uation ceremonies DIPLOMA is Nikole Stotesbery receiving her Arndt, Nikole is the daughter of Jennifer lie. Ortonville's Head Start Pre- school program held it's annual graduation ceremonies last Tuesday at the Ortonville National Guard Armory. Fifteen graduates took part in the program. The Head Start graduating class is shown above with their instructors. In front, left to right are Ashley Kaiser, Maria Miller, Courtney Meyer, Dylan Koch, Amy Dockter, Shannon Karels, Kara Helgeson and Jackson Zemke. In back left to right are teacher- Vicki Arndt, Destiny Eastman, Tara Freeberg, William Rosenstiel, Nikole Stotesbery, Nathan Nelson, Caleb Tollakson, Christopher Weber, foster grandparent- Jean Ulrich, in back and teacher assistant- Kathy Nelson. The following donated their time, money and/or services to the Head Start program, which are much appreciated by the teachers and families: Ortonville School, Dave Kelzer and the Ortonville Fire Dept., Pizza Ranch, Dr. Winther's Office, Ortonville Post Office, Ortonville Hospital, Lou's Greenhouse, Ortonviile Flower Shop, Watertown Zoo, Doug and Renee McKinney, Harley Helgeson, Lori B's, Bill's Super Valu Plus, Elmer's Drive-In, Ortonville Armory, Big Stone Bowl and Unity Square. school news '.s K-2 will be trip of this 26. They rings Granite, bird exhibit at will finish the Ortonville with your eat at Lake vith screw-on 'child wear his/her Committee the students, who helped ground fund- to ALL to set up part June 1 at et at the at the City :.south end of Is coached by girls softball lack of girls are welcome to Ranch, they will visit the Henrich & Sons cement plant. Sounds like a fun- filled day for them. Wednesday, May 26 Field trip for K-2 to Ortonville & Milbank Thursday, May 27 Last day of school for students Friday, May 28 - Last day of school for teachers June 7 - 11 - Bible School at Trinity June 14 - 25 - Swimming lessons at LqP Valley High MENU Breakfast Monday--Frosted donuts, cheese sticks, apple juice, 1% milk. Tuesday--Assorted cereals, toast, grape-apple juice, 1% milk. Wednesday--French toast sticks, breakfast links, orange juice, 1% milk Thursday--Assorted donuts, cheese slices, apple juice, 1% milk. Lunch Monday--Cheese pizza, lettuce salad, orange slices, apple crisp, skim chocolate milk. TuesdayCook's Choice Wednesday--Hotdogs on bun, nacho chips with cheese sauce, apple and orange slices, 1% milk. Thursday--Ham & cheese subs, cornchips, banana, bread, 1% milk. All practices Scheduled for for Hope Olson Bridal shower set es 3-6 went to on their on Friday. lye Glass and to They Historic nch at Pizza There will be an open house bridal shower honoring Hope Olson, daughter of Lyle and Betty Berglund, bride-to-be of David Bill, at Zion Lutheran Church, Appleton on Thursday, June 3, 1999 at 7 p.m. Save your paper and your bow, put your gift in a paper bag, add a can of food instead, then watch their cupboard overflow ....... HOUSE Rc4n Cutting at LIFETOUOH Lackluster session for rural Minnesota By Rep. Doug Peterson The 1999 legislative session ended schedule on Monday, May 17. And while it certainly did see some posi- tive developments, from the rural per- spective this session was extremely unproductive. Perhaps the great failing was the fact that the farm price crisis was almost completely ignored. While the Legislature did provide emergency farm assistance of $4 an acre - which is a little more than the price of a bushel of beans - we did very little to address the root causes of the price crisis. The House Republican majori- ty seemed unwilling or unable to chal- lenge the trends toward corporate control and corporate concentration in agriculture. In fact, Agriculture Finance Committee Chair Bob Hess called proposals to help farmers get a fair price in an open market "dumb ideas." The picture is somewhat better on taxes - but again, there are flies in the ointment. We passed the largest tax- cut bill in state history - $1.6 billion in permanent income and other tax cuts - and a $1.3 billion one-time sales tax rebate. But an unfairly large share of those cuts and rebates were directed to a tiny fraction of our population - the wealthiest 6 percent of taxpayers, with incomes above $120,000. the permanent income tax cut for a fami- ly earning around $50,000 amounts to about $300, or about $6 a week. And Markets No. 1 Wheat ...................... 2.96 Soybeans ........................... 4.10 Corn ................................... 1.71 May 25, 1998 No. 1 Wheat ...................... 3.60 Soybeans ........................... 5.91 Corn ................................... 2.06 Prairie Five menu Reservations may be made by calling the Senior Center. When requesting a meal call the Senior Center the day prior to eating at 839- 3555 before 5 p.m. Tuesday, May 25 Turkey/Dressing, Mashed Potatoes/Gravy, Peas, Pumpkin Custard, Whole Wheat Bread Wednesday, May 26 Pork Chop, Augratin Potatoes, Wisconsin Blend Vegs., Fruited Jello, Rye Bread Thursday, May 27 Roast Beef Commercial, Mashed Potatoes/Gravy, Candied Carrots, Sherbet, Whole Wheat Bread Friday, May 28 Ham Balls, Baked Potato, Cabbage/Pineapple Sld, Cookie or Bar, Raisin Bread Monday, May 31 Memorial Day Holiday INDEPENDENT WANT ADS PAY Open house for Signe Hans' 81st An open house honoring Signe Hans on her 81sv birthday will be held at the Clinton Memorial Building on Saturday, June 5th from 2to4 p.m. Everyone is invited. No gifts please. Historical Society seeks bicycles If you've got an old bicycle, or an old tricycle, you can help the Big Stone County Historical Society with it's July Special Display. Each month the Society features a different collection, supplied by various people who are willing to loan an item, or a '011ection, for just one month, For instance, recently, Norm Shelsta's shaving mug collection was featured. In July, the Society would like to feature bicycles in honor of the tenth anniversary of The Ride Across Minnesota (TRAM), and it's return to Ortonville as the kick-off city. The Society will display photos from previous TRAM starts, along with a collection of T-shirts from each of the years TRAM started in Ortonville. Any residents that have TRAM memorabilia they would be willing to have on display for one month, can contact the museum at 839-3359, and leave your name and phone number, along with a description of the item. In addition the Society would like to have a general display about biking. They would love to have old bicycles, tricycles, or unicycles on display, on a loan basis. If readers have other collections they are willing to loan for future display, contact LaVerne Docring, at: Big Stone County Historical Society, R2, Box 31, Ortonville, MN 56278, or call 320-839-3359. NEW ARRIVAL... JOE BOXER CLOTHES We have Joe Boxer Shirts, Shorts ............ Orl ..... Pullovers! Ortonville, MN 56278 320-839.3122 Hours: Mon..Fd. 9am-6pm; Sat. 9am-4pm I was deeply disappointed that it took almost five months and four attempts to pass the "immediate" rebate. We provided more state school aid - but not nearly enough to help all the schools that are running into financial problems, cutting programs and increasing class sizes. Higher educa- tion got more money, but student aid was redirected toward high-income students attending private colleges. Why couldn't we redirect aid to peo- ple going to technical college in hopes of finding a better job? This session also saw the reversal of last year's compromise on feedlots. The rules that prevented a single oper- ator from placing thousands of ani- mals in a small area without environ- mental review are being repealed without public comment. The authors the proposal say it will save money for the small hog producer. It sure will - it will put him out of business. The only thing this will do is give an advantage to the mega-producers. Small and mid-sized producers won't be able to compete with corporately financed large feedlots. On issue after issue, It almost seemed like the House Republicans who formed the majority this session were ignoring or penalizing Rural Minnesota. I suppose that's not sur- prising when you realize that the leg- islators hold key committee chair- manships and leadership positions were overwhelmingly from the Twin Cities suburbs. * The Tax Committee chair is from Minnetonka and the Property Tax chair from Edina. * The K-12 education chair is from Bloomington. * The Transportation and Transportation Finance chairs are from Chanhassen and Chaska. * The chief author of the agricul- ture and environment finance bill is from Stillwater! This is precisely the result I was afraid of when these chairmanship appointments were announced at the start of the legislative session. It seems clear that the Republican cau- cus operates by and for the Twin Cities suburbs. They represent dis- tricts with strong economies, plenty of jobs and no farms in crisis. And they don't seem to have much sympathy for people in rural farm communities or Main Street businesses. Meanwhile, the Republicans are trumpeting their success in cutting taxes. Cutting taxes is easy - it's the easiest vote any lawmaker can take. What's more difficult is doing the responsible things that aren't so popu- lar. So far, the House Republican majority proved it can do the easy things. It has not proved it can under- take the more difficult task of identi- fying and meeting the needs of our state, its people and its families. ( ouncil sets public hearing on city office relocat=on Ortonville's City Council set a date for a public hearing on the relocation of the city offices at its regular meet- ing Monday. Following a debate on relocation which has now spanned several months, Councilman George Elliott made the motion, stating, "Let's get this thing done with." Suggestions for relocating to Hilltop, the former Minnwest Bank building, the Masonic Lodge and other buildings now vacant have been suggested in the past months, along with the possibility of building a new facility near Big Stone Lake. The hearing will be held June 21 at 7 p.m. in one of the city's choices fir relocation, the upstairs of the former Masonic Ltxlge building. In other business last Monday night, Roger Bird, who had been appointed real estate consultant for the city recently, updated the council on the purchase of  tract of Otter Tail Power Company s land located west of First Street between County Road 30 (Dike Road) which connects Ottoaville and Big Stone City, SD, and Highway 12. Bird stated Otter Tail is now involved in a voluntary cleanup of the site, and the land must now be remapped and platted, at a cost of between $2,000 and $3,000. Following Bird's presentation, councilman Mike Dorry stated, "What bothers me is they keep saying 'acquiring', but they're actually gonm just give it to us. We should stop doing this and leave them alone for now, or I'm afraid they'll forget the whole thing." Bird stated he will be continuing to work with Otter Tail on acquiring the hand for the city, and will update the council perkxlically. INDEPENDENT WANT ADS PAY Baby shower for Micah, Morgan Manuel An open house baby shower for Micah and Morgan Manuel will be held this Saturday, May 29, 1999 at 10 a.m. at St. Pauls Church in Bellingham. Parents are Kyle and Jessica Manuel of St. Cloud. i WE WILL BE CLOSED Monday, May 31st in honor of MEMORIAL DAY. Have a safe and happy holiday weekend: MINNWEST BANK ORTONVILLE ,,,, MINNV$T SANK CdlOt, 21 SE Second St. * Ortonville, MN 56278 Phone 320-83%2568 MoneyLine 1-888-616-2265 I II Imagine a Hail Insurance Provider Who Understands... The difficult crop production decisions you have made in 1999. The energy and resources you will commit to produce a good crop. ; will dedicate our resources to help ou protect your crop. Call a Farm Credit Services Loan Officer or Insurance Specialist today. Together, we can rise to the challenge. Kathy Behrens Tim Hanson Warren Schoenherr Graceville, MN * 112 E. St. Paul Ave. (320) 748-7294 or (800) 450-7294 Farm Credit Services V At the heart of a growing America= www'farmcredit'clm i 1999 INDEPENDENT Page 9 ville Head Start holds uation ceremonies DIPLOMA is Nikole Stotesbery receiving her Arndt, Nikole is the daughter of Jennifer lie. Ortonville's Head Start Pre- school program held it's annual graduation ceremonies last Tuesday at the Ortonville National Guard Armory. Fifteen graduates took part in the program. The Head Start graduating class is shown above with their instructors. In front, left to right are Ashley Kaiser, Maria Miller, Courtney Meyer, Dylan Koch, Amy Dockter, Shannon Karels, Kara Helgeson and Jackson Zemke. In back left to right are teacher- Vicki Arndt, Destiny Eastman, Tara Freeberg, William Rosenstiel, Nikole Stotesbery, Nathan Nelson, Caleb Tollakson, Christopher Weber, foster grandparent- Jean Ulrich, in back and teacher assistant- Kathy Nelson. The following donated their time, money and/or services to the Head Start program, which are much appreciated by the teachers and families: Ortonville School, Dave Kelzer and the Ortonville Fire Dept., Pizza Ranch, Dr. Winther's Office, Ortonville Post Office, Ortonville Hospital, Lou's Greenhouse, Ortonviile Flower Shop, Watertown Zoo, Doug and Renee McKinney, Harley Helgeson, Lori B's, Bill's Super Valu Plus, Elmer's Drive-In, Ortonville Armory, Big Stone Bowl and Unity Square. school news '.s K-2 will be trip of this 26. They rings Granite, bird exhibit at will finish the Ortonville with your eat at Lake vith screw-on 'child wear his/her Committee the students, who helped ground fund- to ALL to set up part June 1 at et at the at the City :.south end of Is coached by girls softball lack of girls are welcome to Ranch, they will visit the Henrich & Sons cement plant. Sounds like a fun- filled day for them. Wednesday, May 26 Field trip for K-2 to Ortonville & Milbank Thursday, May 27 Last day of school for students Friday, May 28 - Last day of school for teachers June 7 - 11 - Bible School at Trinity June 14 - 25 - Swimming lessons at LqP Valley High MENU Breakfast Monday--Frosted donuts, cheese sticks, apple juice, 1% milk. Tuesday--Assorted cereals, toast, grape-apple juice, 1% milk. Wednesday--French toast sticks, breakfast links, orange juice, 1% milk Thursday--Assorted donuts, cheese slices, apple juice, 1% milk. Lunch Monday--Cheese pizza, lettuce salad, orange slices, apple crisp, skim chocolate milk. TuesdayCook's Choice Wednesday--Hotdogs on bun, nacho chips with cheese sauce, apple and orange slices, 1% milk. Thursday--Ham & cheese subs, cornchips, banana, bread, 1% milk. All practices Scheduled for for Hope Olson Bridal shower set es 3-6 went to on their on Friday. lye Glass and to They Historic nch at Pizza There will be an open house bridal shower honoring Hope Olson, daughter of Lyle and Betty Berglund, bride-to-be of David Bill, at Zion Lutheran Church, Appleton on Thursday, June 3, 1999 at 7 p.m. Save your paper and your bow, put your gift in a paper bag, add a can of food instead, then watch their cupboard overflow ....... HOUSE Rc4n Cutting at LIFETOUOH Lackluster session for rural Minnesota By Rep. Doug Peterson The 1999 legislative session ended schedule on Monday, May 17. And while it certainly did see some posi- tive developments, from the rural per- spective this session was extremely unproductive. Perhaps the great failing was the fact that the farm price crisis was almost completely ignored. While the Legislature did provide emergency farm assistance of $4 an acre - which is a little more than the price of a bushel of beans - we did very little to address the root causes of the price crisis. The House Republican majori- ty seemed unwilling or unable to chal- lenge the trends toward corporate control and corporate concentration in agriculture. In fact, Agriculture Finance Committee Chair Bob Hess called proposals to help farmers get a fair price in an open market "dumb ideas." The picture is somewhat better on taxes - but again, there are flies in the ointment. We passed the largest tax- cut bill in state history - $1.6 billion in permanent income and other tax cuts - and a $1.3 billion one-time sales tax rebate. But an unfairly large share of those cuts and rebates were directed to a tiny fraction of our population - the wealthiest 6 percent of taxpayers, with incomes above $120,000. the permanent income tax cut for a fami- ly earning around $50,000 amounts to about $300, or about $6 a week. And Markets No. 1 Wheat ...................... 2.96 Soybeans ........................... 4.10 Corn ................................... 1.71 May 25, 1998 No. 1 Wheat ...................... 3.60 Soybeans ........................... 5.91 Corn ................................... 2.06 Prairie Five menu Reservations may be made by calling the Senior Center. When requesting a meal call the Senior Center the day prior to eating at 839- 3555 before 5 p.m. Tuesday, May 25 Turkey/Dressing, Mashed Potatoes/Gravy, Peas, Pumpkin Custard, Whole Wheat Bread Wednesday, May 26 Pork Chop, Augratin Potatoes, Wisconsin Blend Vegs., Fruited Jello, Rye Bread Thursday, May 27 Roast Beef Commercial, Mashed Potatoes/Gravy, Candied Carrots, Sherbet, Whole Wheat Bread Friday, May 28 Ham Balls, Baked Potato, Cabbage/Pineapple Sld, Cookie or Bar, Raisin Bread Monday, May 31 Memorial Day Holiday INDEPENDENT WANT ADS PAY Open house for Signe Hans' 81st An open house honoring Signe Hans on her 81sv birthday will be held at the Clinton Memorial Building on Saturday, June 5th from 2to4 p.m. Everyone is invited. No gifts please. Historical Society seeks bicycles If you've got an old bicycle, or an old tricycle, you can help the Big Stone County Historical Society with it's July Special Display. Each month the Society features a different collection, supplied by various people who are willing to loan an item, or a '011ection, for just one month, For instance, recently, Norm Shelsta's shaving mug collection was featured. In July, the Society would like to feature bicycles in honor of the tenth anniversary of The Ride Across Minnesota (TRAM), and it's return to Ortonville as the kick-off city. The Society will display photos from previous TRAM starts, along with a collection of T-shirts from each of the years TRAM started in Ortonville. Any residents that have TRAM memorabilia they would be willing to have on display for one month, can contact the museum at 839-3359, and leave your name and phone number, along with a description of the item. In addition the Society would like to have a general display about biking. They would love to have old bicycles, tricycles, or unicycles on display, on a loan basis. If readers have other collections they are willing to loan for future display, contact LaVerne Docring, at: Big Stone County Historical Society, R2, Box 31, Ortonville, MN 56278, or call 320-839-3359. NEW ARRIVAL... JOE BOXER CLOTHES We have Joe Boxer Shirts, Shorts ............ Orl ..... Pullovers! Ortonville, MN 56278 320-839.3122 Hours: Mon..Fd. 9am-6pm; Sat. 9am-4pm I was deeply disappointed that it took almost five months and four attempts to pass the "immediate" rebate. We provided more state school aid - but not nearly enough to help all the schools that are running into financial problems, cutting programs and increasing class sizes. Higher educa- tion got more money, but student aid was redirected toward high-income students attending private colleges. Why couldn't we redirect aid to peo- ple going to technical college in hopes of finding a better job? This session also saw the reversal of last year's compromise on feedlots. The rules that prevented a single oper- ator from placing thousands of ani- mals in a small area without environ- mental review are being repealed without public comment. The authors the proposal say it will save money for the small hog producer. It sure will - it will put him out of business. The only thing this will do is give an advantage to the mega-producers. Small and mid-sized producers won't be able to compete with corporately financed large feedlots. On issue after issue, It almost seemed like the House Republicans who formed the majority this session were ignoring or penalizing Rural Minnesota. I suppose that's not sur- prising when you realize that the leg- islators hold key committee chair- manships and leadership positions were overwhelmingly from the Twin Cities suburbs. * The Tax Committee chair is from Minnetonka and the Property Tax chair from Edina. * The K-12 education chair is from Bloomington. * The Transportation and Transportation Finance chairs are from Chanhassen and Chaska. * The chief author of the agricul- ture and environment finance bill is from Stillwater! This is precisely the result I was afraid of when these chairmanship appointments were announced at the start of the legislative session. It seems clear that the Republican cau- cus operates by and for the Twin Cities suburbs. They represent dis- tricts with strong economies, plenty of jobs and no farms in crisis. And they don't seem to have much sympathy for people in rural farm communities or Main Street businesses. Meanwhile, the Republicans are trumpeting their success in cutting taxes. Cutting taxes is easy - it's the easiest vote any lawmaker can take. What's more difficult is doing the responsible things that aren't so popu- lar. So far, the House Republican majority proved it can do the easy things. It has not proved it can under- take the more difficult task of identi- fying and meeting the needs of our state, its people and its families. ( ouncil sets public hearing on city office relocat=on Ortonville's City Council set a date for a public hearing on the relocation of the city offices at its regular meet- ing Monday. Following a debate on relocation which has now spanned several months, Councilman George Elliott made the motion, stating, "Let's get this thing done with." Suggestions for relocating to Hilltop, the former Minnwest Bank building, the Masonic Lodge and other buildings now vacant have been suggested in the past months, along with the possibility of building a new facility near Big Stone Lake. The hearing will be held June 21 at 7 p.m. in one of the city's choices fir relocation, the upstairs of the former Masonic Ltxlge building. In other business last Monday night, Roger Bird, who had been appointed real estate consultant for the city recently, updated the council on the purchase of  tract of Otter Tail Power Company s land located west of First Street between County Road 30 (Dike Road) which connects Ottoaville and Big Stone City, SD, and Highway 12. Bird stated Otter Tail is now involved in a voluntary cleanup of the site, and the land must now be remapped and platted, at a cost of between $2,000 and $3,000. Following Bird's presentation, councilman Mike Dorry stated, "What bothers me is they keep saying 'acquiring', but they're actually gonm just give it to us. We should stop doing this and leave them alone for now, or I'm afraid they'll forget the whole thing." Bird stated he will be continuing to work with Otter Tail on acquiring the hand for the city, and will update the council perkxlically. INDEPENDENT WANT ADS PAY Baby shower for Micah, Morgan Manuel An open house baby shower for Micah and Morgan Manuel will be held this Saturday, May 29, 1999 at 10 a.m. at St. Pauls Church in Bellingham. Parents are Kyle and Jessica Manuel of St. Cloud. i WE WILL BE CLOSED Monday, May 31st in honor of MEMORIAL DAY. Have a safe and happy holiday weekend: MINNWEST BANK ORTONVILLE ,,,, MINNV$T SANK CdlOt, 21 SE Second St. * Ortonville, MN 56278 Phone 320-83%2568 MoneyLine 1-888-616-2265 I II Imagine a Hail Insurance Provider Who Understands... The difficult crop production decisions you have made in 1999. The energy and resources you will commit to produce a good crop. ; will dedicate our resources to help ou protect your crop. Call a Farm Credit Services Loan Officer or Insurance Specialist today. Together, we can rise to the challenge. Kathy Behrens Tim Hanson Warren Schoenherr Graceville, MN * 112 E. St. Paul Ave. (320) 748-7294 or (800) 450-7294 Farm Credit Services V At the heart of a growing America= www'farmcredit'clm i 1999 INDEPENDENT Page 9