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June 2, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
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THURSDAY, JUNE 2, 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT " .................. , , PAGE I " The OrtonviIle Independent PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY by the Farmers &amp; Merchants Printing Co. A. B. Kaercher, President Frank Harris, Vice-president L. E. Lundgren, Secretary Walter Dinnell, Treasurer OARD OF DIRECTORS A. S. Halls John Kaercher John Witte Walter Dinnell Chester Olson L.E. Lundgren Frank Harris Grace F. Kaercher A. B. Kaercher L. A. Kaercher Managing Editor "CYrus Erickson . Associate Editor Entered as second-class matter Hay 18, 1920, at the post ofice at Ortonville, Minn., under the Act of Marc._h 3, 1879. S.BUBSCRIPTION $2.00 PER YEAR Advertising Rates on Application r--,F.Orei<n A--dve---rtising Representative MERICAN PRESSASSOCIATION t MEMORIAL DAY. Memorial Day services were indeed impressive and solemn, and carried home to every heart a lesson of duty, and in a most touching and sincere manner paid tribute and homage to the heroic dead, and'to all others who have served their country. Words fail--the vocabulary of mor- tal man is wholly inadequate to ex- Press the thots and emotions of the sou1 that swells within us as we con- template the great responsibility that rests upon every human being for either the things that have come to Pass or that will in the future come to Pass, by reason of their acts or Omissions. "Of all sad things of tongue and pen The Saddest are these it might have been.', It is useless to worry about the things we might have done, but ]t is of vital importance to reflect upon them as a guide to our future conduct. The kind Words of encouragoment that we ight have spoken instead of the ars9 ones; the many acts and deeds mdness that we might have per- rmed toward those who have gone; ne r g eat wars that we might have prevented by timely and united action; are all in the great history of the past and Serve only to show our fallibility dr Weaknesses, that future genera- s maY profit thereby. :ay God speed the day when shall ue fulfilled the prophecies of Isaiah hh sa! d "And he shall judge among nations, and shall rebuke many PeOple; and they shall beat their SWords into plowshares, and their 'S-!nto pruning hooks; nation -"u nolt lift sword against nation, neither sha  raoe,, ll they learn war any  FARM LOAN ACT. __ rue fundamental industry of the ountry is agriculture. If that lan- :es and suffers depre.sion, all the r: operated by owners, 68,512 by N aagers, and 2,455,879 by tenants: _..earJy one-third of our population are 1re.rested, directly or indirectb-, in srlculture. This is a sufficient state- h: t.to indicate the importance of . . industry, but it is not all that might be s " and rod. Every man, woman, , CMld in the country who has to llav food and wear clothes is con- ed. What we sometimes hear ellaed as the "farmer problem" is h,lY the problem of every citizen. :.=aer we are farmers, or merely eTum ers, we must all move fmvard lvl.ackward, suffer or prosper, along cut those engaged directly in agri- ural pursuits. t beCOmes, jtherefore, appropriate .e.we are considering any meas-  .nat is put forward as having a .rlng or any bf those roblems to er - P , . to and urge any real, substan- :l, helpful proposal which might be Vane ,,., ed as a solution of any of the ,:ylems and offer any relief" against t- o the difficulties "which confront u7 e engaged in agriculture. _Very effort put forth that might e for u sound and healthy agri- _?ure, and to encourage and stimu- fo those who produce the Nation's , Should be favored and advocated. MALICIOUS CRITICISM. This is no tine for political claptrap buncombe in congress or any other . " g, and militarism on the other " may be forever overthro,m anti aeavay with in order that sane ti;haU st government may be estab- b?a hese ends cannot be accomplished but- a.opeless division of the masses e., niy by the united and determined ipe" " . p - l [son have special privileges. fin Ylng the blame on some one else, -_ "g fault howlin cal mit, abus- ot, ms man or that, this class or the ,,, "r class or assuming the attitude  tt I am holier than thou" will not bring about the desired result. Condemning everything that is big is as foolish as it is to condenm eve- rything that is little. The big busi- .'less grew out of small business well planned and conducted. The bigger the thing the better if it is a good thing. A PLEDGE TO AMERICA. Memorial Day is behind us. From the graves of our comrades we have retraced our steps. Havin paid them full honor and having enshrined their memory deep in ou hearts, let us learn the lesson of their .acrifice. Let our brand of patriotism be as was iheirs, so that we too may be willing to lay down our lives for our country. Let us repeat in our hearts this pledge to the land which we love so well. "I am proud that the United States of America is my country, the'Stars and Stripes my flag. No ,matter from what race I sprang, or what natio: may claim my friendship, my watch- word hall be "America First." A citizen by birth or choice, t will ever strive to make my government re- vered at home anti respected abroad. "I will cherish and uphold the prin- ciples of freedom, equality, justice and humanity. I will abide by the decisions of the majority and respect the rights of the minority. I will never discriminate against any citi- zen because of his religion. I will support the constitution of the United States and oppose every organization destructive to my country's welfare. I will follow no party that does not salute the Flag and keep step to the music of the Union. I pray God to bless my country and her people. "For my country's sake I will ever strive to be a better citizen. I be- lieve that the laborer is entitled to fair wages, reasonable hours and pro- per working conditions., I believe in the sacredness of the lame and the marriage tie. I will do my best to keep physically strong, morally clean and mentally active, and by voice and by vote, take an intelligent part in the government of my country. "I hold in grateful memory the gal- lant deeds of the men who carried our flag thru death ant1 danger. I will make my gratitude practical by helping in every way to restore them to a place of honor a ud prosperity as worthy citizens of this great nation. "I pledge to America the love of my i heart, a true, constant and absolute loyalty; I pledge respect and obedi- ence to her laws. I pledge my pro- party, my honor, and, if need be, my life, to defend her. I pledge allegiance to my Flag and to the, Republic Ifor which it stands, one nation indi;isible, with liberty and justice for all." --American Legion. CARE. OF MILK IN THE HOME. Division of Sanitation, Minnesota State Board of Health. Every customer has a right to ex- pect a dealer to deliver him clean, cold milk in a clean container, but should not hold the dealer responsible for milk which is spoiled thru care- lessness after it reaches the home. The oft-repeated warning that milk be placed promptly in the refrigerator, m a separat compartment from meats, fish, or other foods that might give it a foreign flavor should not be forgotten by the housewife. If no refrigerator is available, a small box can easily be made, containing a flour tin surrounded by sawdust. The bot- tles of milk can be placed in the tin together with a snmll quantity of ice. The sawduct acts as an insulator, and the milk can be kept fully as well, or even better, than is often the case with the ordinary refrigerator. Every housewife should heed the following simple rules: 1. Insist on getting milk in a bot- tle or other sealed package. 2. Have the dealer leave the bot- tles in a cool place, protected from the sun, flies, cats and dogs. 3. Take the bottles in as soon as possible after delivery, and place at once in the refrigerator or on ice. Milk shoald be kept at a temperatm, e below 50 degrees F. until used. 4. Keep the milk or cream in the original package until needed for use. 5. Do not remove milk from the ice box until you are ready to use it. 6. Wash the mouth of the bottle with clean water before pouring out the milk or cream. 7. Be sure that all receptacles for milk are clean. 8. Pour out only as much milk as is needed for immediate use; do not pour the unused portion back. 9. Never take a bottle of milk into a sick room 10. Wash milk bottles as soon as empty and do not use milk utensik, for any other purpose. Light for Reading. So much literature of all kinds is offered to the farmer today that he has a pretty hard time to read what he does select. In the sumer time field work be- gins at a very early hour and lasts until late. A man comes in pretty much tired out with the day's work. Getting-up time, as he looks at it, is pretty close to going-to-bed-time and he wants to use every available min- ute for sleep. But when winter rolls around with short days, long nights and c(mparatively little work any way, the situation is somewhat dif- ferent. There may be enough work to occupy the morning and afternoon a, 1 Ten for 10cents. Handy size. Dealers carryboth. 10 for 10c; 20 for 20z. It's toasted. IHlml0000, HnlmmlHil00llml,ullnH,ii00lNiiiii 'NII,,II I" Ideal in Name- Ideal in Performance Over 20,000 owners of Rumely Ideal separators know what genuine threshing satisfaction really is. For they are using the most scientifically designed machine obtain- able--the one with over 80 years of manufacturing experience back of it--the one with a well-earned reputation for fast, clean threshing. It takes all varieties of grain in any conditlon--headed or bundled, long straw or short, wet or dry, in good weather or bad. And it putt a//the grain where you wat it--in the wagon--not in the stack. Vibration is eliminated by a perfectly counterbalanced cylinder which has the effect of relieving the bearings of wear and keepiilg the shafts in proper alignment. And, instead of having to stop the Ideal and crawl into and under it to make adjustments and do the oiling, you do this work from the outside while the china is running. We can offer you five sizes: 2x36, 28x44, 28x48, 32x52 and 36x60 --all standard in design, all possessing large capacit and thormigh cleaning. And remember we also handle the famous OilPuil tractor. A. H. SENRAU Odessa, Minnesota. ] hours in a casual sort of fashion, but when evening comes there are spare I hours to while away. I Now the up-to-date farmer wants I to keep posted on the latest agricul-I tural methods as well as the news of the day and he finds the evenings best for such work. He finds them much better, too, since electric light has come to his aid. Thanks to the wealth of good and instructive literature now at the far- mer's service and to electricity and the other modern conveniences which give him leisure, the farmer of today can take full advantage of the educa- tional and receational chance that reading offers. Who was the fellow who said that an optimist was a man who carried a corkscrew ? The coming hot weather will see the launching of a series of whirl- Wind county I,egion rallies all over the Seventh Minnesota district, to be followed by a big district convention at Willmar July 5. Each county will vie with the others to boost Seventh District Legion membership higher than that of any other Minnesota dis- trict. Let Us Fill Your Grocery Order No matter what time of the day you call or phone us, we are always prepared to fill your requirements in food necessities. Is there anything in fresh Fruits, Vegetables, Canned or Bottled Goods you need today? We can supply it at most reasonable prices. Saeger's ( Grocery Phone 37 mb ':::  \\; S tyle 5 ub th:Vle2;:nY 00rTu00b::rt00e Clothes m a k e you body of the tire are forced in- look the way you do. If you want good ap- pearance you must wear good clothes. Our clothes are that kind. They are inex- pensive, too. See the new fabrics today. The New Style Shop ward, subjecting them to a se- vere strain that tends to separ- ate and break the cords. The extra thickness of the Michelin tread protects Michelin Cords against such shocks, and the extra rubber between the sof cords still further cushions and protects the tire against injury. Try a Michelin Cord. You'll find it lasts longer. Pufahl's Garage FORD PARTS AND FORD ACCESSORIES Get Your Wedding Stationery At THE INDEPENDENT, II I SIr.DAN $795 f. o. b. Detroit Can you think of any other passenger car that offers you so many advantages as the Ford Sedan? It is a car for evmTbody, everywhere. The business man finds it an asset in his business; the farmer has no end of uses for it, and when it is done with business, it does duty for the whole family. Order your Ford car now. Don't wait until the rush season comes. Just phone us or drop us a card. J. Arthur Mathews & Company Ortonville, Minnesota. i [ i i i m i m m THURSDAY, JUNE 2, 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT " .................. , , PAGE I " The OrtonviIle Independent PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY by the Farmers & Merchants Printing Co. A. B. Kaercher, President Frank Harris, Vice-president L. E. Lundgren, Secretary Walter Dinnell, Treasurer OARD OF DIRECTORS A. S. Halls John Kaercher John Witte Walter Dinnell Chester Olson L.E. Lundgren Frank Harris Grace F. Kaercher A. B. Kaercher L. A. Kaercher Managing Editor "CYrus Erickson . Associate Editor Entered as second-class matter Hay 18, 1920, at the post ofice at Ortonville, Minn., under the Act of Marc._h 3, 1879. S.BUBSCRIPTION $2.00 PER YEAR Advertising Rates on Application r--,F.Orei<n A--dve---rtising Representative MERICAN PRESSASSOCIATION t MEMORIAL DAY. Memorial Day services were indeed impressive and solemn, and carried home to every heart a lesson of duty, and in a most touching and sincere manner paid tribute and homage to the heroic dead, and'to all others who have served their country. Words fail--the vocabulary of mor- tal man is wholly inadequate to ex- Press the thots and emotions of the sou1 that swells within us as we con- template the great responsibility that rests upon every human being for either the things that have come to Pass or that will in the future come to Pass, by reason of their acts or Omissions. "Of all sad things of tongue and pen The Saddest are these it might have been.', It is useless to worry about the things we might have done, but ]t is of vital importance to reflect upon them as a guide to our future conduct. The kind Words of encouragoment that we ight have spoken instead of the ars9 ones; the many acts and deeds mdness that we might have per- rmed toward those who have gone; ne r g eat wars that we might have prevented by timely and united action; are all in the great history of the past and Serve only to show our fallibility dr Weaknesses, that future genera- s maY profit thereby. :ay God speed the day when shall ue fulfilled the prophecies of Isaiah hh sa! d "And he shall judge among nations, and shall rebuke many PeOple; and they shall beat their SWords into plowshares, and their 'S-!nto pruning hooks; nation -"u nolt lift sword against nation, neither sha  raoe,, ll they learn war any  FARM LOAN ACT. __ rue fundamental industry of the ountry is agriculture. If that lan- :es and suffers depre.sion, all the r: operated by owners, 68,512 by N aagers, and 2,455,879 by tenants: _..earJy one-third of our population are 1re.rested, directly or indirectb-, in srlculture. This is a sufficient state- h: t.to indicate the importance of . . industry, but it is not all that might be s " and rod. Every man, woman, , CMld in the country who has to llav food and wear clothes is con- ed. What we sometimes hear ellaed as the "farmer problem" is h,lY the problem of every citizen. :.=aer we are farmers, or merely eTum ers, we must all move fmvard lvl.ackward, suffer or prosper, along cut those engaged directly in agri- ural pursuits. t beCOmes, jtherefore, appropriate .e.we are considering any meas-  .nat is put forward as having a .rlng or any bf those roblems to er - P , . to and urge any real, substan- :l, helpful proposal which might be Vane ,,., ed as a solution of any of the ,:ylems and offer any relief" against t- o the difficulties "which confront u7 e engaged in agriculture. _Very effort put forth that might e for u sound and healthy agri- _?ure, and to encourage and stimu- fo those who produce the Nation's , Should be favored and advocated. MALICIOUS CRITICISM. This is no tine for political claptrap buncombe in congress or any other . " g, and militarism on the other " may be forever overthro,m anti aeavay with in order that sane ti;haU st government may be estab- b?a hese ends cannot be accomplished but- a.opeless division of the masses e., niy by the united and determined ipe" " . p - l [son have special privileges. fin Ylng the blame on some one else, -_ "g fault howlin cal mit, abus- ot, ms man or that, this class or the ,,, "r class or assuming the attitude  tt I am holier than thou" will not bring about the desired result. Condemning everything that is big is as foolish as it is to condenm eve- rything that is little. The big busi- .'less grew out of small business well planned and conducted. The bigger the thing the better if it is a good thing. A PLEDGE TO AMERICA. Memorial Day is behind us. From the graves of our comrades we have retraced our steps. Havin paid them full honor and having enshrined their memory deep in ou hearts, let us learn the lesson of their .acrifice. Let our brand of patriotism be as was iheirs, so that we too may be willing to lay down our lives for our country. Let us repeat in our hearts this pledge to the land which we love so well. "I am proud that the United States of America is my country, the'Stars and Stripes my flag. No ,matter from what race I sprang, or what natio: may claim my friendship, my watch- word hall be "America First." A citizen by birth or choice, t will ever strive to make my government re- vered at home anti respected abroad. "I will cherish and uphold the prin- ciples of freedom, equality, justice and humanity. I will abide by the decisions of the majority and respect the rights of the minority. I will never discriminate against any citi- zen because of his religion. I will support the constitution of the United States and oppose every organization destructive to my country's welfare. I will follow no party that does not salute the Flag and keep step to the music of the Union. I pray God to bless my country and her people. "For my country's sake I will ever strive to be a better citizen. I be- lieve that the laborer is entitled to fair wages, reasonable hours and pro- per working conditions., I believe in the sacredness of the lame and the marriage tie. I will do my best to keep physically strong, morally clean and mentally active, and by voice and by vote, take an intelligent part in the government of my country. "I hold in grateful memory the gal- lant deeds of the men who carried our flag thru death ant1 danger. I will make my gratitude practical by helping in every way to restore them to a place of honor a ud prosperity as worthy citizens of this great nation. "I pledge to America the love of my i heart, a true, constant and absolute loyalty; I pledge respect and obedi- ence to her laws. I pledge my pro- party, my honor, and, if need be, my life, to defend her. I pledge allegiance to my Flag and to the, Republic Ifor which it stands, one nation indi;isible, with liberty and justice for all." --American Legion. CARE. OF MILK IN THE HOME. Division of Sanitation, Minnesota State Board of Health. Every customer has a right to ex- pect a dealer to deliver him clean, cold milk in a clean container, but should not hold the dealer responsible for milk which is spoiled thru care- lessness after it reaches the home. The oft-repeated warning that milk be placed promptly in the refrigerator, m a separat compartment from meats, fish, or other foods that might give it a foreign flavor should not be forgotten by the housewife. If no refrigerator is available, a small box can easily be made, containing a flour tin surrounded by sawdust. The bot- tles of milk can be placed in the tin together with a snmll quantity of ice. The sawduct acts as an insulator, and the milk can be kept fully as well, or even better, than is often the case with the ordinary refrigerator. Every housewife should heed the following simple rules: 1. Insist on getting milk in a bot- tle or other sealed package. 2. Have the dealer leave the bot- tles in a cool place, protected from the sun, flies, cats and dogs. 3. Take the bottles in as soon as possible after delivery, and place at once in the refrigerator or on ice. Milk shoald be kept at a temperatm, e below 50 degrees F. until used. 4. Keep the milk or cream in the original package until needed for use. 5. Do not remove milk from the ice box until you are ready to use it. 6. Wash the mouth of the bottle with clean water before pouring out the milk or cream. 7. Be sure that all receptacles for milk are clean. 8. Pour out only as much milk as is needed for immediate use; do not pour the unused portion back. 9. Never take a bottle of milk into a sick room 10. Wash milk bottles as soon as empty and do not use milk utensik, for any other purpose. Light for Reading. So much literature of all kinds is offered to the farmer today that he has a pretty hard time to read what he does select. In the sumer time field work be- gins at a very early hour and lasts until late. A man comes in pretty much tired out with the day's work. Getting-up time, as he looks at it, is pretty close to going-to-bed-time and he wants to use every available min- ute for sleep. But when winter rolls around with short days, long nights and c(mparatively little work any way, the situation is somewhat dif- ferent. There may be enough work to occupy the morning and afternoon a, 1 Ten for 10cents. Handy size. Dealers carryboth. 10 for 10c; 20 for 20z. It's toasted. IHlml0000, HnlmmlHil00llml,ullnH,ii00lNiiiii 'NII,,II I" Ideal in Name- Ideal in Performance Over 20,000 owners of Rumely Ideal separators know what genuine threshing satisfaction really is. For they are using the most scientifically designed machine obtain- able--the one with over 80 years of manufacturing experience back of it--the one with a well-earned reputation for fast, clean threshing. It takes all varieties of grain in any conditlon--headed or bundled, long straw or short, wet or dry, in good weather or bad. And it putt a//the grain where you wat it--in the wagon--not in the stack. Vibration is eliminated by a perfectly counterbalanced cylinder which has the effect of relieving the bearings of wear and keepiilg the shafts in proper alignment. And, instead of having to stop the Ideal and crawl into and under it to make adjustments and do the oiling, you do this work from the outside while the china is running. We can offer you five sizes: 2x36, 28x44, 28x48, 32x52 and 36x60 --all standard in design, all possessing large capacit and thormigh cleaning. And remember we also handle the famous OilPuil tractor. A. H. SENRAU Odessa, Minnesota. ] hours in a casual sort of fashion, but when evening comes there are spare I hours to while away. I Now the up-to-date farmer wants I to keep posted on the latest agricul-I tural methods as well as the news of the day and he finds the evenings best for such work. He finds them much better, too, since electric light has come to his aid. Thanks to the wealth of good and instructive literature now at the far- mer's service and to electricity and the other modern conveniences which give him leisure, the farmer of today can take full advantage of the educa- tional and receational chance that reading offers. Who was the fellow who said that an optimist was a man who carried a corkscrew ? The coming hot weather will see the launching of a series of whirl- Wind county I,egion rallies all over the Seventh Minnesota district, to be followed by a big district convention at Willmar July 5. Each county will vie with the others to boost Seventh District Legion membership higher than that of any other Minnesota dis- trict. Let Us Fill Your Grocery Order No matter what time of the day you call or phone us, we are always prepared to fill your requirements in food necessities. Is there anything in fresh Fruits, Vegetables, Canned or Bottled Goods you need today? We can supply it at most reasonable prices. Saeger's ( Grocery Phone 37 mb ':::  \\; S tyle 5 ub th:Vle2;:nY 00rTu00b::rt00e Clothes m a k e you body of the tire are forced in- look the way you do. If you want good ap- pearance you must wear good clothes. Our clothes are that kind. They are inex- pensive, too. See the new fabrics today. The New Style Shop ward, subjecting them to a se- vere strain that tends to separ- ate and break the cords. The extra thickness of the Michelin tread protects Michelin Cords against such shocks, and the extra rubber between the sof cords still further cushions and protects the tire against injury. Try a Michelin Cord. You'll find it lasts longer. Pufahl's Garage FORD PARTS AND FORD ACCESSORIES Get Your Wedding Stationery At THE INDEPENDENT, II I SIr.DAN $795 f. o. b. Detroit Can you think of any other passenger car that offers you so many advantages as the Ford Sedan? It is a car for evmTbody, everywhere. The business man finds it an asset in his business; the farmer has no end of uses for it, and when it is done with business, it does duty for the whole family. Order your Ford car now. Don't wait until the rush season comes. Just phone us or drop us a card. J. Arthur Mathews & Company Ortonville, Minnesota. i [ i i i m i m m  0'SSEM'"AT'O" STORAGE 0'STR'S0T'O" PROH'S'TE0 THURSDAy SUNE 2 192l THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDEN'r The Ortonv|De Independent bring about the deid result, can eily be made, containing a flour hou in a casual sort of fashion, bm PUBLISHED EVERy THURSDAY by the Fame & Meraants Printing Ca A. B. Kaeher, President Frank Har Viee-psidcnt L. Y Lundgren, Sretar Waher Dinnell Tasurer nARD OF DIRECTORS A S IIIs Jnhn Kaercher Jnh Witte Witer Dinnel Cheter OIon L E, Lndgren Frank Hais Grace F Kaerch A B Kaeher  lnaing Edinr "'rui rikn ABoat J;ditor lEtered as ond-el ,nat a 1, 1920 at the post e a Ottve, nn nnder the Act  sh , h. ' 8UBSCRIPrION $200 PER YEAR Advertising Rates on AppIition tn the land which we love so wclh 4, Keep the mi k or crea n n tl "1 am proud that the Unitedtatcs original package un need fo u of America is my country, the Stas 5, Do net mo m k f am he e amt Stripes my nag. No matter from ,nx until yon :n read,, e u e what race I sprang, oz what nato, . Wash he men h" of the hotti ,nay rialto my fre,ulship, my watch- with clean wa er be o e pou ng eu 'or, I ahan be "America First." A he m k o e  m c t zen by birth or choice,  ,,ll ever 7. lo sure that all receptacles fat trve to make my overnment re milk a eleam ,'erl at home and respected ahead. , Pour eat only as much milk as , "I ,il cherish and uphold the plln- needed for mmediate use; do not pore oiples of frdom, e, u tv us ce Um uT/ne<l portion back. an, ,umanRy, I will abl,ie by the S. Never take a bottle of milk nc decisio,ls of the majority mi respect a sick roam. the l"ghts of the mnorkv w 10. Wash ik bottles as soon a never diserimhlate against" any clti empty and do not use nfilk utensi] l zen because of his zligon. I will for y other purpo*e. uppert the constitution of the United MEMORIAL DAY. Memorial Day services were indeed 'mpressive and so,cam," and earri,l Eo to eer h g  sre  a most to,chin State and oppese ever oanton Lgh f Ren ar paid tiute and home to dctve to my ntr elf I  So mch litera u e o a ld  hvee hCedeatherandtOeonntry.a others who w, t foo o paty that doe not! offered o he farmer today tha h t Wor fai--the ocabary o mo  sa ne the Fa  keep step tn the! ha   e y had t e to d h   ' woy nadete to e s,e of th U a,oa  pry God to I he doe se ec e  the thot ad oton of the ble my eontry ad her people  I the er tme fiekl ork be o! tha .... i ................. r tYCr Yttrsak.zIe w]lJle  ........... y ................ template the great responsibi ity that strl a e i  n. . un a e A man mes in ptt lieve that the [abor is entitled t much tired out with the day's work e sis upon every human being fo fair wages, anable hou and pt. Gettlng.up time  he oaks at it, is ther th e thing s ha have come to ss or that will in the futu e P]r wrkmg condtUons. I beheve ir ptty close to going.to.bedtime and s, by reaso of he r  s or cldness of the fome and the h a wan s o u e e 'cry available rain omissions, marriage tie. I will do my best t ute for s p Bu when winter rolls , keep phymca]ly strong, moraEy clea aroun d w h hot days, long nights ....... T], r, addestd th ................. a the it might have :d r:ntatll:ct'v ' llI, i bY tvlem ! .................................. , been,,, v e, m n sen pa n wny he s uaton s omewhat dlf the government of my country, ferent. There may be ough work :t i s USeless to worry ahout the "I hoM in grateful memory the gal. to oupv le momng and afternoon lgwemight havedone, but]tisof Innt deeds of the men who earriedl "" ]mpotan to reflect upon len our flag thru death and danger. I ---- a guide to our future eonduc. The wlil make my gatitude practical h, -- -- d Word s of oeouragoment that we helping ia even, way to restore them #. - raed toward thos e who have gone '*I pledge to America the love of my fl" at wars hat we m ght ha' oyalty ; I pledge spt and obedi.  ntedby meyduntlacton en to her laws. I pledge my pro- ", , I[ tn the great hlstory of the pasi petty, my honor, and, if need be my ]  .| erve only to show our fa/libilit eakaess, that futu genera, to my Flag and N the. Republic for which it stands, one natim indl-isiMe. may profit theby. - ha I Y Cod peed the day when ia with liberty and justice for alL" Ifil]ed the prophecies of sa --America n Lgiom id "An d h e shall udge amen ....... ...... t00,STRIKZ// fattens, an d shall rebuke maa) ;  ad they shall bent theh Division of Son, Minneta Into plowares and he not lift sword agahs naton Ery customer has a right to ex- ATT ect a dler to deliver him clean r hai I they leanz war an cold milk in a clean container, but should no hold the den er sponsihle : .f theTIIE FARM LOAN ACT nental indu o try is agrleult. If that ]an. ees and suffer deps on, a he 'p e mt feel the painful effects uut n enjoy peanent pro '!ty f fars a abandoned, if ectnlture is made unpfitable, and [ aditions of ral life are herd aiuUng. -- the United States the a 9'242 farms . Of these, 3,924851 Operated by oers, 68,512 by lltul. Thi s is a sufficient tate- c ,ndcate the importance of tadutry, but it is not MI that h be said Eve T man, woman food ....... d wear tc]Ythsl. s h cot. L Wha t we sometimes hear aaed as the "faer prob[em"i Y the pblem of every citizen. r w e a farmers, or mealy s, we mt all move fom.ard old, suffer or prosper, along ho engaged dictly in ari- al pursuits. eeOmes, thefore, appropriate we are eonsldeing any mean- tat i s put foard as having a g on ay bf tho pmblem to to $m d Urge any rea substan: IPfui proposal which might be red  a solution of any of the s an d offer any llef against f th e difficulties which nfmnt ngaged in agriculture. r effort put forth that might for  round and healthy agrl- and to encourage d stimu- hose who produce the Nation's hnul,I he favored and advocated. MALICIOUS CRITICISM. or is no tie for pnlitical claptrap I Uaeorabe in eongss nr any other aee but it is the time of all times eal onstctive. honest and ]fish genies in the intrusts araaaity that the tide of hal he vc a , s - ag and anarchy on the end hand, ehaPfiteng, unscmpulo money handbag, and militarism on the other do may be forever overthwn and  away with in order that sane llhhedJa st goverent may I estab- hyZa aes ends cannot be accomp/ishe  a hopeIess division of the masses egto my by the united and detrained theft of all right thinking people to that every perso have equal rtamty h.le no pe s I ef  w, ran or eass La son have pal pry eges . s ng lh blmne on some our else i ndin fmqt, howling eaiv.mity abus- Ioth th s ran or that h s c s or the ,, h }la s or assumlag the attitud hat am holier than thou" will no1 Condemning eye,thing that is big tin surrounded by sawdust, The bet when evening emes there an spa is as foolish as it s to enndemn eve- tics of ,milk can be placed in the tin hours to whle away. rything tat is Iittle. The blg bast together with a small quantity nf ce Nnw the Ul o-date armer t aess glow out of small business well thTne wdUctlk ts as an insulator, an(l to keep posted'on he ate t aglS-eul:_ planned and comlueted. The bigger  mll;ektcan be kept fully as well, or carol meth ..... e a the ne,,s he hilg thc better Jf Jt Js a good e n e er* thn 1 of he ease of  ay a 1 he fimls the eveniqg thing, wth the ordinary refrigerator, EvelTi bes o uch we k. He finds them -- housewife should heed the followm I much better too since eec e g A PI.EI)GE TO AMERICA. snaple rules: has come to his aid .............................. t e 1' nSlt n g;ttmJaen'lzkein a bet" T .............................. the graxes of our comrades e have o o er sea e p ag, ns rest ,e I testate now at he far tlaced our steps Having paid them tl Z Have the dealer leave the bet mer,s  w ce and o e ec city and fulI honor aml haxlng enshrJoed their es m a cool place, protected frmr he o her me ern convert ens'wh ch momoly deep in aug healts let u thesn,_fl/es,tsand dog& learn the lesson of their m trice. Let 3 Tkb a e the bottles in as soon a gvehmcan ake fueSUe'a vatagehe fml eel the eduea_ ay ,ur brand of patriotism be as was pass] e a te dehvezT, and place at tons a d aa anal chance that hob% so that  too ma) be willing ,mce h the cfiigelator or on ice readin offels e lay down our lives for our country, iMiik shoJd be kept at a tempe)atu g , Let u lepeat in our hearts this pledge belo,, 50 degrees F, until used Who was the fello ho said that an optimist was a man nhe carried a corkscrew ? The coming hot weather ill see the launching of a series of whirl- wind eouoty ]gion rallie all over the eventh Minnesota district, to he followed by a his district convention at WH/ma? Jury 5 i:aeh ommty will vie with tim others to boost Seventh Dstrict Legion membership higher than ha o a y o her M naeta d s- trict Clothes make you look the way you do. If you want good ap- pearance you must wear good clothes. Our clothes are that kind. They are inex- nsive, too. See the new fabcs today. The New Style Shop B. PERS$ON, Propelor, PAG $ for milk which is poiled thin ea- leanness after it aehes the horr, e. The Ten for 10ccnt HandF nft-peated warJng that milk be size. Dealerscarryboth. placed pmptly in the refgerator, |0 for 10c; 20 [or 20c. in a separate mpartment from It's tted. meats, fish, or other fods that might forgotten by the housewife. If no refrigeratar is available, a small box Ideal in Performance 1 t bey  truing tb mtt aclm  eha obt o ruble -- t he e wlth  $0 ya of muurlng eevieae bk o f It--the  vAth a ll.ed puta f fma, 1 threshing. It tak all vaetes of g*ah in y dovheado  banded, lg tw  h, we or dr/, In good wtbef  bad. And it putt a/l the grain wh you wat it--in the wag--not in the tk, Vlbratlo h lmnated by a per fctly tbala c]lad which h the efft of rcticvlag the bearings of  and keel tt thaft tn pop lmm An4, inad of havn| tO atop the Ideva emd wl into mad d it to mak adjumt$ d do the oiling, y do hi k from We  off  fl sites: 2z36, 244, 28x4, 32x52 and 36x60 1 standard ha design, I possessing Ige capacitY nod though t'A cmbex  al* haodic tl f ORpuli tracts. A. FI. SEMRAU Let Us Fill Your Grocery Order No matter what time of the day you call or phone us we are always prepared to fill your requirements in food necessities. is the anything i n fresh Fits. Vegetables, Cned or Bottled Goods Saeger's ! ' Grocery V.)G)<k.., ' STONE BRUISEI "ard, subjecting them to a se- vere strain that tends to separ- ate and break tlm cords. The extra thickness of the Michelin tad protet. Mieheli Cords agmnst such shks, and the ext rubber betwn the layer of rls still further cushions and pteets the ti against hLulT. Try a Michelin Cord. You'll find it lasts longer. Pufahl's Garage FORD PARTS AND FORD ACCESSORIES t Yr Wedding Statiery At THE INDEPiNDENT. SEDAN[ $795 f. o. b. Detroit' Can you think of any other passe.4ger car that offers you so many advantages as the Ford Sedan? It is a car for everybody, everywhere. The business man finds it an asset in his husiness; the fmmr has no end of uses for it, and when it is done with business, it does duty for tbe whole family. Order your Ford car now. Don't wait until the rush season comes. Just phone us or drop us a card. J. Arthur Mathews & Company Ortonville, Minnesota. THURSDAY, JUNE 2, 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT " .................. , , PAGE I " The OrtonviIle Independent PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY by the Farmers & Merchants Printing Co. A. B. Kaercher, President Frank Harris, Vice-president L. E. Lundgren, Secretary Walter Dinnell, Treasurer OARD OF DIRECTORS A. S. Halls John Kaercher John Witte Walter Dinnell Chester Olson L.E. Lundgren Frank Harris Grace F. Kaercher A. B. Kaercher L. A. Kaercher Managing Editor "CYrus Erickson . Associate Editor Entered as second-class matter Hay 18, 1920, at the post ofice at Ortonville, Minn., under the Act of Marc._h 3, 1879. S.BUBSCRIPTION $2.00 PER YEAR Advertising Rates on Application r--,F.Orei<n A--dve---rtising Representative MERICAN PRESSASSOCIATION t MEMORIAL DAY. Memorial Day services were indeed impressive and solemn, and carried home to every heart a lesson of duty, and in a most touching and sincere manner paid tribute and homage to the heroic dead, and'to all others who have served their country. Words fail--the vocabulary of mor- tal man is wholly inadequate to ex- Press the thots and emotions of the sou1 that swells within us as we con- template the great responsibility that rests upon every human being for either the things that have come to Pass or that will in the future come to Pass, by reason of their acts or Omissions. "Of all sad things of tongue and pen The Saddest are these it might have been.', It is useless to worry about the things we might have done, but ]t is of vital importance to reflect upon them as a guide to our future conduct. The kind Words of encouragoment that we ight have spoken instead of the ars9 ones; the many acts and deeds mdness that we might have per- rmed toward those who have gone; ne r g eat wars that we might have prevented by timely and united action; are all in the great history of the past and Serve only to show our fallibility dr Weaknesses, that future genera- s maY profit thereby. :ay God speed the day when shall ue fulfilled the prophecies of Isaiah hh sa! d "And he shall judge among nations, and shall rebuke many PeOple; and they shall beat their SWords into plowshares, and their 'S-!nto pruning hooks; nation -"u nolt lift sword against nation, neither sha  raoe,, ll they learn war any  FARM LOAN ACT. __ rue fundamental industry of the ountry is agriculture. If that lan- :es and suffers depre.sion, all the r: operated by owners, 68,512 by N aagers, and 2,455,879 by tenants: _..earJy one-third of our population are 1re.rested, directly or indirectb-, in srlculture. This is a sufficient state- h: t.to indicate the importance of . . industry, but it is not all that might be s " and rod. Every man, woman, , CMld in the country who has to llav food and wear clothes is con- ed. What we sometimes hear ellaed as the "farmer problem" is h,lY the problem of every citizen. :.=aer we are farmers, or merely eTum ers, we must all move fmvard lvl.ackward, suffer or prosper, along cut those engaged directly in agri- ural pursuits. t beCOmes, jtherefore, appropriate .e.we are considering any meas-  .nat is put forward as having a .rlng or any bf those roblems to er - P , . to and urge any real, substan- :l, helpful proposal which might be Vane ,,., ed as a solution of any of the ,:ylems and offer any relief" against t- o the difficulties "which confront u7 e engaged in agriculture. _Very effort put forth that might e for u sound and healthy agri- _?ure, and to encourage and stimu- fo those who produce the Nation's , Should be favored and advocated. MALICIOUS CRITICISM. This is no tine for political claptrap buncombe in congress or any other . " g, and militarism on the other " may be forever overthro,m anti aeavay with in order that sane ti;haU st government may be estab- b?a hese ends cannot be accomplished but- a.opeless division of the masses e., niy by the united and determined ipe" " . p - l [son have special privileges. fin Ylng the blame on some one else, -_ "g fault howlin cal mit, abus- ot, ms man or that, this class or the ,,, "r class or assuming the attitude  tt I am holier than thou" will not bring about the desired result. Condemning everything that is big is as foolish as it is to condenm eve- rything that is little. The big busi- .'less grew out of small business well planned and conducted. The bigger the thing the better if it is a good thing. A PLEDGE TO AMERICA. Memorial Day is behind us. From the graves of our comrades we have retraced our steps. Havin paid them full honor and having enshrined their memory deep in ou hearts, let us learn the lesson of their .acrifice. Let our brand of patriotism be as was iheirs, so that we too may be willing to lay down our lives for our country. Let us repeat in our hearts this pledge to the land which we love so well. "I am proud that the United States of America is my country, the'Stars and Stripes my flag. No ,matter from what race I sprang, or what natio: may claim my friendship, my watch- word hall be "America First." A citizen by birth or choice, t will ever strive to make my government re- vered at home anti respected abroad. "I will cherish and uphold the prin- ciples of freedom, equality, justice and humanity. I will abide by the decisions of the majority and respect the rights of the minority. I will never discriminate against any citi- zen because of his religion. I will support the constitution of the United States and oppose every organization destructive to my country's welfare. I will follow no party that does not salute the Flag and keep step to the music of the Union. I pray God to bless my country and her people. "For my country's sake I will ever strive to be a better citizen. I be- lieve that the laborer is entitled to fair wages, reasonable hours and pro- per working conditions., I believe in the sacredness of the lame and the marriage tie. I will do my best to keep physically strong, morally clean and mentally active, and by voice and by vote, take an intelligent part in the government of my country. "I hold in grateful memory the gal- lant deeds of the men who carried our flag thru death ant1 danger. I will make my gratitude practical by helping in every way to restore them to a place of honor a ud prosperity as worthy citizens of this great nation. "I pledge to America the love of my i heart, a true, constant and absolute loyalty; I pledge respect and obedi- ence to her laws. I pledge my pro- party, my honor, and, if need be, my life, to defend her. I pledge allegiance to my Flag and to the, Republic Ifor which it stands, one nation indi;isible, with liberty and justice for all." --American Legion. CARE. OF MILK IN THE HOME. Division of Sanitation, Minnesota State Board of Health. Every customer has a right to ex- pect a dealer to deliver him clean, cold milk in a clean container, but should not hold the dealer responsible for milk which is spoiled thru care- lessness after it reaches the home. The oft-repeated warning that milk be placed promptly in the refrigerator, m a separat compartment from meats, fish, or other foods that might give it a foreign flavor should not be forgotten by the housewife. If no refrigerator is available, a small box can easily be made, containing a flour tin surrounded by sawdust. The bot- tles of milk can be placed in the tin together with a snmll quantity of ice. The sawduct acts as an insulator, and the milk can be kept fully as well, or even better, than is often the case with the ordinary refrigerator. Every housewife should heed the following simple rules: 1. Insist on getting milk in a bot- tle or other sealed package. 2. Have the dealer leave the bot- tles in a cool place, protected from the sun, flies, cats and dogs. 3. Take the bottles in as soon as possible after delivery, and place at once in the refrigerator or on ice. Milk shoald be kept at a temperatm, e below 50 degrees F. until used. 4. Keep the milk or cream in the original package until needed for use. 5. Do not remove milk from the ice box until you are ready to use it. 6. Wash the mouth of the bottle with clean water before pouring out the milk or cream. 7. Be sure that all receptacles for milk are clean. 8. Pour out only as much milk as is needed for immediate use; do not pour the unused portion back. 9. Never take a bottle of milk into a sick room 10. Wash milk bottles as soon as empty and do not use milk utensik, for any other purpose. Light for Reading. So much literature of all kinds is offered to the farmer today that he has a pretty hard time to read what he does select. In the sumer time field work be- gins at a very early hour and lasts until late. A man comes in pretty much tired out with the day's work. Getting-up time, as he looks at it, is pretty close to going-to-bed-time and he wants to use every available min- ute for sleep. But when winter rolls around with short days, long nights and c(mparatively little work any way, the situation is somewhat dif- ferent. There may be enough work to occupy the morning and afternoon a, 1 Ten for 10cents. Handy size. Dealers carryboth. 10 for 10c; 20 for 20z. It's toasted. IHlml0000, HnlmmlHil00llml,ullnH,ii00lNiiiii 'NII,,II I" Ideal in Name- Ideal in Performance Over 20,000 owners of Rumely Ideal separators know what genuine threshing satisfaction really is. For they are using the most scientifically designed machine obtain- able--the one with over 80 years of manufacturing experience back of it--the one with a well-earned reputation for fast, clean threshing. It takes all varieties of grain in any conditlon--headed or bundled, long straw or short, wet or dry, in good weather or bad. And it putt a//the grain where you wat it--in the wagon--not in the stack. Vibration is eliminated by a perfectly counterbalanced cylinder which has the effect of relieving the bearings of wear and keepiilg the shafts in proper alignment. And, instead of having to stop the Ideal and crawl into and under it to make adjustments and do the oiling, you do this work from the outside while the china is running. We can offer you five sizes: 2x36, 28x44, 28x48, 32x52 and 36x60 --all standard in design, all possessing large capacit and thormigh cleaning. And remember we also handle the famous OilPuil tractor. A. H. SENRAU Odessa, Minnesota. ] hours in a casual sort of fashion, but when evening comes there are spare I hours to while away. I Now the up-to-date farmer wants I to keep posted on the latest agricul-I tural methods as well as the news of the day and he finds the evenings best for such work. He finds them much better, too, since electric light has come to his aid. Thanks to the wealth of good and instructive literature now at the far- mer's service and to electricity and the other modern conveniences which give him leisure, the farmer of today can take full advantage of the educa- tional and receational chance that reading offers. Who was the fellow who said that an optimist was a man who carried a corkscrew ? The coming hot weather will see the launching of a series of whirl- Wind county I,egion rallies all over the Seventh Minnesota district, to be followed by a big district convention at Willmar July 5. Each county will vie with the others to boost Seventh District Legion membership higher than that of any other Minnesota dis- trict. Let Us Fill Your Grocery Order No matter what time of the day you call or phone us, we are always prepared to fill your requirements in food necessities. Is there anything in fresh Fruits, Vegetables, Canned or Bottled Goods you need today? We can supply it at most reasonable prices. Saeger's ( Grocery Phone 37 mb ':::  \\; S tyle 5 ub th:Vle2;:nY 00rTu00b::rt00e Clothes m a k e you body of the tire are forced in- look the way you do. If you want good ap- pearance you must wear good clothes. Our clothes are that kind. They are inex- pensive, too. See the new fabrics today. The New Style Shop ward, subjecting them to a se- vere strain that tends to separ- ate and break the cords. The extra thickness of the Michelin tread protects Michelin Cords against such shocks, and the extra rubber between the sof cords still further cushions and protects the tire against injury. Try a Michelin Cord. You'll find it lasts longer. Pufahl's Garage FORD PARTS AND FORD ACCESSORIES Get Your Wedding Stationery At THE INDEPENDENT, II I SIr.DAN $795 f. o. b. Detroit Can you think of any other passenger car that offers you so many advantages as the Ford Sedan? It is a car for evmTbody, everywhere. The business man finds it an asset in his business; the farmer has no end of uses for it, and when it is done with business, it does duty for the whole family. Order your Ford car now. Don't wait until the rush season comes. Just phone us or drop us a card. J. Arthur Mathews & Company Ortonville, Minnesota. i [ i i i m i m m