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The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
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June 2, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
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June 2, 1921
 

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JUNE 2, 1921 TIIE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT O PAGE 7  The Farmers Corner DEVOTED ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF FARMERS AND FARMER'S CLUBS. Furnish Succulent Food for Small Dairies With the development of the silo dairy cow owners have over- the value of roots as a succu- feed for cattle. Mangel-wurzel carrots, and turnips are the roots grown for this pur- They are particuarly adapted and more moist portions The principal draw- use is the labor of grow- and storing them. other hand, root crops have advantage for small dairies, ]s generally accepted that a silo not prove economical where less six animals are bei,ng fed. Roots stored in a proper cellar, or in the gTound, and can be taken m any desired quantity without to the remainder. intended for winter storage to stan in the field until heavy autumn frosts oc- they are pulled and stored or cellars, requiring much the treatment as potatoes and sam- crops. to 35 pounds of sliced or with a proper grain ra- forage, is a days ration ordinary (laity cow. Thu it that 2V_o tons will carry a t the usual five mo.nths' win- period. An acre or two cry in Mi,nnesota should be repre- sented at the convention June 7. Re- member that the original call for the meeting, June 6, has been changed to the 7." "U" Summer Session Will Be Open June 20 The annual summer session of the University of Minnesota will be held this year from June 20 to July 30, or a period of six weeks. Students can register June 18 and 20. At Uni- versity Farm the usual fundamental courses offered in the college of agri- culture, forestry, and home economics will be offered in the summer school and opportunities for graduate studies will be given by many of the divisions including dairy husbandry, entomol- ogy, biochemistry, horticulture, etc. Emphasis will be given to the work in home economics and a large regis- tration is expected in that division.  Let U. S. D. of A. Help Solve Your Problems The United States Department of Agriculture hs in available form in- formation, the work of practical scien- tists, on ahnost every problem which confronts the farmer. This information was 'athered by your I)epartment of Agriculture for your benefit. carrots, and tunnips shouhl Use it. enough to supply any herd which i It is carried to hu,ndrels of thou- enough to make a silo! With the development of i sands of farmers and farmers' wives by county a'ents and home demon- industry many imple- stration agents. nhio:ls rOdff culture have , ,Vlen you have a farm proMem or uce the laoor a household problem, present it .to grow root erops. I your county aent or home demonstra- '------ . tion agent if there is one in your lye Creameries county. State Association If there is ,no such agent, or if the / information thru that source does not co-operative creameries exactly ,meet the case, write to the Lo take another step in co- DepartmeLt of Agriculture. organizing a state asso- call has been issued to Prices of Meat Animals C-operative associations of Lowest In Ten Years to send delegates to a con- be t{eld in the capitol at Prices of meat animals (hogs, cat- on Tuesday, June 7. tle, sheep, and fowls) to producers of SPecial purpose of the state- the United States decreased 9 per will be to help the cent from March 15 to April 15, ac- build up and maintain the cording to a report issued by the Bu- gle system of manufacturing leau of Crop Estimates. h the last help the creameries to the best ad- .Uniformity and high qual- products will be goals state association will un- reach. of University Farm, 10 years prices paid for meat animals have increased 4.5 per cent during the period from the middle of March to the middle of April. The report shows that on April 15 the i.dex figure of prices for meat animals was about 37.9 per cent lower tha,n a year ago; r says: CO-operative creameries of raanufacture around one illion pounds of butter Last year the sales of but- creameries amounted to dollars. -It is not neces- mention the importance of average of the last t0 years on April 15. The statisticians of the depart- ment point out' that the high prieos paid for meat animals durina" the last few years is the result of increased demand (luring and immediately fol- lowihg the war, and that the present prices are approaching those which mai,ntaine(1 during normal times pre- ceding' the war. O t MARKET LETTER o Tuesday's Closing-- Cattle 600. Market mostly steady to strong, best killers some higlr. Calves 700. Market steady, best lights to packers $6.50. Hogs 2,500. Market 15c to 35c higher, closing weak. Bulk $7.25 to $7.75, top $7.85. Sheep 200. Market steady. South St. Paul, Minn., May 31, 1921: The Memorial holiday and the severe breaks in the markets last week caused light receipts on opemng (lays this week, and due largely to the'cur- tailment in supplies some reaction was noted in both cattle and hogs. The best kinds of killing cattle because of their scarcity sold somewhat higher, half a load of choice steers am l heiG ers mixed averaging 844 pounds top- ping the Tuesday trade at $9.00. A %w loads of nedium to heavy steers of a good beef grade sold from $7.35 to $7.65, with bulk of common and medi- um grades from $6.50 to $7.25. Butcher cows and heifers sohl mostly fran $4.50 to $6.25, with afew small lots of heifcrs on up to $7.50. Country demand for thin sl,e st.,:k ,vhi, h ]. (- been abs'orbing most of the so-calied canners and cutter% is on the wane, and such kinds will again soon have to travel the packer route. Ve:d calves sohl steady, packer top on ]ights $6.50. Stocker and feeder trade continues under light denmnd and light receipts. Hogs have reacted somewhat after ]:caching the lowest point in years late las week, range today $6.75 to $7.85, bulk $7.25 to $7.75, good pigs $8.60 to $8.75. Sheep and lambs about steady, following recent declines. Good to choice lambs quotable $9.'25 to $10.50, good to choice ewes 83.00 to $3.50. The old lady who used to timidly peer out of the window when her swain serenaded her on his guitar, now has a granddaughter who clashes out of the house at the first sound of her gentleman fren's Klaxon. Mother--"Always think twice be-' fore you speak." Tommy--"Gee, ma, you sure do some quic] thinking when you start on pay i % it known that this im- may be seriously in- mportation of foreign pramotion of butter :s need, therefore, for the creaneries to get to- protection. The state Will be chiefly foF this Every co-operative cream- breaking fan belt 00UIUUUUUUUUUfl$,UU!!IflgUUUBSUUUUUUUUUSUUUUUH$1USUI00 " .............................. .o _ _ i Professional and / -- = Business Directdry U S _. :. E N E --- E R ------- C.E. SIGLOH = " - [or Expert ELECTRIC ---  SERVICE --- C I M F_ WIRING E  REPAIRING --  L C 0 --" Phone 284-L L E D - Ortonville, Minn. -- E ! E o D N R F- JOE BAYER & SON _ E N - of the Ortonville Tailoring Co.  All kinds of cleaning and pressin -ffi Tl00e gurii00 ffi neatly done. "-- Suits Made to Order. --- IOh STREET AT FOURTH VENOE  Ortonviile, Minn. l  MINNEAPOLIS mmm - The Northwest's Largest and Most Beautiful Ho=tMry . JOHN SPANYERS All Room ar Outside and Each oom has Priv,ta Bath _ Light Hauling of all Kinds TARIFF: --- Express and Baggage 75 lloom (Private Baths)Single at $2.00--Double $3.00 , 325 Rooms (Private Baths Single at $2.50---Double $3.50  Telephone 287 Ortonville, Minn. 200 Rooms (Private Baths) Single at $3 00--Double $4.00 Others from $40) to $t5.00   ][[Hll[IHIII[HIHIII[HI[HI[IIHIHllIHIIIIHIIHHHIHWHHHHHHIHHHImHWIW. PAUL DIRNBAUER f Brick Layer and Plasterer Stone Mason and All Kinds of Cement Work. MONUMENTS Ortonville, Matin. IL F. D. PETERSON & SON See Our Prices Betore Buyin,l 00efld [0[ Our Desi00lns 000I000Vll[[ M000UM[00I WORKS JOHNSON & LINDHOLM, Props. Manufacturers and Quarriers o[ the famous Mahogany Granite --Get Your Wedding Stationery At THE INDEPENDENT. and 16.3 per cent lower than the We will pay the following prices for junk: Old Iron, $6.00 to $10.00 per ton Copper and heavy Brass,4c to 8c .. ,, ....... HART - PAI;I,I in Mi,anesota, because it ..................... . ..... "':.;:,'::,TY' - .... . per pound. ' ''i ''''"'  " ''",'&:):7.7.""..'.,,; ........ Well known. But. .... t ]s nee- Old Rags,  cent per pound. '. ..... :""'=:"'-, ma; 1 11 1 ! I .% , . sellol 1 ? l . ? " to 1 cent per pound. .-z-a::tR,... ,nct o e n . _  :; ,t n ' b tt r Ppe Fittings, Brass Goods,  Beltmg ad Hose carried in fore, o] e stock. Acetylene Welding. to et - The Ortonvflle- Foundry ' ""':" n D t e W F M efly f 1" 't s . . ULLICA, Prop. Phone 23 * .......... | SAVE" YOUR SLOGAN! the Hart-Parr. The fan is propelled by a fric- tion pulley driven di- rectly from the fly- wheel. This enables it to run much faster than the ordinary faa and cools the motor perfect- ly in the hottest weath- er. The air is forced thru the radiator from the rear, keeping out in- sects and dirt and car- rying the fumes and heat away from the operator. Harvest your crop at lower cost ' A saving in the cost of harvesting is the same as an increase in the price received for the crop You can easily puU two binders with a Hart-Parr 20 or three with the Hart-Parr 30, and they tra el three miles an hour from sun up to sun down no matter how hot it is or how thick the flies. Your boy can operate it. The new Hart-Parr "20" The Hart-Parr 20 is built along the same lines as the famous Hart- Parr 36, it has the same belt power facilities inproportion to its power, and will serve well in your threshing, silo filling, corn shell- ing and odd jobs thruout the fall and winter season. The features that have made the Hart-Parr an outstanding suc- cess are the result f over twenty years tractor building experi- ence. It is built by the founders of the tractor industry. Come in and see us about it now or write or catalogue. What is better than that? Savings is the foundation of SUccess. You reap what you sow. Don't epect to har- vest a crop of dollars for your old age unless you plant a few today .... ., , : 0NVILLE STATE BANK . John Carlson, President. C. I. Stark, Cashier. H.A. StRoke, As't. Cashier. Between You and Me" says the Good Judge ..., Here's genuine chewing satisfaction for you, hook- ed up with real economy. A small chew of this class of tobacco lasts much long- er than a big chew of thv ordinary kind--that's be- cause the] full, rich, real tobacco taste lasts so long. Any man who uses t h9 Real Tobacco Chew tell you that. Put u in two st$1es (2LTT is a long fine-cut tobacco RIGHT CUT is a short.cut tobacco 1 ALVAH I. MATTHEWS Ortonville, Minn. Dray Line Big Stone Lake Ice Phone 38 Ortonville, Mann ARTAH PUDER All Kinds o Plastering and St ucc'O Work, Big Stone City, S. Dak. Kodak PRINTING ENLARGING Prompt, Quality Service, Moderate Prices. THE REED STUDIO Ortonville Minn. DR. R. D. RIFENBARK OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN One block ujhill from Gunderson's 3rug Store Vapor-Sulphur Cabinet Treatments (For rheumatism, neuritis, etc.) F. L. BROWN - THE JEWELER Ortonville, Minnesoti FOR TRUCK SERVICE and any kind of light and heavy draying , Hausauer Bros. PHONE 268 Orders Given Prompt Attention | A. B. KAERCHER , Attorney at Law Odd Fellows Building Ortonville, Minn. DR. F. W. DUNN. Chiropractor ORTONVILLE, IINN. Xray Spinographical Laboratory 12-13-14.15-16 Shumaker Bldg. Col. Win. Wellendorf AUCTIONEER 30 years' experience. No practtv- zng on your property. Call or write me early and get in on an early date. Ortonville, Minnesota J. A. JOHNSON PIANO TUNING AND REPAIRING PHONES--Retiden- 194 Furniture Store - :All Work Guaranteed Ortonville, Minneot a. WILL FINCH Experienced Painter Phone 235-L All Work Guaranteed $OHN MALMQUIST Interior Deeornting and Artistic Sign Painting Phone 22.L Ortonville, MitmesotL ELMER SALSBURY "THE WELL DIGGER  Fifteen Years' xl,i Ortonville h Minn. R.F.D. 2 You Need Printing We Do Printing Let us get together and both will be satisfied Tit[ OilIO1tt[ I$)[P[MPPtI JUNE 2, 1921 TIIE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT O PAGE 7  The Farmers Corner DEVOTED ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF FARMERS AND FARMER'S CLUBS. Furnish Succulent Food for Small Dairies With the development of the silo dairy cow owners have over- the value of roots as a succu- feed for cattle. Mangel-wurzel carrots, and turnips are the roots grown for this pur- They are particuarly adapted and more moist portions The principal draw- use is the labor of grow- and storing them. other hand, root crops have advantage for small dairies, ]s generally accepted that a silo not prove economical where less six animals are bei,ng fed. Roots stored in a proper cellar, or in the gTound, and can be taken m any desired quantity without to the remainder. intended for winter storage to stan in the field until heavy autumn frosts oc- they are pulled and stored or cellars, requiring much the treatment as potatoes and sam- crops. to 35 pounds of sliced or with a proper grain ra- forage, is a days ration ordinary (laity cow. Thu it that 2V_o tons will carry a t the usual five mo.nths' win- period. An acre or two cry in Mi,nnesota should be repre- sented at the convention June 7. Re- member that the original call for the meeting, June 6, has been changed to the 7." "U" Summer Session Will Be Open June 20 The annual summer session of the University of Minnesota will be held this year from June 20 to July 30, or a period of six weeks. Students can register June 18 and 20. At Uni- versity Farm the usual fundamental courses offered in the college of agri- culture, forestry, and home economics will be offered in the summer school and opportunities for graduate studies will be given by many of the divisions including dairy husbandry, entomol- ogy, biochemistry, horticulture, etc. Emphasis will be given to the work in home economics and a large regis- tration is expected in that division.  Let U. S. D. of A. Help Solve Your Problems The United States Department of Agriculture hs in available form in- formation, the work of practical scien- tists, on ahnost every problem which confronts the farmer. This information was 'athered by your I)epartment of Agriculture for your benefit. carrots, and tunnips shouhl Use it. enough to supply any herd which i It is carried to hu,ndrels of thou- enough to make a silo! With the development of i sands of farmers and farmers' wives by county a'ents and home demon- industry many imple- stration agents. nhio:ls rOdff culture have , ,Vlen you have a farm proMem or uce the laoor a household problem, present it .to grow root erops. I your county aent or home demonstra- '------ . tion agent if there is one in your lye Creameries county. State Association If there is ,no such agent, or if the / information thru that source does not co-operative creameries exactly ,meet the case, write to the Lo take another step in co- DepartmeLt of Agriculture. organizing a state asso- call has been issued to Prices of Meat Animals C-operative associations of Lowest In Ten Years to send delegates to a con- be t{eld in the capitol at Prices of meat animals (hogs, cat- on Tuesday, June 7. tle, sheep, and fowls) to producers of SPecial purpose of the state- the United States decreased 9 per will be to help the cent from March 15 to April 15, ac- build up and maintain the cording to a report issued by the Bu- gle system of manufacturing leau of Crop Estimates. h the last help the creameries to the best ad- .Uniformity and high qual- products will be goals state association will un- reach. of University Farm, 10 years prices paid for meat animals have increased 4.5 per cent during the period from the middle of March to the middle of April. The report shows that on April 15 the i.dex figure of prices for meat animals was about 37.9 per cent lower tha,n a year ago; r says: CO-operative creameries of raanufacture around one illion pounds of butter Last year the sales of but- creameries amounted to dollars. -It is not neces- mention the importance of average of the last t0 years on April 15. The statisticians of the depart- ment point out' that the high prieos paid for meat animals durina" the last few years is the result of increased demand (luring and immediately fol- lowihg the war, and that the present prices are approaching those which mai,ntaine(1 during normal times pre- ceding' the war. O t MARKET LETTER o Tuesday's Closing-- Cattle 600. Market mostly steady to strong, best killers some higlr. Calves 700. Market steady, best lights to packers $6.50. Hogs 2,500. Market 15c to 35c higher, closing weak. Bulk $7.25 to $7.75, top $7.85. Sheep 200. Market steady. South St. Paul, Minn., May 31, 1921: The Memorial holiday and the severe breaks in the markets last week caused light receipts on opemng (lays this week, and due largely to the'cur- tailment in supplies some reaction was noted in both cattle and hogs. The best kinds of killing cattle because of their scarcity sold somewhat higher, half a load of choice steers am l heiG ers mixed averaging 844 pounds top- ping the Tuesday trade at $9.00. A %w loads of nedium to heavy steers of a good beef grade sold from $7.35 to $7.65, with bulk of common and medi- um grades from $6.50 to $7.25. Butcher cows and heifers sohl mostly fran $4.50 to $6.25, with afew small lots of heifcrs on up to $7.50. Country demand for thin sl,e st.,:k ,vhi, h ]. (- been abs'orbing most of the so-calied canners and cutter% is on the wane, and such kinds will again soon have to travel the packer route. Ve:d calves sohl steady, packer top on ]ights $6.50. Stocker and feeder trade continues under light denmnd and light receipts. Hogs have reacted somewhat after ]:caching the lowest point in years late las week, range today $6.75 to $7.85, bulk $7.25 to $7.75, good pigs $8.60 to $8.75. Sheep and lambs about steady, following recent declines. Good to choice lambs quotable $9.'25 to $10.50, good to choice ewes 83.00 to $3.50. The old lady who used to timidly peer out of the window when her swain serenaded her on his guitar, now has a granddaughter who clashes out of the house at the first sound of her gentleman fren's Klaxon. Mother--"Always think twice be-' fore you speak." Tommy--"Gee, ma, you sure do some quic] thinking when you start on pay i % it known that this im- may be seriously in- mportation of foreign pramotion of butter :s need, therefore, for the creaneries to get to- protection. The state Will be chiefly foF this Every co-operative cream- breaking fan belt 00UIUUUUUUUUUfl$,UU!!IflgUUUBSUUUUUUUUUSUUUUUH$1USUI00 " .............................. .o _ _ i Professional and / -- = Business Directdry U S _. :. E N E --- E R ------- C.E. SIGLOH = " - [or Expert ELECTRIC ---  SERVICE --- C I M F_ WIRING E  REPAIRING --  L C 0 --" Phone 284-L L E D - Ortonville, Minn. -- E ! E o D N R F- JOE BAYER & SON _ E N - of the Ortonville Tailoring Co.  All kinds of cleaning and pressin -ffi Tl00e gurii00 ffi neatly done. "-- Suits Made to Order. --- IOh STREET AT FOURTH VENOE  Ortonviile, Minn. l  MINNEAPOLIS mmm - The Northwest's Largest and Most Beautiful Ho=tMry . JOHN SPANYERS All Room ar Outside and Each oom has Priv,ta Bath _ Light Hauling of all Kinds TARIFF: --- Express and Baggage 75 lloom (Private Baths)Single at $2.00--Double $3.00 , 325 Rooms (Private Baths Single at $2.50---Double $3.50  Telephone 287 Ortonville, Minn. 200 Rooms (Private Baths) Single at $3 00--Double $4.00 Others from $40) to $t5.00   ][[Hll[IHIII[HIHIII[HI[HI[IIHIHllIHIIIIHIIHHHIHWHHHHHHIHHHImHWIW. PAUL DIRNBAUER f Brick Layer and Plasterer Stone Mason and All Kinds of Cement Work. MONUMENTS Ortonville, Matin. IL F. D. PETERSON & SON See Our Prices Betore Buyin,l 00efld [0[ Our Desi00lns 000I000Vll[[ M000UM[00I WORKS JOHNSON & LINDHOLM, Props. Manufacturers and Quarriers o[ the famous Mahogany Granite --Get Your Wedding Stationery At THE INDEPENDENT. and 16.3 per cent lower than the We will pay the following prices for junk: Old Iron, $6.00 to $10.00 per ton Copper and heavy Brass,4c to 8c .. ,, ....... HART - PAI;I,I in Mi,anesota, because it ..................... . ..... "':.;:,'::,TY' - .... . per pound. ' ''i ''''"'  " ''",'&:):7.7.""..'.,,; ........ Well known. But. .... t ]s nee- Old Rags,  cent per pound. '. ..... :""'=:"'-, ma; 1 11 1 ! I .% , . sellol 1 ? l . ? " to 1 cent per pound. .-z-a::tR,... ,nct o e n . _  :; ,t n ' btt r Ppe Fittings, Brass Goods,  Beltmg ad Hose carried in fore, o] e stock. Acetylene Welding. to et - The Ortonvflle- Foundry ' ""':" n D t e W F M efly f 1" 't s . . ULLICA, Prop. Phone 23 * .......... | SAVE" YOUR SLOGAN! the Hart-Parr. The fan is propelled by a fric- tion pulley driven di- rectly from the fly- wheel. This enables it to run much faster than the ordinary faa and cools the motor perfect- ly in the hottest weath- er. The air is forced thru the radiator from the rear, keeping out in- sects and dirt and car- rying the fumes and heat away from the operator. Harvest your crop at lower cost ' A saving in the cost of harvesting is the same as an increase in the price received for the crop You can easily puU two binders with a Hart-Parr 20 or three with the Hart-Parr 30, and they tra el three miles an hour from sun up to sun down no matter how hot it is or how thick the flies. Your boy can operate it. The new Hart-Parr "20" The Hart-Parr 20 is built along the same lines as the famous Hart- Parr 36, it has the same belt power facilities inproportion to its power, and will serve well in your threshing, silo filling, corn shell- ing and odd jobs thruout the fall and winter season. The features that have made the Hart-Parr an outstanding suc- cess are the result f over twenty years tractor building experi- ence. It is built by the founders of the tractor industry. Come in and see us about it now or write or catalogue. What is better than that? Savings is the foundation of SUccess. You reap what you sow. Don't epect to har- vest a crop of dollars for your old age unless you plant a few today .... ., , : 0NVILLE STATE BANK . John Carlson, President. C. I. Stark, Cashier. H.A. StRoke, As't. Cashier. Between You and Me" says the Good Judge ..., Here's genuine chewing satisfaction for you, hook- ed up with real economy. A small chew of this class of tobacco lasts much long- er than a big chew of thv ordinary kind--that's be- cause the] full, rich, real tobacco taste lasts so long. Any man who uses t h9 Real Tobacco Chew tell you that. Put u in two st$1es (2LTT is a long fine-cut tobacco RIGHT CUT is a short.cut tobacco 1 ALVAH I. MATTHEWS Ortonville, Minn. Dray Line Big Stone Lake Ice Phone 38 Ortonville, Mann ARTAH PUDER All Kinds o Plastering and St ucc'O Work, Big Stone City, S. Dak. Kodak PRINTING ENLARGING Prompt, Quality Service, Moderate Prices. THE REED STUDIO Ortonville Minn. DR. R. D. RIFENBARK OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN One block ujhill from Gunderson's 3rug Store Vapor-Sulphur Cabinet Treatments (For rheumatism, neuritis, etc.) F. L. BROWN - THE JEWELER Ortonville, Minnesoti FOR TRUCK SERVICE and any kind of light and heavy draying , Hausauer Bros. PHONE 268 Orders Given Prompt Attention | A. B. KAERCHER , Attorney at Law Odd Fellows Building Ortonville, Minn. DR. F. W. DUNN. Chiropractor ORTONVILLE, IINN. Xray Spinographical Laboratory 12-13-14.15-16 Shumaker Bldg. Col. Win. Wellendorf AUCTIONEER 30 years' experience. No practtv- zng on your property. Call or write me early and get in on an early date. Ortonville, Minnesota J. A. JOHNSON PIANO TUNING AND REPAIRING PHONES--Retiden- 194 Furniture Store - :All Work Guaranteed Ortonville, Minneot a. WILL FINCH Experienced Painter Phone 235-L All Work Guaranteed $OHN MALMQUIST Interior Deeornting and Artistic Sign Painting Phone 22.L Ortonville, MitmesotL ELMER SALSBURY "THE WELL DIGGER  Fifteen Years' xl,i Ortonville h Minn. R.F.D. 2 You Need Printing We Do Printing Let us get together and both will be satisfied Tit[ OilIO1tt[ I$)[P[MPPtI \\; tSDAy, JUNE 2, 1921 THE ORTONVlLLE INDEPENDE5 pGE 7  -- ;[e,, ol,,, I o ,,.s o,, p   I1 a ) IIIIIIlifilllfll$11imllllllllfliillll The Farmers Corner ............. : -= ment point cue Oult the high pl]ce, fPa d [e n oat, anhnals dullng the h,. t,  U    $  DEVOTED ESPEC ALLY TO ThE ACT V T ES OF FARMERS de'nmi du'ing and bmnediatell fol-    f" f : .: ": (ff'   g - AND'F s lo,ing the war, and that the p,eent  -  -  - maintained during nel,l times pre  C  i, ";"  # , sentedattheeonvention June7. Re- *------4  L o '  : , ood for Small Da|rleS!meber tjht thserig, .............  IARKE T LEE R ' L ] :. E  tth the development of the i o e,ng ......... hnged to ---- q*'  -- __ t dalry cow owners have over-I " Tuesday's Closing-- ,  D t"   .... R M the va] of ots as a succu-I. ,, -- Cattle 600. Market mostly -- E 't's  fo't, pl will Be Open June 20 t3; .......... 0o ek)  t--T t- tee ...... ) . , They are partieuly alaptdl Th ...... 1 .......... f h $6.50. Iogs 2,D00, Market lsc  '| Itl]*]['l[ 1 l]I[ m- ler and mo moist portionsl Universit ' of Minnesota w be he to 35e hgher' elstag weak" Bulk / _m io, STRET AT FQURTH AVENO[ i o their use is the labor of grow- period of six wks. Students ca , get steay, !  . ateating, and storing them, Iregister June 18 a.d 20. At Uni. SuthSt'Pau/'Min'MaYJa'1921:i i rhNorl,,etLarqutandMotBwaatfulHotelry [] the other hand, root crops have ; vel.sity Fa Lhe usl fundamenta: le Memola] holiday d the eveze:  ,, o ........ Ot,* nd Each Roo h pr/*) th tadvanage or small dairie, eoursoffereiatheeollegeofagri hreak in the makes as week[  , TARIFF: . s genera y accepted ha cu/tu fostry and h ....... caused gh . e pts on opning ay ffi 3S   .......... Bath S ngle a, $ 00-- )cub $ 00 i a o ,  m   cms n.aleathsS , a $ 5 t prove on ieal h e e il b offered "n th umme seh th s ,eek d d argeIy t th ' ur i  2O o R v Duubk $3. 5o om wcr s wz e i es r co xs ,an ue o ee .  ,ms(pnateKalhs) Smleai$0Double$4C) i ig a omal  a being fed. Roots I an oppqrtun! ties for graduate studies tai) merit p supphe some, reaction was [ [] Others from ,$4 g to $ 5 00 , ' " , r an a propel, l a o- wnn oe gven y my of the v s on ne, m onto cattte ann hogs, Thel  :m :hedeund, and can be taken [ including dairy hshdry, entomol th;: t kilnds of ki]Jing cattle h ...... f lllllllllllllmlllllllllll[ I I $1llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllll, y sid quantity w hout: ogy, biochemistry, horticul m,e e e ir scarcity sold somewhat hillel. the remainder. ] Emphasis will he given to the vo.k izalf n load of choice steels and heft r tended for win er orate ! Jn home eeononi a a a ge reg s- era mixed vel'gng 844 pop/iris top= :  to stan in the field until ; tration is expected in that division.  ping the Tuesday trade at $900. A few heaY au umn frosts oe-I -- lo,d of medium to heavy steers of a! i IAT. .1   they are pulled an s od Let W S D. of A. Help ffe"d beef grade sold flora $7.35 to ............................. Probl ............................ $ ............. IVIgJNUM PN'I'S eellar qu[ ng n u h t e; Solv Y 7"65,illl bn]k of eommou and medi 8w'hapoel lin lieu e uvula e c n e here o ap o$76O CUntl 1 p ga ra m n t k fp el or i , , Y g ad a on ! ) ,/m, ocnl o aea len: emn hn Le tk,lhT n ry d- - - Th t tls[ e)l u)nost eel problem which Leon aho. g  o e e el a an cow, u 1 cenflent  thn falmer a ;:,,at.,, ....... l'e..y .............................. he'e h> ean>c, ,:, eu e.. ,s ,.,,, ,,,e. .... Sen . See Our ua fi, e n, oahs*b, D " at, u(n Kn  w aga, soou have our epaltment of Agriculture for to travel the packer route Ve,] [ 0[ g peziod An acre or t,,, our be.efit. carrels, and tulips shouhJ Us e it. eahres sob/ tead3, packer top / o Upply any held which It is eazrled to hudrl* of thou- enough to make n silo sa)as o fame and farmers' wives Wethnthe development of by courtly aents and home demon- dustry many nnpM . sratlen agents. methods of culture have Wen you. hae a fa ix, p 0M,l,, or groWw hwh reduce the labor: a houeh o d p'eb era, psent it-t ' loot crops. [ou count, aentorhem d ,t'a I t " e emo., . m, ten f here s one n your tatlve Creameries ] county. nl State Association If there is 0 uch agent, or if the a -- inforroation thlu that source does not eo=operatlve eteamerie exactly ,nt the case write to the . t take another step in c Department of Agrirultur. .oa A b orgaulzng a state asso- I '00 Call has been i snell tolPrices of Ie Animals 'opera ire assodaton of . . t to me Lowest In Ten Yeals nd delegate to a foe- )n to he ield in the capitol at - -- a'on Toe ' Prices of mea an ma s (hogs, eat- I - sday, June 7. [ tie, sheep, and fowls) to producezs of .,L',o: :7eh:ft th;,s:"  ............................ )iea h e p t e cent from March 15 to April 15 - aL ^  - o nu urmg au of c p Estimates.  the last ,i,,;: ]p th .......... 0 yeRP p.s pa for ,10, [m.,s ge. Un" "--.r to the .best d- have "nereased 4 5 per cent during the ai ffnty and high qual- period fm the middle of Mah to t the iT prodts, w.il[ be goals the midd e of Apt I ']:he port shows k  slat!n 111 un- that on Aplil 15 the idex figure of J. le,, h, !prima fur meat animals was abort ei' f Umveity Farm t 37 9 per n ower tha a year ago h e stsays: !and 63 per nt ]or than the so 'Claeratlce camer[e  of :ta aufatu onnd one] .... g. million pounds o bute. lilimil Last Year the sales ef but, thse ramere s ouned o lon dollars. It is nut nece- ..................... ili00;:ll nes in Minnesota, beeau e i Well known. But it is nee- at to have it no that this ira=  may be eriosly S ! :a th ................... I tteu the pmotion of butter era.l  ed, hefot, fr the r Self poreetion. The tate rf hva ea eries to get to- oa Will be chiefly re{ thls . Every co-opera,re cremn-i  ' , "SAVE" YOUR SLOGAN! What is better than that? Savings is the re.darien f au You a what you sow. Don't expect to ha vest a crop of dollars /or your old age less you plant a few today.  : )R'ToNVILLEnSTA!E BANK : e. j. Stark, Caser. ' H, A. Stuck Ain't. Cuhi*r. Between You and Me" say* the G,od Judge .  Here's muine chewing satisineSoa for you, hook- ed up with real economy. A small chew of thi clan of tobevco lasts much long- er than a big ebew of the ordinary kind--that's be- cause tbel full, rich, real , tobacco taste lasts solong. Any man who uses the Real Tobacco aew will tell you that, r. 'UT is a long fine-mat tobacco e,,.t ....... ,er ,gh don,a.,I a.,' pm  i Bel0fe light  ipt s, ..................................... , Des@s Buyiu eaehin the foxiest polo  eas late laM ,xeek, range o av $ 8 o ' ......... ' ...... '" ........... WRKS0 $S.GO to $8.75. Sheep and lanli ab()ut ................................. 0001000Vll[[ MONUM[NI Geod to choice lamb* quotable $9.25 to $1050. goal to choice ees $3.00 to $.50, The old lad, nho used (o timid b, JOHNSON & LINDHOLM, Props peel. out of the window when her swaiu senaded he o his guitar, a out .............................. of .,e hoa,e at the fls,h,0and ......... el Manufacturers and uu00iers of ae ................. ......... ! famous Mahogany Granite IIothex--"Alwas think twlee be- fo you speak." Tommy--"Gee ma you sure do some qulcT( ninking when yea start, on pm? i --Get Your Wedding StatioRery At THE INDEPENDENT. . There's slipping' I brking fan belt on the Hart-Parr. The f .......... "" Harvest your crop tlon pulley driven di- etly fm the fly- I ...... ...... ' ..... oe lower cost, to n mo fa.r *hun tit. the ordinary fa and els the motor perft- ly in the hottest weath-  the cost of harvestin is the same er. The ai s foe th the rgdiator fm th e aS an increase in the price recCtved for the ere re, keeping out in- t. d lrt d - You can easily pull two binders with a Hart-Parr 20 or three sting the fes and with the Hart.Parr 30, and the t travel three miles an hour beat away from the crater, from sun up to sun down no matter how hot it is or how thick the flies. Your boy can operate it. The new Hart-Parr "20" The Had-Parr 20 is built along the same fines as the famous Hart- Parr 30, it has the same belt power facilities inproportion to its power, and will serve well in your threshing, silo tilting, corn shell- ing and odd jobs thraout the fall and winter Season. The features that have made the Hart.Parr an outstanding suc- cess are the result f over twenty years tractor building experi- ence. It is built b ' the founders of the tractor industry. Come in and see us about it now or write or catalogue. ',i W'/-"., : ALVAH I. MATTHEWS '  -..2.,=.. ,: ! Business Direetdy ' C. SIG - [0 [x0e[t WIRINGSERV]CE ........ / REPAIRING Phe 284-L Orlvill*, Mina JOE BAYER & SON Of the Ortvil[e Tailorin C All kinds, of o[eaninff d pssln8 ntly done, ui Me to Older. Ortonvlle. Mln JOHN SPANYERS Light Hauling of 1B Kinds Express aud Baggage Telepho 287 Ortoavlle. Minm PAUL DIENBAIR Stone Man d All Kinds of Cement Wm., Ortville, Mifin. g.F. D, PETERSON & SON Day Line Big Stone Lake lee Phone 38 Ortonvllle, Minn. ARTAH PUDER All Kinds plastering and Slu Work Big Sto.e City, s. Dak,_ Kodak .........  e} PRINTING ENLARGIN Pmpt, Quality Service, Moderat PrL, THE REED STUDIO Or tonville Minn. DR. R. D. RIFENBARK OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN Dne b]k u h]] f Gundeon'e rug Sto Vapor-Sulphur aMnet Treatmenta I (For rheumattsra, nemtis, etc.) --t F. L. BROWN - THE JEWELER 0r tonvill Minneta FOR TRUCK SE' d  Snd of light d hea trayin, Hausauer Bros. PHONE 268 &]l Orders Glenn prompt Atteatk A. B. KAERCHER , Attoey at Law Odd Fellows BtIdmz Oronvil]e, Ml. DR. F. W. DUNN. Chiropracinr ORTONVILLF  I:NI. Xray Spinographleal LaboratOl 12-13-I4-15-16 Shumak Bldg, q Col. Win. WeHendorf AUCTIONEER 3O es' trpernetg No prat- ," ou yo lagm't$'. Call r ate me erly a get in on mrl date. 3mmville, MlnnemUi J. A. JOHNSON pIANO TUNING AND P3mAIRIN Furalun Sto. N All Work Guaranteed Ottomlll Mtneaet . WILL FINCH Work Ga*rarJ0l - OHN MALMQUIST ltrl Doth ad Art[t Sign Paatlag ELMER SA/.BBURY YLL DIGG" Fittms Ym' Ortonvllle Mln , F. It Ortonville Minn.  ' You Need Printing We Do Printing Let us get tegether and both [ will be tied JUNE 2, 1921 TIIE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT O PAGE 7  The Farmers Corner DEVOTED ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF FARMERS AND FARMER'S CLUBS. Furnish Succulent Food for Small Dairies With the development of the silo dairy cow owners have over- the value of roots as a succu- feed for cattle. Mangel-wurzel carrots, and turnips are the roots grown for this pur- They are particuarly adapted and more moist portions The principal draw- use is the labor of grow- and storing them. other hand, root crops have advantage for small dairies, ]s generally accepted that a silo not prove economical where less six animals are bei,ng fed. Roots stored in a proper cellar, or in the gTound, and can be taken m any desired quantity without to the remainder. intended for winter storage to stan in the field until heavy autumn frosts oc- they are pulled and stored or cellars, requiring much the treatment as potatoes and sam- crops. to 35 pounds of sliced or with a proper grain ra- forage, is a days ration ordinary (laity cow. Thu it that 2V_o tons will carry a t the usual five mo.nths' win- period. An acre or two cry in Mi,nnesota should be repre- sented at the convention June 7. Re- member that the original call for the meeting, June 6, has been changed to the 7." "U" Summer Session Will Be Open June 20 The annual summer session of the University of Minnesota will be held this year from June 20 to July 30, or a period of six weeks. Students can register June 18 and 20. At Uni- versity Farm the usual fundamental courses offered in the college of agri- culture, forestry, and home economics will be offered in the summer school and opportunities for graduate studies will be given by many of the divisions including dairy husbandry, entomol- ogy, biochemistry, horticulture, etc. Emphasis will be given to the work in home economics and a large regis- tration is expected in that division.  Let U. S. D. of A. Help Solve Your Problems The United States Department of Agriculture hs in available form in- formation, the work of practical scien- tists, on ahnost every problem which confronts the farmer. This information was 'athered by your I)epartment of Agriculture for your benefit. carrots, and tunnips shouhl Use it. enough to supply any herd which i It is carried to hu,ndrels of thou- enough to make a silo! With the development of i sands of farmers and farmers' wives by county a'ents and home demon- industry many imple- stration agents. nhio:ls rOdff culture have , ,Vlen you have a farm proMem or uce the laoor a household problem, present it .to grow root erops. I your county aent or home demonstra- '------ . tion agent if there is one in your lye Creameries county. State Association If there is ,no such agent, or if the / information thru that source does not co-operative creameries exactly ,meet the case, write to the Lo take another step in co- DepartmeLt of Agriculture. organizing a state asso- call has been issued to Prices of Meat Animals C-operative associations of Lowest In Ten Years to send delegates to a con- be t{eld in the capitol at Prices of meat animals (hogs, cat- on Tuesday, June 7. tle, sheep, and fowls) to producers of SPecial purpose of the state- the United States decreased 9 per will be to help the cent from March 15 to April 15, ac- build up and maintain the cording to a report issued by the Bu- gle system of manufacturing leau of Crop Estimates. h the last help the creameries to the best ad- .Uniformity and high qual- products will be goals state association will un- reach. of University Farm, 10 years prices paid for meat animals have increased 4.5 per cent during the period from the middle of March to the middle of April. The report shows that on April 15 the i.dex figure of prices for meat animals was about 37.9 per cent lower tha,n a year ago; r says: CO-operative creameries of raanufacture around one illion pounds of butter Last year the sales of but- creameries amounted to dollars. -It is not neces- mention the importance of average of the last t0 years on April 15. The statisticians of the depart- ment point out' that the high prieos paid for meat animals durina" the last few years is the result of increased demand (luring and immediately fol- lowihg the war, and that the present prices are approaching those which mai,ntaine(1 during normal times pre- ceding' the war. O t MARKET LETTER o Tuesday's Closing-- Cattle 600. Market mostly steady to strong, best killers some higlr. Calves 700. Market steady, best lights to packers $6.50. Hogs 2,500. Market 15c to 35c higher, closing weak. Bulk $7.25 to $7.75, top $7.85. Sheep 200. Market steady. South St. Paul, Minn., May 31, 1921: The Memorial holiday and the severe breaks in the markets last week caused light receipts on opemng (lays this week, and due largely to the'cur- tailment in supplies some reaction was noted in both cattle and hogs. The best kinds of killing cattle because of their scarcity sold somewhat higher, half a load of choice steers am l heiG ers mixed averaging 844 pounds top- ping the Tuesday trade at $9.00. A %w loads of nedium to heavy steers of a good beef grade sold from $7.35 to $7.65, with bulk of common and medi- um grades from $6.50 to $7.25. Butcher cows and heifers sohl mostly fran $4.50 to $6.25, with afew small lots of heifcrs on up to $7.50. Country demand for thin sl,e st.,:k ,vhi, h ]. (- been abs'orbing most of the so-calied canners and cutter% is on the wane, and such kinds will again soon have to travel the packer route. Ve:d calves sohl steady, packer top on ]ights $6.50. Stocker and feeder trade continues under light denmnd and light receipts. Hogs have reacted somewhat after ]:caching the lowest point in years late las week, range today $6.75 to $7.85, bulk $7.25 to $7.75, good pigs $8.60 to $8.75. Sheep and lambs about steady, following recent declines. Good to choice lambs quotable $9.'25 to $10.50, good to choice ewes 83.00 to $3.50. The old lady who used to timidly peer out of the window when her swain serenaded her on his guitar, now has a granddaughter who clashes out of the house at the first sound of her gentleman fren's Klaxon. Mother--"Always think twice be-' fore you speak." Tommy--"Gee, ma, you sure do some quic] thinking when you start on pay i % it known that this im- may be seriously in- mportation of foreign pramotion of butter :s need, therefore, for the creaneries to get to- protection. The state Will be chiefly foF this Every co-operative cream- breaking fan belt 00UIUUUUUUUUUfl$,UU!!IflgUUUBSUUUUUUUUUSUUUUUH$1USUI00 " .............................. .o _ _ i Professional and / -- = Business Directdry U S _. :. E N E --- E R ------- C.E. SIGLOH = " - [or Expert ELECTRIC ---  SERVICE --- C I M F_ WIRING E  REPAIRING --  L C 0 --" Phone 284-L L E D - Ortonville, Minn. -- E ! E o D N R F- JOE BAYER & SON _ E N - of the Ortonville Tailoring Co.  All kinds of cleaning and pressin -ffi Tl00e gurii00 ffi neatly done. "-- Suits Made to Order. --- IOh STREET AT FOURTH VENOE  Ortonviile, Minn. l  MINNEAPOLIS mmm - The Northwest's Largest and Most Beautiful Ho=tMry . JOHN SPANYERS All Room ar Outside and Each oom has Priv,ta Bath _ Light Hauling of all Kinds TARIFF: --- Express and Baggage 75 lloom (Private Baths)Single at $2.00--Double $3.00 , 325 Rooms (Private Baths Single at $2.50---Double $3.50  Telephone 287 Ortonville, Minn. 200 Rooms (Private Baths) Single at $3 00--Double $4.00 Others from $40) to $t5.00   ][[Hll[IHIII[HIHIII[HI[HI[IIHIHllIHIIIIHIIHHHIHWHHHHHHIHHHImHWIW. PAUL DIRNBAUER f Brick Layer and Plasterer Stone Mason and All Kinds of Cement Work. MONUMENTS Ortonville, Matin. IL F. D. PETERSON & SON See Our Prices Betore Buyin,l 00efld [0[ Our Desi00lns 000I000Vll[[ M000UM[00I WORKS JOHNSON & LINDHOLM, Props. Manufacturers and Quarriers o[ the famous Mahogany Granite --Get Your Wedding Stationery At THE INDEPENDENT. and 16.3 per cent lower than the We will pay the following prices for junk: Old Iron, $6.00 to $10.00 per ton Copper and heavy Brass,4c to 8c .. ,, ....... HART - PAI;I,I in Mi,anesota, because it ..................... . ..... "':.;:,'::,TY' - .... . per pound. ' ''i ''''"'  " ''",'&:):7.7.""..'.,,; ........ Well known. But. .... t ]s nee- Old Rags,  cent per pound. '. ..... :""'=:"'-, ma; 1 11 1 ! I .% , . sellol 1 ? l . ? " to 1 cent per pound. .-z-a::tR,... ,n ct o e n . _  :; ,t n ' btt r Ppe Fittings, Brass Goods,  Beltmg ad Hose carried in fore, o] e stock. Acetylene Welding. to et - The Ortonvflle- Foundry ' ""':" n D t e W F M efly f 1" 't s . . ULLICA, Prop. Phone 23 * .......... | SAVE" YOUR SLOGAN! the Hart-Parr. The fan is propelled by a fric- tion pulley driven di- rectly from the fly- wheel. This enables it to run much faster than the ordinary faa and cools the motor perfect- ly in the hottest weath- er. The air is forced thru the radiator from the rear, keeping out in- sects and dirt and car- rying the fumes and heat away from the operator. Harvest your crop at lower cost ' A saving in the cost of harvesting is the same as an increase in the price received for the crop You can easily puU two binders with a Hart-Parr 20 or three with the Hart-Parr 30, and they tra el three miles an hour from sun up to sun down no matter how hot it is or how thick the flies. Your boy can operate it. The new Hart-Parr "20" The Hart-Parr 20 is built along the same lines as the famous Hart- Parr 36, it has the same belt power facilities inproportion to its power, and will serve well in your threshing, silo filling, corn shell- ing and odd jobs thruout the fall and winter season. The features that have made the Hart-Parr an outstanding suc- cess are the result f over twenty years tractor building experi- ence. It is built by the founders of the tractor industry. Come in and see us about it now or write or catalogue. What is better than that? Savings is the foundation of SUccess. You reap what you sow. Don't epect to har- vest a crop of dollars for your old age unless you plant a few today .... ., , : 0NVILLE STATE BANK . John Carlson, President. C. I. Stark, Cashier. H.A. StRoke, As't. Cashier. Between You and Me" says the Good Judge ..., Here's genuine chewing satisfaction for you, hook- ed up with real economy. A small chew of this class of tobacco lasts much long- er than a big chew of thv ordinary kind--that's be- cause the] full, rich, real tobacco taste lasts so long. Any man who uses t h9 Real Tobacco Chew tell you that. Put u in two st$1es (2LTT is a long fine-cut tobacco RIGHT CUT is a short.cut tobacco 1 ALVAH I. MATTHEWS Ortonville, Minn. Dray Line Big Stone Lake Ice Phone 38 Ortonville, Mann ARTAH PUDER All Kinds o Plastering and St ucc'O Work, Big Stone City, S. Dak. Kodak PRINTING ENLARGING Prompt, Quality Service, Moderate Prices. THE REED STUDIO Ortonville Minn. DR. R. D. RIFENBARK OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN One block ujhill from Gunderson's 3rug Store Vapor-Sulphur Cabinet Treatments (For rheumatism, neuritis, etc.) F. L. BROWN - THE JEWELER Ortonville, Minnesoti FOR TRUCK SERVICE and any kind of light and heavy draying , Hausauer Bros. PHONE 268 Orders Given Prompt Attention | A. B. KAERCHER , Attorney at Law Odd Fellows Building Ortonville, Minn. DR. F. W. DUNN. Chiropractor ORTONVILLE, IINN. Xray Spinographical Laboratory 12-13-14.15-16 Shumaker Bldg. Col. Win. Wellendorf AUCTIONEER 30 years' experience. No practtv- zng on your property. Call or write me early and get in on an early date. Ortonville, Minnesota J. A. JOHNSON PIANO TUNING AND REPAIRING PHONES--Retiden- 194 Furniture Store - :All Work Guaranteed Ortonville, Minneot a. WILL FINCH Experienced Painter Phone 235-L All Work Guaranteed $OHN MALMQUIST Interior Deeornting and Artistic Sign Painting Phone 22.L Ortonville, MitmesotL ELMER SALSBURY "THE WELL DIGGER  Fifteen Years' xl,i Ortonville h Minn. R.F.D. 2 You Need Printing We Do Printing Let us get together and both will be satisfied Tit[ OilIO1tt[ I$)[P[MPPtI