Newspaper Archive of
The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
Lyft
June 15, 1999     The Ortonville Independent
PAGE 4     (4 of 20 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 4     (4 of 20 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
June 15, 1999
 

Newspaper Archive of The Ortonville Independent produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




Editorial comment City office choice is obvious! There should be no reason...given cost to their constituents, the taxpayer...why our City Fathers should have any problem in deciding which of four choices to make for location of new city offices! Let's take a good hard and honest look at the four choices that will be aired at a public hearing on the topic come next Monday, June 21st in the former Masonic Lodge building. We present here the facts, the costs, the pros and cons on each site and conclude with what we feel is the obvious and most logical choice. 1) Building a new complex at Hilltop. The plus is that the city offices and all departments and equipment would be under one roof. The negative is that the cost would be near $300,000, actually more like $500,000 if the fire hall and police department were to be included there also. Another negative is that the offices would be away from the central part of town. We question why this should even be a choice at the hearing, for the Council previously has turned thumbs down on this. 2) Remodeling the present Masonic building, which is now city property. A plus is the site is downtown. Also, there is no purchase cost, but on the negative side, cost for remodeling would be extensive, perhaps near $200,000, and it's questionable if space is adequate and if the building structure is sound enough! Side-hill parking is also a negative. 3) Build an all-new city complex on land the city has just purchased at the foot of Big Stone Lake. The only plus is having all departments under one roof, as Intergenerational story telling thru the Arts would be the case at Hilltop. The negative is that such land should be retained for more tourist-oriented business, such as a Marina or a park or recreational center, similar to the great Eahtonka of earlier days. 4) Moving into the former Minnwest Bank building on main street. Many positives include a) It being centrally located and downtown, filling an eye- sore void on main street, and keeping traffic in the business section; b) Keeping the building on the tax rolls (if rented); c)No remodeling is needed at all, ready for occupancy, with a large vault already there for record keeping; d) Cost to taxpayer would be the lowest level of all choices with reasonable rent, and if building is purchased, cost would only be $55,000, far cheaper than any other site; e) Another plus is that the building has a ready-made slot window in the alley for residents to merely drive up (no need to park) to drop off their monthly utility bills. A drop- box on main street is also ready-made in front of the bank building; f) Finally, the city would have a tenant in the basement, namely The Ortonville Independent, which would provide a monthly rental income to the city. City residents have already been extremely hard- hit this year on assessments in paying for a new water treatment center, and for city street blacktopping, including new storm sewers and street gutters. Common sense tells us the best bet for the taxpayer dollar is the Minnwest Bank building. In all respects, it makes the most sense! Dollar-wise, location wise! Ortonville Community Education be receiving a second $5000 grant and The Big Stone Arts Council will from the Southwest Regional Arts and Humanities Council for an Intergenerational Arts Project. The purpose of the grant will be to help people learn how to find great stories in their community and to tell these stories to others by publishing, per- forming and illustrating. This year's project will begin the Thanks a million Rausch observes 50th with Franciscan sisters Dear Mr. Ross: It's only 3:30 a.m. as I write this letter, but I know that sleep has completely left me for tonight. Life has changed so drastically in the last 8 months, I wonder if the kids can take anymore. And yet, I know they will have to because today I start chemotherapy for uterine cancer. However, the cancer was preceded by my husband leaving, losing our home and having to give up our family pets. And now this. I don't know if I'm more inclined to have a pity-party or laugh hysterically. I have 3 kids-good kids, ages 12, 14 and 17. They have been a source of comfort to me. My only hope is that none of them inherit their father's weakness of running out when things get tough. I hope you don't feel I'm setting you up for a big kill, but yes, I do have a request. I'm going to be off work receiving intense chemo. I've only been employed for 18 months with my current employer and I've used up all my vacation time which means I need to take a 4 week leave of absence. My folks can carry me on utilities and gr)ceries, but my rent is $900 a month (3-bedroom apartments are extremely costly). How about a one time gift from you? You certainly could ease my burden and help keep my little family together. Mrs. O. E... Transatlantic Weeklies, Winnipeg Dear Mrs. F.: So many of life's challenges seem to carry a black cloud and cause a dampening of the week of June 21, 1999, culminating with an exhibit and performances dur- human spirit. However, even within p 15 G (.-1"IT-E) ing the Ortonville Corn Festival. these periods are little victories and .... ''d,,;',, "cL Local photographer and artist, Don moments of happiness you "' ......... Sherman, Ortonville Elementary otherwise would never experience.  )- teacher with an art education back- For example, making rent next ground, Jo Elliot, and OHS senior, month is a real issue, until you learn i Ol w  Kristen Dragseth, will team up as that mY $900 should arrive any day. Q I | facilitators for the nine week program. Now, there's a certain elation. Enjoy Hofl The idea of this project evolves the moment for what it is. Best i HOI VVQI| around story collecting and weaving wishes. ***** local stories into performance, hand- Dear Mr. Ross: The reason I'm made books illustrated with drawing, writing you is because my husband o painting, printmaking, digital media and I have been trying for the past 3 and more. Intergenerational arts pro- years to have a child. We have tried grams provide opportunities for chil- several different infertility treatments. dren and adults to learn more about Nothing worked so last June we tried each other and express the extraordi- an expensive surgical procedure called nary in what they find together in G.1.ET.(Gamete Intra Fallopian Tube ordinary life whether it is past or pre- Transfer). Twelve days later we found sent. By bringing generations together " ' into a theme of community identity Ronald Scott and involvement through art it will be .... :,i MundwileT . Funeral Hone ..... possible to learn much moreabouour i' announces the death of Ronald L, history and enjoy the communication Scott, 65, of rural Sister Rose Mae Rausch, daughter of the late Val and Katherine Rausch of Big Stone City, will cele- brate 50 years as a member of the Franciscan Sisters of Little Falls, on Sunday, June 27. A Mass of Thanksgiving will be offered at St. Francis Convent, Little Falls, for the jubilarians. Sister Rose Mae was accepted into the Franciscan Novitiate on August 12, 1949. She was given the religious name, Sister Mary Petra, but returned to her baptismal name. She pro- nounced her temporary vows on August 12, 1951 and perpetual vows on August 12, 1954. Sister Rose Mac graduated from eighth grade in Big Stone City and from St. Francis High School, Little Falls. She received her bachelor's degree from the College of St. Catherine, St. Paul, and a master's degree in theology from the University of San Francisco, California. Other schools from which Sister has taken courses include: Laval University, Quebec City, Canada; Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Immaculate Heart College, Los Angeles, California; St. John's University, Collegeville, Minnesota; St. Paul Seminary, St. Paul; St. Bonaventure University, St. Bonaventure, New York; John F. Kennedy University, Berkeley, California, and Washington Theological Union, Washington, D.C. She served as a seventh grade teacher at St. Joseph's Waite Park and as a principal of Holy Spirit School, St. Cloud; was director of novices for the Franciscan Sisters of Little Falls; coordinator of religious education in five-parish region in Archdiocese of St. Paul/Minneapolis; a catechetical team member at Warren; member of administrative team for the Franciscan Sisters; a missionary in San Felix, Venezuela; and Community Minister of the Franciscan Sisters of Little Falls, 1988-1996. At the present time she serves as pastoral administrator for St. Jude Parish, Sylacauga, and Holy Name of Jesus Parish, Childersburg, Alabama. of it and to preserve it for future gen- erations. Registration will be completed by Friday, June 11. Space is limited. (15 enrollments - I0 to 12 yr. olds, 15 enrollments - 13-18 yr. olds and up to 30 adult enrollments. To reserve a smt, contact Shawnda Johnson. II I I ONCE AGAIN... MANY THANKS Recent new and renewal sub- scribers to The Independent which we gratefully acknowledge with thanks for your loyalty: Victor Stolpman Esther Mullins Darcy's Cutting Edge Matt Drobny Paul Drobny Scott Maas Jeff Berger Clayton Gloege Martha Kuefler Chester Carl, Sr. Raymond G. Karels Clyde Sitter Henry Redtleid Emma Schwarze Harold Voss Ramona Dorry Virginia Elvecrog David Ellingson Klein National Bank Mark Chase Margaret Van Lith Bea Nordick Jeanette Nordick Ron Nordick Jack Nordick Rev. Ihno Jaussen Clifford Longworth George Gimmestad Lawrence Millerbernd Regina Millerbernd Ginger Drobny H.O. Price Ardelle Courtney James Wendland Art Brnus Mrs. Marlys McCorkle Derald Rolfsmeier Carol Lind Louis Hannen Delmer Mielitz Bill Busk Kent Stotesbery Angle Stotesbery Maynard Shelstad Arthur Quance Robert Ekelund Joel Kuyper Beverly Hesser Joyee Schultz Dean Von Eschen Mrs. Terry Freeman Kanthak Small Engines Vernon Henkelman Janice Wolf I II Ortonville. Ron died June 10th at his home. A Mass of Christian Burial was held Monday, June 14th in the Church of St. John at Ortonville. Father Bob Goblirsch officiated and burial was in the St. Lawrence Cemetery at Milbank. Music was presented by Mrs. Pat Kunz, organist; the Church of St. John's Choir and Mrs. Shelly Kurkosky, vocalist. Honorary pallbearers were Harlan and Marcella Hansen, Marlyn and Dorothy Vangsness, John and Anna Rothi, Howard and Vivian Janssen, and Don and Linda Schumacher. Active pallbearers were grandsons: Brandon, Bradley, James and Andrew Eckberg, Erie Gatz and Decek Wels. Ronald Lee Scott was born May 20, 1934, at Clinton; the son of Bernard Joseph and Myrtle Marie (Friedel) Scott. He attended elementary school at Odessa, and graduated from Ortonville High School in 1953. After high school, Ron farmed with his father a few years. He served in the Minnesota National Guard from 1957-1963. He was united in marriage on June Bishop's Charity Fishing Tourney raises $11,500 A total of $11,500 was raised for priests education as Ron Giessinger, Jim Hartman and Jackson Graf were first place winners at the third annual Bishop's Charity Fishing Tournament last Monday at Schmidt's Landing on Big Stone Lake. The team caught a total of 9.35 pounds of walleye to take top honors among the 47 fishermen competing. Second place winners were Wayne and Nancy Meyer of Revillo, who had a catch of 9.05 pounds. In third place were Father Ray Otto, Steven Brown and Dan Laskowske with 7.65 pounds. Wayne Meyer also had the largest walleye at 5.25 pounds, and Scott Torness had the largest other fish, a sheephead weighing 5.05 pounds. The purpose of the annual event was to raise funds for education of seminarians. One hundred and eighteen guests were served the meal, catered by Trevett's Cafe. Bishop Robert J. Carlson was present for the event. In the late afternoon, he celebrated mass at the camp grounds, and following the dinner announced that in the fall the diocese will have a record number of 35 young men beginning study in seminaries. This is a record for dioceses throughout the country. It has become possible, the Bishop says, because of the daily prayers for vocations by 5,000 parishoners throughout the diocese. Hosting the tournament were St. Charles Parish, Big Stone City, and Annunciation Parish of Revilio, SD. Co-chairmen were Wade Van Dover and Val Rausch. A special guest was Deacon John Short, who was ordained to the priesthood Friday at the Cathedral in Sioux Falls, SD. I INDEPENDENT WANT ADS BRING QUICK RESULTS! I out our prayers had been answered. We were going to be parents!! Only 2 weeks later we found out it was an ectopic pregnancy. It has been 8 months since this happened and we are back at square one. Unfortunately, most insurance companies don't recognize infertility as a medical condition and will pay for only a small portion of treatment, if they pay any thing at all. The emotional toll it takes on a person is immense, as is the financial burden. We have spent all of our savings and are still paying off our bills from last year. Hardly a day goes by that I don't mourn for the child I may never have. I have one of the best infertility doctors in the country and am fortunate to live in an area where costs are relatively low-about $4,500. It would take us at least 2 more years to save up this amount of money on top of paying off our current medical debt. We realize that you may be our last hope in trying to have a child. Please, this is extremely important to us. Mrs. S. R .... The Shopper, Tucson, AZ Dear Mrs. R.: I'm truly sorry for your plight, but I don't feel procreation is an inalienable right. If you have that much love to shower upon a child, why not seek foster care or adoption? I realize adoption can be spendy also, but foster care is nominal. And . although with foster care you don't have the benefit of raising a child from womb to tomb, children are not possessions to own. They are a gift to be nurtured. Bottom line- infertility seems to hit couples who want children the most. Medical intervention is great if you can afford it. But if a couple has time, energy and love to devote, why not select a child who has been dealt a losing hand and help turn that life around? To me, that would be parenting at its finest. It is a selfless act and one that could bring great rewards to all parties involved. www. thanksamillion, corn Thanks A Million 7340 Ohms Lane, Minneapolis, MN 55439 4, 1960, at t, Lowrence C.,tIic Church in Milbanl, SD with Marie Fender. In 1961, Ronald added a dairy operation to his farm south east of Ortonville. In December of 1997, he retired from the dairy, but continued to farm his land. He was a member of the Church of St. John and the Knights of Columbus. He was active in 4-H as a youth, and as an adult served as a leader. He was a devoted husband and father, and took delight in each grandchild. He will be remembered for his contagious smile, his wonderful sense of humor and his practical jokes. He truly loved his farming career and each animal he cared for, facing each day with a smile. Ronald L. Scott is survived by his wife, Marie of rural Ortonville; four daughters and sons-in-law: Debbie and Leo Wels of Lewisville Cheryl and Kevin Schweer of Milbank; LeAnn and Blain Gatz of Milbank; and Lori and Tom Walsh of Ortonville, also one son and daughter- in-law: Brian and Patty Scott of Maple Grove, 14 grandchildren, one brother- in-law and sister-in-law: Dennis and Arlene Fender of rural Milbank, and two sisters-in-law: Pamela Fender of rural Milbank and Eileen and Matt Fender of rural Milbank. Also many nieces and nephews. Ron was preceded in death by his parents and one infant brother. Mundwiler Funeral Home of Milbank was in charge of the arrangements for Ronald L. Scott. Nineteenth annual Big Stone Walleye Classic this weekend The 19th annual Big Stone Walleye Classic will be held this weekend, June 19-20 on Big Stone Lake. The contest boasts a purse of $9,000, with $1,800 going to the first place team. In addition, the committee will award $100 each day to the team that releases the largest walleye and a goose egg drawing for $200 per day will be held for those reeling in no fish. Jean Hentges, one of the event organizers, stated the contest was already becoming full as of last Friday with 81 of the potential 99 teams. "We have a good turnout every year for the contest, and most of the teams are family, whether it be father and daughter, father and son, brothers or whatever," Hentges said. Hentges also said that even though the prize money may not be as huge as some of the other tournaments on / Big Stone Lake, it is all supported by entry fees and local businesses, and offers about 80 percent payback. The tournament will begin with a mandatory rules meeting on Friday night, June 18 at 7 p.m. at The Pump in Milbank, SD. Here, anglers will receive a briefing on the tournament's rules and regulations, and have a chance to win door prizes such as a MinnKota trolling motor. The'public is invited to come watch the boats launch on both Saturday and Sunday mornings at SoDak Park Resort on the South Dakota side of Big Stone Lake at 7 a'.m., and for the weigh-ins both evenings at SoDak, Saturday's at 4 p.m. and Sunday's at 3 p.m. "It's good to see so many families involved in the tournament," Hentges said. "We've had great turnouts and good competition in the past, and we hope to make this year's Walleye Classic even better." JAMES e SUZErrE SARAJ. Office # KATHIE Com RYAN Re MIKE BILL DWYER & NANCY ae# Tues., June 15, 1999 Pubilshed Every T $25.00per year Parle, Traverse Minnesota, in South Dakota. counties in MIn Dakota. All otherS, Postmaster: send The Ortonville Ortonville, BoStone, Lac qul unties in Roberts in February .............. 2 March April .................... 20. May ..................... 18, June .................... 16A July ...................... 14.1 February ............. 29.( March .................. 2(L| April .................... 24.1 May June .................... 19. July February .............. 33.0 March .................. 30,2 April .................... 27 .li May ................... 24 1 June ................... 22.0 July ..................... 19.2 "PUBLISHER'S The Publisher for other errors connection with strictly limited advertisement in or the refund of advertisement. Church Pictures - 5 News Classified ads (Any ad brought In classify.) Thursday: A Friday: 8 a.m.- A Holidays Letters to the is Letter Independent and/or condense paper also publish letts which it might Letters printed or address Addresses and not be published, Letter writers themselves to Please keep AD The Ortonvill determining is If an zatlon char event, be considered newspaper. would ceas( paper receives single paper ink and pap product. paper cost cost of ink and paper used. Advertising crops products to the and t and plows and dealer. particular ,business. ADS: We any advertisirl News:Our A rroge, whether m other stimulate our readers. edltor are those of In Call 32 laaslfled OrXonvllle Page 4 '00INDEPENDENT Editorial comment City office choice is obvious! There should be no reason...given cost to their constituents, the taxpayer...why our City Fathers should have any problem in deciding which of four choices to make for location of new city offices! Let's take a good hard and honest look at the four choices that will be aired at a public hearing on the topic come next Monday, June 21st in the former Masonic Lodge building. We present here the facts, the costs, the pros and cons on each site and conclude with what we feel is the obvious and most logical choice. 1) Building a new complex at Hilltop. The plus is that the city offices and all departments and equipment would be under one roof. The negative is that the cost would be near $300,000, actually more like $500,000 if the fire hall and police department were to be included there also. Another negative is that the offices would be away from the central part of town. We question why this should even be a choice at the hearing, for the Council previously has turned thumbs down on this. 2) Remodeling the present Masonic building, which is now city property. A plus is the site is downtown. Also, there is no purchase cost, but on the negative side, cost for remodeling would be extensive, perhaps near $200,000, and it's questionable if space is adequate and if the building structure is sound enough! Side-hill parking is also a negative. 3) Build an all-new city complex on land the city has just purchased at the foot of Big Stone Lake. The only plus is having all departments under one roof, as Intergenerational story telling thru the Arts would be the case at Hilltop. The negative is that such land should be retained for more tourist-oriented business, such as a Marina or a park or recreational center, similar to the great Eahtonka of earlier days. 4) Moving into the former Minnwest Bank building on main street. Many positives include a) It being centrally located and downtown, filling an eye- sore void on main street, and keeping traffic in the business section; b) Keeping the building on the tax rolls (if rented); c)No remodeling is needed at all, ready for occupancy, with a large vault already there for record keeping; d) Cost to taxpayer would be the lowest level of all choices with reasonable rent, and if building is purchased, cost would only be $55,000, far cheaper than any other site; e) Another plus is that the building has a ready-made slot window in the alley for residents to merely drive up (no need to park) to drop off their monthly utility bills. A drop- box on main street is also ready-made in front of the bank building; f) Finally, the city would have a tenant in the basement, namely The Ortonville Independent, which would provide a monthly rental income to the city. City residents have already been extremely hard- hit this year on assessments in paying for a new water treatment center, and for city street blacktopping, including new storm sewers and street gutters. Common sense tells us the best bet for the taxpayer dollar is the Minnwest Bank building. In all respects, it makes the most sense! Dollar-wise, location wise! Ortonville Community Education be receiving a second $5000 grant and The Big Stone Arts Council will from the Southwest Regional Arts and Humanities Council for an Intergenerational Arts Project. The purpose of the grant will be to help people learn how to find great stories in their community and to tell these stories to others by publishing, per- forming and illustrating. This year's project will begin the Thanks a million Rausch observes 50th with Franciscan sisters Dear Mr. Ross: It's only 3:30 a.m. as I write this letter, but I know that sleep has completely left me for tonight. Life has changed so drastically in the last 8 months, I wonder if the kids can take anymore. And yet, I know they will have to because today I start chemotherapy for uterine cancer. However, the cancer was preceded by my husband leaving, losing our home and having to give up our family pets. And now this. I don't know if I'm more inclined to have a pity-party or laugh hysterically. I have 3 kids-good kids, ages 12, 14 and 17. They have been a source of comfort to me. My only hope is that none of them inherit their father's weakness of running out when things get tough. I hope you don't feel I'm setting you up for a big kill, but yes, I do have a request. I'm going to be off work receiving intense chemo. I've only been employed for 18 months with my current employer and I've used up all my vacation time which means I need to take a 4 week leave of absence. My folks can carry me on utilities and gr)ceries, but my rent is $900 a month (3-bedroom apartments are extremely costly). How about a one time gift from you? You certainly could ease my burden and help keep my little family together. Mrs. O. E... Transatlantic Weeklies, Winnipeg Dear Mrs. F.: So many of life's challenges seem to carry a black cloud and cause a dampening of the week of June 21, 1999, culminating with an exhibit and performances dur- human spirit. However, even within p 15 G (.-1"IT-E) ing the Ortonville Corn Festival. these periods are little victories and .... ''d,,;',, "cL Local photographer and artist, Don moments of happiness you "' ......... Sherman, Ortonville Elementary otherwise would never experience.  )- teacher with an art education back- For example, making rent next ground, Jo Elliot, and OHS senior, month is a real issue, until you learn i Ol w  Kristen Dragseth, will team up as that mY $900 should arrive any day. Q I | facilitators for the nine week program. Now, there's a certain elation. Enjoy Hofl The idea of this project evolves the moment for what it is. Best i HOI VVQI| around story collecting and weaving wishes. ***** local stories into performance, hand- Dear Mr. Ross: The reason I'm made books illustrated with drawing, writing you is because my husband o painting, printmaking, digital media and I have been trying for the past 3 and more. Intergenerational arts pro- years to have a child. We have tried grams provide opportunities for chil- several different infertility treatments. dren and adults to learn more about Nothing worked so last June we tried each other and express the extraordi- an expensive surgical procedure called nary in what they find together in G.1.ET.(Gamete Intra Fallopian Tube ordinary life whether it is past or pre- Transfer). Twelve days later we found sent. By bringing generations together " ' into a theme of community identity Ronald Scott and involvement through art it will be .... :,i MundwileT . Funeral Hone ..... possible to learn much moreabouour i' announces the death of Ronald L, history and enjoy the communication Scott, 65, of rural Sister Rose Mae Rausch, daughter of the late Val and Katherine Rausch of Big Stone City, will cele- brate 50 years as a member of the Franciscan Sisters of Little Falls, on Sunday, June 27. A Mass of Thanksgiving will be offered at St. Francis Convent, Little Falls, for the jubilarians. Sister Rose Mae was accepted into the Franciscan Novitiate on August 12, 1949. She was given the religious name, Sister Mary Petra, but returned to her baptismal name. She pro- nounced her temporary vows on August 12, 1951 and perpetual vows on August 12, 1954. Sister Rose Mac graduated from eighth grade in Big Stone City and from St. Francis High School, Little Falls. She received her bachelor's degree from the College of St. Catherine, St. Paul, and a master's degree in theology from the University of San Francisco, California. Other schools from which Sister has taken courses include: Laval University, Quebec City, Canada; Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Immaculate Heart College, Los Angeles, California; St. John's University, Collegeville, Minnesota; St. Paul Seminary, St. Paul; St. Bonaventure University, St. Bonaventure, New York; John F. Kennedy University, Berkeley, California, and Washington Theological Union, Washington, D.C. She served as a seventh grade teacher at St. Joseph's Waite Park and as a principal of Holy Spirit School, St. Cloud; was director of novices for the Franciscan Sisters of Little Falls; coordinator of religious education in five-parish region in Archdiocese of St. Paul/Minneapolis; a catechetical team member at Warren; member of administrative team for the Franciscan Sisters; a missionary in San Felix, Venezuela; and Community Minister of the Franciscan Sisters of Little Falls, 1988-1996. At the present time she serves as pastoral administrator for St. Jude Parish, Sylacauga, and Holy Name of Jesus Parish, Childersburg, Alabama. of it and to preserve it for future gen- erations. Registration will be completed by Friday, June 11. Space is limited. (15 enrollments - I0 to 12 yr. olds, 15 enrollments - 13-18 yr. olds and up to 30 adult enrollments. To reserve a smt, contact Shawnda Johnson. II I I ONCE AGAIN... MANY THANKS Recent new and renewal sub- scribers to The Independent which we gratefully acknowledge with thanks for your loyalty: Victor Stolpman Esther Mullins Darcy's Cutting Edge Matt Drobny Paul Drobny Scott Maas Jeff Berger Clayton Gloege Martha Kuefler Chester Carl, Sr. Raymond G. Karels Clyde Sitter Henry Redtleid Emma Schwarze Harold Voss Ramona Dorry Virginia Elvecrog David Ellingson Klein National Bank Mark Chase Margaret Van Lith Bea Nordick Jeanette Nordick Ron Nordick Jack Nordick Rev. Ihno Jaussen Clifford Longworth George Gimmestad Lawrence Millerbernd Regina Millerbernd Ginger Drobny H.O. Price Ardelle Courtney James Wendland Art Brnus Mrs. Marlys McCorkle Derald Rolfsmeier Carol Lind Louis Hannen Delmer Mielitz Bill Busk Kent Stotesbery Angle Stotesbery Maynard Shelstad Arthur Quance Robert Ekelund Joel Kuyper Beverly Hesser Joyee Schultz Dean Von Eschen Mrs. Terry Freeman Kanthak Small Engines Vernon Henkelman Janice Wolf I II Ortonville. Ron died June 10th at his home. A Mass of Christian Burial was held Monday, June 14th in the Church of St. John at Ortonville. Father Bob Goblirsch officiated and burial was in the St. Lawrence Cemetery at Milbank. Music was presented by Mrs. Pat Kunz, organist; the Church of St. John's Choir and Mrs. Shelly Kurkosky, vocalist. Honorary pallbearers were Harlan and Marcella Hansen, Marlyn and Dorothy Vangsness, John and Anna Rothi, Howard and Vivian Janssen, and Don and Linda Schumacher. Active pallbearers were grandsons: Brandon, Bradley, James and Andrew Eckberg, Erie Gatz and Decek Wels. Ronald Lee Scott was born May 20, 1934, at Clinton; the son of Bernard Joseph and Myrtle Marie (Friedel) Scott. He attended elementary school at Odessa, and graduated from Ortonville High School in 1953. After high school, Ron farmed with his father a few years. He served in the Minnesota National Guard from 1957-1963. He was united in marriage on June Bishop's Charity Fishing Tourney raises $11,500 A total of $11,500 was raised for priests education as Ron Giessinger, Jim Hartman and Jackson Graf were first place winners at the third annual Bishop's Charity Fishing Tournament last Monday at Schmidt's Landing on Big Stone Lake. The team caught a total of 9.35 pounds of walleye to take top honors among the 47 fishermen competing. Second place winners were Wayne and Nancy Meyer of Revillo, who had a catch of 9.05 pounds. In third place were Father Ray Otto, Steven Brown and Dan Laskowske with 7.65 pounds. Wayne Meyer also had the largest walleye at 5.25 pounds, and Scott Torness had the largest other fish, a sheephead weighing 5.05 pounds. The purpose of the annual event was to raise funds for education of seminarians. One hundred and eighteen guests were served the meal, catered by Trevett's Cafe. Bishop Robert J. Carlson was present for the event. In the late afternoon, he celebrated mass at the camp grounds, and following the dinner announced that in the fall the diocese will have a record number of 35 young men beginning study in seminaries. This is a record for dioceses throughout the country. It has become possible, the Bishop says, because of the daily prayers for vocations by 5,000 parishoners throughout the diocese. Hosting the tournament were St. Charles Parish, Big Stone City, and Annunciation Parish of Revilio, SD. Co-chairmen were Wade Van Dover and Val Rausch. A special guest was Deacon John Short, who was ordained to the priesthood Friday at the Cathedral in Sioux Falls, SD. I INDEPENDENT WANT ADS BRING QUICK RESULTS! I out our prayers had been answered. We were going to be parents!! Only 2 weeks later we found out it was an ectopic pregnancy. It has been 8 months since this happened and we are back at square one. Unfortunately, most insurance companies don't recognize infertility as a medical condition and will pay for only a small portion of treatment, if they pay any thing at all. The emotional toll it takes on a person is immense, as is the financial burden. We have spent all of our savings and are still paying off our bills from last year. Hardly a day goes by that I don't mourn for the child I may never have. I have one of the best infertility doctors in the country and am fortunate to live in an area where costs are relatively low-about $4,500. It would take us at least 2 more years to save up this amount of money on top of paying off our current medical debt. We realize that you may be our last hope in trying to have a child. Please, this is extremely important to us. Mrs. S. R .... The Shopper, Tucson, AZ Dear Mrs. R.: I'm truly sorry for your plight, but I don't feel procreation is an inalienable right. If you have that much love to shower upon a child, why not seek foster care or adoption? I realize adoption can be spendy also, but foster care is nominal. And . although with foster care you don't have the benefit of raising a child from womb to tomb, children are not possessions to own. They are a gift to be nurtured. Bottom line- infertility seems to hit couples who want children the most. Medical intervention is great if you can afford it. But if a couple has time, energy and love to devote, why not select a child who has been dealt a losing hand and help turn that life around? To me, that would be parenting at its finest. It is a selfless act and one that could bring great rewards to all parties involved. www. thanksamillion, corn Thanks A Million 7340 Ohms Lane, Minneapolis, MN 55439 4, 1960, at t, Lowrence C.,tIic Church in Milbanl, SD with Marie Fender. In 1961, Ronald added a dairy operation to his farm south east of Ortonville. In December of 1997, he retired from the dairy, but continued to farm his land. He was a member of the Church of St. John and the Knights of Columbus. He was active in 4-H as a youth, and as an adult served as a leader. He was a devoted husband and father, and took delight in each grandchild. He will be remembered for his contagious smile, his wonderful sense of humor and his practical jokes. He truly loved his farming career and each animal he cared for, facing each day with a smile. Ronald L. Scott is survived by his wife, Marie of rural Ortonville; four daughters and sons-in-law: Debbie and Leo Wels of Lewisville Cheryl and Kevin Schweer of Milbank; LeAnn and Blain Gatz of Milbank; and Lori and Tom Walsh of Ortonville, also one son and daughter- in-law: Brian and Patty Scott of Maple Grove, 14 grandchildren, one brother- in-law and sister-in-law: Dennis and Arlene Fender of rural Milbank, and two sisters-in-law: Pamela Fender of rural Milbank and Eileen and Matt Fender of rural Milbank. Also many nieces and nephews. Ron was preceded in death by his parents and one infant brother. Mundwiler Funeral Home of Milbank was in charge of the arrangements for Ronald L. Scott. Nineteenth annual Big Stone Walleye Classic this weekend The 19th annual Big Stone Walleye Classic will be held this weekend, June 19-20 on Big Stone Lake. The contest boasts a purse of $9,000, with $1,800 going to the first place team. In addition, the committee will award $100 each day to the team that releases the largest walleye and a goose egg drawing for $200 per day will be held for those reeling in no fish. Jean Hentges, one of the event organizers, stated the contest was already becoming full as of last Friday with 81 of the potential 99 teams. "We have a good turnout every year for the contest, and most of the teams are family, whether it be father and daughter, father and son, brothers or whatever," Hentges said. Hentges also said that even though the prize money may not be as huge as some of the other tournaments on / Big Stone Lake, it is all supported by entry fees and local businesses, and offers about 80 percent payback. The tournament will begin with a mandatory rules meeting on Friday night, June 18 at 7 p.m. at The Pump in Milbank, SD. Here, anglers will receive a briefing on the tournament's rules and regulations, and have a chance to win door prizes such as a MinnKota trolling motor. The'public is invited to come watch the boats launch on both Saturday and Sunday mornings at SoDak Park Resort on the South Dakota side of Big Stone Lake at 7 a'.m., and for the weigh-ins both evenings at SoDak, Saturday's at 4 p.m. and Sunday's at 3 p.m. "It's good to see so many families involved in the tournament," Hentges said. "We've had great turnouts and good competition in the past, and we hope to make this year's Walleye Classic even better." JAMES e SUZErrE SARAJ. Office # KATHIE Com RYAN Re MIKE BILL DWYER & NANCY ae# Tues., June 15, 1999 Pubilshed Every T $25.00per year Parle, Traverse Minnesota, in South Dakota. counties in MIn Dakota. All otherS, Postmaster: send The Ortonville Ortonville, BoStone, Lac qul unties in Roberts in February .............. 2 March April .................... 20. May ..................... 18, June .................... 16A July ...................... 14.1 February ............. 29.( March .................. 2(L| April .................... 24.1 May June .................... 19. July February .............. 33.0 March .................. 30,2 April .................... 27 .li May ................... 24 1 June ................... 22.0 July ..................... 19.2 "PUBLISHER'S The Publisher for other errors connection with strictly limited advertisement in or the refund of advertisement. Church Pictures - 5 News Classified ads (Any ad brought In classify.) Thursday: A Friday: 8 a.m.- A Holidays Letters to the is Letter Independent and/or condense paper also publish letts which it might Letters printed or address Addresses and not be published, Letter writers themselves to Please keep AD The Ortonvill determining is If an zatlon char event, be considered newspaper. would ceas( paper receives single paper ink and pap product. paper cost cost of ink and paper used. Advertising crops products to the and t and plows and dealer. particular ,business. ADS: We any advertisirl News:Our A rroge, whether m other stimulate our readers. edltor are those of In Call 32 laaslfled OrXonvllle Page 4 '00INDEPENDENT