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June 15, 1999     The Ortonville Independent
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Big Stone County Precipitation Data Charles Hanson Farm on Artichoke Lake Updated by John Cunningham June 10, 1999 i 00iiiiii!0000, _Normal 1993 January 0.72 1.01 February 0.66 0.26 March 1 37 1.58 April 2,24 2.10 May 2.73 3,50 June 3.61 5.62 July 3.39 8.14 August 3.01 2,68 September 2.19 2.02 October 2.09 0,47 November 0.99 2.19 December 0.54 0.97 Total 23,54 30,54 Def, 199..__4 Def. 1995 Def. 1996 Def, 1997 Def. 1998 0.29 0.78 0,04 0,61 -0,11 2.20 1.48 3.19 2.47 1.19 -0.40 0.93 0.27 0.29 -0.37 0.56 -0.10 0,53 -0,13 1,13 0.21 0.53 -0.84 3.48 2,11 0,52 -085 1.43 0.06 1.91 -O14 4.31 207 2.98 0.74 0,60 -1.64 3.22 098 2,71 0.77 1.50 -1.23 3.39 066 4.25 1,52 0.99 -1.74 299 2.01 2.22 -1 39 2.98 -0.63 1.54 -2.07 2.01 -1.60 3.13 4.75 5.41 2,02 6.51 3.12 5.05 1,66 3.63 0.24 5.15 -0.33 226 -0.75 5.19 218 3.39 0.38 3 59 0.58 3,37 -0.17 2.55 0.36 3.58 1.39 322 1.03 1.37 -0 82 046 -1.62 294 0.85 3.04 0.95 4.23 2.14 359 150 4.63 1.20 0.94 -0.05 0.24 -0.75 1 57 0.58 064 -0,35 1.55 0.4....3 0.2._44 -0,30 0._.555 0.0__.1 1,7.,4 1.20 0.17 -0.37 019 7,00 24,59 1.05 32.84 9.30 28.87 5.33 24.36 0.82 26.41 Def. 1999 DeE 0 47 1.18 0,46 047 016 -0.50 0 54 1.44 0,07 0.47 1 72 -0,52 026 4.14 1.41 -0.48 1.76 036 -1 73 254 0.56 -0.35 4.87 8.64 0.92 S OF THE ASSOCIATION FREE LUTHERAN BIBLE SCHOOL will be presenting a music at Elim Free Lutheran Church, Clinton, at its 9 a.m. Sunday service, June 20th Free Lutheran Church, Ortonville, at its 10:30 a.m. Sunday service on the same day. over 10,000 miles this summer singing at various churches and camps. Members of the Cuiaba, Brazil; Dan Keinanen, Cloquet; Kelli Floan, Fertile; Kristi Forness, Wahpeton, Monseth, Rogers. The Association Free Lutheran Bible School of Minneapolis offers a two year study of the Bible and other related subjects. The public is cordially invited. n report of Minnesota r.mg a weed summer for weeds they ,cally. Kevin weed samples the mail if they Condition to be Send samples to )artment of 411 rpper Buford the following Weed samples: in plastic bags The plants s to paper or lants in a fold Press book and vegetation is growing rapidly; high temperatures increase risk of volatilization with some herbicides. Leaf surfaces can be warmer than air temperatures. Wind carries fine droplets from spray that can cause problems. Damage to non-target plants is one concern. It also can cause residues if food crops are affected. Even when winds aenl aoticeable, chemicals can move to non target plants in backyard situations through fine spray particles. There's often not much room for error when sensitive plants are so close. Wrage offers these tips to avoid drift damage: Avoid using broadleaf treatments (2,4-D, dicamba, MCPE 2,4-DE etc.) on large areas in mid-season. Early spring or fall is safer. Other non-selective treatments (such as glyphosate) can be carried to non-target plants. Use caution. Dig, pull or cut-off scattered weed plants. If treatment is needed, spot treat individual plants. This reduces the " amount of product in an area. Select cool, calm conditions. Avoid any use of ester formulations. Data show that 25 to 50 percent or more volatility can occur with some volatile formulations when temperatures reach to the 80's. Plan major applications for fall whenever possible. CLASSIFIED ADS BRING QUICK RESULTS I III II I Need A Low Interest Home Loan? USDA/Rural Development Office Hours: Ist & 3rd Wednesday each month 9:30-11:30 a.m, in the Farm Service Agency Office in Ortonville. CALL 320-235-5612 FOR MORE INFORMATION Equal Housing Opportunity Total excess Precipitation January 1, 1993 through May 31, 1999 equals 29.29 inches. Plants can be envelope if ;amples at the to avoid having office over a of the top of and/or e. Roots are not identification of :Ver, if sending plants, and timing is y of ;Ion Service "Cultural and 0ntrol in Field s available for offices of the U tension weed Dakota State gs developed the use after broadleaf summer time e to other is" greater Sensitive @!!;i!ii!i Internet's growth ... and impending threats By every measure, Internet use continues to outstrip predictions. In early 1993, about 90,000 Americans had access to the Internet. Today, that number has grown to about 81 mil- lion, an increase of more than 89,000 percent. Compare the Internet's growth with that of other technologies: It took 38 years for the telephone to penetrate 30% of U.S. households. Television took 17 years; personal computers, 13 years. The Internet has taken less than seven years to reach the 30% level and, in terms of capacity, the back- bone of the Internet doubles every 100 days. What makes this important is that federal and state officials are increas- ingly focusing on the Internet as an area ripe for regulation. Whether it's regulating the Internet's content, or finding a way to tax business done over the Internet, or setting rules regarding how people get access to the Internet, government's desire is to get its hands around this rapidly- expanding entity. The best indicator of government's urge to regulate is this: In 1999 more than 1,500 bills that called for some form of Internet regulation were intro- duced this year in state legislatures. And right now, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is laying the groundwork for a regulatory power grab. It wants to set up a whole new bureaucracy just to monitor and regu- late e-commerce. These facts - and many others - are contained in our US Internet Council's recently released "State of the Internet" study. We believe it is the most comprehensive research doc- ument regarding Internet use today. I MINNWEST BANK SALUTES THE DAIRY INDUSTRY with ICE CREAM CONES on Thursday, June 17th 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM in our lobby YOUR FREE WILL DONATION WILL GO TOWARDS THE CANCER BENEFIT "RELAY FOR LIFE" While you're here... C:ID SPECIAL MONEY MANAGER CD WITH THREE BENEFITS Change the Rate + Add to the Balance + Withdraw without Penalty MINNWEST BANK ORTONVILLE MINNWEST BANK GROUP 21 Southeast Second Street Ortonville, Minnesota 56278 Phone 320-839-2568 MoneyLine 1-888-616-2265 *Annual Percentage Yield (APY) and this offer are effective June 4, 1999 and subject to change without notice. This CD not valid for public/business funds. A $10,000.00 minimum opening deposit is required. There is a substantial penalty for early withdrawal beyond the one-time withdrawal opportunity. chronicling the extraordinary growth in Internet usage, e-commerce, and the threats that government regulation pose to the Internet's future growth. One promising element in our report is the dramatic action being taken by industry to bring high speed or "broadband" access to American Internet users. Broadband capability improves sound and graphics, helps websites download much more quick- ly, and dramatically expands con- sumers' ability to effectively use the Internet. Right now competitors from tele- phone, cable, satellite and wireless industries are competing aggressively to meet the surging demand for faster, better access to the Internet. They are deploying a variety of technologies: digital subscriber lines, cable TV wires, satellite and wireless systems, to name a few. Americans should be heartened by the extraordinary competition that's occurring at all levels of Internet activity. Consumers always benefit from vigorous comoetition. For precisely that reason there is no ne.l for government to insert itself and to start applying the heavy hand of regulation. Consumers and the marketplace are busy selecting wiri- ners and losers in the Internet indus- try, and there's no need for govern- ment to start politicizing questions that are best left to innovation and consumer choice. And there is certain- ly no need for the FI'C to start moni- toring, meddlin_g and regulating. We can see now only dim outlines of future Internet technologies. Others will surely soon emerge that are not yet imagined. Government's ideal approach can be summed up in the p, hrase adopted by the Clinton admin- istration -- "First, do no harm." The absolute wrong policy would be to sti- fle innovation and competition by putting the power of government behind any element of the Internet. Specifically, laws and regulations designed for a monopoly environment should not be applied to the Internet. If policy-makers and regulators can just keep their mitts off it, years of explosive Internet growth are likely to continue. Anyone who would like to see our "State of the Internet" white paper in its entirety can visit our website at US1C.org. Enjoyment! ! It's a guarantee from my family to yours. Carson & Barnes' Circus has been owned by nay family for over 60 years. Now we invite . your family to experience our circus family of animals, artists and'. clowns. You enter a tent bigger than a football yet sit only a few feet fr ttie performance. Then enjoy a thrilling personal experience that's every bit as exciting for a 70 year old as it is for a 7 year old. International acts will excite and delight, but never terrify. In fact, the enjoyment of your entire family is personally guaranteed by the Miller family. Join us on Circus Day, ///h//_.k kl--  Yours truly, ///.lill /// F en en s/ ' // of the Miller Family ,  .'---c__ IPd3US *** Hosted by Milbank Kiwanis Club 00INDEPENDENT Page 9b Big Stone County Precipitation Data Charles Hanson Farm on Artichoke Lake Updated by John Cunningham June 10, 1999 i 00iiiiii!0000, _Normal 1993 January 0.72 1.01 February 0.66 0.26 March 1 37 1.58 April 2,24 2.10 May 2.73 3,50 June 3.61 5.62 July 3.39 8.14 August 3.01 2,68 September 2.19 2.02 October 2.09 0,47 November 0.99 2.19 December 0.54 0.97 Total 23,54 30,54 Def, 199..__4 Def. 1995 Def. 1996 Def, 1997 Def. 1998 0.29 0.78 0,04 0,61 -0,11 2.20 1.48 3.19 2.47 1.19 -0.40 0.93 0.27 0.29 -0.37 0.56 -0.10 0,53 -0,13 1,13 0.21 0.53 -0.84 3.48 2,11 0,52 -085 1.43 0.06 1.91 -O14 4.31 207 2.98 0.74 0,60 -1.64 3.22 098 2,71 0.77 1.50 -1.23 3.39 066 4.25 1,52 0.99 -1.74 299 2.01 2.22 -1 39 2.98 -0.63 1.54 -2.07 2.01 -1.60 3.13 4.75 5.41 2,02 6.51 3.12 5.05 1,66 3.63 0.24 5.15 -0.33 226 -0.75 5.19 218 3.39 0.38 3 59 0.58 3,37 -0.17 2.55 0.36 3.58 1.39 322 1.03 1.37 -0 82 046 -1.62 294 0.85 3.04 0.95 4.23 2.14 359 150 4.63 1.20 0.94 -0.05 0.24 -0.75 1 57 0.58 064 -0,35 1.55 0.4....3 0.2._44 -0,30 0._.555 0.0__.1 1,7.,4 1.20 0.17 -0.37 019 7,00 24,59 1.05 32.84 9.30 28.87 5.33 24.36 0.82 26.41 Def. 1999 DeE 0 47 1.18 0,46 047 016 -0.50 0 54 1.44 0,07 0.47 1 72 -0,52 026 4.14 1.41 -0.48 1.76 036 -1 73 254 0.56 -0.35 4.87 8.64 0.92 S OF THE ASSOCIATION FREE LUTHERAN BIBLE SCHOOL will be presenting a music at Elim Free Lutheran Church, Clinton, at its 9 a.m. Sunday service, June 20th Free Lutheran Church, Ortonville, at its 10:30 a.m. Sunday service on the same day. over 10,000 miles this summer singing at various churches and camps. Members of the Cuiaba, Brazil; Dan Keinanen, Cloquet; Kelli Floan, Fertile; Kristi Forness, Wahpeton, Monseth, Rogers. The Association Free Lutheran Bible School of Minneapolis offers a two year study of the Bible and other related subjects. The public is cordially invited. n report of Minnesota r.mg a weed summer for weeds they ,cally. Kevin weed samples the mail if they Condition to be Send samples to )artment of 411 rpper Buford the following Weed samples: in plastic bags The plants s to paper or lants in a fold Press book and vegetation is growing rapidly; high temperatures increase risk of volatilization with some herbicides. Leaf surfaces can be warmer than air temperatures. Wind carries fine droplets from spray that can cause problems. Damage to non-target plants is one concern. It also can cause residues if food crops are affected. Even when winds aenl aoticeable, chemicals can move to non target plants in backyard situations through fine spray particles. There's often not much room for error when sensitive plants are so close. Wrage offers these tips to avoid drift damage: Avoid using broadleaf treatments (2,4-D, dicamba, MCPE 2,4-DE etc.) on large areas in mid-season. Early spring or fall is safer. Other non-selective treatments (such as glyphosate) can be carried to non-target plants. Use caution. Dig, pull or cut-off scattered weed plants. If treatment is needed, spot treat individual plants. This reduces the " amount of product in an area. Select cool, calm conditions. Avoid any use of ester formulations. Data show that 25 to 50 percent or more volatility can occur with some volatile formulations when temperatures reach to the 80's. Plan major applications for fall whenever possible. CLASSIFIED ADS BRING QUICK RESULTS I III II I Need A Low Interest Home Loan? USDA/Rural Development Office Hours: Ist & 3rd Wednesday each month 9:30-11:30 a.m, in the Farm Service Agency Office in Ortonville. CALL 320-235-5612 FOR MORE INFORMATION Equal Housing Opportunity Total excess Precipitation January 1, 1993 through May 31, 1999 equals 29.29 inches. Plants can be envelope if ;amples at the to avoid having office over a of the top of and/or e. Roots are not identification of :Ver, if sending plants, and timing is y of ;Ion Service "Cultural and 0ntrol in Field s available for offices of the U tension weed Dakota State gs developed the use after broadleaf summer time e to other is" greater Sensitive @!!;i!ii!i Internet's growth ... and impending threats By every measure, Internet use continues to outstrip predictions. In early 1993, about 90,000 Americans had access to the Internet. Today, that number has grown to about 81 mil- lion, an increase of more than 89,000 percent. Compare the Internet's growth with that of other technologies: It took 38 years for the telephone to penetrate 30% of U.S. households. Television took 17 years; personal computers, 13 years. The Internet has taken less than seven years to reach the 30% level and, in terms of capacity, the back- bone of the Internet doubles every 100 days. What makes this important is that federal and state officials are increas- ingly focusing on the Internet as an area ripe for regulation. Whether it's regulating the Internet's content, or finding a way to tax business done over the Internet, or setting rules regarding how people get access to the Internet, government's desire is to get its hands around this rapidly- expanding entity. The best indicator of government's urge to regulate is this: In 1999 more than 1,500 bills that called for some form of Internet regulation were intro- duced this year in state legislatures. And right now, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is laying the groundwork for a regulatory power grab. It wants to set up a whole new bureaucracy just to monitor and regu- late e-commerce. These facts - and many others - are contained in our US Internet Council's recently released "State of the Internet" study. We believe it is the most comprehensive research doc- ument regarding Internet use today. I MINNWEST BANK SALUTES THE DAIRY INDUSTRY with ICE CREAM CONES on Thursday, June 17th 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM in our lobby YOUR FREE WILL DONATION WILL GO TOWARDS THE CANCER BENEFIT "RELAY FOR LIFE" While you're here... C:ID SPECIAL MONEY MANAGER CD WITH THREE BENEFITS Change the Rate + Add to the Balance + Withdraw without Penalty MINNWEST BANK ORTONVILLE MINNWEST BANK GROUP 21 Southeast Second Street Ortonville, Minnesota 56278 Phone 320-839-2568 MoneyLine 1-888-616-2265 *Annual Percentage Yield (APY) and this offer are effective June 4, 1999 and subject to change without notice. This CD not valid for public/business funds. A $10,000.00 minimum opening deposit is required. There is a substantial penalty for early withdrawal beyond the one-time withdrawal opportunity. chronicling the extraordinary growth in Internet usage, e-commerce, and the threats that government regulation pose to the Internet's future growth. One promising element in our report is the dramatic action being taken by industry to bring high speed or "broadband" access to American Internet users. Broadband capability improves sound and graphics, helps websites download much more quick- ly, and dramatically expands con- sumers' ability to effectively use the Internet. Right now competitors from tele- phone, cable, satellite and wireless industries are competing aggressively to meet the surging demand for faster, better access to the Internet. They are deploying a variety of technologies: digital subscriber lines, cable TV wires, satellite and wireless systems, to name a few. Americans should be heartened by the extraordinary competition that's occurring at all levels of Internet activity. Consumers always benefit from vigorous comoetition. For precisely that reason there is no ne.l for government to insert itself and to start applying the heavy hand of regulation. Consumers and the marketplace are busy selecting wiri- ners and losers in the Internet indus- try, and there's no need for govern- ment to start politicizing questions that are best left to innovation and consumer choice. And there is certain- ly no need for the FI'C to start moni- toring, meddlin_g and regulating. We can see now only dim outlines of future Internet technologies. Others will surely soon emerge that are not yet imagined. Government's ideal approach can be summed up in the p, hrase adopted by the Clinton admin- istration -- "First, do no harm." The absolute wrong policy would be to sti- fle innovation and competition by putting the power of government behind any element of the Internet. Specifically, laws and regulations designed for a monopoly environment should not be applied to the Internet. If policy-makers and regulators can just keep their mitts off it, years of explosive Internet growth are likely to continue. Anyone who would like to see our "State of the Internet" white paper in its entirety can visit our website at US1C.org. Enjoyment! ! It's a guarantee from my family to yours. Carson & Barnes' Circus has been owned by nay family for over 60 years. Now we invite . your family to experience our circus family of animals, artists and'. clowns. You enter a tent bigger than a football yet sit only a few feet fr ttie performance. Then enjoy a thrilling personal experience that's every bit as exciting for a 70 year old as it is for a 7 year old. International acts will excite and delight, but never terrify. In fact, the enjoyment of your entire family is personally guaranteed by the Miller family. Join us on Circus Day, ///h//_.k kl--  Yours truly, ///.lill /// F en en s/ ' // of the Miller Family ,  .'---c__ IPd3US *** Hosted by Milbank Kiwanis Club 00INDEPENDENT Page 9b