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June 15, 1999     The Ortonville Independent
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June 15, 1999
 

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Carson and Barnes Circus here soon, with a new addition Isa's glad it's over.., and you would be, too, if you'd been pregnant for 22 months as Isa has. And if your new baby weighed in at 250 pounds, you'd probably be glad you were an elephant. To see the new baby live and in person, Carson and Barnes Great American Circus will be holding two shows in Milbank, SD Monday, June 28, at 4:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m on South Highway 15, sponsored by the Milbank Kiwanis Club. Carson and Barnes Circus is proud to announce that on September 6, 1998, Isa, a 30-year-old member of the Carson and Barnes family of performing Asian elephants, gave birth to her first baby, a female named "Jennie", and one of just a special few baby elephants to be born in captivity. Present at the birth was Lillie, Isa's elephant friend, who helped to comfort her and prevent her from stepping on the baby, along with Dr. Schmidt, the Springfield, MO Zoo veterinarian, Isa's own doctor, Ted Eudy, Tim Frisco, Carson and Barnes animal care director, and Kristin Miller Byrd, fourth generation owner of the circus. While the arrival of any new baby is a miraculous event, this elephant's arrival is truly special, as there are only about 40,000 of the endangered Asian elephants remaining in the world. In an attempt to help preserve these magnificent animals, Carson and Barnes Circus has established a breeding farm near Hugo, OK, the circus's winter quarters, where Isa delivered her calf. Breeding these animals in captivity is an expensive, complicated and time consuming activity. Determining a female's fertile period is no easy task and it took years to develop a reliable detection method using hormone testing and ultrasound. An elephant's reproductive cycle is 22 days but the egg can be fertilized on only two of those days. Since elephants give no outward indication that their reproductive cycle has begun, scientists use these tests to determine when the cycle begins and, even more critical, the optimum time for fertilization. Loss of habitat and poaching have contributed to the alarming decline in both Asian and African elephant populations, with the Asian species experiencing the most drastic reduction. Institutions such as the Springfield Zoo and Carson and Barnes Circus are dedicated to developing a successful breeding program, but must contend with an aging breeding population and a widespread North American elephant population. Carson and Barnes rotates elephants from its eight month tour of circus performances to the breeding facility as they become fertile. Kelly is pregnant now and the next chance for a successful live birth was February, 1999. In addition, the Miller family, owners of Carson and Barnes Circus, have established the Endangered Ark Foundation to provide funding and support for preserving elephants and other endangered species. In lieu of baby /  ,  i , ISA WITH HER BABY. A 30-year-old member of the Carson and Barnes family of performing Asian elephants, Isa gave birth to her first baby "Jennie" recently. Both can be seen at the circus, which will hold two shows in Milbank, SD Monday, June 28. shower gifts, contributions can be sent to the Foundation at P.O. Box J, Hugo, Oklahoma, 74743. Carson and Barnes recognizes that unless something is done quickly, the extremely endangered Asian elephant is doomed, and it is proud to contribute to the world wide efforts to save these wonderful animals through its breeding program. Advance tickets are available at Bill's Super Valu Plus, Ortonville, and costs are $10 for adults and $5 for children ages 5-11 before circus day, and $12 for adults and $6 for children on circus day. Preschool children are free with coupons before circus day, and $4 the day of the circus. The categories include a) prairie plants, b) prairie animals (including insects, etc.), c) prairie landscapes or uses and d) miscellaneous prairie photos. Prizes are 1st Place - $40; 2nd Place $30; 3rd Place - $20 and Honorable Mention (2) - $10. Judging will be based upon content, adherence to contest theme and photographic quality. The photographs will become the property of the Lac qui Parle SWCD and its Prairie Initiative Partners and will be housed in the SWCD office. The photo must have been taken in Lac qui Parle County or contiguous Native Prairie Our Natural Heritage INT, ALL2MI0ULAY By Sonja Farmer Native Prairie Photography Contest The Lac qui Parle Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD) and its Prairie Initiative Partners are sponsoring a photography contest. The theme is "Native Prairie Our Natural Heritage" and is open to all. The contest is being sponsored in an effort to increase awareness of prairie, allow artistic expression of prairie appreciation and to build a local library of prairie photographs for use by local organizations and agencies. Prescribed burning invigorates The time is the late 18th century. Perhaps right here in what is soon to be Big Stone County, Waves of prairie grass can be seen to the horizon along with scores of grazing bison. As an early season electrical storm approaches from beyond the western bluffs on Big Stone Lake, a crack of lightning sets the plain ablaze. The prairie is consumed at will until rain or some natural land feature stops it; perhaps the Mississippi River. This was not an uncommon sce- nario for those times. As a matter of fact, fire was an integral part of grass- land environments and had co-existed for many centuries with prairie plants and wildlife until European settle- ment. Plant animal, and even Native American communities came to depend on fire for their very suste- nance. The management program for prairie habitats and wildlife on Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge has been able to take advantage of the opportunities offered by such natural- ly occurring events as fire. By using fire in a controlled way (prescribed burning) we can attempt to bring about the benefits to the land that has always been a part of our tallgrass prairies. In the absence of fire, native grass- lands tend to lose their ability to pro- vide food, cover and quality nesting habitat for prairie-dependent species of wildlife. Dead vegetation retards new plant growth. Non-native species such as brome, quack and Kentucky bluegrass out-compete fire dependent, native plants such as big bluestem, switchgrass, Indiangrass, and a myri- ad of forbs. Without fire, most native grasslands are rapidly colonized by woody species, (trees and shrubs), which is a very obvious change to the prairie landscape. As undesirable plants establish themselves the habitat can no longer support the same num- ber and species of wildlife. Wildlife species at Big Stone NWR like the ring-necked pheasant, mallard, countless small mammals and non-game birds have been shown to respond very favorably to the vig- orous new growth of prairie plants that come from a prescribed burn. Although some losses of early nests are inevitable, wildlife losses from fire have been over-emphasized. Excluding fire from grasslands actual- ly increases wildlife losses by permit- ting the habitat to deteriorate. This spring Big Stone NWR plans to burn 2,600 acres of prairie habitat on the refuge and on the newly acquired Wetland Management District which lies in Lincoln and Lyon Counties. These prairie ecotypes 'need fire to this year, Big Stone. help in their Buffalo Use Fire the State helping wetland Man is a Harrison, AN. It Service crew people and all the ment. Very rarely plan get Weather time of year, will determine scribed burn can b That is to the proper well trained team is controlled burn pla Through the burning, turned back the use of a naturall our prairie tants have come t0' result, we have on the refuge birds, 41 species countless species mention a piece natural heritage. ' 1 Save Ti%s?aVe $$$ WANT ADS II counties. Photograph(s) submitted should be between a minimum of 4" x 6" to a maximum of 11" x 14" in size and should be mounted. Entries are limited to 2 entries/person/category and negatives should be submitted with the photograph. Submit your photograph(s) and negative to Lac qui Parle Soil and Water Conservation District, 525 First Street East, Madison, MN 56256 by December 15, 1999. Include the following information with your photograph: name, address, phone number, category, description of photo and title, location where photo was shot, negative number and signed model release from any persons in the photo. If you have any questions, please call the SWCD at 320-598-7321, Ex. 3. II I "IIFI i "NORTHEAST ORTHOPAEDIC CENTER , Serving N.E. South Dakota and Western Minnesota for 13 years Seeing patients weekly at the Ortonville Hospital. Call Lori Larson at 1-320-839-2502 for an appointment. WE NOW ACCEPT MEDICARE ASSIGNMENT Michael J. Vener, M.D. Len B. Kolodychuk, M.D. (6o5) 88z-2630 or 1-800-658-4763 Mallard Pointe Business Park Watertown, SD CKx00. Neighbors. Good Friends. Minnesota who they can friend. A good when it comes to age, for sixty relied on Blue Shield of offers you a wide care supplementS': their Basic Medical Plan, Senior Gold. the state's largest work, to help you doctor you Worldwide let you down Paperless claims t coverage simple. ized senior are always there with questions. you can count or, affordable price, information, agent listed beloW. Good Coverage. 1993 Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota A inember of the Association, an Blue Register TO THE From The Distributors of e e '.* : " : : : " .: :i. Jr -- -- A COMPLETE LINE.OF WHOLESALE KEMP $ DAIRY PRODUC ,ooos, ou,,,,c, c,,,,,.., .o,,o, A ".. I   ' '  "I ' CRAB "BREAI)S ! p ,FRENGH "S P'IM .sAUSAGE LOBsTE Ice Cream Adds *WEINE ! II " Sparkle to Summer .KEMp'S I/h-000000Pll -.------- ---..,,,--.-- -- -, P- | ! II! k" II Serving the FolIowI00II Towns & Rural Area=  . Ortonville Louisburg Watson ' .,/ Big Stone City, SD Rosen Holloway Johnson Rosholt, SD Twin Clinton Marietta Correll Collis Sisseton, SD You can reach us at this number... Beardsley Nassau Danvers Wheaton Wilmot, SD (605) 862-8619 Barry Appleton Alberta New Effington, SD Corona, SD Odessa Milan Morris Fairmount, ND Milbank, SD Butch Thole, Jr. - Big Stone City Bellingham Dawson Chokio Hankinson, ND Stockholm, SD 84t S.II. lad Street Page lOb "  INDEPENDENT Carson and Barnes Circus here soon, with a new addition Isa's glad it's over.., and you would be, too, if you'd been pregnant for 22 months as Isa has. And if your new baby weighed in at 250 pounds, you'd probably be glad you were an elephant. To see the new baby live and in person, Carson and Barnes Great American Circus will be holding two shows in Milbank, SD Monday, June 28, at 4:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m on South Highway 15, sponsored by the Milbank Kiwanis Club. Carson and Barnes Circus is proud to announce that on September 6, 1998, Isa, a 30-year-old member of the Carson and Barnes family of performing Asian elephants, gave birth to her first baby, a female named "Jennie", and one of just a special few baby elephants to be born in captivity. Present at the birth was Lillie, Isa's elephant friend, who helped to comfort her and prevent her from stepping on the baby, along with Dr. Schmidt, the Springfield, MO Zoo veterinarian, Isa's own doctor, Ted Eudy, Tim Frisco, Carson and Barnes animal care director, and Kristin Miller Byrd, fourth generation owner of the circus. While the arrival of any new baby is a miraculous event, this elephant's arrival is truly special, as there are only about 40,000 of the endangered Asian elephants remaining in the world. In an attempt to help preserve these magnificent animals, Carson and Barnes Circus has established a breeding farm near Hugo, OK, the circus's winter quarters, where Isa delivered her calf. Breeding these animals in captivity is an expensive, complicated and time consuming activity. Determining a female's fertile period is no easy task and it took years to develop a reliable detection method using hormone testing and ultrasound. An elephant's reproductive cycle is 22 days but the egg can be fertilized on only two of those days. Since elephants give no outward indication that their reproductive cycle has begun, scientists use these tests to determine when the cycle begins and, even more critical, the optimum time for fertilization. Loss of habitat and poaching have contributed to the alarming decline in both Asian and African elephant populations, with the Asian species experiencing the most drastic reduction. Institutions such as the Springfield Zoo and Carson and Barnes Circus are dedicated to developing a successful breeding program, but must contend with an aging breeding population and a widespread North American elephant population. Carson and Barnes rotates elephants from its eight month tour of circus performances to the breeding facility as they become fertile. Kelly is pregnant now and the next chance for a successful live birth was February, 1999. In addition, the Miller family, owners of Carson and Barnes Circus, have established the Endangered Ark Foundation to provide funding and support for preserving elephants and other endangered species. In lieu of baby /  ,  i , ISA WITH HER BABY. A 30-year-old member of the Carson and Barnes family of performing Asian elephants, Isa gave birth to her first baby "Jennie" recently. Both can be seen at the circus, which will hold two shows in Milbank, SD Monday, June 28. shower gifts, contributions can be sent to the Foundation at P.O. Box J, Hugo, Oklahoma, 74743. Carson and Barnes recognizes that unless something is done quickly, the extremely endangered Asian elephant is doomed, and it is proud to contribute to the world wide efforts to save these wonderful animals through its breeding program. Advance tickets are available at Bill's Super Valu Plus, Ortonville, and costs are $10 for adults and $5 for children ages 5-11 before circus day, and $12 for adults and $6 for children on circus day. Preschool children are free with coupons before circus day, and $4 the day of the circus. The categories include a) prairie plants, b) prairie animals (including insects, etc.), c) prairie landscapes or uses and d) miscellaneous prairie photos. Prizes are 1st Place - $40; 2nd Place $30; 3rd Place - $20 and Honorable Mention (2) - $10. Judging will be based upon content, adherence to contest theme and photographic quality. The photographs will become the property of the Lac qui Parle SWCD and its Prairie Initiative Partners and will be housed in the SWCD office. The photo must have been taken in Lac qui Parle County or contiguous Native Prairie Our Natural Heritage INT, ALL2MI0ULAY By Sonja Farmer Native Prairie Photography Contest The Lac qui Parle Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD) and its Prairie Initiative Partners are sponsoring a photography contest. The theme is "Native Prairie Our Natural Heritage" and is open to all. The contest is being sponsored in an effort to increase awareness of prairie, allow artistic expression of prairie appreciation and to build a local library of prairie photographs for use by local organizations and agencies. Prescribed burning invigorates The time is the late 18th century. Perhaps right here in what is soon to be Big Stone County, Waves of prairie grass can be seen to the horizon along with scores of grazing bison. As an early season electrical storm approaches from beyond the western bluffs on Big Stone Lake, a crack of lightning sets the plain ablaze. The prairie is consumed at will until rain or some natural land feature stops it; perhaps the Mississippi River. This was not an uncommon sce- nario for those times. As a matter of fact, fire was an integral part of grass- land environments and had co-existed for many centuries with prairie plants and wildlife until European settle- ment. Plant animal, and even Native American communities came to depend on fire for their very suste- nance. The management program for prairie habitats and wildlife on Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge has been able to take advantage of the opportunities offered by such natural- ly occurring events as fire. By using fire in a controlled way (prescribed burning) we can attempt to bring about the benefits to the land that has always been a part of our tallgrass prairies. In the absence of fire, native grass- lands tend to lose their ability to pro- vide food, cover and quality nesting habitat for prairie-dependent species of wildlife. Dead vegetation retards new plant growth. Non-native species such as brome, quack and Kentucky bluegrass out-compete fire dependent, native plants such as big bluestem, switchgrass, Indiangrass, and a myri- ad of forbs. Without fire, most native grasslands are rapidly colonized by woody species, (trees and shrubs), which is a very obvious change to the prairie landscape. As undesirable plants establish themselves the habitat can no longer support the same num- ber and species of wildlife. Wildlife species at Big Stone NWR like the ring-necked pheasant, mallard, countless small mammals and non-game birds have been shown to respond very favorably to the vig- orous new growth of prairie plants that come from a prescribed burn. Although some losses of early nests are inevitable, wildlife losses from fire have been over-emphasized. Excluding fire from grasslands actual- ly increases wildlife losses by permit- ting the habitat to deteriorate. This spring Big Stone NWR plans to burn 2,600 acres of prairie habitat on the refuge and on the newly acquired Wetland Management District which lies in Lincoln and Lyon Counties. These prairie ecotypes 'need fire to this year, Big Stone. help in their Buffalo Use Fire the State helping wetland Man is a Harrison, AN. It Service crew people and all the ment. Very rarely plan get Weather time of year, will determine scribed burn can b That is to the proper well trained team is controlled burn pla Through the burning, turned back the use of a naturall our prairie tants have come t0' result, we have on the refuge birds, 41 species countless species mention a piece natural heritage. ' 1 Save Ti%s?aVe $$$ WANT ADS II counties. Photograph(s) submitted should be between a minimum of 4" x 6" to a maximum of 11" x 14" in size and should be mounted. Entries are limited to 2 entries/person/category and negatives should be submitted with the photograph. Submit your photograph(s) and negative to Lac qui Parle Soil and Water Conservation District, 525 First Street East, Madison, MN 56256 by December 15, 1999. Include the following information with your photograph: name, address, phone number, category, description of photo and title, location where photo was shot, negative number and signed model release from any persons in the photo. If you have any questions, please call the SWCD at 320-598-7321, Ex. 3. II I "IIFI i "NORTHEAST ORTHOPAEDIC CENTER , Serving N.E. South Dakota and Western Minnesota for 13 years Seeing patients weekly at the Ortonville Hospital. Call Lori Larson at 1-320-839-2502 for an appointment. WE NOW ACCEPT MEDICARE ASSIGNMENT Michael J. Vener, M.D. Len B. Kolodychuk, M.D. (6o5) 88z-2630 or 1-800-658-4763 Mallard Pointe Business Park Watertown, SD CKx00. Neighbors. Good Friends. Minnesota who they can friend. A good when it comes to age, for sixty relied on Blue Shield of offers you a wide care supplementS': their Basic Medical Plan, Senior Gold. the state's largest work, to help you doctor you Worldwide let you down Paperless claims t coverage simple. ized senior are always there with questions. you can count or, affordable price, information, agent listed beloW. Good Coverage. 1993 Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota A inember of the Association, an Blue Register TO THE From The Distributors of e e '.* : " : : : " .: :i. Jr -- -- A COMPLETE LINE.OF WHOLESALE KEMP $ DAIRY PRODUC ,ooos, ou,,,,c, c,,,,,.., .o,,o, A ".. I   ' '  "I ' CRAB "BREAI)S ! p ,FRENGH "S P'IM .sAUSAGE LOBsTE Ice Cream Adds *WEINE ! II " Sparkle to Summer .KEMp'S I/h-000000Pll -.------- ---..,,,--.-- -- -, P- | ! II! k" II Serving the FolIowI00II Towns & Rural Area=  . Ortonville Louisburg Watson ' .,/ Big Stone City, SD Rosen Holloway Johnson Rosholt, SD Twin Clinton Marietta Correll Collis Sisseton, SD You can reach us at this number... Beardsley Nassau Danvers Wheaton Wilmot, SD (605) 862-8619 Barry Appleton Alberta New Effington, SD Corona, SD Odessa Milan Morris Fairmount, ND Milbank, SD Butch Thole, Jr. - Big Stone City Bellingham Dawson Chokio Hankinson, ND Stockholm, SD 84t S.II. lad Street Page lOb "  INDEPENDENT