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The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
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June 23, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
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June 23, 1921
 

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THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT Jl VOLUME 2 ORTONVILLE, MINN, THURSDAY, JUNE 23j 1921 NUMBER 7 i ss r its  SUCCEEDS IN ATTEMPT TO START BASEBALL With Appleton Sun- day To Open Much Delay- ed Season--Old Grounds To Be Used. Baseball which----as practically some time ago after an er- a team started, is to be re- according to the latest advice the local Degion post which is a team. The curtain raiser 1921 season will be a game next Sunday. or not the Legion would team in the field depended on 0f grounds auitable for a dia- only place being the tract was used last year. Arrange- made just recently with owner of this, to use Place. The negotiations were in of "Herb" Bolsta and J. A. Ja- who will have charge of the team, and Wayne Kelly. men of Ortonville were so- for money with which will be hired. This" is the sa.laried man the team will sup- are that an effort will be in ease sufficient funds re to get Barney Childs here for Childs worked on the for the Ortonville team last and is well-known by all local s. of the Legion planned to diamond in shape Thursday for the Appleton game, mow- :he field and skinning the di- Will be held regular from The no team has been or- Yet, there is some good ma- draw from, and the Legion represented by a good team. local talent there is Wayne and Chic Zwiener who could with either "Cub" for ateJaer. Joe Pe- Bertelson, Robert Mac* Harry Peterson, and Earl a other eligibles. am_e has been scheduled and will be played there Many Flock to Beaches As Mercury Goes Higher Hot weather of last week, reaching the peak on the three last days of the week, caused more people to flock to the beeches in hopes of finding relief from the heat, than at any other time this summer. Even somewhat cool weather on Sunday and the other days of this week seemed to result in no let-up, and the beaches were as popular as ever. What is believed to be a record crowd was at the beach at Eahtonka Sunday afternoon. It was estimated that not less than seventy-five people were there at one time between two and three o&apos;clock. Accommodations at Eahtonka were used to the lira.it all (luring the afternoon, and those in charge said it was undoubtedly a rec- ord day. Everyone was of the opinion that "swimmin's fine." Feeder Roads Important Part of State Program The fact that /mendment No. I plan is primarily to provide a good road to every Minnesota farm gate and not merely automobile boulevards is being emphasized by the present campaign for good federal aid legis- lation. That it makes available ap- proximately $5,000,000 a year for the less expensive the larger system of feeder roads than for the heavy-traf- fic trunk routes has been pointed out by state highway officials in the move- ment in which farmers and other or- ganizatioas joined later. "Farmers' roads get first considera- tion under the Minnesota highway plan. This is primarily an agricul- tural state and farmers' roads must have that place. Anything that will hinder instead of help the farmers of the state has no part in the program," said officials. The same policy will apply under the intent of the new law regulating the use of cleats and lugs on wheels on Minnesota highways, Commission- er Babcock said, to allay the fears of threshenmen. Mud hooks are barred as a rule but the use of lugs will be permitted when necessary. "Neither the highway department nor the far- mers want roads carelessly torn up and damaged, and we count on the thresherrnen using good judgment to avoid it," he said. Third Well In Order. on the city wa- with the hot weather has ecessary for the city of Or- to put into operation another wells. of this week work was fix the well on the north Avenue just east with First street. is being done by Gunder of Clinton. of the four wella have to date as they supplied for the city. It is thot addition of the third well, Water win be obtained to meet of fixing the well will be about the end of this week. Thieves Still Pree; No Clues Found has been discovered to date lead to or help in ap- the thiefs who broke in Repair shop a week ago night and stole Ford parts of considerazle value, to Art Pufahl, owner of the of the work in- the party was familiar and led those investL- it had been done by Nothing further has which would strength- On, and the case is where first discovere Folks Saturday -7-m52 having de- were entitled to a days Called a halt in their work and went to McGee's tsheY held a regular Out- ]xty people from that there. was spent by many of some of them having the morning in order to fishing. Picnic lunch was and in the afternoon regular get-together. tleranShine Fatal To Two. atll al j. Schwenk, married, and !t, inrhrtu,nogle , both farmers C ok, died early Sat- ing from drinking poison-  said to be moonshine, later e: ..and shown to contain strych-  .,,:_tt  mr: Schwenk and his wife were r,-hart.place about I0 o'clock  aright, and just before depart- %*a ome Schwenk is said to have e e , to take a couple of swal- it "Wli .' Ii k._ quor and arriving home :ew  violently ill and died a 1 later. Mr. Reinhart was td. next moZmtn and found  r ql  -,- g 1 near his home.---Swii ! nson) bonitor. Washouts Make Flyers Arrive Behind Schedule Heavy rains and WUuts in Mon- tana, causing damagt to the Chicago, Milwaukee, and St.  road as well as many others, delayed the Flyers from the coast on londay and Tues- day of this week, and they were ar- riving here all the way from five to even hours late. Monday afterncola, No. 16 which is due here at 4:53 p. rn, dd not arrive until about 11:30. Both Flyers on Tuesday were also late, No. 18 which is scheduled to arrive at 9:05 a. m. not coming tlntil about 4:3@in the af- temon. The afternoon Flyer was ai- ,5 late. By Wednesday they were again run- ning on scheduled time. The locals from both the west and the east, not having encountered this trouble, were running on time. Clinton Sunday School Holds Annual Picnic About seventy-five members of the Sunday" school of the Swedish Luther- an church of Clinton, together with the parents, enjoyed their annual Sunday school picnic which was held last Sunday afternoon at the Gust Anderson farm about seven miles up the lake from Ortonville. In the afternoon, following a pic- nic lunch, the members of the Sunday school gave a program which consisted of speaking and singing, by both indi- vidual members and groups. The pro- gram was given under the diron of Mrs. Victor Lewis, superintendent of the Sunday school, who was as- sisted by Miss Hilda Swenson. Refreshments were served after the program, the proceeds going to the Sunday school fund. Glenn Matthews to Join Eastmaw Co. Glenn Matthews is now visiting his home here, having just completed a year of gaduate work at the Uni- versity of Minnesota. He graduated from the Uniersity last year, getting his Bachelor's degree then, and his work this year gives him a Master's degree. He received high honors in his work, Chemistry. In a few weeks he will leave for Rochester, N. Y., where hd will join the Eastman Kodak Company. Dance Prices are Reduced. Announcement is made this week by Often Brothers, managers of Eah- tonka of a reduction in the price of danc tickets, taking effect at the first dance this week whidh was held Tues- day . Tickets for the entire evening which have not been sold before this season are being offered, while there has been a reduction on single dance tickets. The admission charge has al- so been removed. SPECIAL SESSION OF HOG CHOLERA BREAKS COURT HERE JULY 1 OUT NEAR ODESSA Motion For New Tri'---al In Rothi Case I Efforts Made t C--b It By Strict Comes Up Before Judge t Observance of Quarantine and Flaherty. Consideration and final action on the motion for a new trial for Gus Rothi, found guilty at the Spring term of District Court of "carnal abuse of a female child under the age of eigh- teen years" will be given by Judge Flaherty, when a special session of District Court will be called Friday, July 1. No other cases are on the calendar Sanitary Measures. Two new cases of hog cholera have appeared in section 21 of Odessa town- ship this week, according to word from the offices of the County Agent, M. P. Roske. The situation which now prevails is given as follows: The weather conditions at the pres- ent time aid greatly in the spread of this disease and it is very important to be heard at this special term. The that every farmer in this section use exception to this will come if attor-levery means to help check the spread neys on ,cais which were postponed of it. arrange to ave their case submitted It must be remembered that dogs, at this te There is only a smaUlteams, wagons, crows and pigeons possibility of such action. No persons have been summoned for I jury service for this term. I Attorneys for both the state and the defense will make their appeal relative to the motion for the new trial, and Judge Flaherty will give out his decision. Rothi was found guilty of the charge which was placed against him after a comparatively short period of deliberation by the jury. The case was one of the most important cases to come before the Spring term of court. When the case was tried then Rothi was represented by Attorneys Howard Babcock of Sisseton and A. B. Kaer- cher of Ortonville. R. G. Farrington, county attorney, represented the state. Sow Thistle, Worst of Weeds, Found In Toqua The farmer up in Red River Valley recognizes the perennial sow thistle as the worst of all the weed pests. In fact authorities claim that it is harder to eradicate than all the other weeds put together. A small patch of these plants has been found in Toqua township. "No doubt there are other small patches in the county that are just making a start and have not as yet been dis.- covered," said M. P. Roske, county agent. He adds: , This thistle spreads very rapidly; both by underground stems and by seed. A few plants will scatter seed over an entire field. We must not let this weed get a start in this countY, t It has done so much damage in te northern part that tke state is lie- - termined not to let it spread fmC,mt! south into the southern counties. ' Burletins explaining the appearance of this weed can be had at the Farm Bureau oce. carry this disease from one pen to another. Dogs should be tied up and the crows and pigeons shot. There were eight cases of cholera around Barry and Beardsley this spring but the outbreak at the prem ent is pretty well under control. ]t has been demonstrated during the last three years, here in this county, that hog cholera can be controlled where the quarantine and tary measures ae carried out. The State Livestock Sanitary Board has i'ecommended the double treatment of vaccination in in- fected territory. Effort Made to Stop Speeding On Highways Speed maniacs are not only the tar- gets for criticism in newspapers, from public-spirited citizens and even road patrolmen who fear for their lives, but make a seri0us problem for the highway department, Commissioner Babcock said recently. "We are building and maintaining good smooth highways, but we cannot police them, too, under the law," the commissioner added. "That is pri- marily a matter for the sheriffs of the different counties as fax as rural high- ways are involved. But we will be glad to co-operate as far as possible to insure public safety in this as well as other directions." Counties which are employing sher- iffs' deputies for road policing on mo- torcycles find the plan more than self- sustaining, fines exceeding the ex- pense, it was reported. Speed-breaking bumps, described as bumps that will e hardly felt at a 25-mile pace but will almost throw, oc- cupants from cars driven faster than 40 miles an hour, were suggested but Commissioner Babcock said he was not ready to subscribe to the idea. War on Barberry Carried Into Big00 Stone County @ MEN FROM U. S. D. OF A. TO black. This is the winter stage. The MAKE FARM TO FARM ]winter spores cannot germinate at CANVASS. once but lie dormant on the stubble Eradication of the barberry bush in Big Stone county iS the goal of the campaign now being caAed on here by the United States Department of Agriculture, with co-operation by the Farm Bureau and other farm organ- izations. The campaign here is being conduc- ted under the direct supervision of H. W. Manuel and D. G. Fletcher of the Bureau of Plant Industry of the De- partment of Agriculture. They are working thru the headquarters of this bureau at St. Paul. As the result of their first few days in the field they have found the bar- berry bush in one place, according to a report they made public Tuesday. This was on a farm about seven or eight miles east of Ortonville Rust has already spread about a quarter of a mile from the bushes there. It was now confined mostly to weeds, but was at a stage and condi- tion which indicated that it would soon spread on the grasses. The case against the barberry is not a new one Some time ago the Minnesota Department of Agriculture at the University Farm announced that they "declared war on the bar- berry," and steps have been taken to rid the state of this bush. The manner in which black rust is spread by the barberry bush is given in circular semt out by the Spring Wheat Crop Improvement Associa- tion of Minneapolis. In explanation it says: Black stem rust is caused by a well known fungous parasite. In the spring this parasite grows on the common barberry on which it forms rust spores (in "cluster cups") and these spores (seeds) are bloom by the wind to grasses or grains. They germinate in moisture furnished by rain or dew and infect the grain or grass plants. The parasite gets inside the plant, takes its food from this plant and then within a week or two produces *the red or summer spore dust famil- or straw until spring. Then they germinate but they cannot, directIy infect grains and grasses . This black stage of the rust can infect only the common barberry. Destroy the cora- l men barberry and the black stage of the rust becomes ham.les The rust cannot then get an early start in the spring, bcause it cannot maintain itself in the northern states in the red stage during the winter. Unde the heading "The Common Barberry, An Outlaw" it goes on o say: So clear was the case against the common barberry that in 1917 North Dakota passed a law requiring its de- struction. Since then, Montana, Colo- rado, Nebraska, South Dakota, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Michi* gan, and Indiana and the prairie provinces of Canada have made com- pulsory the destruction of the bar- berry. Congress has made substan- tial appropriations to assist in the fight against this dangerous bush and the United States Department of Agriculture has led in the movement by co-operating with the several states to reduce rust losses by destroying the bush. The part that the people must take in the attempt to destroy the bar- berry is contained in the following words which makes clear the neces- sity of co-operation by all. IS says: But even so the United States De- partment of Agriculture and state au- thorities cannot alone find all the bushes, The success of the fight against the barberry depends on the public interest and on the people who own the bushes, Mere laws will not eradicate barberries, we want men with shovels and grubhoes. Above all, men, women, and children who know the barberry when they see it. Learu to kow the common barberry and de,roy it. This is the public duty of every citizen, especially in the rural communities. It is on your premises ? Look and see; if it is there, g it out. Is it in your neighborhood ? If I Ford Plunges Off Lake I Road; No One Injured Speed and a bad rut along the lake road failed to make a good combina- tion, with the result that a Ford road- ster in which Harry Brown of this city, a Mr. Wheeler sof Chicago, and a third party were riding, left the road and plunged down the embank- ment near the A. L. Moore and Gee. Fosberg residences. No one was seriously hurt, only scratches and bruises being sustained by the three. The accident occurred about 10:30 last Friday night. The Ford which suffered the most from the plunge, is reported to hae turned over twice in going down the embankment. The top and windshield were smashed, the radiator was pushed and damaged, and one of the front wheels broken off clean at the hubs. I With a new wheel on, the car was I driven to one of the Ortonville gar- ages under its own power. Headlight Law Goes Into Effect July 1 Headlights on all motor cars oper- ating in the state ,must be of the non- glare type beginning with July 1, as prescribed by the law passed by the 921 session of the Minnesota legisla- ture which goes into effect on that date. Motorists should take note of the provisions of this law, a part of section, 4, chapter 472, H. F. No. 1159, which reads: No person shall use or cause to be used after July 1, 1921, on any mo- tor vehicle operated on any public street, or highway any headlights with reflector unless that reflector or glass in front of such liglt be so etched, ground, moulded or constructed that the lighted filament shall appear blu red or all light emitted therefrom and projected above the level of the lia4ted filament .shall be free from brilliant luster. The law further states that: No so-called spotlight or search- light shall be used upon vehicles trav- elling public highways, except when such spotlights or searchlights are of such construction as to make it im- possible to make the center of the beam of light strike the level high- way at a greater distance than 100 feet in rent of the motor vehicle; ex- cept when the beam of light is swung 30 degrees to the right or to the left of the straight ahead position, no limi- tation is plac on the height to which the beam is raised." Elevator Stockholders Hold Important Meeting Appointment of C. J. Stark, cashier of the Ortonville State Bank, as audi- tor to make a complete report of the stock on hand of the Farmers Eleva tor and Fuel company, .was the result of the meeting of stockholders of that company last Saturday afternoon at the Odd Fellows hall. It was first intended to have a re- port handed in some time the first of June but the large amount of goods on hand prevented those who were to make the report from getting an in- ventory of all the stock. Only an esti- mated report of the stock was given at the meeting Saturday. Two talks were given at this meet. ing to the stockholders of the com- pany. One was given by Mr. Stark wbo urged that the farmers should organize more strongly, making their program more inclusive and providing for the tmarketing of all the products of the farm. The other talk was given by E. H. Vankrevelen, representative of the Equity Co-operative Exchange of St. Paul, who is now working among the farmers in the interests of the Equity. He explained that work that the Equity was doing, and how the local elevators-were operated under the Equity plan. Because of the lack of a complete report the meeting was postponed to a future date. This was the regular annual meet- ing of the stockholders of the com- pany. Gets $50 Watch As Prize. A $50 gold watch was received this week by Walter Ulrich of this city, son of Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Ulrich, and one of the contestants in the Minne- apolis Daily News auto contest," for having practically a tie vote for sec- ond prize in the campaign for the second period. Three of the contestant, of whom Ulrich was one, lead the contest for this period and were about tied for first place.. Only a few votes separ- ated them. Mr. Ulrich is now one of the leaders in the contest which will end about July 4. He has been carrying on an extensive campaign in spite of his handicap, his lower extremities having been paralyzed when he was hurt in a building accident in Big Stone City iar to any grain grower. This red rust is the summer stage of the black stem rust. These spores in turn are blown about by the wind and infect other grass and grain plants. Thus many crops of red spores may be produced and each crop causes more rust Later in tlm sean the rust becom it is, get the owner to dig it out--if some years ago. He wishes that all herefuses, report it to the state ex-lpersons intending to subscribe for periment station. There still are l that paper or planning to renew their thousands of hushes in the spring I subscriptions see him. wheat states of the upper Mississippi I ....... Valley. I' The Milbank and Ortonville Luther The extent of the damage done by Leagues will*hold a joint picnic at the barberry bush thru i spread oil McGee's Park Sunday commencing at (Continued on pae 4) I eleven o'clock in the forenoon. LUTHER BAND TO GIVE EXCELLENT PROGRAMS HERE Two Concert At Chautau- qua Park Saturday To Consist of Best In Band Music. One of the most exceptional oppor- tunities ever given to the people of Ortonville and surrounding laces to hear concerts of the highest order will come this Saturday when the Luther college Band-of Decorah, In.# gives two concerts at the Chautauqua Park, one concert to be at 2:00 p. re,- and the other at 8:00 p. m. The band which is now on its 60th anniversary tour is meeting with great success wherever it is heard. High honors and praise have been won by it, both on the tour this year, and on tours of previous years. Of the tour this year the following has been said: Several of the largest cities in South Dakota have been visited, among them Mitchell, Huron, and Madison. Evervhere the enthusiactic applause of the audience has showed their appreciation of the high stan- dard of music rendered by this stu- dent organization. Fame of the preceded it, and many are surprised to find that it really is composed of stu- dents, and not of older musiclaae They are further surprised at the qual- ity of music rendered by these young musicians. The evening concert at Toronto, S. D., developed into a Luther jubilee. There were a number of Luther grad- uates and former students present, some of whom had comae fifty miles to hear the concert. In The Minneapolis Journal of a re- cent date, there is said of the Luther College Band: This amateur concert band is play- ing music of the highest order. Among the feature numbers may be mention- ed: Wagner's "Tannhauser" Over- ture; Tschaikowsky's "March Slave"; and Largo from Dvork's "From the New World" Symphony. Some of the other number axe: Rossini's "La Gaz- za Ladra" Overture, Supp's "Tan- talusqualen" Overture, Andante fron Beethoven's "Fifth Symphony,' Jes- sel's "The Wedding of thb Ro," Johnson's "The Death of luster," Meyerbeer's "March Indienne" from "L'Africaine," Rossini's "William Tell" Overture, Andante frown Haydn's "Surprise Symphony," Thomas"Mig - non" Polonais, and many others of like nature. One added feature of these concerts beautiful new set of xylophones which will be the introduction of a very they have recently purchased. Both xylophones and the chimes will be feao tured not only in various selections but also in solos. The concert is being gyen under the auspices of the Big Stoneehoir of the two .Norwegian Lutheran churches of Clinton. More Than 1,000 Patrolmen # Keep State s Roads Good W. F. Rosenwald, chief maintenance engineer, and his assistant, Engineer M. J. Hoffman, announced that 1,009 ,atrolmen, one for each 5 to 8-mile section of trunk highway, are now at work keeping the roads smooth, also that fleets made up of more than 40 txactors and 100 trucks are given the - patrolmen special help when neces- sary to put their sections in good shape for maintenance. Names of pa- trolmen on roads hereabouts are to be given out soon. ,o Condition of Yellowstone Trail Report Weey Weekly reports of the road condi- tions of the Yellowstone Trail, giv- ing important information of the en- tire route, are received in Ortonville by the Park Garage, the Columbia Hotel, and the J. Arthur Matthews & Company Garage, at which place they are accessible to tourists a people planning to travel over th Yellowstone Trail. This service is furnished each week to these three places by the Yellowstone Trail of. rices at Minneapolis. Contract for Building of Correll Bridge Let The contract for the construction of the bridge to be built two miles ea of the village of Correll on trunk highway No. 26 has been let to the Prendergast Bridge Construction com- pany of Milbank, S. D., it was an- nounced by County Engineer F. W. Engdahl. The contract was given t the Milbank company Jure 14. The price for which the bridge is to be built was not given out. Construction of the bridge will be begun the latter part of thisweek or the first of next week. On the com- pletion of this road running from east of Correll will run straight along the section line, eliminating tlm detour which has been a part of it since i was constractl. THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT Jl VOLUME 2 ORTONVILLE, MINN, THURSDAY, JUNE 23j 1921 NUMBER 7 i ss r its  SUCCEEDS IN ATTEMPT TO START BASEBALL With Appleton Sun- day To Open Much Delay- ed Season--Old Grounds To Be Used. Baseball which----as practically some time ago after an er- a team started, is to be re- according to the latest advice the local Degion post which is a team. The curtain raiser 1921 season will be a game next Sunday. or not the Legion would team in the field depended on 0f grounds auitable for a dia- only place being the tract was used last year. Arrange- made just recently with owner of this, to use Place. The negotiations were in of "Herb" Bolsta and J. A. Ja- who will have charge of the team, and Wayne Kelly. men of Ortonville were so- for money with which will be hired. This" is the sa.laried man the team will sup- are that an effort will be in ease sufficient funds re to get Barney Childs here for Childs worked on the for the Ortonville team last and is well-known by all local s. of the Legion planned to diamond in shape Thursday for the Appleton game, mow- :he field and skinning the di- Will be held regular from The no team has been or- Yet, there is some good ma- draw from, and the Legion represented by a good team. local talent there is Wayne and Chic Zwiener who could with either "Cub" for ateJaer. Joe Pe- Bertelson, Robert Mac* Harry Peterson, and Earl a other eligibles. am_e has been scheduled and will be played there Many Flock to Beaches As Mercury Goes Higher Hot weather of last week, reaching the peak on the three last days of the week, caused more people to flock to the beeches in hopes of finding relief from the heat, than at any other time this summer. Even somewhat cool weather on Sunday and the other days of this week seemed to result in no let-up, and the beaches were as popular as ever. What is believed to be a record crowd was at the beach at Eahtonka Sunday afternoon. It was estimated that not less than seventy-five people were there at one time between two and three o'clock. Accommodations at Eahtonka were used to the lira.it all (luring the afternoon, and those in charge said it was undoubtedly a rec- ord day. Everyone was of the opinion that "swimmin's fine." Feeder Roads Important Part of State Program The fact that /mendment No. I plan is primarily to provide a good road to every Minnesota farm gate and not merely automobile boulevards is being emphasized by the present campaign for good federal aid legis- lation. That it makes available ap- proximately $5,000,000 a year for the less expensive the larger system of feeder roads than for the heavy-traf- fic trunk routes has been pointed out by state highway officials in the move- ment in which farmers and other or- ganizatioas joined later. "Farmers' roads get first considera- tion under the Minnesota highway plan. This is primarily an agricul- tural state and farmers' roads must have that place. Anything that will hinder instead of help the farmers of the state has no part in the program," said officials. The same policy will apply under the intent of the new law regulating the use of cleats and lugs on wheels on Minnesota highways, Commission- er Babcock said, to allay the fears of threshenmen. Mud hooks are barred as a rule but the use of lugs will be permitted when necessary. "Neither the highway department nor the far- mers want roads carelessly torn up and damaged, and we count on the thresherrnen using good judgment to avoid it," he said. Third Well In Order. on the city wa- with the hot weather has ecessary for the city of Or- to put into operation another wells. of this week work was fix the well on the north Avenue just east with First street. is being done by Gunder of Clinton. of the four wella have to date as they supplied for the city. It is thot addition of the third well, Water win be obtained to meet of fixing the well will be about the end of this week. Thieves Still Pree; No Clues Found has been discovered to date lead to or help in ap- the thiefs who broke in Repair shop a week ago night and stole Ford parts of considerazle value, to Art Pufahl, owner of the of the work in- the party was familiar and led those investL- it had been done by Nothing further has which would strength- On, and the case is where first discovere Folks Saturday -7-m52 having de- were entitled to a days Called a halt in their work and went to McGee's tsheY held a regular Out- ]xty people from that there. was spent by many of some of them having the morning in order to fishing. Picnic lunch was and in the afternoon regular get-together. tleranShine Fatal To Two. atll al j. Schwenk, married, and !t, inrhrtu,nogle , both farmers C ok, died early Sat- ing from drinking poison-  said to be moonshine, later e: ..and shown to contain strych-  .,,:_tt  mr: Schwenk and his wife were r,-hart.place about I0 o'clock  aright, and just before depart- %*a ome Schwenk is said to have e e , to take a couple of swal- it "Wli .' Ii k._ quor and arriving home :ew  violently ill and died a 1 later. Mr. Reinhart was td. next moZmtn and found  r ql  -,- g 1 near his home.---Swii ! nson) bonitor. Washouts Make Flyers Arrive Behind Schedule Heavy rains and WUuts in Mon- tana, causing damagt to the Chicago, Milwaukee, and St.  road as well as many others, delayed the Flyers from the coast on londay and Tues- day of this week, and they were ar- riving here all the way from five to even hours late. Monday afterncola, No. 16 which is due here at 4:53 p. rn, dd not arrive until about 11:30. Both Flyers on Tuesday were also late, No. 18 which is scheduled to arrive at 9:05 a. m. not coming tlntil about 4:3@in the af- temon. The afternoon Flyer was ai- ,5 late. By Wednesday they were again run- ning on scheduled time. The locals from both the west and the east, not having encountered this trouble, were running on time. Clinton Sunday School Holds Annual Picnic About seventy-five members of the Sunday" school of the Swedish Luther- an church of Clinton, together with the parents, enjoyed their annual Sunday school picnic which was held last Sunday afternoon at the Gust Anderson farm about seven miles up the lake from Ortonville. In the afternoon, following a pic- nic lunch, the members of the Sunday school gave a program which consisted of speaking and singing, by both indi- vidual members and groups. The pro- gram was given under the diron of Mrs. Victor Lewis, superintendent of the Sunday school, who was as- sisted by Miss Hilda Swenson. Refreshments were served after the program, the proceeds going to the Sunday school fund. Glenn Matthews to Join Eastmaw Co. Glenn Matthews is now visiting his home here, having just completed a year of gaduate work at the Uni- versity of Minnesota. He graduated from the Uniersity last year, getting his Bachelor's degree then, and his work this year gives him a Master's degree. He received high honors in his work, Chemistry. In a few weeks he will leave for Rochester, N. Y., where hd will join the Eastman Kodak Company. Dance Prices are Reduced. Announcement is made this week by Often Brothers, managers of Eah- tonka of a reduction in the price of danc tickets, taking effect at the first dance this week whidh was held Tues- day . Tickets for the entire evening which have not been sold before this season are being offered, while there has been a reduction on single dance tickets. The admission charge has al- so been removed. SPECIAL SESSION OF HOG CHOLERA BREAKS COURT HERE JULY 1 OUT NEAR ODESSA Motion For New Tri'---al In Rothi Case I Efforts Made t C--b It By Strict Comes Up Before Judge t Observance of Quarantine and Flaherty. Consideration and final action on the motion for a new trial for Gus Rothi, found guilty at the Spring term of District Court of "carnal abuse of a female child under the age of eigh- teen years" will be given by Judge Flaherty, when a special session of District Court will be called Friday, July 1. No other cases are on the calendar Sanitary Measures. Two new cases of hog cholera have appeared in section 21 of Odessa town- ship this week, according to word from the offices of the County Agent, M. P. Roske. The situation which now prevails is given as follows: The weather conditions at the pres- ent time aid greatly in the spread of this disease and it is very important to be heard at this special term. The that every farmer in this section use exception to this will come if attor-levery means to help check the spread neys on ,cais which were postponed of it. arrange to ave their case submitted It must be remembered that dogs, at this te There is only a smaUlteams, wagons, crows and pigeons possibility of such action. No persons have been summoned for I jury service for this term. I Attorneys for both the state and the defense will make their appeal relative to the motion for the new trial, and Judge Flaherty will give out his decision. Rothi was found guilty of the charge which was placed against him after a comparatively short period of deliberation by the jury. The case was one of the most important cases to come before the Spring term of court. When the case was tried then Rothi was represented by Attorneys Howard Babcock of Sisseton and A. B. Kaer- cher of Ortonville. R. G. Farrington, county attorney, represented the state. Sow Thistle, Worst of Weeds, Found In Toqua The farmer up in Red River Valley recognizes the perennial sow thistle as the worst of all the weed pests. In fact authorities claim that it is harder to eradicate than all the other weeds put together. A small patch of these plants has been found in Toqua township. "No doubt there are other small patches in the county that are just making a start and have not as yet been dis.- covered," said M. P. Roske, county agent. He adds: , This thistle spreads very rapidly; both by underground stems and by seed. A few plants will scatter seed over an entire field. We must not let this weed get a start in this countY, t It has done so much damage in te northern part that tke state is lie- - termined not to let it spread fmC,mt! south into the southern counties. ' Burletins explaining the appearance of this weed can be had at the Farm Bureau oce. carry this disease from one pen to another. Dogs should be tied up and the crows and pigeons shot. There were eight cases of cholera around Barry and Beardsley this spring but the outbreak at the prem ent is pretty well under control. ]t has been demonstrated during the last three years, here in this county, that hog cholera can be controlled where the quarantine and tary measures ae carried out. The State Livestock Sanitary Board has i'ecommended the double treatment of vaccination in in- fected territory. Effort Made to Stop Speeding On Highways Speed maniacs are not only the tar- gets for criticism in newspapers, from public-spirited citizens and even road patrolmen who fear for their lives, but make a seri0us problem for the highway department, Commissioner Babcock said recently. "We are building and maintaining good smooth highways, but we cannot police them, too, under the law," the commissioner added. "That is pri- marily a matter for the sheriffs of the different counties as fax as rural high- ways are involved. But we will be glad to co-operate as far as possible to insure public safety in this as well as other directions." Counties which are employing sher- iffs' deputies for road policing on mo- torcycles find the plan more than self- sustaining, fines exceeding the ex- pense, it was reported. Speed-breaking bumps, described as bumps that will e hardly felt at a 25-mile pace but will almost throw, oc- cupants from cars driven faster than 40 miles an hour, were suggested but Commissioner Babcock said he was not ready to subscribe to the idea. War on Barberry Carried Into Big00 Stone County @ MEN FROM U. S. D. OF A. TO black. This is the winter stage. The MAKE FARM TO FARM ]winter spores cannot germinate at CANVASS. once but lie dormant on the stubble Eradication of the barberry bush in Big Stone county iS the goal of the campaign now being caAed on here by the United States Department of Agriculture, with co-operation by the Farm Bureau and other farm organ- izations. The campaign here is being conduc- ted under the direct supervision of H. W. Manuel and D. G. Fletcher of the Bureau of Plant Industry of the De- partment of Agriculture. They are working thru the headquarters of this bureau at St. Paul. As the result of their first few days in the field they have found the bar- berry bush in one place, according to a report they made public Tuesday. This was on a farm about seven or eight miles east of Ortonville Rust has already spread about a quarter of a mile from the bushes there. It was now confined mostly to weeds, but was at a stage and condi- tion which indicated that it would soon spread on the grasses. The case against the barberry is not a new one Some time ago the Minnesota Department of Agriculture at the University Farm announced that they "declared war on the bar- berry," and steps have been taken to rid the state of this bush. The manner in which black rust is spread by the barberry bush is given in circular semt out by the Spring Wheat Crop Improvement Associa- tion of Minneapolis. In explanation it says: Black stem rust is caused by a well known fungous parasite. In the spring this parasite grows on the common barberry on which it forms rust spores (in "cluster cups") and these spores (seeds) are bloom by the wind to grasses or grains. They germinate in moisture furnished by rain or dew and infect the grain or grass plants. The parasite gets inside the plant, takes its food from this plant and then within a week or two produces *the red or summer spore dust famil- or straw until spring. Then they germinate but they cannot, directIy infect grains and grasses . This black stage of the rust can infect only the common barberry. Destroy the cora- l men barberry and the black stage of the rust becomes ham.les The rust cannot then get an early start in the spring, bcause it cannot maintain itself in the northern states in the red stage during the winter. Unde the heading "The Common Barberry, An Outlaw" it goes on o say: So clear was the case against the common barberry that in 1917 North Dakota passed a law requiring its de- struction. Since then, Montana, Colo- rado, Nebraska, South Dakota, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Michi* gan, and Indiana and the prairie provinces of Canada have made com- pulsory the destruction of the bar- berry. Congress has made substan- tial appropriations to assist in the fight against this dangerous bush and the United States Department of Agriculture has led in the movement by co-operating with the several states to reduce rust losses by destroying the bush. The part that the people must take in the attempt to destroy the bar- berry is contained in the following words which makes clear the neces- sity of co-operation by all. IS says: But even so the United States De- partment of Agriculture and state au- thorities cannot alone find all the bushes, The success of the fight against the barberry depends on the public interest and on the people who own the bushes, Mere laws will not eradicate barberries, we want men with shovels and grubhoes. Above all, men, women, and children who know the barberry when they see it. Learu to kow the common barberry and de,roy it. This is the public duty of every citizen, especially in the rural communities. It is on your premises ? Look and see; if it is there, g it out. Is it in your neighborhood ? If I Ford Plunges Off Lake I Road; No One Injured Speed and a bad rut along the lake road failed to make a good combina- tion, with the result that a Ford road- ster in which Harry Brown of this city, a Mr. Wheeler sof Chicago, and a third party were riding, left the road and plunged down the embank- ment near the A. L. Moore and Gee. Fosberg residences. No one was seriously hurt, only scratches and bruises being sustained by the three. The accident occurred about 10:30 last Friday night. The Ford which suffered the most from the plunge, is reported to hae turned over twice in going down the embankment. The top and windshield were smashed, the radiator was pushed and damaged, and one of the front wheels broken off clean at the hubs. I With a new wheel on, the car was I driven to one of the Ortonville gar- ages under its own power. Headlight Law Goes Into Effect July 1 Headlights on all motor cars oper- ating in the state ,must be of the non- glare type beginning with July 1, as prescribed by the law passed by the 921 session of the Minnesota legisla- ture which goes into effect on that date. Motorists should take note of the provisions of this law, a part of section, 4, chapter 472, H. F. No. 1159, which reads: No person shall use or cause to be used after July 1, 1921, on any mo- tor vehicle operated on any public street, or highway any headlights with reflector unless that reflector or glass in front of such liglt be so etched, ground, moulded or constructed that the lighted filament shall appear blu red or all light emitted therefrom and projected above the level of the lia4ted filament .shall be free from brilliant luster. The law further states that: No so-called spotlight or search- light shall be used upon vehicles trav- elling public highways, except when such spotlights or searchlights are of such construction as to make it im- possible to make the center of the beam of light strike the level high- way at a greater distance than 100 feet in rent of the motor vehicle; ex- cept when the beam of light is swung 30 degrees to the right or to the left of the straight ahead position, no limi- tation is plac on the height to which the beam is raised." Elevator Stockholders Hold Important Meeting Appointment of C. J. Stark, cashier of the Ortonville State Bank, as audi- tor to make a complete report of the stock on hand of the Farmers Eleva tor and Fuel company, .was the result of the meeting of stockholders of that company last Saturday afternoon at the Odd Fellows hall. It was first intended to have a re- port handed in some time the first of June but the large amount of goods on hand prevented those who were to make the report from getting an in- ventory of all the stock. Only an esti- mated report of the stock was given at the meeting Saturday. Two talks were given at this meet. ing to the stockholders of the com- pany. One was given by Mr. Stark wbo urged that the farmers should organize more strongly, making their program more inclusive and providing for the tmarketing of all the products of the farm. The other talk was given by E. H. Vankrevelen, representative of the Equity Co-operative Exchange of St. Paul, who is now working among the farmers in the interests of the Equity. He explained that work that the Equity was doing, and how the local elevators-were operated under the Equity plan. Because of the lack of a complete report the meeting was postponed to a future date. This was the regular annual meet- ing of the stockholders of the com- pany. Gets $50 Watch As Prize. A $50 gold watch was received this week by Walter Ulrich of this city, son of Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Ulrich, and one of the contestants in the Minne- apolis Daily News auto contest," for having practically a tie vote for sec- ond prize in the campaign for the second period. Three of the contestant, of whom Ulrich was one, lead the contest for this period and were about tied for first place.. Only a few votes separ- ated them. Mr. Ulrich is now one of the leaders in the contest which will end about July 4. He has been carrying on an extensive campaign in spite of his handicap, his lower extremities having been paralyzed when he was hurt in a building accident in Big Stone City iar to any grain grower. This red rust is the summer stage of the black stem rust. These spores in turn are blown about by the wind and infect other grass and grain plants. Thus many crops of red spores may be produced and each crop causes more rust Later in tlm sean the rust becom it is, get the owner to dig it out--if some years ago. He wishes that all herefuses, report it to the state ex-lpersons intending to subscribe for periment station. There still are l that paper or planning to renew their thousands of hushes in the spring I subscriptions see him. wheat states of the upper Mississippi I ....... Valley. I' The Milbank and Ortonville Luther The extent of the damage done by Leagues will*hold a joint picnic at the barberry bush thru i spread oil McGee's Park Sunday commencing at (Continued on pae 4) I eleven o'clock in the forenoon. LUTHER BAND TO GIVE EXCELLENT PROGRAMS HERE Two Concert At Chautau- qua Park Saturday To Consist of Best In Band Music. One of the most exceptional oppor- tunities ever given to the people of Ortonville and surrounding laces to hear concerts of the highest order will come this Saturday when the Luther college Band-of Decorah, In.# gives two concerts at the Chautauqua Park, one concert to be at 2:00 p. re,- and the other at 8:00 p. m. The band which is now on its 60th anniversary tour is meeting with great success wherever it is heard. High honors and praise have been won by it, both on the tour this year, and on tours of previous years. Of the tour this year the following has been said: Several of the largest cities in South Dakota have been visited, among them Mitchell, Huron, and Madison. Evervhere the enthusiactic applause of the audience has showed their appreciation of the high stan- dard of music rendered by this stu- dent organization. Fame of the preceded it, and many are surprised to find that it really is composed of stu- dents, and not of older musiclaae They are further surprised at the qual- ity of music rendered by these young musicians. The evening concert at Toronto, S. D., developed into a Luther jubilee. There were a number of Luther grad- uates and former students present, some of whom had comae fifty miles to hear the concert. In The Minneapolis Journal of a re- cent date, there is said of the Luther College Band: This amateur concert band is play- ing music of the highest order. Among the feature numbers may be mention- ed: Wagner's "Tannhauser" Over- ture; Tschaikowsky's "March Slave"; and Largo from Dvork's "From the New World" Symphony. Some of the other number axe: Rossini's "La Gaz- za Ladra" Overture, Supp's "Tan- talusqualen" Overture, Andante fron Beethoven's "Fifth Symphony,' Jes- sel's "The Wedding of thb Ro," Johnson's "The Death of luster," Meyerbeer's "March Indienne" from "L'Africaine," Rossini's "William Tell" Overture, Andante frown Haydn's "Surprise Symphony," Thomas"Mig - non" Polonais, and many others of like nature. One added feature of these concerts beautiful new set of xylophones which will be the introduction of a very they have recently purchased. Both xylophones and the chimes will be feao tured not only in various selections but also in solos. The concert is being gyen under the auspices of the Big Stoneehoir of the two .Norwegian Lutheran churches of Clinton. More Than 1,000 Patrolmen # Keep State s Roads Good W. F. Rosenwald, chief maintenance engineer, and his assistant, Engineer M. J. Hoffman, announced that 1,009 ,atrolmen, one for each 5 to 8-mile section of trunk highway, are now at work keeping the roads smooth, also that fleets made up of more than 40 txactors and 100 trucks are given the - patrolmen special help when neces- sary to put their sections in good shape for maintenance. Names of pa- trolmen on roads hereabouts are to be given out soon. ,o Condition of Yellowstone Trail Report Weey Weekly reports of the road condi- tions of the Yellowstone Trail, giv- ing important information of the en- tire route, are received in Ortonville by the Park Garage, the Columbia Hotel, and the J. Arthur Matthews & Company Garage, at which place they are accessible to tourists a people planning to travel over th Yellowstone Trail. This service is furnished each week to these three places by the Yellowstone Trail of. rices at Minneapolis. Contract for Building of Correll Bridge Let The contract for the construction of the bridge to be built two miles ea of the village of Correll on trunk highway No. 26 has been let to the Prendergast Bridge Construction com- pany of Milbank, S. D., it was an- nounced by County Engineer F. W. Engdahl. The contract was given t the Milbank company Jure 14. The price for which the bridge is to be built was not given out. Construction of the bridge will be begun the latter part of thisweek or the first of next week. On the com- pletion of this road running from east of Correll will run straight along the section line, eliminating tlm detour which has been a part of it since i was constractl. u Js JECT TO L,CEnSE AOr EEMEnT r EPr O0UCT,On 0,SSEM,nAT,On STOrAOE 0,STr,SUT,On Pr OS,S,TE0 JUN . --THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT VOLUME2 ORTONVILLE. MINN. THURSDAY, SUNE  1921 NUMBER 7 iPECIAL SESSION OF I HOG CHOLERA BREAKS Ford Plunges Off Lake COURT HERE JULY 11 OUT NEAR ODESSA i Road; No One Injured MOi' }or New Trial n Re hi Casel Efforts Made Iocb It By Strh't Sid and a bl t along the Iake tomes 13p Before Judge Ohservau of Quarautine and road fi ed to make a good eomb/na- Fiaherty. Sanitary Measures. ] tion with th result that a Ford road- -- -- ster in which Harry Blown of ts Consideration mtd final tion on the Two new ces of hug cho era have city a Mr Wh er f Chicago and motlon for anewtriaI for GosRot lappeardinton21ofOdsatown-! a th I a were ridn left the , , m p y ,g fun( guilty at the Spring te oflsh] p this wk, ord]ng to word mad and plunged down the bank- Dmtnct Court uf carnal ahu of 1 from he ufO.s of the County Agen%[ merit nr the A, L. M d Gee. a fenlaie child .under the age of eigh-' M. P Roske Fosberg residen tn years" wall be given by JudgF The situation which now pvi]s is l No one  riou ly hurt, only F!herty, wh  sPeeial ssion of] given  follows:  tehes and bi being eustdned District Court wall be [led Fhday, The weather conditions at the ps% by the the. July l. Lent time aid gatly in the spread ufi The ideat urred about 10:30 No other es a un the" cadar this disa and it is very importlmt last Friday night LEC, I lrvv iMany Flock to Beaches ..... OUUL/UO AS M ..... y Goes Higher LUTHER BAND Ta i IN ATTEMPT TO hot r:th:: ::X::a::. m-- , e pea n e r y e I'ADT DA]DDAI I I eek, caused mo people to flock to llg k.-L thu bhes in hopes of finding relief [ -- [ from the heat, than at any other time arae With Appleton I this summer. _ Sun-j g ......... hat eoolf th .... [ say TO Open Much Delay- Sunday and the other dzys of thi |tl Season--Old Groundslk sd to ,sult in no Iet-up, [TO Be Used [and the beaeh we as popular as ball ,''" . ,. l eVWimt s be e'ed o b ..... d o get a 1 go . Sunday afteoon. It w estimated team started, m to be re-I that not less th seventy-five people to be heard at this special ts. The i that every fmer in this etion n The Ford which suffered the moat Ortonville and suunding aee ta GIVE EXCELLENT PROGRAMS HERE Two Concedes At Clmutau- qua Park Saturday TO Consist of Best In Band Music. One of the must exeptioaal oplm ttmities ever given to the people of . exption to this will come if atto e rerv mes to he p check the $pm I 1Din  o s  rted to hoe he coerts of the hlght orde . . . m there at une te betwn two . , p go, po . L Lem post which s h A , no s on cawes which we postponed of iL I tued er tw  n gobg down the 11 come thin Saturday wh the a a . land tee oclk. ommuda luns . uv g to m. The curtmn r i at Eahtoka were used to the rmlt al arrge to the,r  sub.trod I mus be embered that dogs, I embanknt. The top arm vndshld Lather oUege Bd f Deeorah, la, P 1921 sason vll be a game dung the afteoo and tose , at thiz term. The ,s on " a a  teams wago crows d p'geo, ns were stashed the radlator" was phed gives twu nrts at the Chautauqua oo n ne t t*h um]Y ". ..... d ! ................ doubt lly : el! ) ...................... [ carry ' ..... 'a .......... i .... v@ed: ....... th ............ ...... be a t ...... 3 o g] n olda Nopetonshavubnsmmorledfor other. Dogsshould betiedupd whls broken off ee at Ire httbs, and the other at S:00 p. m. y* team m he fie d depended on  Y" . ..... ! m-y serviee for thls term [ I ews and p geos shoL w ta  *h T he bd which s n on ts 60th of veryon was oi cue opinion ma __1... a w w..e, on, ..e ear wa . . grrOund8 lUltab]e for a dis- ....... Attoeys for both the state and Th ' h  f eh a uversary tour Is mtmg with , wtmm] S fine, - ; ere we eta o o er dr yen to ouu of the Ortonm o g wa [ -- are n try n e s y ages under te o power ' nly Pl being the trm the defense will mak their appeal' u d Ba a d B ard e this " rt su whumor tt Is hearth ' were made ust rntly with Feeder Roads Important trial, and Judge Flaherty will give' p   x, el ue er nt o p  -] " k* t fx won bY it, both on the tour t}ds Year# sed last yr. Age- lative to the motion for the new s rin but the outbrk at the  -- High hono d 9rm ha been Kaerefier owner of this to uel Part of State program ou hs d s on e - P  , i eauugle haw .sees and  tours of previous ye' ace , . , , I,,," has bn demonstrated dng the [as . '. The negoatlons were m : -- Ruthi was found guilty of the t] r ea hel n th un hat lute Effect July 1 of the tour this ye the follog eel Herb,, Bolsta and j.A.j a_ The fact that A*rendmeut No litharge which w piad against hlm ho loler' n be ntroledYwhe -- hecn sald: n wh o w ha chge of the p] tn is pimaliy to provRle a good I after a comparatively short Ferlod of'  - Head ghts on a motor cars spar / Several of the largest cities in n tea ' . , - he ]uarant ne d  ary mesus . . , a eaed ou The State vestock . . I . m andWaye Ke y road o every ] nnesoa faint gaedelheratinn by the ary The case L at/ngluthestatemst be of the uon- South Dakot have been ited, emenof Orton'dle-landnat mereiyautomobile boulevards wmoneof heroes mporant cases S t R h i-o ended the ga type begnmng'hJuY 1, as among them Mitchell, Hn hat.day for mona, with which I is heiug emphized by the preselt' to come befo the Spring ton of double tYratment of vclnation in in P leihed by the law pmad by the I Mfin. Everhe the thusitw r w be hired Thij is the campaign for good federal aid legis : court 92 e s on of the Minnesota egis a [ applae of the audience he showed aed " - " I " fee e err, ory . ra;  will up-I lotion That it makes avmlable ap-, When the  wm tried then Rothl __ tu which gs rote effect  that their appelation of t high start- proximately $5,000,000 a year for the! was repted by Attune rs Hewed W 4 gA 4  da te. Motorists should take note of I dard of music ndered by tba atu. s are t )rt wl I bei less expensi the larger system of' Babcock of ,q/ston md A, B, Kacr- l tOrt xvae tO oop the provisions of thls law, a part of dent organizatio Fe of the bad m  funds #  feeder ads than for the heavy-trot-I char of Ortonvflle. R G. Farrlngton, Speeding On Highways section, 4, chapter 472, H, F. No. 1159, ! preceded it, asd my  rid to -- hieh reads: ] find that it lly is composed of ffou- fie tnk routes has bn pointed OUr county attorney, pnted the state. Cilda on the by state highway omcials in the move -- Speed lui are nat only the L No person shatl use or cause to be dets, and not of older musieaa le Or  team la stl, me nt in which ae rs and other o Sow Thistle, Worst of gets for criticism in newspapers, from used after JulY 1' 1921' on Y m'lThey ae further surprised at the qllai* well:knox by all ]al ganizatioas joined later. ! public spirited citizens and ever ad tor vehicle operated on any pubIic! icy o'f mie nded by thee young Iemk i ,,Farmers, ros get first nsider- Weeds, Found In Toqua PB tlmen who fear for thei r live, i strut, or highway any headlight  with i musieian. o[ the Legion pied to o t under the M e ot h hwa  . hut mke a rious roblem for the reflector unless that reflector or gls The evening coneer at Toronto, tL the diond in ]bpe Thursday:.lan This .rLmil,, = agricuIY-I The fa?r UP In Rd, River VII" hi=hwa, de.attract, p Commissioner l iu fnt of such ligit be SO etched, D developed into a Lu,r jubff ag or th ................. ' ................ , .......... i asehegwors  oaf aP] nl:eed estmtn e Bck ........ -. ] ................... ted that ] .................. the grad- fie[ d an d skiming tho dia have that p] Anything that wiil I . .... ,,We ale hu Id a d maitainin I the lighted ill.lent shall appear hlu ues d foyer studepis pt, t:et factauherlteselmthat]tlsh)Mer  mg n g red o a "t 'te hef had eflf ml , hinder in+toad of help the fmers of t o edieate h al the other weed good smooth highways, bat we cannot r ig i m me of whom  Y oniWdl he held ..... f ...................... "n ............... h .............. " the ] ........................... I ......... . n o no team has ben or- said officials - , . , , , Th t ' rl tted fi ament sha be f fm, B The Mirmepo[is Journal of a ye t A small patch of these plts h commlssloner added, a is p -+ brilV t I s . u te ' the m some good rna: The sle policy will apply der bn found in Toqua township. "No mail a matter for the sheriffs of thai m n u tar. [ nt date, the is md, of the L t.her tfl d x. aw fm, d the Ignon the intent of the new law gulating douht lhers a other a] patches iffent counties as f as ral high- I The law further stes that: I Cllege Band: . -- O  iprntod bY a god te. the o of cleats d lugs on whls in the county that a t makiug a ways a involveL Rut we will be No so called sthght o" arch+ "JIs amateur ?neert bad m play- .o tnt th s Wayr M. o bh Cow.m ssi f  sbe I gnt   use upon vemc es tv-, ng mzic of he higst oraer Amg riley  , ou 1 a g waYs, 1 on- start and have not  yet been dis- glad to co-operate  ar po s o . . , . . t 'dc g-ier who u]d e r Babcock said, to allay the fea of vered ,, said M i Roske co nsu pub c safety n th s  well  I elhng pnbhc highways, expt when the foa numbe may he mentio Pltohmg with eith "Cub" th  he e Mud hks  baed ' . . . , y .... such spotlights or chlights a of, ed WageI's "Thaut " Ove  ..=g ...,8.. sp_fl .ry rupl.y w .O.lB. . . [ --  rm Berteln Robert M e'ttod hen nsa He" her ff ' d st" f r ad o iain on me polb e to merle tim nter of the d Largo from Dvoek s From the ty , p i w ry. 1 bot h by umiergrod st ard by i s ep i o  p g - , . . at- 'HarlT Peton,dEl thehighwaydepartmeatnurthef- seed Afltsw'llttoraeedtov esflndthenmothaelf hefhghttriketfielevelhxgh'lNWorld SymphnY" Smefthe AT. elgibl ........ t naZI, easier] ..... p ....... tin field. We re.st not  st;inin,, fme$ "eee4io K th .... .at .... ter d .... tn J00{ other n llme =: Roin, $ ,LuC'&s- garae h been hedued and d sr  tmt  the .... twos  rted ftlnffnt of tfie motor vehicle el  L Overt, Suppa T- l'q d , thi wee get a start in this eoun#*V, pause, po . . ( . f sly 10, roll be plaged th thhe using good judgment go It has dope so much damage "..m teln e Speed-breaking humps, der bed  3Pt when the be. of light is swwag I tadq ugten, . .Overrule' Ardans aid it," he said a the state i bu , tha wi fie hard fe at a 0 degles to the right or to the left Beethov a Fifth Sg*aphony, Jes- s osonmeextywa- " - 0m esanhou em sedb t me, Meerbeer's 'moran tn xmra aPly  Bulletixm explalving the appearmce  r, w sugge u . , ., ,, . e ,- essth the hot woath, h Arrive Behhld Schedule ox ............... ... w =. o ,,a. a, .. Comhs on. Back s  ..... t[ -- ["L'm. ', roS s wm tvi] h   for the ,ty of Or- -- But office ready to beerthe to the de Elevator Stokhoder Tell Overrun, Andante frn aych "  eu. .... [ Hold Important Meeting l .... m neath of t M.:, . t, uslng dama to th Oflcago, x r T't   ! ] -- I sou volonms, am1 any 'r'*tth',,w'kw-rk-wJ ' MJtwmak'"dSt'llroad"well war on Barberry toarneo : i Ap:,+o o, 0 ,,,., 'n,.. ....... <V .  we:, on .,e no.  ny othe, delayed the Flyers , , --  d lot the Oonille State Batik ss audi- e  leau ox ese eon ashington &venue jt et from te lt OB CdlOa and Tars- ] ' beautLful new t of xylophones wMch l tersecti .  Y tur to make a compMte port of th0 . . e ..:,,,. ,oe'g'a:: aYn%--' =' ....... Into Btg Stone County .............. ....=., o.+t=--= IF ........... ]hivl eChenntt,ductlaa4a Ba e ivi g em all the way fm five to t and F I w lt Y Y pm' . u of th e four wel ha . MEN FROM U .... S D OF A 1u blk. tins is me muter stage. *ne g o c users /tud not only in varlou lect[on   . Monday afternoon, No. 16 we.h is , MAKE PARM TO FARM aw'ber stes cannot rmnate at{ company last Saturday afteoon at . ante  hey spp ed due he 4,53 ......... ]  = ] but al ]n so os, " efwate fo theeit It thot rear . p.r,dnot CANVASS on bu ie demon o the tobbe theOddDellowsha]l. " he tth ........................ r r y s un b u " BothF ....... " I ....................... " } ............ " dad ........ ae n.rt ,s being Igv under tawate " n u'e ........ Tsday we alsolab, No. 18 which Eradtofthebarberfybshinlgermnate but the r cnot mrea port handedin oUmethefirst of! ausplsf t:elg n8 rto be ohne o meet i t Wo No.egla Luthe ehurohes tda. ts schedu ed ,to arrive at 9:$5  m. B g Stone county N the goal of the iufect grains ad rsea Th s b ack June but the large amount o goods . n The Work of fixl e well wiIl be not coming t] about 4:0ln the at- mNg.11 lOW being cozied on hea stag e of the st n intact only the on hand pvented those who  to Cnnto . --  aoout the end of this week  late. Agricultu, with eo-opemton by the l mou barbary and the blk stage of entory of a]I the s reek. Only  esti- More Thn 1,00 Patrolmen D ett about ng th . eo. The afternoon myer as al- by the Un ted Stats Dpartment of ommun barberry. Destroy the com- make the port from getting  in- -age Thiev Ntili By Wednesday they were again ran. Fam Bau d other fa orgy- j the t beces ha es The st mated port of th stock w glv Kp Sates RotdB G@O lr@A. - - n ng on scheduled time The o nz" at'el us, , cannot thpn get an early start iu the at the mtlng SatuBday- -- , NO C]ulg Fomd fm both the west and the eas, nol The elpaiga he is being condo-[ spring bcause it cannot maintain Two talks were given at this mt- W.F. Ronwdd, chmf maintenance ' de ha h--Tdlovered to date having eountered this trouble, we cad under the diet supervision of m in.if in the northe stte in the ins to tha stockholders ;f the corn- ginesr, and his aistant. gineer that Would lead to or help in ap. mnntng on time W. Manuel and D. G. Fletcher of the d stage duNng the winter, pany. One was given by Mr. Stark M. J. Hoffman. armotmeed that 1,009 ng the thiefs who bke il .ho urged that the flers should ant RepNr op a wk ax flay night and stein Ford part ee4sotie of msiderazle value to Art Pufahl, oer of tht athalTt ara of work in the at the party was famfli l.ahop, d led those lnvest[r fielivve it had been done by , Nnthg farter h la . sad which would trengtk- Outing Saturday g de- halt in their rk Clinton Sunday School Holds Annual Picni( About t;y.-fi membe of the unda; hoo] of the Swedish Luthe an ehuh nf Clinton, together with the paints, vrdnyvd thor annual Sunday hool picnic which was held last Sunday aftoeon at the Gust Anderon f about n miles up the lake fm Ortonville. In t ftsn, fotlowig a pie- rile lunch, the members of the unday sehl gave a Feogam which mnslatod of spea and agtng, by both tadi- vidl mraba cmd go0ups. Th p r w giv of Mrs. Victor Lews. perlntendet of the Sday ehl, who Wu sisted by Mi Hi]do Snso pmgam the peeeds geing to y held a al out- Sunday hoo I fund. m wa spent by many of Glen Matthewa ia now siting having his home hem, havng just completed e murldng Ln order to Pente lunch wag versty of Miuta He gratified neo, d in the aftea from the nirsity It ye. getn a rl get-together, hls Bhelo's degree then, I his work this year gives him a Mae's degree, Ha ived high heno n fiehwenk, mied, d his work, Chemistry. In a re,  leave for Rochester. N. Y, iy Sat- from drinking poison- Comply. Dance Priers a Reduced. Rmthe, mage of spot dust famlb , ad Jt before depart- ,e p uJ i to any grain grower 8ehwenk is said to ha dance tkets, taking n take a couple uf we3 daB *ls week wblc wa held Tues. stem st. The spores in day, Tleket or the entire ernf bhiv' about by the which have not been ld befo thi other gras and grain plt. Thus offered, while there of red pos may he t racing h bee a reduction oa ingle dance The adrion charge h al- Jenltor. : so been reoved. Later in tt me the rut becomes Buau of Platt Industry of the De. part of Agricultu. -They working th the helquart of this bureau at S paul. As the lsaLt uf their flint few days in the field they have formal the bar- berry bush in one place, aceordlr, g to a report they made public Tsday. Ts was un a farra about seven or eight miles et of Orton,Al Rmt h alady sprd abont a qrter of a mile from the bushes the, It w now eoufined mostly to weeds, but was at a stage d eadi- tlou whieh indicted that tt would  spmsd on the gr Tho se agaimt the barberry i not a ew o 8ome time ago the Mirmta Dgartraent of Agtmlture at the Uniraity Faro uod that they "dalart war on the ba bevy," d m have been  to Tt mner in wb.lh black t Is spad by tho barberr hush is gi in dl mt out by the Spriag Wheat Cp Impvement Asa of Minnapolls. In explanation it say: Black stem st ia ed hy a wel known faugeus pasit. In the spriBg this pamslte gws on the commor barberry en whteh it fos st (in "duster cups") and th (sds)  bhim by the win to geases or grains. They gerraiat by in or ds d er gr plants The parasi gets lida the !xmt takes its food fm this plt c a wk or two produce, Unde the heading "The Common Barberry, An Outlaw" it gs on'to say: So clear w the se against the common barberry that in 1917 North Dakota pad a law qulring its ds- struetiom Siee then, Montana, Cole- reds, Nubrka, 8oath nakota, lows, Minsuta, Wconsiu, Illinois, Miehi- :an, and lndaaa sad the prairie ,mvices uf Cada have made com- ,ulry the destrtion of the ba berry. Congress has made hstm- tial apppx/ations to assist in the fight against this dang hush and the United Stat Departlmmt of Aglture has led in the me.mann y -openg with the 1 states to reduce st osses hy destylng the bvah. The part that the people must take organi more strongly, making their progr mum inclusive and providing for the markefing of aB tho predue uf the fm, The other talk w given by E. H. Vkelen, pentave of tile Fuy tve Exchange of St. Paul whu is w working among the faers in the Intest of the Equity. He pllgned that work that the Equit was aoing, d how the Ial elevators .wel, operate4 under the Equity pI, u of the lk of a omplat mlrt the mtlng w Isoned  a future date. ing ef the atekholde ol a com- Iany patrolmen, one for each 5 to 8-mile seetinn of trtmk htghy,  u work kplng the roads smooth, also that flts mde up uf  th 4@ Cractors d tO0 mle giv the - patmlmeB special hLp whe raws- ry to pat thor seeo in goo shape for malntena. Nam of p- tmlmea on roads hereabouts are t he gi out oom Condition of Yellowstone TraU Report Weekly Weekly porta of the road eond t/on of the Yellowso rall, glu- ing important iformaton ef the* on- tire ut, a retved In OrtoHe by the Park Garage, the Columbin Hotel, and the & Arth Mattfiewa in the attempt to desty the b- Gets $50 W|toh As Prlg " they& Compy a=eeaibleGare' teat wblchtouristplaee herr] is contMed in the renewing A $ goid wate w ived thi people planulag ta tral oer the words which makes dear the n- wk by Walter Ulrich of ths city yellowstu Trail. This rdce slty of eoperaon by all. It says: n of Mr. d Mm F. J. Ulch, ar uisld each wk to there tee But even  the United States De- une of the ntestants in the tnne. pla by the YelInte Trail of. partmeut ef Agricultu and state as- apulia Daily Ns auto ntost, ful fl at Mnapolis. thetiea enot al find aH the ha.Ant prttcaly a te vote fur . - bushe The suss of the flghl and prize h the mpalgn for th ontrang agaimt tha barberry depends on th cond period. pahlie interest and on the ple who Three nf the ntestanta, of when of Correli Bridge Le o tha bushes, Mere laws will no Ulch was one, lead the contest for edieate barberries, we want mar this period and  about tied fur The ntraet for the on,reaction of with shells and gruhh Above all fit place.. Oray a few votes pa the bdge to be hilt twn miles st men, women, and childh whe kn ated them. of the ville o Corll n trmk the barberry when they  i Learn Mr, Ulh is new nne of the leadem highwa No- 26 h hee ht to  to know the dontn bberry and destroy iL This is the public duty of wary eiti, peeitdly n the rural commumties It [s on your pIses? Lsuk d ; if it is the, dlg it gut. Is it in yo neighborhood? If it is, get he o to dig it out--if he reruns, report it to the state ex- petdmt station That* titl are thousds o bushes l the spring wht stmes o the upper Mississippi Vall*y. The extent nf th damage dore by brberey hush thin ire spread of (Caattaa oa Itmge 4) in the contest wbJeh will end about July 4. He h been crrythg on an exteaslve eamign in spite af his handip, his lewer extremtiss having been paralyzed when he was hurt in a builcng ident in Bg Stuns City some yea ago. He wishes that all eOBS intending to ubscibe far that paper or planning to  thor subHpti s him. The MiIbank d Ortonvflle Ldther Leagues will hokl a Joint  at McCe's path Suaday mg al elevm o'loek  th forenoon. Pndergast Bridge Construction com- pany of Milbank, S. D., it was an nound by County Enginr F. W. Engdahh The ntt w gi t the Milbank mpny  14 The price for wMch te bridge  t be built w not gin ouL Coratti of the hrdg win he begun the latt part of this week or the first uf next wt On the platen nf th]s road tmlag from sat f Correll w/B mn .traht long tlm section line, diminutive e dtoar wMeh has  a !mt of it I It i onstruetL THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT Jl VOLUME 2 ORTONVILLE, MINN, THURSDAY, JUNE 23j 1921 NUMBER 7 i ss r its  SUCCEEDS IN ATTEMPT TO START BASEBALL With Appleton Sun- day To Open Much Delay- ed Season--Old Grounds To Be Used. Baseball which----as practically some time ago after an er- a team started, is to be re- according to the latest advice the local Degion post which is a team. The curtain raiser 1921 season will be a game next Sunday. or not the Legion would team in the field depended on 0f grounds auitable for a dia- only place being the tract was used last year. Arrange- made just recently with owner of this, to use Place. The negotiations were in of "Herb" Bolsta and J. A. Ja- who will have charge of the team, and Wayne Kelly. men of Ortonville were so- for money with which will be hired. This" is the sa.laried man the team will sup- are that an effort will be in ease sufficient funds re to get Barney Childs here for Childs worked on the for the Ortonville team last and is well-known by all local s. of the Legion planned to diamond in shape Thursday for the Appleton game, mow- :he field and skinning the di- Will be held regular from The no team has been or- Yet, there is some good ma- draw from, and the Legion represented by a good team. local talent there is Wayne and Chic Zwiener who could with either "Cub" for ateJaer. Joe Pe- Bertelson, Robert Mac* Harry Peterson, and Earl a other eligibles. am_e has been scheduled and will be played there Many Flock to Beaches As Mercury Goes Higher Hot weather of last week, reaching the peak on the three last days of the week, caused more people to flock to the beeches in hopes of finding relief from the heat, than at any other time this summer. Even somewhat cool weather on Sunday and the other days of this week seemed to result in no let-up, and the beaches were as popular as ever. What is believed to be a record crowd was at the beach at Eahtonka Sunday afternoon. It was estimated that not less than seventy-five people were there at one time between two and three o'clock. Accommodations at Eahtonka were used to the lira.it all (luring the afternoon, and those in charge said it was undoubtedly a rec- ord day. Everyone was of the opinion that "swimmin's fine." Feeder Roads Important Part of State Program The fact that /mendment No. I plan is primarily to provide a good road to every Minnesota farm gate and not merely automobile boulevards is being emphasized by the present campaign for good federal aid legis- lation. That it makes available ap- proximately $5,000,000 a year for the less expensive the larger system of feeder roads than for the heavy-traf- fic trunk routes has been pointed out by state highway officials in the move- ment in which farmers and other or- ganizatioas joined later. "Farmers' roads get first considera- tion under the Minnesota highway plan. This is primarily an agricul- tural state and farmers' roads must have that place. Anything that will hinder instead of help the farmers of the state has no part in the program," said officials. The same policy will apply under the intent of the new law regulating the use of cleats and lugs on wheels on Minnesota highways, Commission- er Babcock said, to allay the fears of threshenmen. Mud hooks are barred as a rule but the use of lugs will be permitted when necessary. "Neither the highway department nor the far- mers want roads carelessly torn up and damaged, and we count on the thresherrnen using good judgment to avoid it," he said. Third Well In Order. on the city wa- with the hot weather has ecessary for the city of Or- to put into operation another wells. of this week work was fix the well on the north Avenue just east with First street. is being done by Gunder of Clinton. of the four wella have to date as they supplied for the city. It is thot addition of the third well, Water win be obtained to meet of fixing the well will be about the end of this week. Thieves Still Pree; No Clues Found has been discovered to date lead to or help in ap- the thiefs who broke in Repair shop a week ago night and stole Ford parts of considerazle value, to Art Pufahl, owner of the of the work in- the party was familiar and led those investL- it had been done by Nothing further has which would strength- On, and the case is where first discovere Folks Saturday -7-m52 having de- were entitled to a days Called a halt in their work and went to McGee's tsheY held a regular Out- ]xty people from that there. was spent by many of some of them having the morning in order to fishing. Picnic lunch was and in the afternoon regular get-together. tleranShine Fatal To Two. atll al j. Schwenk, married, and !t, inrhrtu,nogle , both farmers C ok, died early Sat- ing from drinking poison-  said to be moonshine, later e: ..and shown to contain strych-  .,,:_tt  mr: Schwenk and his wife were r,-hart.place about I0 o'clock  aright, and just before depart- %*a ome Schwenk is said to have e e , to take a couple of swal- it "Wli .' Ii k._ quor and arriving home :ew  violently ill and died a 1 later. Mr. Reinhart was td. next moZmtn and found  r ql  -,- g 1 near his home.---Swii ! nson) bonitor. Washouts Make Flyers Arrive Behind Schedule Heavy rains and WUuts in Mon- tana, causing damagt to the Chicago, Milwaukee, and St.  road as well as many others, delayed the Flyers from the coast on londay and Tues- day of this week, and they were ar- riving here all the way from five to even hours late. Monday afterncola, No. 16 which is due here at 4:53 p. rn, dd not arrive until about 11:30. Both Flyers on Tuesday were also late, No. 18 which is scheduled to arrive at 9:05 a. m. not coming tlntil about 4:3@in the af- temon. The afternoon Flyer was ai- ,5 late. By Wednesday they were again run- ning on scheduled time. The locals from both the west and the east, not having encountered this trouble, were running on time. Clinton Sunday School Holds Annual Picnic About seventy-five members of the Sunday" school of the Swedish Luther- an church of Clinton, together with the parents, enjoyed their annual Sunday school picnic which was held last Sunday afternoon at the Gust Anderson farm about seven miles up the lake from Ortonville. In the afternoon, following a pic- nic lunch, the members of the Sunday school gave a program which consisted of speaking and singing, by both indi- vidual members and groups. The pro- gram was given under the diron of Mrs. Victor Lewis, superintendent of the Sunday school, who was as- sisted by Miss Hilda Swenson. Refreshments were served after the program, the proceeds going to the Sunday school fund. Glenn Matthews to Join Eastmaw Co. Glenn Matthews is now visiting his home here, having just completed a year of gaduate work at the Uni- versity of Minnesota. He graduated from the Uniersity last year, getting his Bachelor's degree then, and his work this year gives him a Master's degree. He received high honors in his work, Chemistry. In a few weeks he will leave for Rochester, N. Y., where hd will join the Eastman Kodak Company. Dance Prices are Reduced. Announcement is made this week by Often Brothers, managers of Eah- tonka of a reduction in the price of danc tickets, taking effect at the first dance this week whidh was held Tues- day . Tickets for the entire evening which have not been sold before this season are being offered, while there has been a reduction on single dance tickets. The admission charge has al- so been removed. SPECIAL SESSION OF HOG CHOLERA BREAKS COURT HERE JULY 1 OUT NEAR ODESSA Motion For New Tri'---al In Rothi Case I Efforts Made t C--b It By Strict Comes Up Before Judge t Observance of Quarantine and Flaherty. Consideration and final action on the motion for a new trial for Gus Rothi, found guilty at the Spring term of District Court of "carnal abuse of a female child under the age of eigh- teen years" will be given by Judge Flaherty, when a special session of District Court will be called Friday, July 1. No other cases are on the calendar Sanitary Measures. Two new cases of hog cholera have appeared in section 21 of Odessa town- ship this week, according to word from the offices of the County Agent, M. P. Roske. The situation which now prevails is given as follows: The weather conditions at the pres- ent time aid greatly in the spread of this disease and it is very important to be heard at this special term. The that every farmer in this section use exception to this will come if attor-levery means to help check the spread neys on ,cais which were postponed of it. arrange to ave their case submitted It must be remembered that dogs, at this te There is only a smaUlteams, wagons, crows and pigeons possibility of such action. No persons have been summoned for I jury service for this term. I Attorneys for both the state and the defense will make their appeal relative to the motion for the new trial, and Judge Flaherty will give out his decision. Rothi was found guilty of the charge which was placed against him after a comparatively short period of deliberation by the jury. The case was one of the most important cases to come before the Spring term of court. When the case was tried then Rothi was represented by Attorneys Howard Babcock of Sisseton and A. B. Kaer- cher of Ortonville. R. G. Farrington, county attorney, represented the state. Sow Thistle, Worst of Weeds, Found In Toqua The farmer up in Red River Valley recognizes the perennial sow thistle as the worst of all the weed pests. In fact authorities claim that it is harder to eradicate than all the other weeds put together. A small patch of these plants has been found in Toqua township. "No doubt there are other small patches in the county that are just making a start and have not as yet been dis.- covered," said M. P. Roske, county agent. He adds: , This thistle spreads very rapidly; both by underground stems and by seed. A few plants will scatter seed over an entire field. We must not let this weed get a start in this countY, t It has done so much damage in te northern part that tke state is lie- - termined not to let it spread fmC,mt! south into the southern counties. ' Burletins explaining the appearance of this weed can be had at the Farm Bureau oce. carry this disease from one pen to another. Dogs should be tied up and the crows and pigeons shot. There were eight cases of cholera around Barry and Beardsley this spring but the outbreak at the prem ent is pretty well under control. ]t has been demonstrated during the last three years, here in this county, that hog cholera can be controlled where the quarantine and tary measures ae carried out. The State Livestock Sanitary Board has i'ecommended the double treatment of vaccination in in- fected territory. Effort Made to Stop Speeding On Highways Speed maniacs are not only the tar- gets for criticism in newspapers, from public-spirited citizens and even road patrolmen who fear for their lives, but make a seri0us problem for the highway department, Commissioner Babcock said recently. "We are building and maintaining good smooth highways, but we cannot police them, too, under the law," the commissioner added. "That is pri- marily a matter for the sheriffs of the different counties as fax as rural high- ways are involved. But we will be glad to co-operate as far as possible to insure public safety in this as well as other directions." Counties which are employing sher- iffs' deputies for road policing on mo- torcycles find the plan more than self- sustaining, fines exceeding the ex- pense, it was reported. Speed-breaking bumps, described as bumps that will e hardly felt at a 25-mile pace but will almost throw, oc- cupants from cars driven faster than 40 miles an hour, were suggested but Commissioner Babcock said he was not ready to subscribe to the idea. War on Barberry Carried Into Big00 Stone County @ MEN FROM U. S. D. OF A. TO black. This is the winter stage. The MAKE FARM TO FARM ]winter spores cannot germinate at CANVASS. once but lie dormant on the stubble Eradication of the barberry bush in Big Stone county iS the goal of the campaign now being caAed on here by the United States Department of Agriculture, with co-operation by the Farm Bureau and other farm organ- izations. The campaign here is being conduc- ted under the direct supervision of H. W. Manuel and D. G. Fletcher of the Bureau of Plant Industry of the De- partment of Agriculture. They are working thru the headquarters of this bureau at St. Paul. As the result of their first few days in the field they have found the bar- berry bush in one place, according to a report they made public Tuesday. This was on a farm about seven or eight miles east of Ortonville Rust has already spread about a quarter of a mile from the bushes there. It was now confined mostly to weeds, but was at a stage and condi- tion which indicated that it would soon spread on the grasses. The case against the barberry is not a new one Some time ago the Minnesota Department of Agriculture at the University Farm announced that they "declared war on the bar- berry," and steps have been taken to rid the state of this bush. The manner in which black rust is spread by the barberry bush is given in circular semt out by the Spring Wheat Crop Improvement Associa- tion of Minneapolis. In explanation it says: Black stem rust is caused by a well known fungous parasite. In the spring this parasite grows on the common barberry on which it forms rust spores (in "cluster cups") and these spores (seeds) are bloom by the wind to grasses or grains. They germinate in moisture furnished by rain or dew and infect the grain or grass plants. The parasite gets inside the plant, takes its food from this plant and then within a week or two produces *the red or summer spore dust famil- or straw until spring. Then they germinate but they cannot, directIy infect grains and grasses . This black stage of the rust can infect only the common barberry. Destroy the cora- l men barberry and the black stage of the rust becomes ham.les The rust cannot then get an early start in the spring, bcause it cannot maintain itself in the northern states in the red stage during the winter. Unde the heading "The Common Barberry, An Outlaw" it goes on o say: So clear was the case against the common barberry that in 1917 North Dakota passed a law requiring its de- struction. Since then, Montana, Colo- rado, Nebraska, South Dakota, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Michi* gan, and Indiana and the prairie provinces of Canada have made com- pulsory the destruction of the bar- berry. Congress has made substan- tial appropriations to assist in the fight against this dangerous bush and the United States Department of Agriculture has led in the movement by co-operating with the several states to reduce rust losses by destroying the bush. The part that the people must take in the attempt to destroy the bar- berry is contained in the following words which makes clear the neces- sity of co-operation by all. IS says: But even so the United States De- partment of Agriculture and state au- thorities cannot alone find all the bushes, The success of the fight against the barberry depends on the public interest and on the people who own the bushes, Mere laws will not eradicate barberries, we want men with shovels and grubhoes. Above all, men, women, and children who know the barberry when they see it. Learu to kow the common barberry and de,roy it. This is the public duty of every citizen, especially in the rural communities. It is on your premises ? Look and see; if it is there, g it out. Is it in your neighborhood ? If I Ford Plunges Off Lake I Road; No One Injured Speed and a bad rut along the lake road failed to make a good combina- tion, with the result that a Ford road- ster in which Harry Brown of this city, a Mr. Wheeler sof Chicago, and a third party were riding, left the road and plunged down the embank- ment near the A. L. Moore and Gee. Fosberg residences. No one was seriously hurt, only scratches and bruises being sustained by the three. The accident occurred about 10:30 last Friday night. The Ford which suffered the most from the plunge, is reported to hae turned over twice in going down the embankment. The top and windshield were smashed, the radiator was pushed and damaged, and one of the front wheels broken off clean at the hubs. I With a new wheel on, the car was I driven to one of the Ortonville gar- ages under its own power. Headlight Law Goes Into Effect July 1 Headlights on all motor cars oper- ating in the state ,must be of the non- glare type beginning with July 1, as prescribed by the law passed by the 921 session of the Minnesota legisla- ture which goes into effect on that date. Motorists should take note of the provisions of this law, a part of section, 4, chapter 472, H. F. No. 1159, which reads: No person shall use or cause to be used after July 1, 1921, on any mo- tor vehicle operated on any public street, or highway any headlights with reflector unless that reflector or glass in front of such liglt be so etched, ground, moulded or constructed that the lighted filament shall appear blu red or all light emitted therefrom and projected above the level of the lia4ted filament .shall be free from brilliant luster. The law further states that: No so-called spotlight or search- light shall be used upon vehicles trav- elling public highways, except when such spotlights or searchlights are of such construction as to make it im- possible to make the center of the beam of light strike the level high- way at a greater distance than 100 feet in rent of the motor vehicle; ex- cept when the beam of light is swung 30 degrees to the right or to the left of the straight ahead position, no limi- tation is plac on the height to which the beam is raised." Elevator Stockholders Hold Important Meeting Appointment of C. J. Stark, cashier of the Ortonville State Bank, as audi- tor to make a complete report of the stock on hand of the Farmers Eleva tor and Fuel company, .was the result of the meeting of stockholders of that company last Saturday afternoon at the Odd Fellows hall. It was first intended to have a re- port handed in some time the first of June but the large amount of goods on hand prevented those who were to make the report from getting an in- ventory of all the stock. Only an esti- mated report of the stock was given at the meeting Saturday. Two talks were given at this meet. ing to the stockholders of the com- pany. One was given by Mr. Stark wbo urged that the farmers should organize more strongly, making their program more inclusive and providing for the tmarketing of all the products of the farm. The other talk was given by E. H. Vankrevelen, representative of the Equity Co-operative Exchange of St. Paul, who is now working among the farmers in the interests of the Equity. He explained that work that the Equity was doing, and how the local elevators-were operated under the Equity plan. Because of the lack of a complete report the meeting was postponed to a future date. This was the regular annual meet- ing of the stockholders of the com- pany. Gets $50 Watch As Prize. A $50 gold watch was received this week by Walter Ulrich of this city, son of Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Ulrich, and one of the contestants in the Minne- apolis Daily News auto contest," for having practically a tie vote for sec- ond prize in the campaign for the second period. Three of the contestant, of whom Ulrich was one, lead the contest for this period and were about tied for first place.. Only a few votes separ- ated them. Mr. Ulrich is now one of the leaders in the contest which will end about July 4. He has been carrying on an extensive campaign in spite of his handicap, his lower extremities having been paralyzed when he was hurt in a building accident in Big Stone City iar to any grain grower. This red rust is the summer stage of the black stem rust. These spores in turn are blown about by the wind and infect other grass and grain plants. Thus many crops of red spores may be produced and each crop causes more rust Later in tlm sean the rust becom it is, get the owner to dig it out--if some years ago. He wishes that all herefuses, report it to the state ex-lpersons intending to subscribe for periment station. There still are l that paper or planning to renew their thousands of hushes in the spring I subscriptions see him. wheat states of the upper Mississippi I ....... Valley. I' The Milbank and Ortonville Luther The extent of the damage done by Leagues will*hold a joint picnic at the barberry bush thru i spread oil McGee's Park Sunday commencing at (Continued on pae 4) I eleven o'clock in the forenoon. LUTHER BAND TO GIVE EXCELLENT PROGRAMS HERE Two Concert At Chautau- qua Park Saturday To Consist of Best In Band Music. One of the most exceptional oppor- tunities ever given to the people of Ortonville and surrounding laces to hear concerts of the highest order will come this Saturday when the Luther college Band-of Decorah, In.# gives two concerts at the Chautauqua Park, one concert to be at 2:00 p. re,- and the other at 8:00 p. m. The band which is now on its 60th anniversary tour is meeting with great success wherever it is heard. High honors and praise have been won by it, both on the tour this year, and on tours of previous years. Of the tour this year the following has been said: Several of the largest cities in South Dakota have been visited, among them Mitchell, Huron, and Madison. Evervhere the enthusiactic applause of the audience has showed their appreciation of the high stan- dard of music rendered by this stu- dent organization. Fame of the preceded it, and many are surprised to find that it really is composed of stu- dents, and not of older musiclaae They are further surprised at the qual- ity of music rendered by these young musicians. The evening concert at Toronto, S. D., developed into a Luther jubilee. There were a number of Luther grad- uates and former students present, some of whom had comae fifty miles to hear the concert. In The Minneapolis Journal of a re- cent date, there is said of the Luther College Band: This amateur concert band is play- ing music of the highest order. Among the feature numbers may be mention- ed: Wagner's "Tannhauser" Over- ture; Tschaikowsky's "March Slave"; and Largo from Dvork's "From the New World" Symphony. Some of the other number axe: Rossini's "La Gaz- za Ladra" Overture, Supp's "Tan- talusqualen" Overture, Andante fron Beethoven's "Fifth Symphony,' Jes- sel's "The Wedding of thb Ro," Johnson's "The Death of luster," Meyerbeer's "March Indienne" from "L'Africaine," Rossini's "William Tell" Overture, Andante frown Haydn's "Surprise Symphony," Thomas"Mig - non" Polonais, and many others of like nature. One added feature of these concerts beautiful new set of xylophones which will be the introduction of a very they have recently purchased. Both xylophones and the chimes will be feao tured not only in various selections but also in solos. The concert is being gyen under the auspices of the Big Stoneehoir of the two .Norwegian Lutheran churches of Clinton. More Than 1,000 Patrolmen # Keep State s Roads Good W. F. Rosenwald, chief maintenance engineer, and his assistant, Engineer M. J. Hoffman, announced that 1,009 ,atrolmen, one for each 5 to 8-mile section of trunk highway, are now at work keeping the roads smooth, also that fleets made up of more than 40 txactors and 100 trucks are given the - patrolmen special help when neces- sary to put their sections in good shape for maintenance. Names of pa- trolmen on roads hereabouts are to be given out soon. ,o Condition of Yellowstone Trail Report Weey Weekly reports of the road condi- tions of the Yellowstone Trail, giv- ing important information of the en- tire route, are received in Ortonville by the Park Garage, the Columbia Hotel, and the J. Arthur Matthews & Company Garage, at which place they are accessible to tourists a people planning to travel over th Yellowstone Trail. This service is furnished each week to these three places by the Yellowstone Trail of. rices at Minneapolis. Contract for Building of Correll Bridge Let The contract for the construction of the bridge to be built two miles ea of the village of Correll on trunk highway No. 26 has been let to the Prendergast Bridge Construction com- pany of Milbank, S. D., it was an- nounced by County Engineer F. W. Engdahl. The contract was given t the Milbank company Jure 14. The price for which the bridge is to be built was not given out. Construction of the bridge will be begun the latter part of thisweek or the first of next week. On the com- pletion of this road running from east of Correll will run straight along the section line, eliminating tlm detour which has been a part of it since i was constractl.