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July 8, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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and ts were married Catholic Rev. Robert at the ceremony. It Lymond Schuelke of Virginia escorted by her Mori Lee gown and scalloped trim that of re-embroidered dress with scal- down the nor was Sandy Falls, S.D. Were Corina Angela cousin of the Denver, nd Robin Moe, was Dana .was A.J. York, Sioux of the groom. Kuemper, ' Phc Mankato; t0x, x; and Brian brother of h Free .s t3ecch Free press. Free country. Speak up for the First Amendment. Davis vows told i!i: the bride. Ushers were Alan Schuelke, Montevideo, brother of the bride; Chad Rudebusch, Watertown; Tim Lalim, Sioux Falls; Adam Swenson, Scottsdale, AZ.; and Jason Deming, Watertown. Music was provided by organist Linda Hoffman, soloist Kathy Alwin and accompanists Gene and Rita Patterson. A reception was held in the 2nd St. Station. Assisting were Betty Binsfeld, Maggie Brist, Cathy Harstad, Ira Davis, Chona Mendoza, Tiffany and Megan Harstad, Aleshia and Darrick Moe, Cheryl Streich, Florfan Davis, Anna Moe and Emily Kasuske. The bride is a 1993 graduate of Ortonville High School and a 1995 graduate of Willmar Technical College. She is employed at Co-Ev in Watertown. The groom is a 1994 graduate of Watertown High School and attended the University of Minnesota and Mount Marty College. tte is employed at UBC in Watertown. t=ollowing a wedding trip to Cancun, Mexico, they reside in Watertown. Birthdays As Taken From The Big Stone American Legion Auxiliary Birthday Calendar. Tuesday, July.8 Barb Nelson, Peggy Taffe Miles, Tom Erickson, Norman Clark, Sally Ann Helgeson, Matthew Larson, Lois Werner, Amanda Elizabeth Minahan, Carolyn Larson Tiegs, Michelle Ehlebracht, Austin Wiseman, Stuart Moser, Sandy Larson Wednesday, July 9 Amanda Swezey, Paula Brecke Tobin, Harley Helgeson, James Ronald Tyson, Harriet Rausch, Ruth Torgerson, Klary Meier, Alex Jayne Conlon Thursday, July 10 Julie A. Nelson, Nathan Dinnel, Randy Spahr, Sarah Jolaine Tower, Amanda Burdick, Andrew Smithwick, Mindy Peterson Peters, Roger R. Anderson, Tim Gapp, Trinity Rayne Everett Friday, July 11 Marianne Nolop Curry, Diane Wiese Spahr, Gene Oslund, Freida Ehlebracht Saturday, July 12 Kim Kolb, Henry Gimmestad, Jackie Meyer, Joe Wipf, Alicia Ellingson, Lynda Roggenbuck, Brian Frevert, Lynn Gerber, Jack William Koenen, Steve Roggenbuck, Linda Roggenbuck, Paylon Rae Karels Sunday, July 13 Carol Conrad Reiland, Gordon Lindquist, Janet Utley Knutson, Kim Karges, Jr., David Iverson, Paul Read, Vicki Arndt, Brenda McMahon, Lt. Col. Harold Babbitt, Kayla Renee Giese, Nicole Stecker Monday, July 14 Marge Lindholm, Michael Stock, Rick Mosey, Angela Nelson, Sandy Henneberg, Alyssa Hames Tuesday, July 15 Brandon Swigerd, Marissa Lynn Bergeson, Jessica Kongelf, Brent Zahrbock, Barbara Johnson, Shelby Whemtner "-Our Wildlife and Ftsh cannot survive unless our Beautiful Big Stone Lake is pollution free! Please do your part. i II Ication open for 2003 Ripley archery hunts of Natural applications archery deer Y near" Little are scheduled Oct. 25-26. one of these A two- m 2003. The lunt is $8 per deadline is mail written applications m previous ed to DNR s free service :ally of be accessed via the DNR's Web site at www.dnr.state.mn.us. Camp Ripley applications are available through any of three meth- ods. All applicants must apply via the DNR's computerized Electronic Licensing System at one of 1,800 agents located across Minnesota, by ELS telephone at 1-888-665-4236, or through DNR's Internet licensing link at www.dnr.state.mn.us. Those who apply by phone or Internet will be charged an additional convenience fee of $3.50 per transaction. There is no longer a mail-in application form. lo apply, Minnesota. resident hunters must have one of the follow- ing: a valid Minnesota driver's license; a state of Minnesota identifi- cation card (issued by the Department of Public Safety) i a firearms safety certificate number; or a Minnesota DNR number found on current hunt- ing or fishing licenses. Nonresidents must supply their state driver's license, state ID, or Minnesota DNR number if they pur- chased a 2000-2003 hunting or fishing license. It is important that the ID card reflect the current mailing address, which is where notifications will be sent to those chosen in the computer preference drawing. Applicants must be 12 years of age prior to Oct. 16, and have a hunter safety certificate. In addition, anyone born after Dec. 31, 1979, must have a firearms safety certificate, a previous hunting license, or other evidence of successfully completing a hunter safe- ty course to obtain a license to hunt or trap in Minnesota. INDEPENDENT WANT ADS PAY Extension Time To THINK COOL with PRICING ON AIR IONERS from Kirby Hettver Regional Extension Educator General Livestock-Ag Production Systems Stevens County Morris, MN 56267 320/589-7423 COUNTY OF ORIGIN LABELING Country of Origin Labeling is a hot topic in the agricultural sector today and will affect every person in the United States within the next 15 months. Country of Origin Labeling was an legislative initiative that was included in the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002 (2002 Farm Bill). This particular portion of the legislation asked that Country of Origin Labeling be implemented for beef, pork, lamb, fish, perishable agricultural commodities, and peanuts. By September 30, 2004, consumers should be able to walk into a retail store and purchase products of the afore mentioned commodities with knowledge of where they were produced. What are the implications of COOL for producers? Seedstock and cow/calf producers need to keep accurate records of herds starting with calves born this year. Even though many producers already record *by: Vertical Solutions of Ortonville Internet Service Now Available ot Radio Shock - Ortonville Serving the Big Stone Lake including the communities of Ortonville Big Stone City Clinton Odessa #assle-Free Service information, the key will be putting the information into an auditable form for the remainder of the supply chain. Stocker or background producers will need to identify and segregate animals as to their origin. In addition, these producers will be responsible for properly identifying each and every animal sold while maintaining the reliability of the identification of origin. Feedlot operators will also need to identify animals based on their origin upon arrival at the facility and maintain identification of origin and ownership through harvest. Already, retail operations have asked that operations involved in harvesting livestock begin implementing some of the record keeping ispects of COOl.. Consequently, the packers have already begun asking producers to provide documentation concerning the origin of livestock. In addition, some packers will request that producers sign legal affidavits that an audit trail in place can verify the origin of the livestock. Basically, COOL forces documentation concerning an animal's movement from the time it is born until it is harvested. Under this current structure, in order for beef products to be labeled as U.S. Country of Origin, the product must be derived from animals born, raised, and slaughtered in the United States (including animals that were born and raised in Alaska or Hawaii and transported for a period not to exceed 60 days through Canada to the United States and slaughtered in the United States). Many people ask what the costs of implementing such a program will be. Based on a USDA estimate, the first year cost of complying with COOL will approach $2 BILLION. USDA, AMS further estimates that the first year economic burden of record keeping and other costs involved in compliance would include $1 BII, LION for producers, $340 MILLION tbr tbod handlers and $628 MILLION for retailers. After implementation, annual compliance costs associated with COOL are estimated at $600 MILLION for producers, $260 MILLION for food" handlers and $566 MILLION for retailers. ttow much additional money are YOU willing to pay for products labeled USA? Kirby Hettver is an educator with  the University of Minnesota Extension" Service in Ag, Food and Environment -Livestock serving the West Central District that includes Big Stone County. BIG STONE AREA GROWTH Economic Update - 7/7/03 The Board of Directors would like to give a public thank you to Water Monitor, Inc. for their generous contribution of computers, desks, chairs and a variety of office equipment. Sincerely, Roger K. Bird, Executive Director [ Enhance0000 of your Improve the ! with a our computerized:landsCapingservice can change the look of your homeri, ht before your eyes. I1[ II [ We guarantee our work. ] CALL THE LANDSCAPING EXPERTS. .... ' [[ does it aft/ INDEPENDENT Page 5 d and ts were married Catholic Rev. Robert at the ceremony. It Lymond Schuelke of Virginia escorted by her Mori Lee gown and scalloped trim that of re-embroidered dress with scal- down the nor was Sandy Falls, S.D. Were Corina Angela cousin of the Denver, nd Robin Moe, was Dana .was A.J. York, Sioux of the groom. Kuemper, ' Phc Mankato; t0x, x; and Brian brother of h Free .s t3ecch Free press. Free country. Speak up for the First Amendment. Davis vows told i!i: the bride. Ushers were Alan Schuelke, Montevideo, brother of the bride; Chad Rudebusch, Watertown; Tim Lalim, Sioux Falls; Adam Swenson, Scottsdale, AZ.; and Jason Deming, Watertown. Music was provided by organist Linda Hoffman, soloist Kathy Alwin and accompanists Gene and Rita Patterson. A reception was held in the 2nd St. Station. Assisting were Betty Binsfeld, Maggie Brist, Cathy Harstad, Ira Davis, Chona Mendoza, Tiffany and Megan Harstad, Aleshia and Darrick Moe, Cheryl Streich, Florfan Davis, Anna Moe and Emily Kasuske. The bride is a 1993 graduate of Ortonville High School and a 1995 graduate of Willmar Technical College. She is employed at Co-Ev in Watertown. The groom is a 1994 graduate of Watertown High School and attended the University of Minnesota and Mount Marty College. tte is employed at UBC in Watertown. t=ollowing a wedding trip to Cancun, Mexico, they reside in Watertown. Birthdays As Taken From The Big Stone American Legion Auxiliary Birthday Calendar. Tuesday, July.8 Barb Nelson, Peggy Taffe Miles, Tom Erickson, Norman Clark, Sally Ann Helgeson, Matthew Larson, Lois Werner, Amanda Elizabeth Minahan, Carolyn Larson Tiegs, Michelle Ehlebracht, Austin Wiseman, Stuart Moser, Sandy Larson Wednesday, July 9 Amanda Swezey, Paula Brecke Tobin, Harley Helgeson, James Ronald Tyson, Harriet Rausch, Ruth Torgerson, Klary Meier, Alex Jayne Conlon Thursday, July 10 Julie A. Nelson, Nathan Dinnel, Randy Spahr, Sarah Jolaine Tower, Amanda Burdick, Andrew Smithwick, Mindy Peterson Peters, Roger R. Anderson, Tim Gapp, Trinity Rayne Everett Friday, July 11 Marianne Nolop Curry, Diane Wiese Spahr, Gene Oslund, Freida Ehlebracht Saturday, July 12 Kim Kolb, Henry Gimmestad, Jackie Meyer, Joe Wipf, Alicia Ellingson, Lynda Roggenbuck, Brian Frevert, Lynn Gerber, Jack William Koenen, Steve Roggenbuck, Linda Roggenbuck, Paylon Rae Karels Sunday, July 13 Carol Conrad Reiland, Gordon Lindquist, Janet Utley Knutson, Kim Karges, Jr., David Iverson, Paul Read, Vicki Arndt, Brenda McMahon, Lt. Col. Harold Babbitt, Kayla Renee Giese, Nicole Stecker Monday, July 14 Marge Lindholm, Michael Stock, Rick Mosey, Angela Nelson, Sandy Henneberg, Alyssa Hames Tuesday, July 15 Brandon Swigerd, Marissa Lynn Bergeson, Jessica Kongelf, Brent Zahrbock, Barbara Johnson, Shelby Whemtner "-Our Wildlife and Ftsh cannot survive unless our Beautiful Big Stone Lake is pollution free! Please do your part. i II Ication open for 2003 Ripley archery hunts of Natural applications archery deer Y near" Little are scheduled Oct. 25-26. one of these A two- m 2003. The lunt is $8 per deadline is mail written applications m previous ed to DNR s free service :ally of be accessed via the DNR's Web site at www.dnr.state.mn.us. Camp Ripley applications are available through any of three meth- ods. All applicants must apply via the DNR's computerized Electronic Licensing System at one of 1,800 agents located across Minnesota, by ELS telephone at 1-888-665-4236, or through DNR's Internet licensing link at www.dnr.state.mn.us. Those who apply by phone or Internet will be charged an additional convenience fee of $3.50 per transaction. There is no longer a mail-in application form. lo apply, Minnesota. resident hunters must have one of the follow- ing: a valid Minnesota driver's license; a state of Minnesota identifi- cation card (issued by the Department of Public Safety) i a firearms safety certificate number; or a Minnesota DNR number found on current hunt- ing or fishing licenses. Nonresidents must supply their state driver's license, state ID, or Minnesota DNR number if they pur- chased a 2000-2003 hunting or fishing license. It is important that the ID card reflect the current mailing address, which is where notifications will be sent to those chosen in the computer preference drawing. Applicants must be 12 years of age prior to Oct. 16, and have a hunter safety certificate. In addition, anyone born after Dec. 31, 1979, must have a firearms safety certificate, a previous hunting license, or other evidence of successfully completing a hunter safe- ty course to obtain a license to hunt or trap in Minnesota. INDEPENDENT WANT ADS PAY Extension Time To THINK COOL with PRICING ON AIR IONERS from Kirby Hettver Regional Extension Educator General Livestock-Ag Production Systems Stevens County Morris, MN 56267 320/589-7423 COUNTY OF ORIGIN LABELING Country of Origin Labeling is a hot topic in the agricultural sector today and will affect every person in the United States within the next 15 months. Country of Origin Labeling was an legislative initiative that was included in the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002 (2002 Farm Bill). This particular portion of the legislation asked that Country of Origin Labeling be implemented for beef, pork, lamb, fish, perishable agricultural commodities, and peanuts. By September 30, 2004, consumers should be able to walk into a retail store and purchase products of the afore mentioned commodities with knowledge of where they were produced. What are the implications of COOL for producers? Seedstock and cow/calf producers need to keep accurate records of herds starting with calves born this year. Even though many producers already record *by: Vertical Solutions of Ortonville Internet Service Now Available ot Radio Shock - Ortonville Serving the Big Stone Lake including the communities of Ortonville Big Stone City Clinton Odessa #assle-Free Service information, the key will be putting the information into an auditable form for the remainder of the supply chain. Stocker or background producers will need to identify and segregate animals as to their origin. In addition, these producers will be responsible for properly identifying each and every animal sold while maintaining the reliability of the identification of origin. Feedlot operators will also need to identify animals based on their origin upon arrival at the facility and maintain identification of origin and ownership through harvest. Already, retail operations have asked that operations involved in harvesting livestock begin implementing some of the record keeping ispects of COOl.. Consequently, the packers have already begun asking producers to provide documentation concerning the origin of livestock. In addition, some packers will request that producers sign legal affidavits that an audit trail in place can verify the origin of the livestock. Basically, COOL forces documentation concerning an animal's movement from the time it is born until it is harvested. Under this current structure, in order for beef products to be labeled as U.S. Country of Origin, the product must be derived from animals born, raised, and slaughtered in the United States (including animals that were born and raised in Alaska or Hawaii and transported for a period not to exceed 60 days through Canada to the United States and slaughtered in the United States). Many people ask what the costs of implementing such a program will be. Based on a USDA estimate, the first year cost of complying with COOL will approach $2 BILLION. USDA, AMS further estimates that the first year economic burden of record keeping and other costs involved in compliance would include $1 BII, LION for producers, $340 MILLION tbr tbod handlers and $628 MILLION for retailers. After implementation, annual compliance costs associated with COOL are estimated at $600 MILLION for producers, $260 MILLION for food" handlers and $566 MILLION for retailers. ttow much additional money are YOU willing to pay for products labeled USA? Kirby Hettver is an educator with  the University of Minnesota Extension" Service in Ag, Food and Environment -Livestock serving the West Central District that includes Big Stone County. BIG STONE AREA GROWTH Economic Update - 7/7/03 The Board of Directors would like to give a public thank you to Water Monitor, Inc. for their generous contribution of computers, desks, chairs and a variety of office equipment. Sincerely, Roger K. Bird, Executive Director [ Enhance0000 of your Improve the ! with a our computerized:landsCapingservice can change the look of your homeri, ht before your eyes. I1[ II [ We guarantee our work. ] CALL THE LANDSCAPING EXPERTS. .... ' [[ does it aft/ INDEPENDENT Page 5 d