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The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
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July 14, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
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July 14, 1921
 

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THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, JULY 54, 5921 NUMBER 50 GAME Lightning Hits Flag Pole On Odd Fellows Building TO IAghtning struck the flagpole on the Odd Fellows building during the storm APPLETON 19 4 Wednesday afternoon and almost split = it in two, but did no further damage, and from all indications did not touch Exhibition of Popular the building. It was the loudest crash during the storm., and people from Ends Disastrously many parts of town noted its force. By chance Chester Pflueger who was Ortonville -- G a m e working at the Ortonville Ice Cream Next Sunday. a game that closely approached a burlesque exhibition of the pastime, Appleton took the of the Ortonville team and the second game of the season two teams by a score of 19 to Sunday at Appleton. Close of the sport said the game of the best one-ring shows was ever staged. with the fourth inning, players gave evidence a single trace of sociability, everything. They put six aCross in this frame making their 11. The storm subsided after they did not do anything seventh and eighth innings | they scared four runs in each. played good ball in the of the game. Appleton in the opening inning, two being instrumental in giving a chance to register. A couple passes and move errors in the allowed them an additional runs. drew three free trips in inning, but was unable to , ad six scores resulted from it. that point on the game was a matter of going thru move- generosity of Lillejord who was on the mound for Appleton unabated in the second set- walked four men, while Ortonville player draw a pass nicked. Tight fielding on of the Appleton players clip- off every chance the locals had eXtra scores, and they retired Only.one run to their credit. runs were scored by Orton- m the fourth inning, MacMur- double .and Kelly's single, with errors by Appleton, al- MacMurphey, and Zwie- Cross the plate. fourth inning was a nightmare Ortonville llayers. The vic- swing the bludgeon with lSlts while in the fieltl Or- hooted the ball around with abandon. Appleton collected doubles and one single in this was resumed by Ap- the last two innings, and a varied assortsment of causes, which errors and passes were they scored almost at will. tried hard each inning to the margin of difference', but attempt netted them nothing. ' connected with the offerings only times for clean hits, and these scattered that they brot noth- was a decided contrast to the Appleton hammered the SUnday the Ortonville team Milan-Watson combined ame which will be played They have been playing this season, and split even on their two games Members of the local taken up a more strenuous schedule this week, and have a practice almost every The game Sunday should one, and the teams evenly have been made by of the Ortonville team Grace of Big Stone City twirling for them against Grace has been working for Some this season and let the team down 8-1 in a game Fourth. He has showed fine and his offerings have been hard acquainted with.. League Officers for Coming Term League officers to serve dur- next half-year term, were the meeting of the Luther held at Alfred Johnson's Tues- They were, vice-presi- Johnson; secretary, Miss Johnson; treasurer, Edwin and financial secretary, Rob- Rev. Arnold Nelson.is ex-offido. business meting a pro- Plans for a ioin Luther League at Clan- considered` for Class of Eight. of eight will be confirmed Stone church in Clinton by Rev. S. M. Moe, that church. The services and Butter company saw the lighting strike. After it hit the flagpole, he said, it seemed to shoot off toward the court house or trees near there, there ' being a ribbon of lightning over a hun- dred feet long. Has Good Luck Anyhow. It isn't always the best fisherman who gets the biggest fish, at least this was true in the case of Miss Hazel Buck, a local girl of about twelve who seemed to be able to catch nothing but bullheads the other day when in cmpany with some of her other little friends, she was fishing in the mill pond. The benefactor in this instance was one of the  inhabitants of the "jlngles." After some time at the mill pond hey had nbthing on their string but ullheads, when their unknown friend tried his luck with a spear and landed a seven pound pike, which he gave to her. Tho she hadn't caught it, she was just as proud of it as if she had. GIRL RETURNS AS LAKE IS DRAGGED Men Search Bay Near Hartford Beach For Girl Supposed to Have Drowned. After parties had dragged the bay a quarter of a mile south of Hartford Beach Wednesday for almost two hours in search of the body of Miss Agnes Spank, age 17, who was sup- posed to have been drowned there sometime Monday afternoon, she rode up to them in a launch, having just come from B?nanza Mineral Springs where she haki been since her disap- pearance. Miss Spank had been working in the field a while Monday afternoon and complaining of the heat said she was going down to the lake for a swim. She wore an old dress that she used when she went in swimming. Little was thot of her going to the lake as she was a good swimmer, hut when she failed to return to the house in the evening, her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ross Spank Who live about a half mile west of Hartford Beach, began to wor- ry. On Monday they started a search for her, and dragged the bay where she was accustomed to go. Not find- ing her, a larger party was organized to drag the lake. Wayne Kelly, H. A. Stucke, John Gowan, A1. Reynolds, and Cecil Kaercher went from here to Hartford to help in the search. It was after they had dragged the bay with ten-gang hook for almost two hours that she made her appear- ance. According to the story which she is reported to have told, she walked up the South Dakota Side to Mattson's place which was afou five miles above Hartford. From there she crossed over to Bonanza. New Style Shop Rifled By Thief Monday Night A pair of English shoes, size, 15V, may be the clue which will lead to the arrest of the thief who broke into the New Style shop Monday night, and took various articles of men's cloth- ing valued at hardly more than $25, according to E. B. Persson, proprietor. A viginalt watch will be kept for persons wearing shoes of that size, and suspicious characters equipped with canal boats of those dimensions are liable to run counter to the strong arm of the law. The it was hardly possible to check up the stock to tell how much the ver- son had taken, it was definitely known that this pair of shoes were gone as the empty box was on the counter when the store was opened Tuesday morning. Some ties were also miss- ing. It is thot that the intruder was scared before he had collected all the things on his shopping list. A trav- elling bag, a pair of overalls, and a few other things were piled on the counter. Entrance to the place was gained by removing a pae in one of the base- ment windows. He had used a mouth- organ to scrape off the putty, and al- most succeeded in removing the glass without breaking it. The door at the head of the stairway leading up from he basement had been forced and the lock broken. With this robbery, Ed. Persson said he would like tp know why they all picked him to work on. About stx weeks ago three tires and rims, to- gether with the tools and accessories, were stolen from his car whea'he was Annual Report of Library Gives Interesting Facts MORE THAN 7000 BOOKS TAKEN magazines which are accessible to the OUT FOR HOME USE reading public. Thirty magazines and, the English language. The forced to leave it outside one night, the class are Emery John- Anderson, Orville Hox- Advanee your own interests by Martinson, Elmer Nel- keeping in los t0ucfi With ng, Nelson, Evelyn Oleon and tireless workers--The Independent Want Ads. LAST YEAR. More than 7,000 books belonging to Public library were lent for home use during the past year, according to the statistical report for the year ending July 1 and issued recently by Miss of books on hand a total of 312 were added during this same time. The report in general shows a most satisfactory year for the library, and compares very favorably with any preceeding year. According to the report the number of volumes in the library at the be- ginning of the year was 2884. During the year 129 additional books were purchased, while 183 were added dur- the same period by gift, making an aggregate increase of 312 volumes. Deducting from this number, 52 which were lost or withdrawn during the year, the total number at the time the report was given out was 3144. Registration of borrowers showed that 202 new borrowers were regis- tered during the year. Eight hundred borrowers cards were in force July 1 when the report was made. One hun- dred cards for books are now beir,g held by people from the country, the majority of them being new patrons of the city library. This one item is considerably greater than it has been for any of the other years. Circulation statistics gave 5892 as the number of volumes of fiction lent out for home use during the year, while to this 1159 volumes of books classed as non-fiction were lent, mak- ing the total number lent out for home use equal 7051. Figures relative to the reference and reading room disclosed the fact that the average daily attendance was thirty-five, a high average for the whole year. One of the most popular features of the library was the s:elected list #f three newspapers are kept on file in this department of the library. The financial report which was in- cluded in the report for the year show- ed that the library now has a balance on hand amounting to $1,237.97. Re- ceipts for the year amounted to $4,937.92, while expenditures amount- ed to only $3,729.95. The financial report for the year fur- ther showed that there was an unex- pended balance amounting to $1,992.- 51. City appropriations totaled $1,- 414.63, and gifts amounted to $10. Fines collected on books that had been lost or injured netted the library $65.- 85. Renting collection brot in $9.40, and flm other sources the library re- ceived $1,061.02, making a total of $4,967.92. Expenditures for the year were di- vided as follows: Books, $93.78; periodicals, $71.00; binding, $1.50; salaries--library service, $600.00, jan- itor work service, $83.47; heat, $2,028.- 73; light, $1.10; furniture and fix- tures, $9.50; repairs and improve- ments. $596.10; stationery and sup- plies, $23.55; postage, express, and freight, $10.45; insurance, $76.77; and care of lawn, $34.00. Total expendi- tures were $3.728.95. Directors for the library now serv- ing, with the year in which their term expires, are: A. L. Moore, 1921; C. J. Stark, 1921; J. M. Snesrud, 1921; Mrs. Cora Scofield, 1922; Mrs. B. R. Karn, 1922; Mrs. C. Zwiener, 1922; Mrs. Wellman, 1923; Dr. R. D. Rifenbark, 1923, and J. J. Purcell, 1923. Mrs. B. R. Karn is president of the board of directors, and Mrs, Corn Scofield is secretary. Library hours during which the pub- lic is invited to come to the library and make use of its facilities are from 3:30 to 5:30 in the afternoon and 7:00 to 9:00 in the evening. The library ia open every day of the week except Sunday, and is also closed on holidays. Masonic Lodges to Have Big Picnic Wednesday Final arrangements for the Masonic picnic which will be held at Foster Beach next Wednesday, July 20, we agreei upon last Sunday when com- mlttees from the various lodges near Traverse and Big Stone lakes met at Foster. According to the announce- ment made by Ortonville representa- tives, it will be the biggest outing that Masonic lodges in this section have undertaken, and a record crowd is ex- pected to be there. The picnic is be- ing given for only members of Ma- sonic lodges and their families. Lodges which will take part are those from Clinton, Graceville, Whea- ten, White Rok, Sisseton, Wilmot, Big Stone City, Milbank, Browns Val- ley, Appleton, and Ortonville. t The program which is intended to 1 fill the day is made up of band music, I group singing, speaking, together with t a big program of water sports and aj baseball gnome. Arrangements have been made with Mr. Douglas, manager and owner of Foster Beach, to lease the grounds for the day. All boats have also been rented, as has the launch, and they will be at the dis- posal of those there at an K time. The program will start in the fore- noon. At noon there will be a picnic dinner. Ice cream and refreshments will be served free during the a. The pavilion at Hartford has also been obtained for the afternoon by the lodges, and the dancing will be free to those attending the picnic Plans are now being considered to have launches make the trip from Or- tonville to Foster, but as yet they have not been completed. Getting Acquainted Right. Three young men from Columbus, Ohio, who made the trip here by car, are going to give Big Stone County the once over in a little different way than most auto tourists. They have hired out to work in the harvest fields, and will be here or a week or two. They are Charles and Edgar Kales of 888 Sullivan Avenue, Columbus*, and Ellis Loudermitk of 8861/2 Sullivan avenue. They started from Columbus three weeks ague, and made a swing into West Virginia and Kentucky be- fore heading west. They intend to go to the coast on leaving here,, and will tour in Yellowstone National park. They camp out and have only ld one restauraut meal during the time hey have been on the road, Loud,r- milk is-chief cook, being especially qua|ailed afte a apprenticeship in the army. S. D. Methodists End Successful Conference With a crowd estimated to number close to 600 Sunday afternoon, the tAbeen District Conference held at e CChautauqua Park July 1 to 10, closed one of the most successful meet- ings in its history. Thruout the ten days there was a daily attendance of from 150 to 200, the meeting set a new mark in this respect. About thirty ministers and their families frav the Aberdeen district of the Methodist church were at the meetings . Speakers of the highest c.libre made the convention a most interesting and instructive gathering. President Sehermerhorn of South Dakota Weslyan was one of the prin- cipal speakers. Dr. Semans of Mit- chell, S. D., gave a series of talks which were of particular merit. He is pastor of the University church at Mitchell. The Sunday afternoon meeting which drew a Crowd of 600 was in charge of Dr. E. D. Kohlstedt of Chi- cago. His address that afternoon was one of the best on the program. As the result of these meetings, and particularly the one Sunday af- ternoon, several young people pledged themselves to mission work which in- cludes life rvice as deaconesses, missionaires, and work in medical ser- vice. Large delegations from Ortonville were in attendance at many of the meetings of the conference. Plans were considered before the close of the conference for the meet- ing which will be held next year at the Chautauqua Park. Officers Named'For Valley Drainage Body New UIm, July 12.--The Board of directors of the Minnesota Valley Harness Stock Complet Lo Insurance adjustors who came here to make an adjustment on the stock of harness and leather.oods belong- ing to F. E. Davidson which was de- stroyed in the fire on the Fourth stated that it was practically a com- plete loss, according to Mr. Davidson. On|ya small part  of the stock was kept from burning, and this wu dam- aged b water and chemical. Two Vacancies to Fill At School Election Schools thruout the county will have their regular annual election next Saturday, July 56. Officers for the coming year will be selected, at thee elections. TWO vacancies brot about by ex- pired terms are to be filled at the local election for the Ortonville school, Dis- tract No. 1. The places held by J. E. Palmer and Wm. Utley are those to be filled. Mr. Palmer who now holds the po- sition of secretary on the Board of Education has consented to run again, and a petition bearing his name has been filed. He has been closely as- sociated with the Ortonville schools since he came here several years ago as superintendent of schools. Mr. Utley has withdrawn and his name will not appear on the ballot He is treasurer of the Board of Edu- cation at the present time. The person who has been named to enter the contest to take the vacancy which will be left by Mr. Utley is R. F. Walke. Mr. Walker is president of the Parents-Teachers association, has taken active part in school work. He is also secretary of the Boy Scout committee. The election will be held at the- usual voting place. The polls will be opened at 7:00 in the evening, and will be open until 9:00 o'clock. LOCAL PARTIES GET 30 DAY JAIL TERM COMMISSIONERS VOTE SOLID TO DIVIDE PRIOR Foster Proposed Name of New Township Which will Be Smaller of Two--Peti- tion Long Considered. Two distinct hips were crea- ted by the county commissioners at the regular session last Monday when they unanimously agreed to grant the petition asking that Prior township be divided. The eastern part will continue to be known as Prior, while Foster was the name selected for tho new division. The hearing on this petition had been postponed from a special meet- ing which was held March 15. 2"lte petition was first presented to the county board February 8. At the March meeting the board heard the arguments of all persons interested in this subject, but postponed further consideration and final decision until the recent meeting. The boundaries of the new town- ship are described in the resolution approving the petition in the follow- mg manner: commencing at the north- east corner of section 1, township 12, north of range 48, west of the fifth principal meridian, running thence due south to the shores of Big Stone lake, thence following the shore of Put In Traverse County Jail for Sell- Big Stone lake in a west and north- ing Moonshine--S50.00 Fine For Each. Telephone reports received here frc Wheaten Thursday forenoon ave out the information that S. C. Kight and Andrew Moes of Orton- ville were arrested there Tuesday af- ternoon for selling moonshine, and sentenced Wednesday afternoon by Judge S. A. Flaherty at Morris to 30 days in the Traverse county jail, aml fined $50 each. According to the report Kight and Moes were on their way to LaMoure, N. D. While travelling along the road between Dumont and Wheaton Tues- day afternoon they met a man who proved to be one of the Traverse coun- ty deputy sheriffs, and offered him moonshine. They were immediately put under arrest and taken to Whea- ten. Wednesday they were arrainged before Judge Flaherty. EigHt quarts of moonshine were found in the car, it is said. Pioneer Settler Visits Here. George B. Coburn of Terrace was in tom last Friday and Saturday calling on some of early pioneer residents. He claims to be the first white settler at Big Stone City, formerly owning the land on which the Canning Factory and the old Big Stone City depot ann other buildings in that part of town are located, coming to this country i the year 1871. He told some interest- ing experiences of the pioneer days. Those were the (lays when Lorenzo Lawrence the Indian Scout, Mr. Mere and Mr. Robert, Frenchmen, Jacob Hurley, Mr. Martell, Mr. Movious, Frank House and others of he pio- neers were here. 78 GRADUATE FROM CO. RURAL SCHOOLS Largest Class Receives Diplomas At Exercises Held At Grand Theatre. Diplomas were presented to 78 westerly course to a point where t  township line between townships 52 and 124 touches the shore of Big Stone lake, thence due east on said township line to the point of beginning at the northeast corner of said section 1, township 123, range 48 of Big Stone county, Minnesota. That part which will continue to be known as Prior township is the larger of the two, it containing 42 full sec- tions and a part of six others. Foster township will have only 24 full town- ships, and the greater part of seven others, together with additional land along the lake shore. LEGION PLANS BIG BOXING CARNIVAL Proposed Match Will Be Staged Here N ddo Eye.agent, Pazk If Possible. Consideration of a Legion carnival boxing match will be the mP0rtant matter which comes before the mem- bers of the local post tonight at one of its regular meetings. The contem- plated match is to be between Kid Hale, a boxer and fighter of long ex- perience, and Gordon Eldred of this place. The proposals for this event was laid down to the two men early this week, and they considered it very fav- orable. Final action will be taken on it at the Legion meeting. Legion posts thruout the state are fast recognizing boxing which was a popular sport with the men in service, as one of the best forms of entertain- ment. Further impetus has been giv- ing the staging of boxing program by Legion posts by State Commander Vernon who strongly urged Legion posts to promote them whenever they had the opportunity. If the plans go thru, Eldred and Hale will give an exhibition in a six- round go. The Legion post will also make an effort to hold the match in the open and the City Park is their first objective. Drainage and. ConServancy district met here late yesterday, organized, discussed their duties and then ad- journed deciding there was nothing to be done until the completion of the survey of the valley, authorized by the recent legislature. The following officers were elected: President, A. B. Kaercher, Ortonville; vice-president, J. P. Graft, New Ulm; secretary, John H. Macbeth, Manka- to; treasurer, S. F. Stryker, LeSueur. graduates of the county rural schools last Monday at the fourteenth annua! Storm Looks Bad But graduation exercises which were held in the Grand theatre here. They were presented by Miss Martha Rothwell, county superintendent of schools. R. B. MacLean, state graded school in- specter, addressed the graduating class. "It is not always what ve can get out of learning that counts the most," said Mr. MacLean, "it is what we put in it." Imagination was an important feature in learning, and persons should put it into both life and work, he said. "The true learner has a high mv- tive, and the higher the motive the better the learning. Learning sool becomes a passion which will carry one thru life." His concluding words to the graduateswere "Possess a soul interesg in hfe, and use every oppor- tunity for service." The board, seeks to solve the flood In the presentation of the diplomas, situation of the Minnesota valley, but Miss Rothwell .aid. that the rural after listening to an address by E. V. I school of Big Stone .county had com- Willard, state commissioner of drain- t leted  most succeMui year, remark- age and waters,  ecided to await the ing that in this county wltich has a smaller population than Traverse,. al- most twice as many pupflsare being graduated from the rural school this year. The program for the exercises was epo of the commission, authorized I o make a surey of the entire Minne-t sota valley by:the last legislature. 1 Adjournment was taken up with no 1 set time for= future gathering. Minneapolis Journal." Mrs: Mr. and C.E. Prevey of Lin- coln; Nebraska, arrived a few days ago by auto for a visit with Mr. Prevey's sister, Mrs. Tkos. Farring- ton. Mr. Prevey was t one tme pro- lessor of Political Economy at the Univeity of Nebraska. Of late he has been affiliated with the Associa- ted Charitiee. opened with an entrance march, "Al- Ia Marcia," " which was played by Miss Edua Shumaker. Mis Shumaker also gav.e a whistling solo, her piece being "Carmena," a Spanish waltz[ ong. Miss Elizabeth Cummens gave[ a vocal solo and responded with an en- core,: Rev. H. B. Adams of Clinton[ gave the invocation and tim benedic-] tion. Lucian Kaercher guve tWo read- ings. Does Little Damage Wind and rain coming in Wednes- day's storm did little damage to crops around here, but played a few pranks. No serious dmago was reported, an4 the storm was rather limited in its extent. North of Ortonville about three miles was the limit in that direction. How far west it extended is not known, but it did not extend much farther than Odessa or Correll to the east and approached Bellingham. At Appleton and Madison there was onW slight rain, while at Clinton there was but little rain and wind. The storm aras as intense at Odessa as it was here, and the wind was of high ve- locity, according to telephone reports Wednesday night. Down on the lake several boats were tossed around and jerked loose from their moorings. The sailboat, belotg- ing to the Orton Brothers and Floyd Schoen  was tipped over on its side, but no damage resulte& A three-htm- dre pound nchor failed to hold the diving tower that was out a ways from the pavilion and it was driven to the foot of the lake near the North Star elevator. The there was a report that crops suffered from the wid, this-was nt as serions as first supposed. Little grain was lodged, and it is thot that that the loss will be but minor: On the Peninsula the Wind hit the cottage beinK built bF Mr, Collins and moved it more than two feet' off++it8 foundation, twisting it a little because it did not rest level. The damage is thot to be slight tko. THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, JULY 54, 5921 NUMBER 50 GAME Lightning Hits Flag Pole On Odd Fellows Building TO IAghtning struck the flagpole on the Odd Fellows building during the storm APPLETON 19 4 Wednesday afternoon and almost split = it in two, but did no further damage, and from all indications did not touch Exhibition of Popular the building. It was the loudest crash during the storm., and people from Ends Disastrously many parts of town noted its force. By chance Chester Pflueger who was Ortonville -- G a m e working at the Ortonville Ice Cream Next Sunday. a game that closely approached a burlesque exhibition of the pastime, Appleton took the of the Ortonville team and the second game of the season two teams by a score of 19 to Sunday at Appleton. Close of the sport said the game of the best one-ring shows was ever staged. with the fourth inning, players gave evidence a single trace of sociability, everything. They put six aCross in this frame making their 11. The storm subsided after they did not do anything seventh and eighth innings | they scared four runs in each. played good ball in the of the game. Appleton in the opening inning, two being instrumental in giving a chance to register. A couple passes and move errors in the allowed them an additional runs. drew three free trips in inning, but was unable to , ad six scores resulted from it. that point on the game was a matter of going thru move- generosity of Lillejord who was on the mound for Appleton unabated in the second set- walked four men, while Ortonville player draw a pass nicked. Tight fielding on of the Appleton players clip- off every chance the locals had eXtra scores, and they retired Only.one run to their credit. runs were scored by Orton- m the fourth inning, MacMur- double .and Kelly's single, with errors by Appleton, al- MacMurphey, and Zwie- Cross the plate. fourth inning was a nightmare Ortonville llayers. The vic- swing the bludgeon with lSlts while in the fieltl Or- hooted the ball around with abandon. Appleton collected doubles and one single in this was resumed by Ap- the last two innings, and a varied assortsment of causes, which errors and passes were they scored almost at will. tried hard each inning to the margin of difference', but attempt netted them nothing. ' connected with the offerings only times for clean hits, and these scattered that they brot noth- was a decided contrast to the Appleton hammered the SUnday the Ortonville team Milan-Watson combined ame which will be played They have been playing this season, and split even on their two games Members of the local taken up a more strenuous schedule this week, and have a practice almost every The game Sunday should one, and the teams evenly have been made by of the Ortonville team Grace of Big Stone City twirling for them against Grace has been working for Some this season and let the team down 8-1 in a game Fourth. He has showed fine and his offerings have been hard acquainted with.. League Officers for Coming Term League officers to serve dur- next half-year term, were the meeting of the Luther held at Alfred Johnson's Tues- They were, vice-presi- Johnson; secretary, Miss Johnson; treasurer, Edwin and financial secretary, Rob- Rev. Arnold Nelson.is ex-offido. business meting a pro- Plans for a ioin Luther League at Clan- considered` for Class of Eight. of eight will be confirmed Stone church in Clinton by Rev. S. M. Moe, that church. The services and Butter company saw the lighting strike. After it hit the flagpole, he said, it seemed to shoot off toward the court house or trees near there, there ' being a ribbon of lightning over a hun- dred feet long. Has Good Luck Anyhow. It isn't always the best fisherman who gets the biggest fish, at least this was true in the case of Miss Hazel Buck, a local girl of about twelve who seemed to be able to catch nothing but bullheads the other day when in cmpany with some of her other little friends, she was fishing in the mill pond. The benefactor in this instance was one of the  inhabitants of the "jlngles." After some time at the mill pond hey had nbthing on their string but ullheads, when their unknown friend tried his luck with a spear and landed a seven pound pike, which he gave to her. Tho she hadn't caught it, she was just as proud of it as if she had. GIRL RETURNS AS LAKE IS DRAGGED Men Search Bay Near Hartford Beach For Girl Supposed to Have Drowned. After parties had dragged the bay a quarter of a mile south of Hartford Beach Wednesday for almost two hours in search of the body of Miss Agnes Spank, age 17, who was sup- posed to have been drowned there sometime Monday afternoon, she rode up to them in a launch, having just come from B?nanza Mineral Springs where she haki been since her disap- pearance. Miss Spank had been working in the field a while Monday afternoon and complaining of the heat said she was going down to the lake for a swim. She wore an old dress that she used when she went in swimming. Little was thot of her going to the lake as she was a good swimmer, hut when she failed to return to the house in the evening, her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ross Spank Who live about a half mile west of Hartford Beach, began to wor- ry. On Monday they started a search for her, and dragged the bay where she was accustomed to go. Not find- ing her, a larger party was organized to drag the lake. Wayne Kelly, H. A. Stucke, John Gowan, A1. Reynolds, and Cecil Kaercher went from here to Hartford to help in the search. It was after they had dragged the bay with ten-gang hook for almost two hours that she made her appear- ance. According to the story which she is reported to have told, she walked up the South Dakota Side to Mattson's place which was afou five miles above Hartford. From there she crossed over to Bonanza. New Style Shop Rifled By Thief Monday Night A pair of English shoes, size, 15V, may be the clue which will lead to the arrest of the thief who broke into the New Style shop Monday night, and took various articles of men's cloth- ing valued at hardly more than $25, according to E. B. Persson, proprietor. A viginalt watch will be kept for persons wearing shoes of that size, and suspicious characters equipped with canal boats of those dimensions are liable to run counter to the strong arm of the law. The it was hardly possible to check up the stock to tell how much the ver- son had taken, it was definitely known that this pair of shoes were gone as the empty box was on the counter when the store was opened Tuesday morning. Some ties were also miss- ing. It is thot that the intruder was scared before he had collected all the things on his shopping list. A trav- elling bag, a pair of overalls, and a few other things were piled on the counter. Entrance to the place was gained by removing a pae in one of the base- ment windows. He had used a mouth- organ to scrape off the putty, and al- most succeeded in removing the glass without breaking it. The door at the head of the stairway leading up from he basement had been forced and the lock broken. With this robbery, Ed. Persson said he would like tp know why they all picked him to work on. About stx weeks ago three tires and rims, to- gether with the tools and accessories, were stolen from his car whea'he was Annual Report of Library Gives Interesting Facts MORE THAN 7000 BOOKS TAKEN magazines which are accessible to the OUT FOR HOME USE reading public. Thirty magazines and, the English language. The forced to leave it outside one night, the class are Emery John- Anderson, Orville Hox- Advanee your own interests by Martinson, Elmer Nel- keeping in los t0ucfi With ng, Nelson, Evelyn Oleon and tireless workers--The Independent Want Ads. LAST YEAR. More than 7,000 books belonging to Public library were lent for home use during the past year, according to the statistical report for the year ending July 1 and issued recently by Miss of books on hand a total of 312 were added during this same time. The report in general shows a most satisfactory year for the library, and compares very favorably with any preceeding year. According to the report the number of volumes in the library at the be- ginning of the year was 2884. During the year 129 additional books were purchased, while 183 were added dur- the same period by gift, making an aggregate increase of 312 volumes. Deducting from this number, 52 which were lost or withdrawn during the year, the total number at the time the report was given out was 3144. Registration of borrowers showed that 202 new borrowers were regis- tered during the year. Eight hundred borrowers cards were in force July 1 when the report was made. One hun- dred cards for books are now beir,g held by people from the country, the majority of them being new patrons of the city library. This one item is considerably greater than it has been for any of the other years. Circulation statistics gave 5892 as the number of volumes of fiction lent out for home use during the year, while to this 1159 volumes of books classed as non-fiction were lent, mak- ing the total number lent out for home use equal 7051. Figures relative to the reference and reading room disclosed the fact that the average daily attendance was thirty-five, a high average for the whole year. One of the most popular features of the library was the s:elected list #f three newspapers are kept on file in this department of the library. The financial report which was in- cluded in the report for the year show- ed that the library now has a balance on hand amounting to $1,237.97. Re- ceipts for the year amounted to $4,937.92, while expenditures amount- ed to only $3,729.95. The financial report for the year fur- ther showed that there was an unex- pended balance amounting to $1,992.- 51. City appropriations totaled $1,- 414.63, and gifts amounted to $10. Fines collected on books that had been lost or injured netted the library $65.- 85. Renting collection brot in $9.40, and flm other sources the library re- ceived $1,061.02, making a total of $4,967.92. Expenditures for the year were di- vided as follows: Books, $93.78; periodicals, $71.00; binding, $1.50; salaries--library service, $600.00, jan- itor work service, $83.47; heat, $2,028.- 73; light, $1.10; furniture and fix- tures, $9.50; repairs and improve- ments. $596.10; stationery and sup- plies, $23.55; postage, express, and freight, $10.45; insurance, $76.77; and care of lawn, $34.00. Total expendi- tures were $3.728.95. Directors for the library now serv- ing, with the year in which their term expires, are: A. L. Moore, 1921; C. J. Stark, 1921; J. M. Snesrud, 1921; Mrs. Cora Scofield, 1922; Mrs. B. R. Karn, 1922; Mrs. C. Zwiener, 1922; Mrs. Wellman, 1923; Dr. R. D. Rifenbark, 1923, and J. J. Purcell, 1923. Mrs. B. R. Karn is president of the board of directors, and Mrs, Corn Scofield is secretary. Library hours during which the pub- lic is invited to come to the library and make use of its facilities are from 3:30 to 5:30 in the afternoon and 7:00 to 9:00 in the evening. The library ia open every day of the week except Sunday, and is also closed on holidays. Masonic Lodges to Have Big Picnic Wednesday Final arrangements for the Masonic picnic which will be held at Foster Beach next Wednesday, July 20, we agreei upon last Sunday when com- mlttees from the various lodges near Traverse and Big Stone lakes met at Foster. According to the announce- ment made by Ortonville representa- tives, it will be the biggest outing that Masonic lodges in this section have undertaken, and a record crowd is ex- pected to be there. The picnic is be- ing given for only members of Ma- sonic lodges and their families. Lodges which will take part are those from Clinton, Graceville, Whea- ten, White Rok, Sisseton, Wilmot, Big Stone City, Milbank, Browns Val- ley, Appleton, and Ortonville. t The program which is intended to 1 fill the day is made up of band music, I group singing, speaking, together with t a big program of water sports and aj baseball gnome. Arrangements have been made with Mr. Douglas, manager and owner of Foster Beach, to lease the grounds for the day. All boats have also been rented, as has the launch, and they will be at the dis- posal of those there at an K time. The program will start in the fore- noon. At noon there will be a picnic dinner. Ice cream and refreshments will be served free during the a. The pavilion at Hartford has also been obtained for the afternoon by the lodges, and the dancing will be free to those attending the picnic Plans are now being considered to have launches make the trip from Or- tonville to Foster, but as yet they have not been completed. Getting Acquainted Right. Three young men from Columbus, Ohio, who made the trip here by car, are going to give Big Stone County the once over in a little different way than most auto tourists. They have hired out to work in the harvest fields, and will be here or a week or two. They are Charles and Edgar Kales of 888 Sullivan Avenue, Columbus*, and Ellis Loudermitk of 8861/2 Sullivan avenue. They started from Columbus three weeks ague, and made a swing into West Virginia and Kentucky be- fore heading west. They intend to go to the coast on leaving here,, and will tour in Yellowstone National park. They camp out and have only ld one restauraut meal during the time hey have been on the road, Loud,r- milk is-chief cook, being especially qua|ailed afte a apprenticeship in the army. S. D. Methodists End Successful Conference With a crowd estimated to number close to 600 Sunday afternoon, the tAbeen District Conference held at e CChautauqua Park July 1 to 10, closed one of the most successful meet- ings in its history. Thruout the ten days there was a daily attendance of from 150 to 200, the meeting set a new mark in this respect. About thirty ministers and their families frav the Aberdeen district of the Methodist church were at the meetings . Speakers of the highest c.libre made the convention a most interesting and instructive gathering. President Sehermerhorn of South Dakota Weslyan was one of the prin- cipal speakers. Dr. Semans of Mit- chell, S. D., gave a series of talks which were of particular merit. He is pastor of the University church at Mitchell. The Sunday afternoon meeting which drew a Crowd of 600 was in charge of Dr. E. D. Kohlstedt of Chi- cago. His address that afternoon was one of the best on the program. As the result of these meetings, and particularly the one Sunday af- ternoon, several young people pledged themselves to mission work which in- cludes life rvice as deaconesses, missionaires, and work in medical ser- vice. Large delegations from Ortonville were in attendance at many of the meetings of the conference. Plans were considered before the close of the conference for the meet- ing which will be held next year at the Chautauqua Park. Officers Named'For Valley Drainage Body New UIm, July 12.--The Board of directors of the Minnesota Valley Harness Stock Complet Lo Insurance adjustors who came here to make an adjustment on the stock of harness and leather.oods belong- ing to F. E. Davidson which was de- stroyed in the fire on the Fourth stated that it was practically a com- plete loss, according to Mr. Davidson. On|ya small part  of the stock was kept from burning, and this wu dam- aged b water and chemical. Two Vacancies to Fill At School Election Schools thruout the county will have their regular annual election next Saturday, July 56. Officers for the coming year will be selected, at thee elections. TWO vacancies brot about by ex- pired terms are to be filled at the local election for the Ortonville school, Dis- tract No. 1. The places held by J. E. Palmer and Wm. Utley are those to be filled. Mr. Palmer who now holds the po- sition of secretary on the Board of Education has consented to run again, and a petition bearing his name has been filed. He has been closely as- sociated with the Ortonville schools since he came here several years ago as superintendent of schools. Mr. Utley has withdrawn and his name will not appear on the ballot He is treasurer of the Board of Edu- cation at the present time. The person who has been named to enter the contest to take the vacancy which will be left by Mr. Utley is R. F. Walke. Mr. Walker is president of the Parents-Teachers association, has taken active part in school work. He is also secretary of the Boy Scout committee. The election will be held at the- usual voting place. The polls will be opened at 7:00 in the evening, and will be open until 9:00 o'clock. LOCAL PARTIES GET 30 DAY JAIL TERM COMMISSIONERS VOTE SOLID TO DIVIDE PRIOR Foster Proposed Name of New Township Which will Be Smaller of Two--Peti- tion Long Considered. Two distinct hips were crea- ted by the county commissioners at the regular session last Monday when they unanimously agreed to grant the petition asking that Prior township be divided. The eastern part will continue to be known as Prior, while Foster was the name selected for tho new division. The hearing on this petition had been postponed from a special meet- ing which was held March 15. 2"lte petition was first presented to the county board February 8. At the March meeting the board heard the arguments of all persons interested in this subject, but postponed further consideration and final decision until the recent meeting. The boundaries of the new town- ship are described in the resolution approving the petition in the follow- mg manner: commencing at the north- east corner of section 1, township 12, north of range 48, west of the fifth principal meridian, running thence due south to the shores of Big Stone lake, thence following the shore of Put In Traverse County Jail for Sell- Big Stone lake in a west and north- ing Moonshine--S50.00 Fine For Each. Telephone reports received here frc Wheaten Thursday forenoon ave out the information that S. C. Kight and Andrew Moes of Orton- ville were arrested there Tuesday af- ternoon for selling moonshine, and sentenced Wednesday afternoon by Judge S. A. Flaherty at Morris to 30 days in the Traverse county jail, aml fined $50 each. According to the report Kight and Moes were on their way to LaMoure, N. D. While travelling along the road between Dumont and Wheaton Tues- day afternoon they met a man who proved to be one of the Traverse coun- ty deputy sheriffs, and offered him moonshine. They were immediately put under arrest and taken to Whea- ten. Wednesday they were arrainged before Judge Flaherty. EigHt quarts of moonshine were found in the car, it is said. Pioneer Settler Visits Here. George B. Coburn of Terrace was in tom last Friday and Saturday calling on some of early pioneer residents. He claims to be the first white settler at Big Stone City, formerly owning the land on which the Canning Factory and the old Big Stone City depot ann other buildings in that part of town are located, coming to this country i the year 1871. He told some interest- ing experiences of the pioneer days. Those were the (lays when Lorenzo Lawrence the Indian Scout, Mr. Mere and Mr. Robert, Frenchmen, Jacob Hurley, Mr. Martell, Mr. Movious, Frank House and others of he pio- neers were here. 78 GRADUATE FROM CO. RURAL SCHOOLS Largest Class Receives Diplomas At Exercises Held At Grand Theatre. Diplomas were presented to 78 westerly course to a point where t  township line between townships 52 and 124 touches the shore of Big Stone lake, thence due east on said township line to the point of beginning at the northeast corner of said section 1, township 123, range 48 of Big Stone county, Minnesota. That part which will continue to be known as Prior township is the larger of the two, it containing 42 full sec- tions and a part of six others. Foster township will have only 24 full town- ships, and the greater part of seven others, together with additional land along the lake shore. LEGION PLANS BIG BOXING CARNIVAL Proposed Match Will Be Staged Here N ddo Eye.agent, Pazk If Possible. Consideration of a Legion carnival boxing match will be the mP0rtant matter which comes before the mem- bers of the local post tonight at one of its regular meetings. The contem- plated match is to be between Kid Hale, a boxer and fighter of long ex- perience, and Gordon Eldred of this place. The proposals for this event was laid down to the two men early this week, and they considered it very fav- orable. Final action will be taken on it at the Legion meeting. Legion posts thruout the state are fast recognizing boxing which was a popular sport with the men in service, as one of the best forms of entertain- ment. Further impetus has been giv- ing the staging of boxing program by Legion posts by State Commander Vernon who strongly urged Legion posts to promote them whenever they had the opportunity. If the plans go thru, Eldred and Hale will give an exhibition in a six- round go. The Legion post will also make an effort to hold the match in the open and the City Park is their first objective. Drainage and. ConServancy district met here late yesterday, organized, discussed their duties and then ad- journed deciding there was nothing to be done until the completion of the survey of the valley, authorized by the recent legislature. The following officers were elected: President, A. B. Kaercher, Ortonville; vice-president, J. P. Graft, New Ulm; secretary, John H. Macbeth, Manka- to; treasurer, S. F. Stryker, LeSueur. graduates of the county rural schools last Monday at the fourteenth annua! Storm Looks Bad But graduation exercises which were held in the Grand theatre here. They were presented by Miss Martha Rothwell, county superintendent of schools. R. B. MacLean, state graded school in- specter, addressed the graduating class. "It is not always what ve can get out of learning that counts the most," said Mr. MacLean, "it is what we put in it." Imagination was an important feature in learning, and persons should put it into both life and work, he said. "The true learner has a high mv- tive, and the higher the motive the better the learning. Learning sool becomes a passion which will carry one thru life." His concluding words to the graduateswere "Possess a soul interesg in hfe, and use every oppor- tunity for service." The board, seeks to solve the flood In the presentation of the diplomas, situation of the Minnesota valley, but Miss Rothwell .aid. that the rural after listening to an address by E. V. I school of Big Stone .county had com- Willard, state commissioner of drain- t leted  most succeMui year, remark- age and waters,  ecided to await the ing that in this county wltich has a smaller population than Traverse,. al- most twice as many pupflsare being graduated from the rural school this year. The program for the exercises was epo of the commission, authorized I o make a surey of the entire Minne-t sota valley by:the last legislature. 1 Adjournment was taken up with no 1 set time for= future gathering. Minneapolis Journal." Mrs: Mr. and C.E. Prevey of Lin- coln; Nebraska, arrived a few days ago by auto for a visit with Mr. Prevey's sister, Mrs. Tkos. Farring- ton. Mr. Prevey was t one tme pro- lessor of Political Economy at the Univeity of Nebraska. Of late he has been affiliated with the Associa- ted Charitiee. opened with an entrance march, "Al- Ia Marcia," " which was played by Miss Edua Shumaker. Mis Shumaker also gav.e a whistling solo, her piece being "Carmena," a Spanish waltz[ ong. Miss Elizabeth Cummens gave[ a vocal solo and responded with an en- core,: Rev. H. B. Adams of Clinton[ gave the invocation and tim benedic-] tion. Lucian Kaercher guve tWo read- ings. Does Little Damage Wind and rain coming in Wednes- day's storm did little damage to crops around here, but played a few pranks. No serious dmago was reported, an4 the storm was rather limited in its extent. North of Ortonville about three miles was the limit in that direction. How far west it extended is not known, but it did not extend much farther than Odessa or Correll to the east and approached Bellingham. At Appleton and Madison there was onW slight rain, while at Clinton there was but little rain and wind. The storm aras as intense at Odessa as it was here, and the wind was of high ve- locity, according to telephone reports Wednesday night. Down on the lake several boats were tossed around and jerked loose from their moorings. The sailboat, belotg- ing to the Orton Brothers and Floyd Schoen  was tipped over on its side, but no damage resulte& A three-htm- dre pound nchor failed to hold the diving tower that was out a ways from the pavilion and it was driven to the foot of the lake near the North Star elevator. The there was a report that crops suffered from the wid, this-was nt as serions as first supposed. Little grain was lodged, and it is thot that that the loss will be but minor: On the Peninsula the Wind hit the cottage beinK built bF Mr, Collins and moved it more than two feet' off++it8 foundation, twisting it a little because it did not rest level. The damage is thot to be slight tko. P I Lightning Hits Flag Pole i " ECCOND GAME On Odd Fellows Building  Annual Report of Ltbrary I Two VacanciesAt Schoolt FillEleetionl JL'IL'IIOOIVLIIIO!PLquMII/EgTi2D | I n,nvwn "' TO -- Gives" I - , - o-" I , I 1,ightnin struck Lhe flagpole on the Schools thtuout the unty will have Facts I VOTE SOLID TO J, llll Od ......... s bui/diag d ........... .n,e,esan, ............................. i i Wednela3 aftelnoon and almt split __ 4t Saturday, July 16. Officers for the APPLETON 19"4 .......... but ,lid .................... THAN ........................................................ be .......... hesel DIVIDE PRIOR OUT FOR HOME USE leading public. Thirty magazines and -- th e building LAST YEAR thi newspapers are kept on file in TWO vacancies brat about by ex i Festa r ].opose d Name o Exhibition of Popular during the strum, and people -- this department oE the fibrarv, pied terms a to be filled at the lace! . By r The financial port election for the Ortonville 'heo], Dis. ew Towflship Which will Ends Chester Fflueger who was More than 7,000 booka belonging to ,pint for the yr show- The ples held by J. E. public library UUey are r working at the Ortonville lee during the past year, eordlng to the Here Next Sunday. lighting tpart for the year ending After it hit the flagpole, he july 1 and issued nt[y by }.lisa -- said, eeme to shq t o f towal the of hooks on hand a total of 312 were I a game that closely approhed cour t a ot t 1era there, thel added during this e time. burlesque being a ribbon of lightning over a hun- Appleton took feet long, The report in general team and satisfactory year of the seo H L A h compares very avorably o isn, a w ys e n  peeedlng year st SUndrY e atoAP wit get;tthle ;aggeth fl ;etat fieXt this .................... the nun,be, "P ' " ows was true in tt of volumes in the library at the be- of the best one-ng sh . Buck, alol g ginningoftbeyearwas2884. During ; was ever tag'ed. be able to teh nothing the year 129 additional books were Ly wh in purchased, whilo IS3 were addl dur the se period hy gift, making an g to $1,237.97. Re- ceipts for the bear amounted t $4,937.92, while expendltur of secretary on the i to only $8,729.9& gain, The financial report for the year fr a petition bearing bn filed, He h bn closely as- pended balan amoanting to $L992.- sociated with the Ortonville 51. City appropriations termed 41463, and gifts aunted to $80.:as sv rintendent of schools Fines collected on ks that had been [ Pe ,. It or injured netted the libry $65.-! Mr. U Icy 85. Renting eolMction bt Jn $9.40, nan e will not appel d hm other sources the library -I He.is ta ur of tt , calved $1,061.02, making a total ofl cation at the present t]m $4 96792 I The person who has been amed to Expenditures for the year were di-I enter the contest to take the vacancy vided as follows" Books $9378" whleh wiR be left by Mr. Utley is R, penmmal is, $100:., b'md''m, $1"50:., F Waiko Mr Walker ; psident, saiarelibraty 'ice $6.00, an- of the parents-Tethers assmtian, 78; light, $110; furniture and fix- Ha isalso secretary of the Boy Scout itor work i $83.47. heat $2028- hm taken active part m school work. tares, $9.5O; pails and improve- commtt. merits $596A0" stationery and sup- The election wiR be hd at the plies, $2%55; postage, exp}ss, and uai voting plv. The polls will be re of la, $34.O0. Total expendl- win be open until 9:00 oeloek. fight, $8O.45 insuran, $76,77; and opened at 70 m the evemng, and a single trace of soclabilit', f'ends, she w fishng n the milH ,aged ever thing They put s,x II The be f e r "n h nstanee] Deducting fm this number b .ss in this frame making their I as sne of the inhabitants aS the which were lost or withdrawn dmla tl The storm subs ed afterl o ' he ea he oa number at the im . jng es. I  ' they did not.do ar)ymg I After me time at the mill poml I the report was given out was 3144,  seventh a.d eighth mmngs I they had nth]ng on their stng but Registration of bowem shmvl y scared four runs m each. bullheads, when their nnknown friend that 2O2 new bm.rowe were gls- teams played goad ball in the! tried his luck with a spear and anded ted dung the year. Eight hundred g part of the go:me. Appleton I a seven poun pike, wh ch he gave tar bowers cards we n force July 1 eaeemtheopenmgmmng, twolher Ths she hadn't ught it she[whentheportwasmade. Onehua being instetal in giving was ust as proud of it as if she had., dd eds for books are now being chance to gister. A couple I ---- [ held by people from the country, the tus were $&728,95. Ps and me errors in the I RN ma orlty of them being new patrn* 1)ictors for the libry now se- LOCAL PARTIES GET ai GIRL RETU S AS  . . owed them an !of the mty hbrary. Thin one tem i expires, are: A. L Moore, 1921; C, $J 30 DAY JA}L TERM LAKE IS DRAGGED considerably gnter th it has 0. ing, with the year in which their te I -- for y of the other years. trk, 192/; J. M, Snesd, 1921; Mrs, put In Trave County Jail for Sell- COla Sfield, 192; Mrs. B. R. Kern, ing Mshin$50.00 Fine Wellman, 1928; Dr. R. D, Rifenbark, 1922; Mrs C Zw ener, 1922; Mrs. Fo r Each 1923 and ff d Pupil 1923 i lel hone  .... , ep pol. received her Mrs. B, R. Kern is psdent of the fr Wheaten Thmsday fonn of dreters, and Mrs, Core ;?ave out the information that S, C. ]{igbt d Andw Moes of Orlon- additional [ f0tville dw throe fi trips in i ett iing, but wan unable tel Men Search Bay Near Hartford Beach i Ciulation statistics gave 5992 as I For Girl Supposed to Have [ the number of volumes of fiction lent .erosty of  jord wh ..... r.n, ot for h ...... dung th ear, l g on he mound for Apgietonl -- lwhile to this ti59 volumes o oo k h t After part es had dragged the bay: [agel as non-fiction were en mak abaed nt esemd- ' ' e wo'V--I '^ en whilel a quarter of a mile south of Hartford] i.g the total n,ben len*. out for hon I board io7:dYr ra' a pns each Wednesday for almost tyo I 0   fi d' c v use equa 7 .. oo e ,sse r. heLg nicked. Tight fielding on hours in search of the body of MI Figures lative to the refinance Library hours during which the pub. Irt of the Appleton players clip- Agnes Spmk, age lt, who was sup- and reading om dilosed the ft lie is invited to come to the libr5 off ever h had posed to have been ded there that the average daily attendance was and make use of its filiti a f y han e as . of the ]ihrary was the ,elected list 0f Sunday, and is also clnsed on holida Xtra o, and they tlmd sometime Monday aftemn, she rode thirty-five a high average for th 8:30 to 5:a0 in the afternoon and 7:0 one n to their edt. up to them in a launch, he.Ant just whole year. to 9:00 in the evening. The libmr e runs were mod by Orlon- come from Bgnan gineral Springs One of the most popular featur is open every day of the week exe e in the fourth inning, MaeMur- where she ha] been since her disap- thefa double and Kelly's single, pearance. h ................ Masonic Lodge, to Have iS. D. MthodisI E.d dI , with by Appi to ]iller, MaeMurphey, and gwie- field a whim ]|onday afteoon and els the plate complaiidng of th e hent sai d sh e w Big Picnic Wednesdayl Successful Conference lf0rth inning Was a nightma g ing down to th lake for a swim. -- OrtnvilM playe. The vie- She wore an old dress that she used Final arrangements for the Maggie With a crowd estimated to numbel ' when she went in swimming Little picnic which will be held at Fastei close to 600 Sunday afternoon, the were swing the bludgeon witl was that of her going to the lake  Beach next Wednesday July go v:vm Cautq park autr 1 to 10 rebuts while in he Sell Or- A een District Confence held al lie hooted the bMl ound with she w a od ivmmer, hut when agreed upon ]t Sday whet. cam. she failed to retn to the house in lnitts from the various lodges nea elapsed one of She most sful rqeet- $ abandon. Appleton collected the evening, her prents, Mr. and M. 'Pravee d Big Stone lakes met at ings in its history. Throat the tar dubles and one single in this Ross Spink who ive about a half mile Foster Aording to the announce sulithe dgamefrc nwit, west of Hartford Beth, began to war I ment made by Ortonvil]e representa- fmdays the150 to was200, ath edailymcetingattendanceset a nel .,fl ix scores resulted from lva that point on the game  ry. tives, it will be the blggest outlng that markinthbs spect. lY a matter of going th move- On Monday they started a areh Mashie Iodg in this section have About thirty ministers and theil ttts in she was stomed to go Not find- c.'d to he there. Tile picnic is be- the Metho(hst chuh wm at t.be | t  nslaught w rumed by Ap- for her, and dragged the hay whe undel%aken, and a record crowd is ex- families from the Aberdeen district ol i Hartfor to help in the ah, ton, White Rok, Siston Wiimat Dakotn Wesiyan w one of the prin the as two innings, ing her, a larger party w organized' ing given for oniy members of Ma. meeting* . Speakers of the hi hesl a varied assorhment of causes, to drag the lake Wayne Kelly, H. A. sonic lodges and their families, elib made the convention a gmnosl ae  which errors and posse were Stueke ' ffohn Gowan, AL Reynolds, Ledge which will take par e hitelsting and instructive gathering ro they sod almost at will V]ll e d Cel Krcher went from he to tho fm Clinton, Grville, When- Presider Sehermerhern of Sour[ tried halX[ each inmng to h tha rgin of fiffenee, but I after had the l Big Stone C ty, Mi[bank Browns Val elpal speakers. Dr. Semans of Mit ttempt them uothing. ws they dragged ba v w th tel>gang hook for almost[ ley Appleton, and Ortonville :cheli, S, D., gave a series of talks agtw F comate d with the offerings only tw'o hours that she made her appear- The progrl which is intended to ] which we of pelt eu a,  me". He is X u r ele hits' d the shoe. fill heday madeupofb muse,[stor of the Umvetslty ehumh at o at* d that they bt auth- Or was a deeh]ed contrast to the Aording to th story which she is I glap singing speaking together withJ Mitchell Iport ed to have told, she walked up a g program of water sports and a The Sunday afternn meeting Which Apgieton hammond the Llte South Dakota Side to Mattson's baseball ga.ne. Arrangements have which drew a crowd of 600 w in giaee whleh was alan* five miles above ben made with Mr. Douglas, manager) charge of Dr, .. D. Kohlstedt of Chi- vy the Ortonville team Hartford" From tlel* she crossed nd owner of Foster Beach, to lease cage. Hls address that afternoon was Mil-Watsn cmbined over t Bonanz& the gronnds far the day. All boats one of the best on the P rogram` h t the uh f the et g ne which will be played .-- have a so been rented,  has e . r o es me in s, They have bn playing New Style Shop R fled launch and they w be a the d ie aud Parttculall' ' tile he Sunday af ,n, and split even eir tba By Thief Monday Nicht I osa or tose there at anx tme. 'i t,:noon, sere,ha yo?ng peoyte y!e  qhe ploglamW'l start "n the fol -I hem ve, am ,s on work wn ch n- -- At on here II be cn'c eludes llfe lvlee as deaconesses, ,oon no w ap,,/ A pair of English shoes, size ti%, dinner Iee cretan and refreshments ,msslonals* d work m medial ser- g the tay. I vice. The pavilion at Hartford has also Large deMgtions from Ortun'dlle New StyM shop Monday night, eu obtained for the afteoon by e in attendance at many of the book azo ; artlees of men's cloth.' th e lodges and the dancing will be meetings of the conference, , r us a mg pl fil )as were consided before the ing valued at haMiy more than $25  to th' e ttend, the 'e , aordlug o E. B Person, pprletor Plans a new being consi(letl to close of the confelence for the mt- ip from Or- [ ins which will be held next year at the to Foster, hut as yet they Chautauq park. Ome this season : team acquainted with. Term  League arrears to serve din- half-year term were the meeting of the Luther held t Alfred Johnn's Tues- g. They we. v.presi in Juhnsen; secretary, Miss the boniness meting gin Plans fur a iohat Ul r League at Cllr ,n :ere&' for Class of Eight. of ght Stone ] that chuh. villa were arrested there Tuesday af- ternoon for selling moohine, mid l aentenced Wednesday afternoon by Judge S. A. Fldaerty at Mois to 8O : days in the Traverse connty jdt, 1 fined $8O each. Aording to the report Kight and Mees were on their way to LaMoure, N. D. While travening along the mad between Dumont d Wheaten Tues day aftenan they met a man who proved to be one of the Trave en- ty deputy sheriffs, and offered him mounshlne. They were immediately put under arrest and taken to Whea- to W*desday they were arranged before Judge Flaherty. Eigfft q of moonshlne m found in the car, it is said. Pioneer Settler Vislt lter George B, Cobum of Terrace was r to It Friday and Saturday ea]Ung on some ef early pioneer sidents. Hs claims to bz the first white ttler at ig Stone City, formerly oing the land on which the Canning Factory and the old Big Stone Cty depot aria , other buildings in that part of t, a ocated. ming to this country it. the year 1871, He told some interest ing experiences of the pionr days. These were the days when Loren twren the Indian Scout, Mr Mere and Mr. Robert, Frenchmen, Jamb Ilurley, blr. Maltell. Mr. Movious, Frank Hou and uthers of he pie nears were he. 78 GRADUATE FROM CO. RURAL SCHOOLS Largest Class Receives Iplomas At Exercises Held At Grand Theory. Diplomas we pntnd to 78 gduates of the county rural schools last Monday at the feurteqnth nual graduation exeises which were hehl in the Grail theatre here They were Be Smaller of Two--Peti- tion Long Considered. Two diaUnet ---ships were crea- ted by the county commiionera at the glar ion last Monday wh \\; they unanimously aged to grant petition asking that prior towlskip be divided. The etern par wilt continue to be known  prior, whilo the nme selected for the The hearing on this petitio h postponed from a special mt- lg which w held March 15, The tition was fit psented to the ounty board February 8. At the Mh meeting the bord heard the argaments of all persons intricated in this subjt, but postponed furtr consideration and final dslou matil the rent meting. The boundaries of the new to- ship are descrlbed in the resolution appro'Ang the petition In the follow- ing manucr: emeneing a the north. et coer of seon 1, township 125, north of rg 48, wet of the frith principal meridi, nning thm due neath to the shams of Big 8tow lake, thence following the shore of Big Stone lake in a west and north- westerly or to a point where tn  toxmshlp lln betwe wnshil l and 124 touches the shore of Big Stoae lake, thence due east ou said wdip llne to the point of beginning at f2a$ northeast eaer of said section 1, township 128, range 48 of Big Stone eoun % M nnota That part which will continue to be kno as Prior townsIMp Js th0 Ige of the two, it containing 42 full vee- tlons and a part ef six others. Foster township will have only 24 ull to- aMps, and the greater part of svea others, together with additional lad ong the lake shore. LEGION PLANS BIG BOXING CARNIVAL Posed Matoh Will Be Staged Here Next idy_ lwg at Paxk II Poible. Cedetlon of a Legion rniwl boxing match will be the rtant matter whidl comes befo the mere. be of the lo post tonight at o of it glar ',eetings. The ontem- , plated mat is to be betweml Kid ale, a boxer d ghter of long ex- perience, d Gordon Eldrsd of thig pl'e. The pposals for this event w laid down to the two men rly thin week and they consider ed it  fav- orable. Fir, a[ tion will be taken on it at the Legion mting. Legion pots throUt the state a ft reognlzing boxing which wa a popuMr sport with the men in service, a8 one of the best fos of entertain- ment. Further impetus has hn giv- ing the staging of boxing program hy Lcglen posgg by State Commder Veon who strongly ged Legio pots to pmote them whenever they had the opportity. If the plans go thlu, Eldred and HaM will give an exhibition in a six- uad go. The Legion post will al ke an effort to hold the mat in the open and the City park i thei fit objective. Storm Looks Bad But Does Little Damage psted by biiss Mrtba Rothwell Wind and rain earning in Wednes+ county superintendent of hoole. R day's storm did little damage to eps I. MacI.ean, state graded school in around he, but played n few prk pMted.  -- OtSlcers  amed For specter, addssed the gradtm Nu serious dmage w ported, and ..... Va e ' Drahie Bad-' oas the storm was rather limited in ibs arm of the law. Getting Acquainted gnt. J  J "It is not always what we e get extent. TKree young m fro Cobu The it a ha m s, New UI Jul 12 The B d of out of learning that counts the most,' North ef Ortonville about thee ........ k .................... Ohein,=hn =adtheBgPthe 7 bY mcat ......  the y 1 ....... Va/te said Mr, M ........ "i ......... p .................... in that dlrectinn. son had taken, wdefinteyknown grog I . n  Drai e and Conerv.cv d'tlt n .,, maginationwesanimpor n How far wos t extended e not that this mr of sh s we  he once ve n a I ttl d'ffe ant way g 1 c p " oe gone o r i  e i i met bel late ,esterda r or anized featu in ea ng, d per o s ou I known, but it dld not extend much e }  g the empty box was oa the {oulll' than most auto tourists They hay liscusd their lut" s a 'd th ad' put it into both life d work, he farther than edema or Coll to the when the tot* was opened Tuesday hired ant to wm'k m the haes t. fllwd, jone d diding there was nothing to said. st aml approhed Belling.h At lag, S t I aheyd all becharle she reran d aEdgarWkKae8 o far sur ., nf the a e.. lauth rzed h.,l tiveThd thel highe ra th e motive the shght rain, while at Clint there wa. n rn ng. ome es were a so m s n wl bo done until the earn etion of the " e t e rner has a h gh m Appleton d Mad/son here was only It is that hat he intder was S88. Sullivan Aven, Columbus, .and the lecent le islature .' ' better the lning. Learning soofi bu little rain and w rid. ,]?he st o *cared befre h hnd c]lected all the E[hs Ludel/k of 886a Salhvan The followgl omeers Wele elated' bmes a passin which 411 enrr3   intense at Odessa  it w t a enue Tbe tarred from Co umbn g hings on hls shopping list. A tray- v . s 2 s 1*siden A B Kacmher 0rtonville: She thru life." His conclnding wools he, and the wind was of higb - riling bag, a pair of ovelalls, and a !he weeks.alo and made a swing v  pident J p Graft' New U m" to the graduateg'we "Possoas a soul ]ocith adiug to tMphone reports t mto West V rnla a d Kentucky be few other hing s wel. piled on the . , n . saty John H. Mbeh Mka ] intes in life, and use every' ppr" Weduesdag nighL counter fore heading west. They intend to g to tasu r S F Sir ke r ueur tunity for service." Do on he ske severe boats we* to the st o learn g he a d w I Y i Entran to the ple w&s gained by .c n n . , n . The boardseeks o solve the fle I In the psentation ef the diplom,i tossed m'ound and jerked lse fnl movlng  pae in one of the be tour ,n Yellowstone National park siation of the Minnesot a voile but! blis s Rothwel i6 that th e ya thei r meorlngs, The ilboat, helnlkg merit windows. He had used a month- They camp out.. a?d haye only #,h after listening to an, addres byYE V s ehool of Bg tone earth had eor- ing to the Orlon B=thers and Floyd organ to serape off the putty, and hi- one resmurau men. uarmg ne , I Wfl ard s ate eomm ss oner of din slctl  most suesal year, marg Sehn wee tipped ov on tie side. h  ha el nthe ad r ,nest sueeeedl n reolfing the gias t ' . v ee r.o . . " age al wate eeided to await the[ ing that in this unty wlch kas a but no damage ulted. A thr.htm- without baking it. The door at th milk. TM ehlef cook, being eselsl y l le rt of th e omraission au horlzed! smaller population than Tra, ab / died pound of, char failed to hold the quahfied aft aa apprentwes]fip n po s t bead of he staivay Ieading up from I to make a ev of the eti Mi e I, me wiee a ny pupils are being diving tower that was ant a ways fra 'he basement bad bh forced al the the army. [ sate valley b'he It legislatu. } gaduated fm the ral school thle ] the pavilion and it was driven to the lock ....... -- I A ............... th n ....... /feot of the lak ..... the Nor,h .... With this robbery, Ed. Pcrsso oak H Stk Ccmplet Lmm. [ Set ti for" a future ga[hering.-- I The program for the eemlSes was ! elevator. he would like t know why they aI I ......... dJcastom wh .... here I Minneapo s J .... " I oened w th ,e eet=" .... h, "AI-} Thn there .,as a eport )at =p. wks ago th tis and ri, to nm ads Mr, and M C E. Prevey of Lin- Miss Edua Shumaker MIss gh@I  ous $ t . LiR] gather with the tls and gcesori of hotness d leather 'oods belg-I eln; Nebrka, nrrlved a few days also gne a whistling 1o, her pie i grain was lodged, and i is thot that westolen fmhiscarwheahewm ing to F.E. Davidn which ws de- ago by auto for a visit with Mr. being "Cabana," a Spish. walt thatthelowiRhebutmin0r: foed to ]ea it outside one Idght. atyed in the tim on the Fourth Py's aistet, Mrs. Tkos. Farrlng ong. Mis Elizabeth Cummens gave On th Peninsu] the wind hit th -- tated that it was prtilly a corn- to Mr. Prevey w et one tne pro- a vl 1o d responded sdth ml on- ttag hdn hmtlt by Me. Colli ad --Adva your o intents by plate I. rdiag to Mr. Davidsu lessor of Politlcad Econy at the  Roy. H. B. Adds nf Cllntov nved it more than two feet off i Impin in 1 to,eft with wiNthg, Only a small !art of the tock was Laiversity of Nebraska. Of If he gve the invocation and the benedie, fan,arian, twisting it a little beeau - workem--The Independent agedkept fmbwatertrlng,and chem|.d ts w dam% hasted tle.been affiliated dth the Asia- ] tton.lnff Lucian Krer gave two read  itthotdktonetbe restslightlel.t2a   i THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, JULY 54, 5921 NUMBER 50 GAME Lightning Hits Flag Pole On Odd Fellows Building TO IAghtning struck the flagpole on the Odd Fellows building during the storm APPLETON 19 4 Wednesday afternoon and almost split = it in two, but did no further damage, and from all indications did not touch Exhibition of Popular the building. It was the loudest crash during the storm., and people from Ends Disastrously many parts of town noted its force. By chance Chester Pflueger who was Ortonville -- G a m e working at the Ortonville Ice Cream Next Sunday. a game that closely approached a burlesque exhibition of the pastime, Appleton took the of the Ortonville team and the second game of the season two teams by a score of 19 to Sunday at Appleton. Close of the sport said the game of the best one-ring shows was ever staged. with the fourth inning, players gave evidence a single trace of sociability, everything. They put six aCross in this frame making their 11. The storm subsided after they did not do anything seventh and eighth innings | they scared four runs in each. played good ball in the of the game. Appleton in the opening inning, two being instrumental in giving a chance to register. A couple passes and move errors in the allowed them an additional runs. drew three free trips in inning, but was unable to , ad six scores resulted from it. that point on the game was a matter of going thru move- generosity of Lillejord who was on the mound for Appleton unabated in the second set- walked four men, while Ortonville player draw a pass nicked. Tight fielding on of the Appleton players clip- off every chance the locals had eXtra scores, and they retired Only.one run to their credit. runs were scored by Orton- m the fourth inning, MacMur- double .and Kelly's single, with errors by Appleton, al- MacMurphey, and Zwie- Cross the plate. fourth inning was a nightmare Ortonville llayers. The vic- swing the bludgeon with lSlts while in the fieltl Or- hooted the ball around with abandon. Appleton collected doubles and one single in this was resumed by Ap- the last two innings, and a varied assortsment of causes, which errors and passes were they scored almost at will. tried hard each inning to the margin of difference', but attempt netted them nothing. ' connected with the offerings only times for clean hits, and these scattered that they brot noth- was a decided contrast to the Appleton hammered the SUnday the Ortonville team Milan-Watson combined ame which will be played They have been playing this season, and split even on their two games Members of the local taken up a more strenuous schedule this week, and have a practice almost every The game Sunday should one, and the teams evenly have been made by of the Ortonville team Grace of Big Stone City twirling for them against Grace has been working for Some this season and let the team down 8-1 in a game Fourth. He has showed fine and his offerings have been hard acquainted with.. League Officers for Coming Term League officers to serve dur- next half-year term, were the meeting of the Luther held at Alfred Johnson's Tues- They were, vice-presi- Johnson; secretary, Miss Johnson; treasurer, Edwin and financial secretary, Rob- Rev. Arnold Nelson.is ex-offido. business meting a pro- Plans for a ioin Luther League at Clan- considered` for Class of Eight. of eight will be confirmed Stone church in Clinton by Rev. S. M. Moe, that church. The services and Butter company saw the lighting strike. After it hit the flagpole, he said, it seemed to shoot off toward the court house or trees near there, there ' being a ribbon of lightning over a hun- dred feet long. Has Good Luck Anyhow. It isn't always the best fisherman who gets the biggest fish, at least this was true in the case of Miss Hazel Buck, a local girl of about twelve who seemed to be able to catch nothing but bullheads the other day when in cmpany with some of her other little friends, she was fishing in the mill pond. The benefactor in this instance was one of the  inhabitants of the "jlngles." After some time at the mill pond hey had nbthing on their string but ullheads, when their unknown friend tried his luck with a spear and landed a seven pound pike, which he gave to her. Tho she hadn't caught it, she was just as proud of it as if she had. GIRL RETURNS AS LAKE IS DRAGGED Men Search Bay Near Hartford Beach For Girl Supposed to Have Drowned. After parties had dragged the bay a quarter of a mile south of Hartford Beach Wednesday for almost two hours in search of the body of Miss Agnes Spank, age 17, who was sup- posed to have been drowned there sometime Monday afternoon, she rode up to them in a launch, having just come from B?nanza Mineral Springs where she haki been since her disap- pearance. Miss Spank had been working in the field a while Monday afternoon and complaining of the heat said she was going down to the lake for a swim. She wore an old dress that she used when she went in swimming. Little was thot of her going to the lake as she was a good swimmer, hut when she failed to return to the house in the evening, her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ross Spank Who live about a half mile west of Hartford Beach, began to wor- ry. On Monday they started a search for her, and dragged the bay where she was accustomed to go. Not find- ing her, a larger party was organized to drag the lake. Wayne Kelly, H. A. Stucke, John Gowan, A1. Reynolds, and Cecil Kaercher went from here to Hartford to help in the search. It was after they had dragged the bay with ten-gang hook for almost two hours that she made her appear- ance. According to the story which she is reported to have told, she walked up the South Dakota Side to Mattson's place which was afou five miles above Hartford. From there she crossed over to Bonanza. New Style Shop Rifled By Thief Monday Night A pair of English shoes, size, 15V, may be the clue which will lead to the arrest of the thief who broke into the New Style shop Monday night, and took various articles of men's cloth- ing valued at hardly more than $25, according to E. B. Persson, proprietor. A viginalt watch will be kept for persons wearing shoes of that size, and suspicious characters equipped with canal boats of those dimensions are liable to run counter to the strong arm of the law. The it was hardly possible to check up the stock to tell how much the ver- son had taken, it was definitely known that this pair of shoes were gone as the empty box was on the counter when the store was opened Tuesday morning. Some ties were also miss- ing. It is thot that the intruder was scared before he had collected all the things on his shopping list. A trav- elling bag, a pair of overalls, and a few other things were piled on the counter. Entrance to the place was gained by removing a pae in one of the base- ment windows. He had used a mouth- organ to scrape off the putty, and al- most succeeded in removing the glass without breaking it. The door at the head of the stairway leading up from he basement had been forced and the lock broken. With this robbery, Ed. Persson said he would like tp know why they all picked him to work on. About stx weeks ago three tires and rims, to- gether with the tools and accessories, were stolen from his car whea'he was Annual Report of Library Gives Interesting Facts MORE THAN 7000 BOOKS TAKEN magazines which are accessible to the OUT FOR HOME USE reading public. Thirty magazines and, the English language. The forced to leave it outside one night, the class are Emery John- Anderson, Orville Hox- Advanee your own interests by Martinson, Elmer Nel- keeping in los t0ucfi With ng, Nelson, Evelyn Oleon and tireless workers--The Independent Want Ads. LAST YEAR. More than 7,000 books belonging to Public library were lent for home use during the past year, according to the statistical report for the year ending July 1 and issued recently by Miss of books on hand a total of 312 were added during this same time. The report in general shows a most satisfactory year for the library, and compares very favorably with any preceeding year. According to the report the number of volumes in the library at the be- ginning of the year was 2884. During the year 129 additional books were purchased, while 183 were added dur- the same period by gift, making an aggregate increase of 312 volumes. Deducting from this number, 52 which were lost or withdrawn during the year, the total number at the time the report was given out was 3144. Registration of borrowers showed that 202 new borrowers were regis- tered during the year. Eight hundred borrowers cards were in force July 1 when the report was made. One hun- dred cards for books are now beir,g held by people from the country, the majority of them being new patrons of the city library. This one item is considerably greater than it has been for any of the other years. Circulation statistics gave 5892 as the number of volumes of fiction lent out for home use during the year, while to this 1159 volumes of books classed as non-fiction were lent, mak- ing the total number lent out for home use equal 7051. Figures relative to the reference and reading room disclosed the fact that the average daily attendance was thirty-five, a high average for the whole year. One of the most popular features of the library was the s:elected list #f three newspapers are kept on file in this department of the library. The financial report which was in- cluded in the report for the year show- ed that the library now has a balance on hand amounting to $1,237.97. Re- ceipts for the year amounted to $4,937.92, while expenditures amount- ed to only $3,729.95. The financial report for the year fur- ther showed that there was an unex- pended balance amounting to $1,992.- 51. City appropriations totaled $1,- 414.63, and gifts amounted to $10. Fines collected on books that had been lost or injured netted the library $65.- 85. Renting collection brot in $9.40, and flm other sources the library re- ceived $1,061.02, making a total of $4,967.92. Expenditures for the year were di- vided as follows: Books, $93.78; periodicals, $71.00; binding, $1.50; salaries--library service, $600.00, jan- itor work service, $83.47; heat, $2,028.- 73; light, $1.10; furniture and fix- tures, $9.50; repairs and improve- ments. $596.10; stationery and sup- plies, $23.55; postage, express, and freight, $10.45; insurance, $76.77; and care of lawn, $34.00. Total expendi- tures were $3.728.95. Directors for the library now serv- ing, with the year in which their term expires, are: A. L. Moore, 1921; C. J. Stark, 1921; J. M. Snesrud, 1921; Mrs. Cora Scofield, 1922; Mrs. B. R. Karn, 1922; Mrs. C. Zwiener, 1922; Mrs. Wellman, 1923; Dr. R. D. Rifenbark, 1923, and J. J. Purcell, 1923. Mrs. B. R. Karn is president of the board of directors, and Mrs, Corn Scofield is secretary. Library hours during which the pub- lic is invited to come to the library and make use of its facilities are from 3:30 to 5:30 in the afternoon and 7:00 to 9:00 in the evening. The library ia open every day of the week except Sunday, and is also closed on holidays. Masonic Lodges to Have Big Picnic Wednesday Final arrangements for the Masonic picnic which will be held at Foster Beach next Wednesday, July 20, we agreei upon last Sunday when com- mlttees from the various lodges near Traverse and Big Stone lakes met at Foster. According to the announce- ment made by Ortonville representa- tives, it will be the biggest outing that Masonic lodges in this section have undertaken, and a record crowd is ex- pected to be there. The picnic is be- ing given for only members of Ma- sonic lodges and their families. Lodges which will take part are those from Clinton, Graceville, Whea- ten, White Rok, Sisseton, Wilmot, Big Stone City, Milbank, Browns Val- ley, Appleton, and Ortonville. t The program which is intended to 1 fill the day is made up of band music, I group singing, speaking, together with t a big program of water sports and aj baseball gnome. Arrangements have been made with Mr. Douglas, manager and owner of Foster Beach, to lease the grounds for the day. All boats have also been rented, as has the launch, and they will be at the dis- posal of those there at an K time. The program will start in the fore- noon. At noon there will be a picnic dinner. Ice cream and refreshments will be served free during the a. The pavilion at Hartford has also been obtained for the afternoon by the lodges, and the dancing will be free to those attending the picnic Plans are now being considered to have launches make the trip from Or- tonville to Foster, but as yet they have not been completed. Getting Acquainted Right. Three young men from Columbus, Ohio, who made the trip here by car, are going to give Big Stone County the once over in a little different way than most auto tourists. They have hired out to work in the harvest fields, and will be here or a week or two. They are Charles and Edgar Kales of 888 Sullivan Avenue, Columbus*, and Ellis Loudermitk of 8861/2 Sullivan avenue. They started from Columbus three weeks ague, and made a swing into West Virginia and Kentucky be- fore heading west. They intend to go to the coast on leaving here,, and will tour in Yellowstone National park. They camp out and have only ld one restauraut meal during the time hey have been on the road, Loud,r- milk is-chief cook, being especially qua|ailed afte a apprenticeship in the army. S. D. Methodists End Successful Conference With a crowd estimated to number close to 600 Sunday afternoon, the tAbeen District Conference held at e CChautauqua Park July 1 to 10, closed one of the most successful meet- ings in its history. Thruout the ten days there was a daily attendance of from 150 to 200, the meeting set a new mark in this respect. About thirty ministers and their families frav the Aberdeen district of the Methodist church were at the meetings . Speakers of the highest c.libre made the convention a most interesting and instructive gathering. President Sehermerhorn of South Dakota Weslyan was one of the prin- cipal speakers. Dr. Semans of Mit- chell, S. D., gave a series of talks which were of particular merit. He is pastor of the University church at Mitchell. The Sunday afternoon meeting which drew a Crowd of 600 was in charge of Dr. E. D. Kohlstedt of Chi- cago. His address that afternoon was one of the best on the program. As the result of these meetings, and particularly the one Sunday af- ternoon, several young people pledged themselves to mission work which in- cludes life rvice as deaconesses, missionaires, and work in medical ser- vice. Large delegations from Ortonville were in attendance at many of the meetings of the conference. Plans were considered before the close of the conference for the meet- ing which will be held next year at the Chautauqua Park. Officers Named'For Valley Drainage Body New UIm, July 12.--The Board of directors of the Minnesota Valley Harness Stock Complet Lo Insurance adjustors who came here to make an adjustment on the stock of harness and leather.oods belong- ing to F. E. Davidson which was de- stroyed in the fire on the Fourth stated that it was practically a com- plete loss, according to Mr. Davidson. On|ya small part  of the stock was kept from burning, and this wu dam- aged b water and chemical. Two Vacancies to Fill At School Election Schools thruout the county will have their regular annual election next Saturday, July 56. Officers for the coming year will be selected, at thee elections. TWO vacancies brot about by ex- pired terms are to be filled at the local election for the Ortonville school, Dis- tract No. 1. The places held by J. E. Palmer and Wm. Utley are those to be filled. Mr. Palmer who now holds the po- sition of secretary on the Board of Education has consented to run again, and a petition bearing his name has been filed. He has been closely as- sociated with the Ortonville schools since he came here several years ago as superintendent of schools. Mr. Utley has withdrawn and his name will not appear on the ballot He is treasurer of the Board of Edu- cation at the present time. The person who has been named to enter the contest to take the vacancy which will be left by Mr. Utley is R. F. Walke. Mr. Walker is president of the Parents-Teachers association, has taken active part in school work. He is also secretary of the Boy Scout committee. The election will be held at the- usual voting place. The polls will be opened at 7:00 in the evening, and will be open until 9:00 o'clock. LOCAL PARTIES GET 30 DAY JAIL TERM COMMISSIONERS VOTE SOLID TO DIVIDE PRIOR Foster Proposed Name of New Township Which will Be Smaller of Two--Peti- tion Long Considered. Two distinct hips were crea- ted by the county commissioners at the regular session last Monday when they unanimously agreed to grant the petition asking that Prior township be divided. The eastern part will continue to be known as Prior, while Foster was the name selected for tho new division. The hearing on this petition had been postponed from a special meet- ing which was held March 15. 2"lte petition was first presented to the county board February 8. At the March meeting the board heard the arguments of all persons interested in this subject, but postponed further consideration and final decision until the recent meeting. The boundaries of the new town- ship are described in the resolution approving the petition in the follow- mg manner: commencing at the north- east corner of section 1, township 12, north of range 48, west of the fifth principal meridian, running thence due south to the shores of Big Stone lake, thence following the shore of Put In Traverse County Jail for Sell- Big Stone lake in a west and north- ing Moonshine--S50.00 Fine For Each. Telephone reports received here frc Wheaten Thursday forenoon ave out the information that S. C. Kight and Andrew Moes of Orton- ville were arrested there Tuesday af- ternoon for selling moonshine, and sentenced Wednesday afternoon by Judge S. A. Flaherty at Morris to 30 days in the Traverse county jail, aml fined $50 each. According to the report Kight and Moes were on their way to LaMoure, N. D. While travelling along the road between Dumont and Wheaton Tues- day afternoon they met a man who proved to be one of the Traverse coun- ty deputy sheriffs, and offered him moonshine. They were immediately put under arrest and taken to Whea- ten. Wednesday they were arrainged before Judge Flaherty. EigHt quarts of moonshine were found in the car, it is said. Pioneer Settler Visits Here. George B. Coburn of Terrace was in tom last Friday and Saturday calling on some of early pioneer residents. He claims to be the first white settler at Big Stone City, formerly owning the land on which the Canning Factory and the old Big Stone City depot ann other buildings in that part of town are located, coming to this country i the year 1871. He told some interest- ing experiences of the pioneer days. Those were the (lays when Lorenzo Lawrence the Indian Scout, Mr. Mere and Mr. Robert, Frenchmen, Jacob Hurley, Mr. Martell, Mr. Movious, Frank House and others of he pio- neers were here. 78 GRADUATE FROM CO. RURAL SCHOOLS Largest Class Receives Diplomas At Exercises Held At Grand Theatre. Diplomas were presented to 78 westerly course to a point where t  township line between townships 52 and 124 touches the shore of Big Stone lake, thence due east on said township line to the point of beginning at the northeast corner of said section 1, township 123, range 48 of Big Stone county, Minnesota. That part which will continue to be known as Prior township is the larger of the two, it containing 42 full sec- tions and a part of six others. Foster township will have only 24 full town- ships, and the greater part of seven others, together with additional land along the lake shore. LEGION PLANS BIG BOXING CARNIVAL Proposed Match Will Be Staged Here N ddo Eye.agent, Pazk If Possible. Consideration of a Legion carnival boxing match will be the mP0rtant matter which comes before the mem- bers of the local post tonight at one of its regular meetings. The contem- plated match is to be between Kid Hale, a boxer and fighter of long ex- perience, and Gordon Eldred of this place. The proposals for this event was laid down to the two men early this week, and they considered it very fav- orable. Final action will be taken on it at the Legion meeting. Legion posts thruout the state are fast recognizing boxing which was a popular sport with the men in service, as one of the best forms of entertain- ment. Further impetus has been giv- ing the staging of boxing program by Legion posts by State Commander Vernon who strongly urged Legion posts to promote them whenever they had the opportunity. If the plans go thru, Eldred and Hale will give an exhibition in a six- round go. The Legion post will also make an effort to hold the match in the open and the City Park is their first objective. Drainage and. ConServancy district met here late yesterday, organized, discussed their duties and then ad- journed deciding there was nothing to be done until the completion of the survey of the valley, authorized by the recent legislature. The following officers were elected: President, A. B. Kaercher, Ortonville; vice-president, J. P. Graft, New Ulm; secretary, John H. Macbeth, Manka- to; treasurer, S. F. Stryker, LeSueur. graduates of the county rural schools last Monday at the fourteenth annua! Storm Looks Bad But graduation exercises which were held in the Grand theatre here. They were presented by Miss Martha Rothwell, county superintendent of schools. R. B. MacLean, state graded school in- specter, addressed the graduating class. "It is not always what ve can get out of learning that counts the most," said Mr. MacLean, "it is what we put in it." Imagination was an important feature in learning, and persons should put it into both life and work, he said. "The true learner has a high mv- tive, and the higher the motive the better the learning. Learning sool becomes a passion which will carry one thru life." His concluding words to the graduateswere "Possess a soul interesg in hfe, and use every oppor- tunity for service." The board, seeks to solve the flood In the presentation of the diplomas, situation of the Minnesota valley, but Miss Rothwell .aid. that the rural after listening to an address by E. V. I school of Big Stone .county had com- Willard, state commissioner of drain- t leted  most succeMui year, remark- age and waters,  ecided to await the ing that in this county wltich has a smaller population than Traverse,. al- most twice as many pupflsare being graduated from the rural school this year. The program for the exercises was epo of the commission, authorized I o make a surey of the entire Minne-t sota valley by:the last legislature. 1 Adjournment was taken up with no 1 set time for= future gathering. Minneapolis Journal." Mrs: Mr. and C.E. Prevey of Lin- coln; Nebraska, arrived a few days ago by auto for a visit with Mr. Prevey's sister, Mrs. Tkos. Farring- ton. Mr. Prevey was t one tme pro- lessor of Political Economy at the Univeity of Nebraska. Of late he has been affiliated with the Associa- ted Charitiee. opened with an entrance march, "Al- Ia Marcia," " which was played by Miss Edua Shumaker. Mis Shumaker also gav.e a whistling solo, her piece being "Carmena," a Spanish waltz[ ong. Miss Elizabeth Cummens gave[ a vocal solo and responded with an en- core,: Rev. H. B. Adams of Clinton[ gave the invocation and tim benedic-] tion. Lucian Kaercher guve tWo read- ings. Does Little Damage Wind and rain coming in Wednes- day's storm did little damage to crops around here, but played a few pranks. No serious dmago was reported, an4 the storm was rather limited in its extent. North of Ortonville about three miles was the limit in that direction. How far west it extended is not known, but it did not extend much farther than Odessa or Correll to the east and approached Bellingham. At Appleton and Madison there was onW slight rain, while at Clinton there was but little rain and wind. The storm aras as intense at Odessa as it was here, and the wind was of high ve- locity, according to telephone reports Wednesday night. Down on the lake several boats were tossed around and jerked loose from their moorings. The sailboat, belotg- ing to the Orton Brothers and Floyd Schoen  was tipped over on its side, but no damage resulte& A three-htm- dre pound nchor failed to hold the diving tower that was out a ways from the pavilion and it was driven to the foot of the lake near the North Star elevator. The there was a report that crops suffered from the wid, this-was nt as serions as first supposed. Little grain was lodged, and it is thot that that the loss will be but minor: On the Peninsula the Wind hit the cottage beinK built bF Mr, Collins and moved it more than two feet' off++it8 foundation, twisting it a little because it did not rest level. The damage is thot to be slight tko.