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July 14, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
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July 14, 1921
 

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JULY 14, 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE I 0rtonviile Independent EVERY THURSDAY by the Farrs &amp; Merchants Printing Co. President Harris, Vice-president L. F,. Lundgren, Secretar.y ._._Walter Dinnel|, Treasurer BOARD OF DIRECTORS 8. Halls John Kaercher Witte Walter Dinnell Qlson L.E. Lundgren Grace F. Kaercher A. B. Kaercher Kaercher . Managing Editor Erickson . Associate Editor as second-class matter 18, 1920, at the post office at Minn., under the Act of 3, 1879 $2.00 PER YEAR Rates o Application Advertising Representative ,[ICAN PRESS ASSOCIATION 1 STONE LAKE--ITS NEED. of people over the United are reading the luring litera- the vacational offerings Ten Thousand Lakes are swarming to North- as a result. On every there are exclamations of as- at the picturesqueness and. of the state's seendT. of new wealth into the Can be attributed aolely to the efforts of the various clubs and booster organi, of the cities of Northern Min- thru The Ten Thousand Lakes' this great state is being for its beauty and Noi%hern is being lauded as the play- Lof the great middle west, Big eke, one oT the greatest, if not scenic lake in the state, is ssed-up unnoticed, unheralded. it is not being adver- The only way that it gets its before the touring public is by of outh from someone who has to be here Advertising and alone has effectively dem- its worth to those of the part of our state and there rcely a hamlet but what i. reap- harvest and they will continue for years to come. Lake should and can be the mecca for vacationists from Iowa, all of South Dakota Minnesota and the greater North Dakota without the ex- of enormous .;ums--for t nis lust naturally belongs to it. no question but wha': hun- from these sections are fivcking Minnesota. two hundred miles from its " n there are fully a half infl.m Wha percentage of these summer at lake resorts, we say. Doubtless there are thou- How many from the twin do we see camping at Big Stone Mighty few as compared with sections of the state and all be- of an erroneous idea they hae, of information. They are of {that is the largest share that Big Stone Lake is a Watering hole out in the "desert of the state," with no trees it, no fish in it--nothing but a of alkali water with cow tracks its shores, and they will remain opinion until the people of this resort owners and together in a united educate them of the true Big Stone Lake. Then, and will it receive its share of trade. ith A COMMON RIGHT. Practically all the great no- resources of the country in the .of a few enormously rich men in fee simple or Jy mortgages never be paid under prescott it must be apparent to the asual observer that something done at once to prevent the of the last vestige of free-. self government and the es- of a nobility and aristo- oa one hand and serfs and slaves - Other. control of any great natural re- lust not be turned over to in- that they may exploit the and clamp on the screws of op- and extortion at will. If been done in any instance the People have been robbed of right and must see to it is returned.- the enormous wealth pourin. natural resources into the a few, they are able to con- and tyranically all the other financial institutions, of interest that in effect bring about a new systen tuch no one in debt and into which all will be dragged. VEGETABLES. elements are inorganic ma OUr bodies are organic. Sic.c." matter can consume and take only other organi we can actually uc they must be converted forms. Oxygen and hy .ay be taken together as wa- Is a mixture of the element and nitrogen chiefly, and i B nixture form that they enter Sugar is a combination o ..... and hydrogen; so is to remember isthat the elements practically always enter the body in combination. They are ob- tained from the soil, air, and water by bacteria and plants. The bacteria and plants make them ready for our use by combining them into their bodies. Bacteria in the soil take the nitrogen into their bodies, and release it into the soil. It then mingles with the wa- ter in the soil, and i that form is used by the plant. Certain bacteria form nodules in the roots o certain plants, principally beans, pear, and i clover, and give nitrogen from their bodies,  directly to the plants. These plants, legumes, they are called, f,lr- nish one of the large sources by which )ur bodies are supplied with nitrogez Nitrogen is not the only element which is combined by bacteria and plants. The same is true of all other elements. They come into the body of the plant in solution with water, and are converted into the plant sub- stance by a process and assimilation which is very similar to that which goes on in our own bodies. So you see our real food is built up from ele- ments, before we eat it. The elements go into the part of the plant which we eat. Some plants contain a larger pro- portion of one element than they do of others. For instance, onions and cabbage contain much sulphur; tdeans and peas contain a large amount of nitrogen; beets and beet greens con- tain phosphorus, magnesium and cal- cium; lettuce is rich in ohosphorus and calcium. All fruits and vege- tables are important in the diet, be- cause of the large amounts of ele- ments they contain in the form of salts and watelT juices. In planning the diet it is always well to arrange a. combination in which as many as possible of theelements will be pres- ent, Vegetables which supply nitro- gen, iron, sulphur, and phosphorous, Should be mixed plentifully with a diet of starches and fats. Animals which live on plants often are better able to get a combination of elements in their bodies than we are. They eat more extensively of the green plants which are rich in nitro- gen, calcium and numerous other ele- ,ments. The meat of these animals! often supplies us with just the ele- ments we are most in need of. Since we are certain to obtain com- binations of elements in greeu, un- cooked vegetables, and since elements are the things out of which our bodies are made, we should eat plentifully of fresh vegetables.--Minnesota Public Health Association. WHY SHOULD A RETAILER ADVERTISE ? Replying to this question, one might ask" why should a retailer open his front door? Really, why should a re- tailer go into business if he does not intend to advertise ? Why should a /retailer attempt to go into aorekeep- ing if he does not intend for the public to know he is in business and what he has tsell ? Same retailers think of letting the public know when they have some spe- cial bargains in goods that have been carried a long time and are somewhat shelf worn and are out of date and must be disposed of. It is then a big splurge is made and new clerks are added for a few days and big sales are enjoyed for a short time and when it is all over a rest is taken from the unusual ten days' atsk. But old easy days are on again and trade has re- sumed its normal, dull routine. The merchant is content to turn over his merchandise about twice a year and advertise only to get rid of goods that are slow sale. The idea is gained that advertising is essential only when something has grown stale and un- salable by the usual efforts. It is then that advertising is put to the hardest test and if it fails it is condemned as being a useless and unproductive sales feature. This is like advertising only when business is dull, thus giving advertis- ing an unfair test. Successful mer- chants do not wait until business 4s dull to advertise. They keep their ad- vertising going during the brisk sea- son that there may not be any dull periods. They carry a given number of clerks but the ycan not wrap up merchandise until folks come in and buy and they are not supposed to use the telephone to bring in trade. We have for a long time heard the adage: "Keep your name before the public." And this is why so many names are seen on the roadside fences. Yes, and they put names on tomb- stones and keep them there a long time. But they do not create trade. If the name is kept before the pub- lic in connection with real for-sure salesmanship merchandising so that the public will think more of'your store and the goods you have for sale than of your mere name, then some- thing is accomplished. Keep your name before the public but hitch it up with your merchandise and the service to be had in your store and the good val- ues you have to offer and the pleasure to be enjoyed while in your place. Then there is profit in so keeping your name before the people. Put sales talk in your advertising talk the same as you put in your sales conversation and you will bring the public into your store. Unless advertising is egarded as a part of the sales effort it is not being used to its best advantage and fullest effort.--Business Chat. --There is no time to be lost--read The Independent Want Ads now. TRi led in bytoastin00 WILL HELP WOMEN SOLVE HOME PROBLEMS Three important appointments con- nected with the state university's ex- tension work with women were an- nounced today from the office at Uni verity Farm, of Miss Julia O. Neton, state leader of home demon- stration agents: Sylvia I. Richardson was appointed urban home demonstration agent at Duluth, beginning July 15. Miss Richardson has had three years ex- perience in this work in a Michigan county. Mildred L. Wood will be urban home demonstration agent for St Paul, be- ;inning August 15. She was for two rears a home demonstration agent in an Iowa county and one year urban agent in the city of Fort Dodge. Beginning July 7, Miss Nora Hott ,= U will serve Waseca county as demon-: stration agent. Hiss Hott as had' three years experience in the work in E Montana. She is the first agent for X Waseca eounty _:___  g "Trade At Home" Proves Best. Gust Halberg says he has found out L that it pays to do business at home. He was offered So2.00 for a steer the r / other day by a local butcher but he paid $40.00 for the critter last fall and had filled him up regularly with per-  E fectly good corn all winter he did not think that enough so shipped him to South St. Paul. He was paid three dollars a hundred for him there and JUST TH.INK ! A LIBERTY BELL FREE OF CHARGE. This bank wants every boy and girl of this city to have one of these unique home safes. They will help you save your dimes and nickles. Open a Savings Account today and get a Liberty Bell Bank. 5 PER lENT PAID ON ALL SAVINGS ORTONVILLE STATE BANK John Carlson, President. C. J. Stark, Cashier. H.A. Stucke, Ass't. Cashier. the net returns amounted to $19.68. ----- "Neer again," says Gust.--Wheatn i MINNEAPOLIS g Gazette-Reporter. The Northwest' s Largest and Most Beautiful Host, ly All Rmm. are Out,id, and Each Room ha. Prlvata Bath Congress is talking of appropriating  TARIFF: $i,000,000,000 to open trade with Eu- 75 Rooms (Private Baths) Single at $2.00--Double $3 00 rope, but it has actually appropri-  325 Rooms (Private Baths)Singleat$2.50--Double $350 ! ated $800,000,000 to open war. - 200 Rooms (Private Baths)Single at $3 00--Double $4.00 Others from $4.00 to $15.00 l @llllllliillHlllllmHIIIIllmlilllllmllllillllllllllllllllllllllmmHllllllllH00l/ If its anything "Mechanical" and you think it cannot be done--take it to Hall's No shop in this sec- tion so complete in m echanicai equip- ment or manned by more expert mechan- ics. A. S. HALLS Ortonville "F " , mllllHIIIIIIIIIIIMMIlflflflfllllllgl Examine the Tread on This Tire rubber closes instantly and" bars the entrance of pand, ,water or off. The twin-grip design serves a two-fold purpose. The tire roUs on the center rib as easily as a bl bearing. The sharp angled wedges give protection against side-slip. .Ask about the economy of The tread of a tire is the first line of defense against bad rid- ing and rough roads. The tread must hold its own against all road surface to insure easy and safe travel. Kokomo treads are remark- ablytough. Sharp stones, nails, pieces of glass donot penetrate Kokomo treads. If anabrasion complete Kokomo equipment is the elastic, for city or country driving. made, live, tread- J tl r M tth w[" & C " Ar m a e ompany Lumber Prices Are Down to such a low point, that to either hope or wait for a lower price would be unreasonable.. Right now there exists a real opportunity to save by buying, as prices are bound to advance when building activities make their demand felt. H&ne building costs are not anything like as high as you think. Lumber is cheaper than we ever expected to see it, or ever expect to see it agaim Let us show you may pictures and plans of modern homes that we have gathered for yor benefit. If you " -'+ u... own your qwn tome, you really owe i to yourself to talk the matter of bililding costs over with experienced au- thorities. We have made a close study of all practical and eco- nomical uses to which the material we sell can be put. We can be real helpful in showing you how to "cut according to your cloth," and our best advice and assistance is yours for the ask- ing, and we don't expect you to feel under any obligations to us either. , " ,11RES00oIl00GES .. t' ,, ..... ..  ',i  _,. ....... ' . Geier Lumber Company tPemember 16ur 6:mndmother,.r Cow.eriChlie? - ....... -- How she prized it? And how she used it for it out o. What would she have thought of a copper washtub? Probably that it was toO ood to be true. But it isn'tl 00lu0000ird .ELeCTRiC CLOTHES has a 3 foot copper tub--gleaming outside, perfectly smooth inside, that oscillates and washes clothes abso- lutely clean, and quicker than you would have thought possible. BlueBird has only one kind of tub--copper. And copper was chosen because it wears long, retains heat, never rusts or acts chemically on the clothes and is as easy to clean as a china plate. Because it is the best! Every feature of BlueBird is just as wonderful as the j tulx See it today. Call at the store, or phone and arrange for .A Free Demonstration m your home. Learn what BlueBird wash- hour will mean to you. J. D. Ross & Company Ortonviile, Minn. . , ., " JULY 14, 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE I 0rtonviile Independent EVERY THURSDAY by the Farrs & Merchants Printing Co. President Harris, Vice-president L. F,. Lundgren, Secretar.y ._._Walter Dinnel|, Treasurer BOARD OF DIRECTORS 8. Halls John Kaercher Witte Walter Dinnell Qlson L.E. Lundgren Grace F. Kaercher A. B. Kaercher Kaercher . Managing Editor Erickson . Associate Editor as second-class matter 18, 1920, at the post office at Minn., under the Act of 3, 1879 $2.00 PER YEAR Rates o Application Advertising Representative ,[ICAN PRESS ASSOCIATION 1 STONE LAKE--ITS NEED. of people over the United are reading the luring litera- the vacational offerings Ten Thousand Lakes are swarming to North- as a result. On every there are exclamations of as- at the picturesqueness and. of the state's seendT. of new wealth into the Can be attributed aolely to the efforts of the various clubs and booster organi, of the cities of Northern Min- thru The Ten Thousand Lakes' this great state is being for its beauty and Noi%hern is being lauded as the play- Lof the great middle west, Big eke, one oT the greatest, if not scenic lake in the state, is ssed-up unnoticed, unheralded. it is not being adver- The only way that it gets its before the touring public is by of outh from someone who has to be here Advertising and alone has effectively dem- its worth to those of the part of our state and there rcely a hamlet but what i. reap- harvest and they will continue for years to come. Lake should and can be the mecca for vacationists from Iowa, all of South Dakota Minnesota and the greater North Dakota without the ex- of enormous .;ums--for t nis lust naturally belongs to it. no question but wha': hun- from these sections are fivcking Minnesota. two hundred miles from its " n there are fully a half infl.m Wha percentage of these summer at lake resorts, we say. Doubtless there are thou- How many from the twin do we see camping at Big Stone Mighty few as compared with sections of the state and all be- of an erroneous idea they hae, of information. They are of {that is the largest share that Big Stone Lake is a Watering hole out in the "desert of the state," with no trees it, no fish in it--nothing but a of alkali water with cow tracks its shores, and they will remain opinion until the people of this resort owners and together in a united educate them of the true Big Stone Lake. Then, and will it receive its share of trade. ith A COMMON RIGHT. Practically all the great no- resources of the country in the .of a few enormously rich men in fee simple or Jy mortgages never be paid under prescott it must be apparent to the asual observer that something done at once to prevent the of the last vestige of free-. self government and the es- of a nobility and aristo- oa one hand and serfs and slaves - Other. control of any great natural re- lust not be turned over to in- that they may exploit the and clamp on the screws of op- and extortion at will. If been done in any instance the People have been robbed of right and must see to it is returned.- the enormous wealth pourin. natural resources into the a few, they are able to con- and tyranically all the other financial institutions, of interest that in effect bring about a new systen tuch no one in debt and into which all will be dragged. VEGETABLES. elements are inorganic ma OUr bodies are organic. Sic.c." matter can consume and take only other organi we can actually uc they must be converted forms. Oxygen and hy .ay be taken together as wa- Is a mixture of the element and nitrogen chiefly, and i B nixture form that they enter Sugar is a combination o ..... and hydrogen; so is to remember isthat the elements practically always enter the body in combination. They are ob- tained from the soil, air, and water by bacteria and plants. The bacteria and plants make them ready for our use by combining them into their bodies. Bacteria in the soil take the nitrogen into their bodies, and release it into the soil. It then mingles with the wa- ter in the soil, and i that form is used by the plant. Certain bacteria form nodules in the roots o certain plants, principally beans, pear, and i clover, and give nitrogen from their bodies,  directly to the plants. These plants, legumes, they are called, f,lr- nish one of the large sources by which )ur bodies are supplied with nitrogez Nitrogen is not the only element which is combined by bacteria and plants. The same is true of all other elements. They come into the body of the plant in solution with water, and are converted into the plant sub- stance by a process and assimilation which is very similar to that which goes on in our own bodies. So you see our real food is built up from ele- ments, before we eat it. The elements go into the part of the plant which we eat. Some plants contain a larger pro- portion of one element than they do of others. For instance, onions and cabbage contain much sulphur; tdeans and peas contain a large amount of nitrogen; beets and beet greens con- tain phosphorus, magnesium and cal- cium; lettuce is rich in ohosphorus and calcium. All fruits and vege- tables are important in the diet, be- cause of the large amounts of ele- ments they contain in the form of salts and watelT juices. In planning the diet it is always well to arrange a. combination in which as many as possible of theelements will be pres- ent, Vegetables which supply nitro- gen, iron, sulphur, and phosphorous, Should be mixed plentifully with a diet of starches and fats. Animals which live on plants often are better able to get a combination of elements in their bodies than we are. They eat more extensively of the green plants which are rich in nitro- gen, calcium and numerous other ele- ,ments. The meat of these animals! often supplies us with just the ele- ments we are most in need of. Since we are certain to obtain com- binations of elements in greeu, un- cooked vegetables, and since elements are the things out of which our bodies are made, we should eat plentifully of fresh vegetables.--Minnesota Public Health Association. WHY SHOULD A RETAILER ADVERTISE ? Replying to this question, one might ask" why should a retailer open his front door? Really, why should a re- tailer go into business if he does not intend to advertise ? Why should a /retailer attempt to go into aorekeep- ing if he does not intend for the public to know he is in business and what he has tsell ? Same retailers think of letting the public know when they have some spe- cial bargains in goods that have been carried a long time and are somewhat shelf worn and are out of date and must be disposed of. It is then a big splurge is made and new clerks are added for a few days and big sales are enjoyed for a short time and when it is all over a rest is taken from the unusual ten days' atsk. But old easy days are on again and trade has re- sumed its normal, dull routine. The merchant is content to turn over his merchandise about twice a year and advertise only to get rid of goods that are slow sale. The idea is gained that advertising is essential only when something has grown stale and un- salable by the usual efforts. It is then that advertising is put to the hardest test and if it fails it is condemned as being a useless and unproductive sales feature. This is like advertising only when business is dull, thus giving advertis- ing an unfair test. Successful mer- chants do not wait until business 4s dull to advertise. They keep their ad- vertising going during the brisk sea- son that there may not be any dull periods. They carry a given number of clerks but the ycan not wrap up merchandise until folks come in and buy and they are not supposed to use the telephone to bring in trade. We have for a long time heard the adage: "Keep your name before the public." And this is why so many names are seen on the roadside fences. Yes, and they put names on tomb- stones and keep them there a long time. But they do not create trade. If the name is kept before the pub- lic in connection with real for-sure salesmanship merchandising so that the public will think more of'your store and the goods you have for sale than of your mere name, then some- thing is accomplished. Keep your name before the public but hitch it up with your merchandise and the service to be had in your store and the good val- ues you have to offer and the pleasure to be enjoyed while in your place. Then there is profit in so keeping your name before the people. Put sales talk in your advertising talk the same as you put in your sales conversation and you will bring the public into your store. Unless advertising is egarded as a part of the sales effort it is not being used to its best advantage and fullest effort.--Business Chat. --There is no time to be lost--read The Independent Want Ads now. TRi led in bytoastin00 WILL HELP WOMEN SOLVE HOME PROBLEMS Three important appointments con- nected with the state university's ex- tension work with women were an- nounced today from the office at Uni verity Farm, of Miss Julia O. Neton, state leader of home demon- stration agents: Sylvia I. Richardson was appointed urban home demonstration agent at Duluth, beginning July 15. Miss Richardson has had three years ex- perience in this work in a Michigan county. Mildred L. Wood will be urban home demonstration agent for St Paul, be- ;inning August 15. She was for two rears a home demonstration agent in an Iowa county and one year urban agent in the city of Fort Dodge. Beginning July 7, Miss Nora Hott ,= U will serve Waseca county as demon-: stration agent. Hiss Hott as had' three years experience in the work in E Montana. She is the first agent for X Waseca eounty _:___  g "Trade At Home" Proves Best. Gust Halberg says he has found out L that it pays to do business at home. He was offered So2.00 for a steer the r / other day by a local butcher but he paid $40.00 for the critter last fall and had filled him up regularly with per-  E fectly good corn all winter he did not think that enough so shipped him to South St. Paul. He was paid three dollars a hundred for him there and JUST TH.INK ! A LIBERTY BELL FREE OF CHARGE. This bank wants every boy and girl of this city to have one of these unique home safes. They will help you save your dimes and nickles. Open a Savings Account today and get a Liberty Bell Bank. 5 PER lENT PAID ON ALL SAVINGS ORTONVILLE STATE BANK John Carlson, President. C. J. Stark, Cashier. H.A. Stucke, Ass't. Cashier. the net returns amounted to $19.68. ----- "Neer again," says Gust.--Wheatn i MINNEAPOLIS g Gazette-Reporter. The Northwest' s Largest and Most Beautiful Host, ly All Rmm. are Out,id, and Each Room ha. Prlvata Bath Congress is talking of appropriating  TARIFF: $i,000,000,000 to open trade with Eu- 75 Rooms (Private Baths) Single at $2.00--Double $3 00 rope, but it has actually appropri-  325 Rooms (Private Baths)Singleat$2.50--Double $350 ! ated $800,000,000 to open war. - 200 Rooms (Private Baths)Single at $3 00--Double $4.00 Others from $4.00 to $15.00 l @llllllliiMiiimmlllllmlilllllmllllMilllllllllMlllmmmHiimM/ If its anything "Mechanical" and you think it cannot be done--take it to Hall's No shop in this sec- tion so complete in m echanicai equip- ment or manned by more expert mechan- ics. A. S. HALLS Ortonville "F " , mllllHIIIIIIIIIIIMMIlflflflfllllllgl Examine the Tread on This Tire rubber closes instantly and" bars the entrance of pand, ,water or off. The twin-grip design serves a two-fold purpose. The tire roUs on the center rib as easily as a bl bearing. The sharp angled wedges give protection against side-slip. .Ask about the economy of The tread of a tire is the first line of defense against bad rid- ing and rough roads. The tread must hold its own against all road surface to insure easy and safe travel. Kokomo treads are remark- ablytough. Sharp stones, nails, pieces of glass donot penetrate Kokomo treads. If anabrasion complete Kokomo equipment is the elastic, for city or country driving. made, live, tread- J tl r M tth w[" & C " Ar m a e ompany Lumber Prices Are Down to such a low point, that to either hope or wait for a lower price would be unreasonable.. Right now there exists a real opportunity to save by buying, as prices are bound to advance when building activities make their demand felt. H&ne building costs are not anything like as high as you think. Lumber is cheaper than we ever expected to see it, or ever expect to see it agaim Let us show you may pictures and plans of modern homes that we have gathered for yor benefit. If you " -'+ u... own your qwn tome, you really owe i to yourself to talk the matter of bililding costs over with experienced au- thorities. We have made a close study of all practical and eco- nomical uses to which the material we sell can be put. We can be real helpful in showing you how to "cut according to your cloth," and our best advice and assistance is yours for the ask- ing, and we don't expect you to feel under any obligations to us either. , " ,11RES00oIl00GES .. t' ,, ..... ..  ',i  _,. ....... ' . Geier Lumber Company tPemember 16ur 6:mndmother,.r Cow.eriChlie? - ....... -- How she prized it? And how she used it for it out o. What would she have thought of a copper washtub? Probably that it was toO ood to be true. But it isn'tl 00lu0000ird .ELeCTRiC CLOTHES has a 3 foot copper tub--gleaming outside, perfectly smooth inside, that oscillates and washes clothes abso- lutely clean, and quicker than you would have thought possible. BlueBird has only one kind of tub--copper. And copper was chosen because it wears long, retains heat, never rusts or acts chemically on the clothes and is as easy to clean as a china plate. Because it is the best! Every feature of BlueBird is just as wonderful as the j tulx See it today. Call at the store, or phone and arrange for .A Free Demonstration m your home. Learn what BlueBird wash- hour will mean to you. J. D. Ross & Company Ortonviile, Minn. . , ., " 14, 1921 THE ORTOIWILLE IND]P]TD:EF PAGE e 0rtonviBe Independent EVERY by the Vice-prodder L. F Ltmdgr S'retay Walter lunen, Treaeur ]0ARD OF DIRECTOR John Kaercher . Walter DJell L, E. Lundgr Grace F. Kaercher A. B. Kaeher . Maltghlg Editor ]tekmtt Actate the post office at der the Act of 187 AppIletlon 8TON E LAKe-IT S NEED. over the leading the luring liter On ecew o as- ,iotuueness aria ;nto the attributed Bolely to the efforts of the vmdous ,gM- a of the eiti of Northern Min- thin The Ten Tlund Lakes' gt state  I,eing beauty and Nottra lake in the state, is unnoticed, herdeL not being adver- Te only way that it gets its before the touring public is by of ,mOuth from ed to be he. Advmisig a,,d ;y dem- its worth to those of the our state and the all of South Dakota, Minneta and te gloater ly belo,,gs to tw o hundred mile fm I the  fully a Wha pertage f these e summer at lake ol't, we Doubtless How tlons of the state and all be- of an eonus idea they have, :k of information, They a o Ithat s the largest slate Big Stone Lake / a hole oat in the "desert elemenb8 prtilly always enter the body in mblnation. They are oh- . talned from the soil, air, and water by bacteria  plate. The btoa and plants make them ready for our r combining them into their bedim, and release theil, It then mingles wth tar in the soil, and i that fo is used by the plan Certain bacteria #ants, principally beans, pear, and clover, and #re nltmgen bodies; directly to the plants. plants, leffnes, they are elll, f,]r- Nit.gun is is eombined by plants. element. They come into the b,ly plant in lution with water, e pla.t uU- by a pmss and cry similar goes n Jn our oa bodies, So you see our aI food is built up from e:e- ments, before we eat it, The elements go into the prt of the plant which Son plants eontaln a larger pz- portion of one ement than they d of others. For itanee, uens and bbage contain much sulphur; s and ps contain a large nitgen; beets and beet gns con- taia phosphors, magnesium d eaT- ei; lettuce is rich in uhospho and ealei. All fruits  ,d vege tab are mpertant in the det, be- of ale they contain in the salts and watelT Jui In planning the diet it i always wail a eombltion in Vegetabl which supply nltm- iron, svJphur, and phosphorous, Should be mixed pltifully Anima which llve on plants until ten days' atsk. But old easy days a on again and trade has its noa[ dull mntn T.he ntent to tu over his a yea d adverte only to get rid of goods that gained that advertising is esntiaZ only when something h gwn stale and - salable by the usUal efforts. that adveriehg is put to the hardest tt and if it fls it is ndemned as being This is like advertising only when Ls,  is du, thus giving advertis- ing an unfair test. Seesful mar- do not wait until business is ertl . They kp their ad vertising going durmg the bek sea- son the tho may not he any dull periods. They carry a Sfv nnber of clerks but the yn not wrap up mehandiee tfl folks me ill and buy and they s not supposed to use, the telephone to bring n trade, i We have for a long tlme he the adage: "Keep your ae befo the public." And this is why so aay names am seen on the adsde f*ns. Yes, and they put s on ste and keep them the a long But the salesmahip the public will think more of'yo store and the gocs you have for sale tha of your me name, then some. thing is mplished. Kp your name befo the public but hitch it up wltl your merchdlae sad the iee to be had in your store and the good val- ad the pleasure to be enjoyed while n your place. Then the is profit in so keeping your me befn the people. Put your advertising put in you will bnng the public into your ste g is egarded  a effo it is not bein advantage and fullest than we a, effort. Business Chat. T]eY eat m extensively of the The is no time--'-------- be lost--read ium md numerous other ale- green plants which are rich in nitro- The Independent Want Ad now The meat of these animals -- supplies us with just the Since we a certain to vegetables, the thing are made, we should eat plentifully of fsh vegetabI,--Mb,nota Public Health Asslation. k hy  open hs WHy HILD A RETAiLeR ADVERTISE? Repy to th uesto one ght Reay, h: she a  gu nto he f he doe ot to adverhe? Why hud a /etme ttampt to go to orek ng f he does ot nted for the pbe has e? S rtaerthnk of ettg the y hae aome s ered a oug te ad are eoebt and are out of date and Ravor|s mut be dispoed of. It is then a big"  by bgi enjoyed ............ over i of te state," with t, no fl in itnothiug but a alkali water wth ow tracks shos, and they wll remab until the people of this eueate them of the true Rig Then, and A COMMON RIGHT. Ptaetieally all the gat the country in the 0f a few enormously I. fee simple or 6y mortgages be paid uder psent it mut be appat to the a nobility one hand and serfs and slaves 0thor. they may at a been done in a, People have retued.- pourln a few, they yd SOLVE with women A LIBERTY BELL FREE OF CHARGE. This bank wants today fm the ofli al Unl verity Fm, of Miss Julia 0 every boy and girl of this city o have one of these unique Newton. state le )J home safes. They wi][ hetp you save your dimes d station agents: " ninkles. Open a Savhgs Aount today d ge a Liberty Be]I Bank. urb home demotration agent al 5 PERCENT PAID ON ALL SAVINGS Duluth, beginning July 15. Mis has had thee yea ex. .......  .......... ORTONVILLE STATE BANK county. $n Carton, Pideat. demonstration agent for S Paul, be. C.J. tar Chle. H. A, Sluek, AI. Caler, ginning Auglt 15. She was for tw ye a home demonstration agent ir I!1111 IM an Iowa county and one ye urba at n the etty of ro .og MJiglmlllH..jiIilllllmmUlllfll$1111mlflllmgllfHiiiil Beginning July 7, Miss NO Hott  t- ]I e Wa unty as demon-  N station ugent Hiss Hurt ban had tht yea experience in the work ir "  R Montan She is the first agent fo m X C v Waseea enty. "Trade At Home" pv BeM. gg  L I CO Gust Halberg say other day by filled him up ffalarly With pe  Souh ........ . ........... = i ghe rtis otel dolla a htmdred for IO*k STRBZT AT IURTH AVNI "Neer again," s;  HJNNEAPOLIS Gazette-Reporter.  Th Northwut's Largest a'nd Mo#BwtlHol tl,OOO,ooo,0oo to open trade with Eu-  ( TARIP: --- 75 Rma Private Baths) Singh at $2,00--Double $3.00 rope, but i has tlly approprl- I 325 Rma (Prile Bathe) Single at $2.50--Db[e $3,$0 200 Rms Pvat Baths) Sln le at fd CO-Doubl $4.00 ted $800,000,00 to open '. " i Otht m $4, to $1&00 If its anything "Mechanical" and you think it cannot be done--take it to Hall's No shop in this sec- tion so complete in mech'a nica] equip- ment or manned by more expert mechan- ics, A, S. HALLS OrtonviHe --.====''O'''B*''B''W--. m ................ Examine the Tread on This Tire rubber closes instantly and  bars the ntatme ofnd, atsr or oil.. t vp des'serves a tWO-fOl llrpose. The tire rolls on thecenier rib as eas a a b bearlng. Tba amp angled wedges give promctlon against side-slip. The tsead of a fire/$ the firet line of defame against bad rid- fog and rough roads, The head must hold its own against all road surface to insure easy and safe travel, Kokomo treads ave remark- ablytough. Sharp Stone,nails, pieces of glass do not penetrate Ask about the economy of t bring about a new ssle, KokoDIo treads. If an abrasion complete Kokorno" equipment y from  hJch no one i, deil 18 made, the elatlc, live, trad- for city or country drivmgo to whioh al be dragged. .. J. Arthur Matthews & Company .' nenta  inorganic  bties a organle. SIC, lnttter  nse d tak   at*hstance only other orgni befo we can 'tualIy us< ts they must be converte e fos. Oxygen d hy be taken together  wa a miXt of the elementy td nitgen chiefly, and il -!: . " lxtur tom ttmt th .... , ,rIR$AND ! Sugar is a ombuation o, ,,h, ' " .... .:.-.'-_,.::. "" . -":'-:: MMlllfllllllllUIlllmllMIIIIIHIIglgllMIIglMIglllmBBI Lumber Prices Are Down to sh a low point, that to either hope or wait for a lower price would be asonabe Right now the exists a real opportunity to sa by buayuing prices a bound to advan wh buildzg aetiti.s make their demand fell Hohr blldng cost8 a not hlng Hk  high  ou thlnl Lumber is cheaper thm we ev expected to see it, or er expt to e it agai Let us show you my pictures ar plmeas of mern homes that we have gathered for your bmefiK If you dn't o you o Eu hvme, you reIly o  to Foulllf to talk the ttee of hfilding costa over w[h experind au- thorfie We have made close study of a]] practical d ee nomil us to wMeb the material  sell  be put. We  be al helpful n showing yon how to "cut aeeordhg to yo cloth," ld our best ad and asistan is you f the k- ing, d we don't expect you to fl under g oblifio to either. Geier Lumber Company How she prized it? And how she used it for yar$ and years? And brought it out only on special qccasios? What would abe have thought of s copper washtub? Probably that it WaS tOO ood tO be true, Ut it isn't[ mc Q.OI"HI WA, has a 2 foot copper tub--gleaming ots/de, perfect emOoth inIde, that osculates and washe clothes abo- Iotely c]e/tn, ind qnjclr th4Erl For s Wttl l thOUg pomdbl. ]B[ueBiz hm only one Iod or'tub--copper, Aca:] oppe WlS chosen bccluse it welrl log+ rig ht, tv rm or stz chemic4y on  the lothm and is u euy to cle=n as a chiva plat Because it is the bestl Kve feature of BlueBird Is t as wonderful as the the mtore, or phon and sn'ge for .A Free lmlfion Lem wht BlueBird wash.  hour will n to you, . J. D. Ross & Company Ortonville, Milm.  ? JULY 14, 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE I 0rtonviile Independent EVERY THURSDAY by the Farrs & Merchants Printing Co. President Harris, Vice-president L. F,. Lundgren, Secretar.y ._._Walter Dinnel|, Treasurer BOARD OF DIRECTORS 8. Halls John Kaercher Witte Walter Dinnell Qlson L.E. Lundgren Grace F. Kaercher A. B. Kaercher Kaercher . Managing Editor Erickson . Associate Editor as second-class matter 18, 1920, at the post office at Minn., under the Act of 3, 1879 $2.00 PER YEAR Rates o Application Advertising Representative ,[ICAN PRESS ASSOCIATION 1 STONE LAKE--ITS NEED. of people over the United are reading the luring litera- the vacational offerings Ten Thousand Lakes are swarming to North- as a result. On every there are exclamations of as- at the picturesqueness and. of the state's seendT. of new wealth into the Can be attributed aolely to the efforts of the various clubs and booster organi, of the cities of Northern Min- thru The Ten Thousand Lakes' this great state is being for its beauty and Noi%hern is being lauded as the play- Lof the great middle west, Big eke, one oT the greatest, if not scenic lake in the state, is ssed-up unnoticed, unheralded. it is not being adver- The only way that it gets its before the touring public is by of outh from someone who has to be here Advertising and alone has effectively dem- its worth to those of the part of our state and there rcely a hamlet but what i. reap- harvest and they will continue for years to come. Lake should and can be the mecca for vacationists from Iowa, all of South Dakota Minnesota and the greater North Dakota without the ex- of enormous .;ums--for t nis lust naturally belongs to it. no question but wha': hun- from these sections are fivcking Minnesota. two hundred miles from its " n there are fully a half infl.m Wha percentage of these summer at lake resorts, we say. Doubtless there are thou- How many from the twin do we see camping at Big Stone Mighty few as compared with sections of the state and all be- of an erroneous idea they hae, of information. They are of {that is the largest share that Big Stone Lake is a Watering hole out in the "desert of the state," with no trees it, no fish in it--nothing but a of alkali water with cow tracks its shores, and they will remain opinion until the people of this resort owners and together in a united educate them of the true Big Stone Lake. Then, and will it receive its share of trade. ith A COMMON RIGHT. Practically all the great no- resources of the country in the .of a few enormously rich men in fee simple or Jy mortgages never be paid under prescott it must be apparent to the asual observer that something done at once to prevent the of the last vestige of free-. self government and the es- of a nobility and aristo- oa one hand and serfs and slaves - Other. control of any great natural re- lust not be turned over to in- that they may exploit the and clamp on the screws of op- and extortion at will. If been done in any instance the People have been robbed of right and must see to it is returned.- the enormous wealth pourin. natural resources into the a few, they are able to con- and tyranically all the other financial institutions, of interest that in effect bring about a new systen tuch no one in debt and into which all will be dragged. VEGETABLES. elements are inorganic ma OUr bodies are organic. Sic.c." matter can consume and take only other organi we can actually uc they must be converted forms. Oxygen and hy .ay be taken together as wa- Is a mixture of the element and nitrogen chiefly, and i B nixture form that they enter Sugar is a combination o ..... and hydrogen; so is to remember isthat the elements practically always enter the body in combination. They are ob- tained from the soil, air, and water by bacteria and plants. The bacteria and plants make them ready for our use by combining them into their bodies. Bacteria in the soil take the nitrogen into their bodies, and release it into the soil. It then mingles with the wa- ter in the soil, and i that form is used by the plant. Certain bacteria form nodules in the roots o certain plants, principally beans, pear, and i clover, and give nitrogen from their bodies,  directly to the plants. These plants, legumes, they are called, f,lr- nish one of the large sources by which )ur bodies are supplied with nitrogez Nitrogen is not the only element which is combined by bacteria and plants. The same is true of all other elements. They come into the body of the plant in solution with water, and are converted into the plant sub- stance by a process and assimilation which is very similar to that which goes on in our own bodies. So you see our real food is built up from ele- ments, before we eat it. The elements go into the part of the plant which we eat. Some plants contain a larger pro- portion of one element than they do of others. For instance, onions and cabbage contain much sulphur; tdeans and peas contain a large amount of nitrogen; beets and beet greens con- tain phosphorus, magnesium and cal- cium; lettuce is rich in ohosphorus and calcium. All fruits and vege- tables are important in the diet, be- cause of the large amounts of ele- ments they contain in the form of salts and watelT juices. In planning the diet it is always well to arrange a. combination in which as many as possible of theelements will be pres- ent, Vegetables which supply nitro- gen, iron, sulphur, and phosphorous, Should be mixed plentifully with a diet of starches and fats. Animals which live on plants often are better able to get a combination of elements in their bodies than we are. They eat more extensively of the green plants which are rich in nitro- gen, calcium and numerous other ele- ,ments. The meat of these animals! often supplies us with just the ele- ments we are most in need of. Since we are certain to obtain com- binations of elements in greeu, un- cooked vegetables, and since elements are the things out of which our bodies are made, we should eat plentifully of fresh vegetables.--Minnesota Public Health Association. WHY SHOULD A RETAILER ADVERTISE ? Replying to this question, one might ask" why should a retailer open his front door? Really, why should a re- tailer go into business if he does not intend to advertise ? Why should a /retailer attempt to go into aorekeep- ing if he does not intend for the public to know he is in business and what he has tsell ? Same retailers think of letting the public know when they have some spe- cial bargains in goods that have been carried a long time and are somewhat shelf worn and are out of date and must be disposed of. It is then a big splurge is made and new clerks are added for a few days and big sales are enjoyed for a short time and when it is all over a rest is taken from the unusual ten days' atsk. But old easy days are on again and trade has re- sumed its normal, dull routine. The merchant is content to turn over his merchandise about twice a year and advertise only to get rid of goods that are slow sale. The idea is gained that advertising is essential only when something has grown stale and un- salable by the usual efforts. It is then that advertising is put to the hardest test and if it fails it is condemned as being a useless and unproductive sales feature. This is like advertising only when business is dull, thus giving advertis- ing an unfair test. Successful mer- chants do not wait until business 4s dull to advertise. They keep their ad- vertising going during the brisk sea- son that there may not be any dull periods. They carry a given number of clerks but the ycan not wrap up merchandise until folks come in and buy and they are not supposed to use the telephone to bring in trade. We have for a long time heard the adage: "Keep your name before the public." And this is why so many names are seen on the roadside fences. Yes, and they put names on tomb- stones and keep them there a long time. But they do not create trade. If the name is kept before the pub- lic in connection with real for-sure salesmanship merchandising so that the public will think more of'your store and the goods you have for sale than of your mere name, then some- thing is accomplished. Keep your name before the public but hitch it up with your merchandise and the service to be had in your store and the good val- ues you have to offer and the pleasure to be enjoyed while in your place. Then there is profit in so keeping your name before the people. Put sales talk in your advertising talk the same as you put in your sales conversation and you will bring the public into your store. Unless advertising is egarded as a part of the sales effort it is not being used to its best advantage and fullest effort.--Business Chat. --There is no time to be lost--read The Independent Want Ads now. TRi led in bytoastin00 WILL HELP WOMEN SOLVE HOME PROBLEMS Three important appointments con- nected with the state university's ex- tension work with women were an- nounced today from the office at Uni verity Farm, of Miss Julia O. Neton, state leader of home demon- stration agents: Sylvia I. Richardson was appointed urban home demonstration agent at Duluth, beginning July 15. Miss Richardson has had three years ex- perience in this work in a Michigan county. Mildred L. Wood will be urban home demonstration agent for St Paul, be- ;inning August 15. She was for two rears a home demonstration agent in an Iowa county and one year urban agent in the city of Fort Dodge. Beginning July 7, Miss Nora Hott ,= U will serve Waseca county as demon-: stration agent. Hiss Hott as had' three years experience in the work in E Montana. She is the first agent for X Waseca eounty _:___  g "Trade At Home" Proves Best. Gust Halberg says he has found out L that it pays to do business at home. He was offered So2.00 for a steer the r / other day by a local butcher but he paid $40.00 for the critter last fall and had filled him up regularly with per-  E fectly good corn all winter he did not think that enough so shipped him to South St. Paul. He was paid three dollars a hundred for him there and JUST TH.INK ! A LIBERTY BELL FREE OF CHARGE. This bank wants every boy and girl of this city to have one of these unique home safes. They will help you save your dimes and nickles. Open a Savings Account today and get a Liberty Bell Bank. 5 PER lENT PAID ON ALL SAVINGS ORTONVILLE STATE BANK John Carlson, President. C. J. Stark, Cashier. H.A. Stucke, Ass't. Cashier. the net returns amounted to $19.68. ----- "Neer again," says Gust.--Wheatn i MINNEAPOLIS g Gazette-Reporter. The Northwest' s Largest and Most Beautiful Host, ly All Rmm. are Out,id, and Each Room ha. Prlvata Bath Congress is talking of appropriating  TARIFF: $i,000,000,000 to open trade with Eu- 75 Rooms (Private Baths) Single at $2.00--Double $3 00 rope, but it has actually appropri-  325 Rooms (Private Baths)Singleat$2.50--Double $350 ! ated $800,000,000 to open war. - 200 Rooms (Private Baths)Single at $3 00--Double $4.00 Others from $4.00 to $15.00 l @llllllliillHlllllmHIIIIllmlilllllmllllillllllllllllllllllllllmmHllllllllH00l/ If its anything "Mechanical" and you think it cannot be done--take it to Hall's No shop in this sec- tion so complete in m echanicai equip- ment or manned by more expert mechan- ics. A. S. HALLS Ortonville "F " , mllllHIIIIIIIIIIIMMIlflflflfllllllgl Examine the Tread on This Tire rubber closes instantly and" bars the entrance of pand, ,water or off. The twin-grip design serves a two-fold purpose. The tire roUs on the center rib as easily as a bl bearing. The sharp angled wedges give protection against side-slip. .Ask about the economy of The tread of a tire is the first line of defense against bad rid- ing and rough roads. The tread must hold its own against all road surface to insure easy and safe travel. Kokomo treads are remark- ablytough. Sharp stones, nails, pieces of glass donot penetrate Kokomo treads. If anabrasion complete Kokomo equipment is the elastic, for city or country driving. made, live, tread- J tl r M tth w[" & C " Ar m a e ompany Lumber Prices Are Down to such a low point, that to either hope or wait for a lower price would be unreasonable.. Right now there exists a real opportunity to save by buying, as prices are bound to advance when building activities make their demand felt. H&ne building costs are not anything like as high as you think. Lumber is cheaper than we ever expected to see it, or ever expect to see it agaim Let us show you may pictures and plans of modern homes that we have gathered for yor benefit. If you " -'+ u... own your qwn tome, you really owe i to yourself to talk the matter of bililding costs over with experienced au- thorities. We have made a close study of all practical and eco- nomical uses to which the material we sell can be put. We can be real helpful in showing you how to "cut according to your cloth," and our best advice and assistance is yours for the ask- ing, and we don't expect you to feel under any obligations to us either. , " ,11RES00oIl00GES .. t' ,, ..... ..  ',i  _,. ....... ' . Geier Lumber Company tPemember 16ur 6:mndmother,.r Cow.eriChlie? - ....... -- How she prized it? And how she used it for it out o. What would she have thought of a copper washtub? Probably that it was toO ood to be true. But it isn'tl 00lu0000ird .ELeCTRiC CLOTHES has a 3 foot copper tub--gleaming outside, perfectly smooth inside, that oscillates and washes clothes abso- lutely clean, and quicker than you would have thought possible. BlueBird has only one kind of tub--copper. And copper was chosen because it wears long, retains heat, never rusts or acts chemically on the clothes and is as easy to clean as a china plate. Because it is the best! Every feature of BlueBird is just as wonderful as the j tulx See it today. Call at the store, or phone and arrange for .A Free Demonstration m your home. Learn what BlueBird wash- hour will mean to you. J. D. Ross & Company Ortonviile, Minn. . , ., "