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torial comment at Ortonville attended , the National Classroom in held June 14th. k long stay. Jenny lad Dayton in his with whom she is side photo. rs Jenny had the were Ralph Nader Candidate), Dr. (CIA), General Reserve), The de Stacy Harrison retary of State), g.an (ND), and The me Olsen (Peace able to tour the apiLol Building, m, the Vietnam atk,nal Cemetery, assy, Smithsonian Jefferson, Lincoln, Var Memorials. "owl prospects rosy for 2003 rated by the U.S Estimated ponds in the northcentral that has I:en in decline for several Service (USFWS) U.S. and prairie region of Canada decades. "Pintails returned to south- good news coming regions of Service its annual Duck and Habitat swath of.the )rding to South Fis and Parks ;t Spencer Vaa, this :ire inventory con- 1, Covering an area Montana north- prairies, park- forest, which in Alaska. rea stretches from on the west to the s ifi the east," Vaa iking aspect of this ret rn of water to tchewan Onally the heart of are I of Canada has SeVere drought for .. tell the story. almost doubled compared to last year and are now above the long-term average. "The total duck population in the traditional survey area was estimated at more than 36 million ducks, 16 per- cent above last year's estimate of 31 million," Vaa said. Of special note to South Dakota duck hunters is the mallard count. Vaa noted that the type of duck hunting season framework South Dakota receives is predicated on two criteria: The number of mallards surveyed in the traditional survey area, including the states of Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan, and the number of ponds from the prairie regions of Canada. "Both numbers are favorable this year, so prospects look good for a repeat of the type of seasons we have experienced in recent years," Vaa noted. Another item of interest from this year's survey is the rebound in the population status of pintails, a species Ur web site at www.ortonvilleindependent.com | = an tlnlt of the I I /11 I 49 I 62. Account of incidents or events 63. Rank 64. Unhappily 65. __ Blyton, children's author Clues DOWN I. Ancient German 2. Entranceway 3. Single, or Indian 3-5- t T-- P, - ,'i- l 7" ..... IIIIIIII 2 13 3, 3i IIIIIIII 3 4 5, 53 4. Social system devel- 41. Military disguise oped in Europe in the 43. Playing fields 8th century 44. Pleasantly 5. Names 45. Anesthetic 6. Hired 46. Green algae corn- 7. Barbarians men in freshwater 8. Japanese waist pouch lakes 9. Plant organ 47. On the up and up, 10. Muslim calendar slang month 48. French river .. .... ?m i [--] Z- 29. Vestment worn by priests 31. Indicate pain or discomfort 32. Musical interval of two semitones 33. Afrikaans 34. Goidelic language of Ireland 35. These (old English) 37: Phone company .11. A place of assembly 49. Person of for the people in exceptional holiness ancient Greece 51. A short syllable 12. Plateaus (poetry) 13. A sharp narrow ridge 52. Dry found in rugged 53. Breed mountains 21. Seizing one 22. Hair on the head 25. George --, --4---q- American ' ' * ' _+-_._+. utopian *-[21 26. Allege i.,  i  I 27. Gulls ll II 28. Bullfrog, IT1,, ,--1- for one iT1-+-+,,, ' 2003 =- --+-.--4- i !tHI --+-- iv lVl t I| ,,] | g g A I| ! 14 1 0 I id =1 ern Alberta and Saskatchewan in large numbers in response to the improved wetland habitat, but whether they will be successful in recruiting young will greatly depend upon the amount of grassland habitat available on the landscape," Vaa said. "Undisturbed grasslands in the form of pastures, hayland, native prairie, fall seeded cereal grains, such as winter wheat, and Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) cover, along with wetlands, are the key to healthy waterfowl popula- tions." Canada geese are also surveyed during May by the USFWS, and South Dakota's population of resident giant Canada geese increased from 89,000 in 2002 to an estimated 130,000 in 2003. According to Vaa, " the Department has an active goose damage management program that prevents and responds to goose depre- dation, and hunters have the opportu- nity to harvest resident Canada start- ing in early September in certain parts of eastern South Dakota." Logan Jacobsen Student of Year at BSC School Logan Jacobsen was recen'tly named a student of the semester for the second semester and Big Stone City School. He was also named Student of the Year, and was presented a $50 savings bond from the American Legion at the graduation ceremony on May 21, 2003. Logan is the 14 year-old son of Brent and Dorla Jacobsen of rural Clinton. In school, Logan is involved in band, oral interpretation, and basketball. He is a member of New Life Community Baptist Church in Ortonville, and is involved with trail building at Bonanza Educational Center. Hobbies that Logan enjoys include: camping, hunting, fishing, trapping, hiking and reading. Logan's favorite classes in school are math and speech His role model is his father, Brent. Logan also enjoys helping his grandmother. After graduation from high school, Logan plans to attend college. ONCE AGAIN... MANY THANKS Recent new and renewal sub- scribers to The Independent which we gratefully acknowledge with thanks for your loyalty: Peter Hansen Olga Frost Lee Guse Connie Newman Ronald Krogsrud Barry Long Walter Maatz Dorothy Tiliman David Lundell Verna Stoehr Mrs. Gary Alberts Gerald Adeiman Stan Rensberger Roger Johnson Victor Stolpman Mrs. Roger Lunde Curt Rothi Stanley Mack Tom Karels Dorothy Rygajlo Anne Peterson Dale Kiitzke Bud Kiitzke @2003 Rochtrr post.Bulletin Co, LLC. Ed Fischer Syndic=re fist her@ potbulllin,om l Extension report Donna Geisir Regional Extension Educator 4-H Youth Development East Ottertail County New York Mills,Mn 56567 218/383-3000 COUNTY FAIR AND 4-HERS In many counties across Minnesota, 4-H youth are busy getting projects ready for the County Fair. - The local County fair can play a vital role in the learning process for 4-H youth. It provides an opportunity for them to "showcase" the learning they have done in their project work. 4-H youth have the opportunity to participate in conference judging. This is a conversation between the youth and a judge around the completed project, but more importantly around the learning that has taken place. The ribbon placing is awarded 50% on knowledge and 50% on exhibit. Following are some tips taken from the 4-H Judging Task Force material: Practice answering questions from parents, siblings, or friends. Easy questions are: What is your name'? How long have you been in the project? Answer clearly and 0onfidently. Practice more specific questions too. These might include: 1. Why did you ch0os this idea/item as your exhibit? 2. How did you make this exhibit? 3. What choices did you make when putting this exhibit together? 4. How much time, money, materials, efforts, and skill did you use to prepare this exhibit? 5. Who did you get to spend time with in this project? 6. Why is this a good birdhouse, garden box, etc.? 7. What have you made in this project before? 8. What did you learn by preparing this exhibit? 9. What did you learn from mistakes you made? 10. What plans do you have for next year? Be honest and sincere with your answers. If you don't know an answer -that's okay - you may say "my best guess would be": Check out the project bulletins - they are a great resource for 4-H project work! Talk to others who are interested in the same topic to learn from them, too. Finish projects early to relieve stress on both 4-H'ers and parents. The conference judging experience can be a learning opportunity for both 4-H'er and judge! The 4-H'er should be able to have fun with a caring adult in a safe environment. This adult should be willing to listen, evaluate and provide constructive feed back. Remember that any competition has its risks. Everyone cannot be the top winner. Others may have had more skills, time, advice, or money in preparing their exhibits. You compete against these unknowns and take your chances. If your exhibit helped you learn something you wanted to learn more about or if it is something that you or your family can use, and then you are a winner no matter what ribbon you receive! So sit back, talk to the judges like they're a good friend, and have fun at the county fair. HOpefully, many ple can get out to the local County Fair and see the hard work many 4-Hers have put into their project work. They work hard at many things throughout the year and this is one time for them to have their exhibits showcased. Donna Geiser is an Educator with the University of Minnesota Extension Service in the 4-H Youth Development area, serving a region including Big Stone County. Extension report I Cinda Carlson District Nutrition Education Program Coordinator Swift County Benson, MN 56215 3201843-3796 NATIONAL HUNGER AWARENESS DAY Last June 5th our country observed National Hunger Awareness Day. This yearly event was designed to increase .... awareness of hunger and the theme this year focused on hunger experienced by children. In polling local food shelves, most administrators state that while donations are usually lower in the summer months, demands for food is sharply on the rise. This is caused in large part by children who are on vacation from school and no longer have access to school breakfasts and lunches. Here are some facts about hunger and children: - Ten million children receive food from a food shelf, soup kitchen or a shelter. - Among food shelf users ten percent are ages 0-5. - Twenty percent of food shelf clients stated that their child/children had skipped meals in the past year because the family couldn't afford food. Statistics like these are startling to counties in our area, who are disturbed by the idea that children from our neighborhoods or communities are going to bed hungry on a regular basis. Given the climate of budget cuts, voters across both Democratic and Republican parties are remarkably unified on the issue of hunger and children. 00iNDEPENDENT I - Seventy five percent of all voters said they would approve the expansion of the school breakfast program. - Sixty eight per cent of all voters said they would approve of creating a summer lunch program. - Ninety four percent believed that reducing hunger was a top priority for legislators, out distancing environmental and health care issues and the same number indicated that they were in favor of the school lunch and WIC programs. - Sixty four percent indicated that they would be less likely to vote for a candidate who advocates for making cuts to the food stamp program. - Sixty eight percent indicated that they would be more likely to vote for a candidate whose agenda includes solving the problem of hunger. And, although children and hunger is a very serious issue, problems of seniors and hunger in rural America also exist, each of which carries its own ironies. Many citizens believe that, in the case of seniors, these citizens have lived through the depression and in many cases have fought in wars to defend freedoms for all, only to spend their dwindling years scrambling to find enough money to nourish themselves. And hunger is also prevalent in rural areas, even though these are the areas that produce so much food to feed all of its citizens. Solutions for the problem of hunger are not easy to find. The Nutrition Education Program continues to provide free researched base education in the hopes that low- income families will make better use of their food dollars. Nutrition Education Assistants are housed in each of the fourteen counties of the West Central District and can be reached by phone at the Extension Office in each county. Cinda Carlson is the Regional Nutrition Education Director for the West Central District, serving a region including Big Stone County. The Ortonville Independent (U.S.P.S. 412-460) eeee'e JAMES D. KAERCHER Publisher / Managing Editor SUZETTE KAERCHER-BLAKE Editor and Advertising Sales ARLENE WlESE Office Manager O KATHIE LANTIS Computer and Comeosition Supervisor EMILEE OKESON Compositor / Receptionist BETH FULLER Reporter / Photographer BILL DWYER Pressman BOB SHEROD Pressman TIM GRONFELD Camera Department NANCY SCOBLIC Collater PHIL BLAKE Layeout MELANIE STEGNER Advertising / Print Sales Tues., July 15, 2003 Vol. 85; No. 25 Continuing the ORTONVILLE JOURNAL STAR Published Every Tuesday at 29 2nd St. N.W, Ortonville. MN 56278 Periodicals Postage Paid at Ortonville, Minnesota SUBSCRIPTION RATES $30.00 per year in Big Stone, Lac qui Parle, Traverse and Swift Counties in Minnesota, Grant and Roberts Counties in South Dakota. $34.00 for all other .'ounties in Minnesota and South Dakota. All others, $38.00 Postmaster: Song er year. address changes to The Ortonville Independent, Box 336,, Ortonville, Minnesota 56278. NEW SUBSCRIPTION RATE SCHEDULE - ALL SUBSCRIPTIONS ARE BASED ON A FEBRUARY 1ST DUE DATE- Big Stone, Lae qui Parle, Traverse, Swift Counties In Minnuota and Grant and Roberts in South Dakota February ........... 30.00 August .............. 15.00 March ................ 27.50 September ........ 12.50 April .................. 2500 October ............. 1E00 May ................... 22.50 November ........... 7.50 June .................. 20,00 December ........... 5.00 July ................... 17.50 Januery ............... 2,50 ALL OTHERS IN MINN. AND SO. DAK. Februery ........... 34.00 August .............. 17.04 March ................ 31.24 September ........ 1420 AI .................. 28.40 October ............. 1 t ,36 May ................... 25,56 November ........... 8.52 June .................. 2272 December ........... 5.68 July .................. 19,88 January ............... 2.84 ALL AREA OUTSIDE OF MINN. AND SO. DAK. February ........... 3800 August .............. 19.02 March ................ 34.87 September ........ 15.85 April .................. 31.70 October ............. 12.68 May ................... 28.53 November ........... 9.51 June .................. 25.36 December ........... 6.34 July ................... 22.19 Januery ............... 3.17 "PUBLISHER'S LIABILITY FOR ERROR" The Publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. The Publisher's liability for other errors or omissions in connection with an adver- tisement is strictly limited to publication of the advertisement in any subsequent issue or the refund of any monies prod for the advertisement. DEADLINES Church notes - Saturday mail Display ads - Fridaymail Correspondence - Monday mail Pictures - 5 p.m. Friday News - Friday afternoon Classified ads" Friday noon" (Any ad brought in later wilt be too late to classify.) OFFICE HOURS A Monday: 8 AM-5 PM A Tuesday: 8 AM-5 PM Wednesday: 8 AM-12 NOON; 1-5 PM A Thursday: 8 AM-12 NOON; 1-5 PM A Friday: 8 AM-5 PM Holidays may affect office hours. LE'n'ERS POLICY Letters to the editor discussing com- munity issues are encouraged. Letter writers should be aware that The Independent reserves the right to edit and/or condense letters for print. The aper also reserves the right not to pub- h letters that are unsuitable or for which it might be held legally liable. Letters should contain the writer's rinted or typed name, signature, address and telephone number. Addresses and telephone numbers will not be published. Letter writers are asked to limit them- selves to one letter per month. Please keep letter brief, parferably not over 350 words, and to the point. AD vs. NEWS The Ortonville Independent policy in determining what is advertising and what is news is based on one simple test: If an individual business or organi- zation charges for admission to an event for an item or for a service, it will be con- sidered advertising. In other words, "If you charge, we charge." Advertising is the life-blood of a news- paper. Without it a newspaper would cease to exist. The money a paper receives for subscriptions and single paper sales is used to pay for the ink and paper used in producing the product. It no longer.does so because of paper cost increases. It still covers the cost of ink md a smell portion of the paper used. Advertising to a newspaper is like crops and livestock to farmers; meat and products to the grocer; dresses, coats and underwear to the soft-line merchant; and plows and tractors to the implement dealer. Without any of those items, the particular business would not be in busi- ness. ADS: We reserve the right to refuse any advertising without obligation to justify our decision, POLICIES: News: Our goal is to report the newS as fully and accurately as possibl6. The staff's opinions will appear only n the opinion page. Editorials: Opinions published on this age, whether locally written or reprinted om other sources s intended to stlmu- ate th nk ng and discuss on among our readers. Opinions expressed by the edi- tor are her own and not necessarily those of other staff members. Opinions expressed in items from other publica- tions may be contradictory to the editor's own views, but are offered for their gen, eral interest. Phone 320-839-6163 or fax 320- 839-3761 to place display or clas- sified advertising in the Ortonville Independent, e-mail: mail @ ortonvilleindependent.com Page 3 i/ torial comment at Ortonville attended , the National Classroom in held June 14th. k long stay. Jenny lad Dayton in his with whom she is side photo. rs Jenny had the were Ralph Nader Candidate), Dr. (CIA), General Reserve), The de Stacy Harrison retary of State), g.an (ND), and The me Olsen (Peace able to tour the apiLol Building, m, the Vietnam atk,nal Cemetery, assy, Smithsonian Jefferson, Lincoln, Var Memorials. "owl prospects rosy for 2003 rated by the U.S Estimated ponds in the northcentral that has I:en in decline for several Service (USFWS) U.S. and prairie region of Canada decades. "Pintails returned to south- good news coming regions of Service its annual Duck and Habitat swath of.the )rding to South Fis and Parks ;t Spencer Vaa, this :ire inventory con- 1, Covering an area Montana north- prairies, park- forest, which in Alaska. rea stretches from on the west to the s ifi the east," Vaa iking aspect of this ret rn of water to tchewan Onally the heart of are I of Canada has SeVere drought for .. tell the story. almost doubled compared to last year and are now above the long-term average. "The total duck population in the traditional survey area was estimated at more than 36 million ducks, 16 per- cent above last year's estimate of 31 million," Vaa said. Of special note to South Dakota duck hunters is the mallard count. Vaa noted that the type of duck hunting season framework South Dakota receives is predicated on two criteria: The number of mallards surveyed in the traditional survey area, including the states of Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan, and the number of ponds from the prairie regions of Canada. "Both numbers are favorable this year, so prospects look good for a repeat of the type of seasons we have experienced in recent years," Vaa noted. Another item of interest from this year's survey is the rebound in the population status of pintails, a species Ur web site at www.ortonvilleindependent.com | = an tlnlt of the I I /11 I 49 I 62. Account of incidents or events 63. Rank 64. Unhappily 65. __ Blyton, children's author Clues DOWN I. Ancient German 2. Entranceway 3. Single, or Indian 3-5- t T-- P, - ,'i- l 7" ..... IIIIIIII 2 13 3, 3i IIIIIIII 3 4 5, 53 4. Social system devel- 41. Military disguise oped in Europe in the 43. Playing fields 8th century 44. Pleasantly 5. Names 45. Anesthetic 6. Hired 46. Green algae corn- 7. Barbarians men in freshwater 8. Japanese waist pouch lakes 9. Plant organ 47. On the up and up, 10. Muslim calendar slang month 48. French river .. .... ?m i [--] Z- 29. Vestment worn by priests 31. Indicate pain or discomfort 32. Musical interval of two semitones 33. Afrikaans 34. Goidelic language of Ireland 35. These (old English) 37: Phone company .11. A place of assembly 49. Person of for the people in exceptional holiness ancient Greece 51. A short syllable 12. Plateaus (poetry) 13. A sharp narrow ridge 52. Dry found in rugged 53. Breed mountains 21. Seizing one 22. Hair on the head 25. George --, --4---q- American ' ' * ' _+-_._+. utopian *-[21 26. Allege i.,  i  I 27. Gulls ll II 28. Bullfrog, IT1,, ,--1- for one iT1-+-+,,, ' 2003 =- --+-.--4- i !tHI --+-- iv lVl t I| ,,] | g g A I| ! 14 1 0 I id =1 ern Alberta and Saskatchewan in large numbers in response to the improved wetland habitat, but whether they will be successful in recruiting young will greatly depend upon the amount of grassland habitat available on the landscape," Vaa said. "Undisturbed grasslands in the form of pastures, hayland, native prairie, fall seeded cereal grains, such as winter wheat, and Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) cover, along with wetlands, are the key to healthy waterfowl popula- tions." Canada geese are also surveyed during May by the USFWS, and South Dakota's population of resident giant Canada geese increased from 89,000 in 2002 to an estimated 130,000 in 2003. According to Vaa, " the Department has an active goose damage management program that prevents and responds to goose depre- dation, and hunters have the opportu- nity to harvest resident Canada start- ing in early September in certain parts of eastern South Dakota." Logan Jacobsen Student of Year at BSC School Logan Jacobsen was recen'tly named a student of the semester for the second semester and Big Stone City School. He was also named Student of the Year, and was presented a $50 savings bond from the American Legion at the graduation ceremony on May 21, 2003. Logan is the 14 year-old son of Brent and Dorla Jacobsen of rural Clinton. In school, Logan is involved in band, oral interpretation, and basketball. He is a member of New Life Community Baptist Church in Ortonville, and is involved with trail building at Bonanza Educational Center. Hobbies that Logan enjoys include: camping, hunting, fishing, trapping, hiking and reading. Logan's favorite classes in school are math and speech His role model is his father, Brent. Logan also enjoys helping his grandmother. After graduation from high school, Logan plans to attend college. ONCE AGAIN... MANY THANKS Recent new and renewal sub- scribers to The Independent which we gratefully acknowledge with thanks for your loyalty: Peter Hansen Olga Frost Lee Guse Connie Newman Ronald Krogsrud Barry Long Walter Maatz Dorothy Tiliman David Lundell Verna Stoehr Mrs. Gary Alberts Gerald Adeiman Stan Rensberger Roger Johnson Victor Stolpman Mrs. Roger Lunde Curt Rothi Stanley Mack Tom Karels Dorothy Rygajlo Anne Peterson Dale Kiitzke Bud Kiitzke @2003 Rochtrr post.Bulletin Co, LLC. Ed Fischer Syndic=re fist her@ potbulllin,om l Extension report Donna Geisir Regional Extension Educator 4-H Youth Development East Ottertail County New York Mills,Mn 56567 218/383-3000 COUNTY FAIR AND 4-HERS In many counties across Minnesota, 4-H youth are busy getting projects ready for the County Fair. - The local County fair can play a vital role in the learning process for 4-H youth. It provides an opportunity for them to "showcase" the learning they have done in their project work. 4-H youth have the opportunity to participate in conference judging. This is a conversation between the youth and a judge around the completed project, but more importantly around the learning that has taken place. The ribbon placing is awarded 50% on knowledge and 50% on exhibit. Following are some tips taken from the 4-H Judging Task Force material: Practice answering questions from parents, siblings, or friends. Easy questions are: What is your name'? How long have you been in the project? Answer clearly and 0onfidently. Practice more specific questions too. These might include: 1. Why did you ch0os this idea/item as your exhibit? 2. How did you make this exhibit? 3. What choices did you make when putting this exhibit together? 4. How much time, money, materials, efforts, and skill did you use to prepare this exhibit? 5. Who did you get to spend time with in this project? 6. Why is this a good birdhouse, garden box, etc.? 7. What have you made in this project before? 8. What did you learn by preparing this exhibit? 9. What did you learn from mistakes you made? 10. What plans do you have for next year? Be honest and sincere with your answers. If you don't know an answer -that's okay - you may say "my best guess would be": Check out the project bulletins - they are a great resource for 4-H project work! Talk to others who are interested in the same topic to learn from them, too. Finish projects early to relieve stress on both 4-H'ers and parents. The conference judging experience can be a learning opportunity for both 4-H'er and judge! The 4-H'er should be able to have fun with a caring adult in a safe environment. This adult should be willing to listen, evaluate and provide constructive feed back. Remember that any competition has its risks. Everyone cannot be the top winner. Others may have had more skills, time, advice, or money in preparing their exhibits. You compete against these unknowns and take your chances. If your exhibit helped you learn something you wanted to learn more about or if it is something that you or your family can use, and then you are a winner no matter what ribbon you receive! So sit back, talk to the judges like they're a good friend, and have fun at the county fair. HOpefully, many ple can get out to the local County Fair and see the hard work many 4-Hers have put into their project work. They work hard at many things throughout the year and this is one time for them to have their exhibits showcased. Donna Geiser is an Educator with the University of Minnesota Extension Service in the 4-H Youth Development area, serving a region including Big Stone County. Extension report I Cinda Carlson District Nutrition Education Program Coordinator Swift County Benson, MN 56215 3201843-3796 NATIONAL HUNGER AWARENESS DAY Last June 5th our country observed National Hunger Awareness Day. This yearly event was designed to increase .... awareness of hunger and the theme this year focused on hunger experienced by children. In polling local food shelves, most administrators state that while donations are usually lower in the summer months, demands for food is sharply on the rise. This is caused in large part by children who are on vacation from school and no longer have access to school breakfasts and lunches. Here are some facts about hunger and children: - Ten million children receive food from a food shelf, soup kitchen or a shelter. - Among food shelf users ten percent are ages 0-5. - Twenty percent of food shelf clients stated that their child/children had skipped meals in the past year because the family couldn't afford food. Statistics like these are startling to counties in our area, who are disturbed by the idea that children from our neighborhoods or communities are going to bed hungry on a regular basis. Given the climate of budget cuts, voters across both Democratic and Republican parties are remarkably unified on the issue of hunger and children. 00iNDEPENDENT I - Seventy five percent of all voters said they would approve the expansion of the school breakfast program. - Sixty eight per cent of all voters said they would approve of creating a summer lunch program. - Ninety four percent believed that reducing hunger was a top priority for legislators, out distancing environmental and health care issues and the same number indicated that they were in favor of the school lunch and WIC programs. - Sixty four percent indicated that they would be less likely to vote for a candidate who advocates for making cuts to the food stamp program. - Sixty eight percent indicated that they would be more likely to vote for a candidate whose agenda includes solving the problem of hunger. And, although children and hunger is a very serious issue, problems of seniors and hunger in rural America also exist, each of which carries its own ironies. Many citizens believe that, in the case of seniors, these citizens have lived through the depression and in many cases have fought in wars to defend freedoms for all, only to spend their dwindling years scrambling to find enough money to nourish themselves. And hunger is also prevalent in rural areas, even though these are the areas that produce so much food to feed all of its citizens. Solutions for the problem of hunger are not easy to find. The Nutrition Education Program continues to provide free researched base education in the hopes that low- income families will make better use of their food dollars. Nutrition Education Assistants are housed in each of the fourteen counties of the West Central District and can be reached by phone at the Extension Office in each county. Cinda Carlson is the Regional Nutrition Education Director for the West Central District, serving a region including Big Stone County. The Ortonville Independent (U.S.P.S. 412-460) eeee'e JAMES D. KAERCHER Publisher / Managing Editor SUZETTE KAERCHER-BLAKE Editor and Advertising Sales ARLENE WlESE Office Manager O KATHIE LANTIS Computer and Comeosition Supervisor EMILEE OKESON Compositor / Receptionist BETH FULLER Reporter / Photographer BILL DWYER Pressman BOB SHEROD Pressman TIM GRONFELD Camera Department NANCY SCOBLIC Collater PHIL BLAKE Layeout MELANIE STEGNER Advertising / Print Sales Tues., July 15, 2003 Vol. 85; No. 25 Continuing the ORTONVILLE JOURNAL STAR Published Every Tuesday at 29 2nd St. N.W, Ortonville. MN 56278 Periodicals Postage Paid at Ortonville, Minnesota SUBSCRIPTION RATES $30.00 per year in Big Stone, Lac qui Parle, Traverse and Swift Counties in Minnesota, Grant and Roberts Counties in South Dakota. $34.00 for all other .'ounties in Minnesota and South Dakota. All others, $38.00 Postmaster: Song er year. address changes to The Ortonville Independent, Box 336,, Ortonville, Minnesota 56278. NEW SUBSCRIPTION RATE SCHEDULE - ALL SUBSCRIPTIONS ARE BASED ON A FEBRUARY 1ST DUE DATE- Big Stone, Lae qui Parle, Traverse, Swift Counties In Minnuota and Grant and Roberts in South Dakota February ........... 30.00 August .............. 15.00 March ................ 27.50 September ........ 12.50 April .................. 2500 October ............. 1E00 May ................... 22.50 November ........... 7.50 June .................. 20,00 December ........... 5.00 July ................... 17.50 Januery ............... 2,50 ALL OTHERS IN MINN. AND SO. DAK. Februery ........... 34.00 August .............. 17.04 March ................ 31.24 September ........ 1420 AI .................. 28.40 October ............. 1 t ,36 May ................... 25,56 November ........... 8.52 June .................. 2272 December ........... 5.68 July .................. 19,88 January ............... 2.84 ALL AREA OUTSIDE OF MINN. AND SO. DAK. February ........... 3800 August .............. 19.02 March ................ 34.87 September ........ 15.85 April .................. 31.70 October ............. 12.68 May ................... 28.53 November ........... 9.51 June .................. 25.36 December ........... 6.34 July ................... 22.19 Januery ............... 3.17 "PUBLISHER'S LIABILITY FOR ERROR" The Publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. The Publisher's liability for other errors or omissions in connection with an adver- tisement is strictly limited to publication of the advertisement in any subsequent issue or the refund of any monies prod for the advertisement. DEADLINES Church notes - Saturday mail Display ads - Fridaymail Correspondence - Monday mail Pictures - 5 p.m. Friday News - Friday afternoon Classified ads" Friday noon" (Any ad brought in later wilt be too late to classify.) OFFICE HOURS A Monday: 8 AM-5 PM A Tuesday: 8 AM-5 PM Wednesday: 8 AM-12 NOON; 1-5 PM A Thursday: 8 AM-12 NOON; 1-5 PM A Friday: 8 AM-5 PM Holidays may affect office hours. LE'n'ERS POLICY Letters to the editor discussing com- munity issues are encouraged. Letter writers should be aware that The Independent reserves the right to edit and/or condense letters for print. The aper also reserves the right not to pub- h letters that are unsuitable or for which it might be held legally liable. Letters should contain the writer's rinted or typed name, signature, address and telephone number. Addresses and telephone numbers will not be published. Letter writers are asked to limit them- selves to one letter per month. Please keep letter brief, parferably not over 350 words, and to the point. AD vs. NEWS The Ortonville Independent policy in determining what is advertising and what is news is based on one simple test: If an individual business or organi- zation charges for admission to an event for an item or for a service, it will be con- sidered advertising. In other words, "If you charge, we charge." Advertising is the life-blood of a news- paper. Without it a newspaper would cease to exist. The money a paper receives for subscriptions and single paper sales is used to pay for the ink and paper used in producing the product. It no longer.does so because of paper cost increases. It still covers the cost of ink md a smell portion of the paper used. Advertising to a newspaper is like crops and livestock to farmers; meat and products to the grocer; dresses, coats and underwear to the soft-line merchant; and plows and tractors to the implement dealer. Without any of those items, the particular business would not be in busi- ness. ADS: We reserve the right to refuse any advertising without obligation to justify our decision, POLICIES: News: Our goal is to report the newS as fully and accurately as possibl6. The staff's opinions will appear only n the opinion page. Editorials: Opinions published on this age, whether locally written or reprinted om other sources s intended to stlmu- ate th nk ng and discuss on among our readers. Opinions expressed by the edi- tor are her own and not necessarily those of other staff members. Opinions expressed in items from other publica- tions may be contradictory to the editor's own views, but are offered for their gen, eral interest. Phone 320-839-6163 or fax 320- 839-3761 to place display or clas- sified advertising in the Ortonville Independent, e-mail: mail @ ortonvilleindependent.com Page 3 i/