Newspaper Archive of
The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
Lyft
July 27, 1999     The Ortonville Independent
PAGE 1     (1 of 24 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 1     (1 of 24 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
July 27, 1999
 

Newspaper Archive of The Ortonville Independent produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




k heart" !i!, ! ....  ..... ii  . w . Lo.I artist Darold Bailey, left, along with assistant John Schultz of Big Stone City, Ork recently on this seven ton granite buffalo sculpture, to be located in the Monarch of in Sioux Fails, SD. The sculpture, set in local mahogany granite, was funded through the buffaloes and will sit in the park with lights and music on it nightly. County Fair Promises Something for Everyone F TEN YEARS and visi- Lakeside By Elaine Gustafson In addition to the events listed in a prior news paper article, the entertain- ment schedule is nearly been complet- ed for the 1999 Big Stone County Fair July 29 through August 1. The Bingo stand opens on Thursday night at 7 p.m. for 10 cent Bingo. Originally this started for the kids but has been so popular everybody comes to play. Each day of the Fair the Bingo stand opens at 1 p.m. The food stands will also be open Thursday night and the "Wen-T" Band will per- form at 8 p.m. This is a group of young fellows coming to show their stuff. Friday the typical Senior Citizens Day will again have the Melody Kings playing in the shelter area start- ing at 2 p.m. Pastor and Mrs. Ragan from the Siloah Church north of Graceville will do their music pro- gram at 3 p.m. Lots of good music in a two hour span. The KS93 Radio Station from Watertown will do their "Pepsi Party" at 4 p.m. This will fall in line with the Ciem and Annie clowns coming on the grounds at 5 p.m. In the meantime at the other end of the Fairgrounds there is the all day Friday livestock judging with the final show in the horse arena at 4:30 p.m. The Kids Pedal Pull starts at 5:30 p.m as usual on the tar area in front of the office building. New entertainment this year is the "Uffda Brudders" starting at 7 p.m. They are Norski comedy, Country Harmony and Good Old Gospel, the Uffda Brothers have it all, they say. Friday evening ends with the Teen Dance sponsored by the 4-H'ers. Saturday beings with the Awards Ceremony starting at 8:30 a.m. fol- lowed by the 4-H Premium Auction. The Youth Open Horse Show will begin at 11:30 a.m. in the horse arena area. The Zucchinis will entertain in the shelter area starting at 1 p.m. and again at 3 p.m. They were here last year with their magical tricks, etc. A couple of young fellows, we will call them "The Giibertson's" will perform at 4 p.m. They sing and play guitar, etc. and they are nephews of Cheri and Jim Kaye of Clinton. The Tae Kwon Do demonstration will follow the Gilbertson's in the shelter area. The Old Time Machinery Parade will start at the east end of the fairgrounds at 5 p.m. Go directly to the Endure Race at the track following this enter- tainment. The race starts at 6 p.m. Thea Daniels, whose grandparents are from the Beardsley area, will return again this year. We will set her equip- ment up differently this year because of the size of the speakers it didn't work so well under the shelter. Sunday worship service at the Fairgrounds begins at 10:30 a.m. The Mara Sisters and Jacob, with their old time fiddle, western, gospel, polkas, bluegrass, waltzes and fiddle hoe- downs will entertain .with two shows on Sunday. One at 1:00 p.m. and the second at 3:00 p.m. The Old Time Machinery parade will again start at the east end of the fairgrounds at 12:30 p.m. and lead us down to the 4- H Parade of Champions starting at lp.m. The 4-H Round Robin Showmanship Contest will begin at 1:30 p.m. This is the top senior show- men of different animals competing against each other. The 4-H in action starts at 2:30 p.m. with the Crime Solvers Contest, 3;30 p.m. is the Judging Team Event and 4:30 p.m. the Project Bowl Event. We hope the pub- lic can enjoy these learning activities. The Demolition Derby starts at 4 p.m. followed by the Threshing Bee. The Threshing Bee will be to the east of the race track and to the south of the Carnival area. The 1999 Fair winds down with the drawings for prizes donated by people sponsoring the can- isters displayed in the Industrial Building. Be sure to sign up at these canisters, some for the young that will be designated and the adult canisters as well. KMSD Radio will be donat- ing Valley Fair tickets again this year as well as other prizes which will be given away at the close of the Fair. There have been additional articles giving the schedule for the 2nd Annual Iron Pour. Please check that out and attend the classes and iron pour demonstration. Also the Flea Market and Craft Sales area. The Big Stone Snowmobile Club will again sponsor the dunking tank in back of the office building. Doug Tomschin is to bring in his helicopter and the Clinton Fire Department is having the raffle drawing for the Four-Wheeler. This is most of the entertainment that is lined up at this point. We have a few surprises so be sure to come to the Big Stone County Fair next week. There will be lots to do and see. County board hears scary prediction on farm crisis "Unless prices dramatically improve, there will be. xn my estimation, approximately thirty percent less farmers next year, unless something is done to support prices or control supply and allow the marketplace to support prices." These were the words of Minnwest Bank Vice President Scott Maas, in a letter dated July 9, presented to the Big Stone County Board at its regular meeting last Tuesday by Big Stone County Extension Agent John Cunningham. Maas' letter stated Minnwest Bank calculates break even prices for producers, with those prices including prinopal and interest payments on all loans, family living expenses and a ten percent depreciation factor. After reviewing 13 customer files. Maas' letter stated break even prices ranged from a high of $2.40 per bushel and a low of $1.52 on corn, with an average break even price of $1.90 per bushel, and a loan rate of $1.76. For soybeans, a high of $6.00 per bushel would be needed to break even, with a low of $4.20, average of $5.12, and loan rates of $4.99 per bushel. "With a 30 percent exit of farmers there will also be a negative affect on asset valuations of machinery and equipment, because the depressed farm economy will be unable to bid to support the values on this much farm equipment," Maas' letter stated. Maas stated a possible solution to the crisis could lie in allowing farmers to bid acres to leave idle for a one to five year period, with the bidding process similar to the CRP bidding process. "If, on average, the bid was $100 per acre, that could potentially take 18 million acres out (Continued on page 3) ORTONVILLE WAS THE RECIPIENT OF THE "GOLDEN TREE AWARD" recently, for the city's work on planting new trees and saving existing ones. Shown above accepting the award from the American Public Power Association are City Clerk/Administrator Roman Taffe, left, and Ortonville Mayor Dave Ellingson at right. Council discusses funding for congregate care facility facility are in fact realistic. "I came in late in this deal, but from what I do know, were in line with what we're asking," Gronseth stated. Councilman Dan takes stated, "We need to decide as a council what will make the city grow. I'm in favor of seeing people from the cities possibly coming here to retire but I (Continued on page 3) Ortonville financial report in this issue Elsewhere in this issue is the annual financial report for the city of Ortonville, as prepared by City Clerk/Administrator Roman Taffe. Ortonville's City Council discussed funding for the city's Break-in at Elmer's Drive-In Friday The Big Stone City, SD Police Department reports sometime late Friday evening or early Saturday morning, Elmer's Drive in of Big Stone City was broken into. Robert Goergen, Big Stone City Police Chief, stated entry had been gained after the suspect broke a window in the north door of the building. Only food was discovered missing, though blood was found on the scene as the suspect had cut himself on the broken glass. The police department asks anyone with information on the break-in to contact the Big Stone City Police Department at 839-6161. Bicyclist injured Monday morning The tenth annual TRAM went off with only one accident, as riders left Ortonville early yesterday morning, Monday July 26. Frederick Ericson, 50 of Brooklyn Park was injured at shortly before 7 a.m. Monday as the front brakes on his bicycle locked coming down Monroe Avenue to Second Street. According to the Ortonville Police Department, Ericson sustained injuries to his elbows, knees and face when he flew over the handlebars. Ericson also complained of neck pain and was taken to the Ortonville Hospital. Hospital staff refused to comment on Ericson's condition as of presstime Monday. .proposed congregate care facility at ts regular meeting last Monday, with concerns expressed by the public and councilmembers on the financial stability of the project. The question brought before the council was whether to fund the project with revenue bonds, obligating only the congregate care facility itself, or general obligation bonds, where funds would be taken from all entiites of the city. "I can't understand the rationale here," stated Councilman George Elliot on the proposed facility, to be located on the north side of the Northridge Residence in Ortonville. "They need a 93 percent occupancy rate to make it operational, so 22 of the 24 rooms need to be rented at all times. If it's less than that, the remainder comes from the taxpayers to keep the thing going. Eighty or 90 percent of the people in town can't afford to live there, anyway; it just sounds like a welfare for the rich program." Tom Gronseth, Economic Development Authority (EDA) board member, stated the group had gotten a report from Springsted Financial Advisors stating the costs of the Lori B's is.going out of busuness This Friday, July 30 will be the last day Lori B's will be open for business, The women's clothing store in Ortonville has launched a "Going Out of Business" sale with 30 to 80 percent off all merchandise in the store. Everything will be sold by 3 p.m. Friday, so hurry in before the merchandise is gone. See ad inside for details. THEEA DANIELS will appear at the Big Stone County Fair this Saturday, July 31. She is the granddaughter of Larry and Phyllis Schwagerl of Browns Valley. ORTONVILLE WAS A "TENT CITY" Sunday evening as an estimated 1,700 riders descended on the town for Monday's start of the tenth annual MS TRAM. Any and all area parks were filled to capacity with tents Sunday evening, as riders were entertained by a variety of acts in Ortonville's Lakeside Park. k heart" !i!, ! ....  ..... ii  . w . Lo.I artist Darold Bailey, left, along with assistant John Schultz of Big Stone City, Ork recently on this seven ton granite buffalo sculpture, to be located in the Monarch of in Sioux Fails, SD. The sculpture, set in local mahogany granite, was funded through the buffaloes and will sit in the park with lights and music on it nightly. County Fair Promises Something for Everyone F TEN YEARS and visi- Lakeside By Elaine Gustafson In addition to the events listed in a prior news paper article, the entertain- ment schedule is nearly been complet- ed for the 1999 Big Stone County Fair July 29 through August 1. The Bingo stand opens on Thursday night at 7 p.m. for 10 cent Bingo. Originally this started for the kids but has been so popular everybody comes to play. Each day of the Fair the Bingo stand opens at 1 p.m. The food stands will also be open Thursday night and the "Wen-T" Band will per- form at 8 p.m. This is a group of young fellows coming to show their stuff. Friday the typical Senior Citizens Day will again have the Melody Kings playing in the shelter area start- ing at 2 p.m. Pastor and Mrs. Ragan from the Siloah Church north of Graceville will do their music pro- gram at 3 p.m. Lots of good music in a two hour span. The KS93 Radio Station from Watertown will do their "Pepsi Party" at 4 p.m. This will fall in line with the Ciem and Annie clowns coming on the grounds at 5 p.m. In the meantime at the other end of the Fairgrounds there is the all day Friday livestock judging with the final show in the horse arena at 4:30 p.m. The Kids Pedal Pull starts at 5:30 p.m as usual on the tar area in front of the office building. New entertainment this year is the "Uffda Brudders" starting at 7 p.m. They are Norski comedy, Country Harmony and Good Old Gospel, the Uffda Brothers have it all, they say. Friday evening ends with the Teen Dance sponsored by the 4-H'ers. Saturday beings with the Awards Ceremony starting at 8:30 a.m. fol- lowed by the 4-H Premium Auction. The Youth Open Horse Show will begin at 11:30 a.m. in the horse arena area. The Zucchinis will entertain in the shelter area starting at 1 p.m. and again at 3 p.m. They were here last year with their magical tricks, etc. A couple of young fellows, we will call them "The Giibertson's" will perform at 4 p.m. They sing and play guitar, etc. and they are nephews of Cheri and Jim Kaye of Clinton. The Tae Kwon Do demonstration will follow the Gilbertson's in the shelter area. The Old Time Machinery Parade will start at the east end of the fairgrounds at 5 p.m. Go directly to the Endure Race at the track following this enter- tainment. The race starts at 6 p.m. Thea Daniels, whose grandparents are from the Beardsley area, will return again this year. We will set her equip- ment up differently this year because of the size of the speakers it didn't work so well under the shelter. Sunday worship service at the Fairgrounds begins at 10:30 a.m. The Mara Sisters and Jacob, with their old time fiddle, western, gospel, polkas, bluegrass, waltzes and fiddle hoe- downs will entertain .with two shows on Sunday. One at 1:00 p.m. and the second at 3:00 p.m. The Old Time Machinery parade will again start at the east end of the fairgrounds at 12:30 p.m. and lead us down to the 4- H Parade of Champions starting at lp.m. The 4-H Round Robin Showmanship Contest will begin at 1:30 p.m. This is the top senior show- men of different animals competing against each other. The 4-H in action starts at 2:30 p.m. with the Crime Solvers Contest, 3;30 p.m. is the Judging Team Event and 4:30 p.m. the Project Bowl Event. We hope the pub- lic can enjoy these learning activities. The Demolition Derby starts at 4 p.m. followed by the Threshing Bee. The Threshing Bee will be to the east of the race track and to the south of the Carnival area. The 1999 Fair winds down with the drawings for prizes donated by people sponsoring the can- isters displayed in the Industrial Building. Be sure to sign up at these canisters, some for the young that will be designated and the adult canisters as well. KMSD Radio will be donat- ing Valley Fair tickets again this year as well as other prizes which will be given away at the close of the Fair. There have been additional articles giving the schedule for the 2nd Annual Iron Pour. Please check that out and attend the classes and iron pour demonstration. Also the Flea Market and Craft Sales area. The Big Stone Snowmobile Club will again sponsor the dunking tank in back of the office building. Doug Tomschin is to bring in his helicopter and the Clinton Fire Department is having the raffle drawing for the Four-Wheeler. This is most of the entertainment that is lined up at this point. We have a few surprises so be sure to come to the Big Stone County Fair next week. There will be lots to do and see. County board hears scary prediction on farm crisis "Unless prices dramatically improve, there will be. xn my estimation, approximately thirty percent less farmers next year, unless something is done to support prices or control supply and allow the marketplace to support prices." These were the words of Minnwest Bank Vice President Scott Maas, in a letter dated July 9, presented to the Big Stone County Board at its regular meeting last Tuesday by Big Stone County Extension Agent John Cunningham. Maas' letter stated Minnwest Bank calculates break even prices for producers, with those prices including prinopal and interest payments on all loans, family living expenses and a ten percent depreciation factor. After reviewing 13 customer files. Maas' letter stated break even prices ranged from a high of $2.40 per bushel and a low of $1.52 on corn, with an average break even price of $1.90 per bushel, and a loan rate of $1.76. For soybeans, a high of $6.00 per bushel would be needed to break even, with a low of $4.20, average of $5.12, and loan rates of $4.99 per bushel. "With a 30 percent exit of farmers there will also be a negative affect on asset valuations of machinery and equipment, because the depressed farm economy will be unable to bid to support the values on this much farm equipment," Maas' letter stated. Maas stated a possible solution to the crisis could lie in allowing farmers to bid acres to leave idle for a one to five year period, with the bidding process similar to the CRP bidding process. "If, on average, the bid was $100 per acre, that could potentially take 18 million acres out (Continued on page 3) ORTONVILLE WAS THE RECIPIENT OF THE "GOLDEN TREE AWARD" recently, for the city's work on planting new trees and saving existing ones. Shown above accepting the award from the American Public Power Association are City Clerk/Administrator Roman Taffe, left, and Ortonville Mayor Dave Ellingson at right. Council discusses funding for congregate care facility facility are in fact realistic. "I came in late in this deal, but from what I do know, were in line with what we're asking," Gronseth stated. Councilman Dan takes stated, "We need to decide as a council what will make the city grow. I'm in favor of seeing people from the cities possibly coming here to retire but I (Continued on page 3) Ortonville financial report in this issue Elsewhere in this issue is the annual financial report for the city of Ortonville, as prepared by City Clerk/Administrator Roman Taffe. Ortonville's City Council discussed funding for the city's Break-in at Elmer's Drive-In Friday The Big Stone City, SD Police Department reports sometime late Friday evening or early Saturday morning, Elmer's Drive in of Big Stone City was broken into. Robert Goergen, Big Stone City Police Chief, stated entry had been gained after the suspect broke a window in the north door of the building. Only food was discovered missing, though blood was found on the scene as the suspect had cut himself on the broken glass. The police department asks anyone with information on the break-in to contact the Big Stone City Police Department at 839-6161. Bicyclist injured Monday morning The tenth annual TRAM went off with only one accident, as riders left Ortonville early yesterday morning, Monday July 26. Frederick Ericson, 50 of Brooklyn Park was injured at shortly before 7 a.m. Monday as the front brakes on his bicycle locked coming down Monroe Avenue to Second Street. According to the Ortonville Police Department, Ericson sustained injuries to his elbows, knees and face when he flew over the handlebars. Ericson also complained of neck pain and was taken to the Ortonville Hospital. Hospital staff refused to comment on Ericson's condition as of presstime Monday. .proposed congregate care facility at ts regular meeting last Monday, with concerns expressed by the public and councilmembers on the financial stability of the project. The question brought before the council was whether to fund the project with revenue bonds, obligating only the congregate care facility itself, or general obligation bonds, where funds would be taken from all entiites of the city. "I can't understand the rationale here," stated Councilman George Elliot on the proposed facility, to be located on the north side of the Northridge Residence in Ortonville. "They need a 93 percent occupancy rate to make it operational, so 22 of the 24 rooms need to be rented at all times. If it's less than that, the remainder comes from the taxpayers to keep the thing going. Eighty or 90 percent of the people in town can't afford to live there, anyway; it just sounds like a welfare for the rich program." Tom Gronseth, Economic Development Authority (EDA) board member, stated the group had gotten a report from Springsted Financial Advisors stating the costs of the Lori B's is.going out of busuness This Friday, July 30 will be the last day Lori B's will be open for business, The women's clothing store in Ortonville has launched a "Going Out of Business" sale with 30 to 80 percent off all merchandise in the store. Everything will be sold by 3 p.m. Friday, so hurry in before the merchandise is gone. See ad inside for details. THEEA DANIELS will appear at the Big Stone County Fair this Saturday, July 31. She is the granddaughter of Larry and Phyllis Schwagerl of Browns Valley. ORTONVILLE WAS A "TENT CITY" Sunday evening as an estimated 1,700 riders descended on the town for Monday's start of the tenth annual MS TRAM. Any and all area parks were filled to capacity with tents Sunday evening, as riders were entertained by a variety of acts in Ortonville's Lakeside Park.