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Ortonville, Minnesota
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July 27, 1999     The Ortonville Independent
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.,,, By JDK Another small worlder! From two different persons, both miles apart and one whom we have not heard from in years, we received the same clipping from a recent issue of the Minnesota Historical Society's "Member News" publication show- ing an article on our Hobo Soup. The first person to point out the story was Ortonville's Judy Drewicke and the second, via mail, was Mary Kay O"Hearn of Minneapolis, who once worked for this newspaper under our late father-publisher Lem back in the 1950's. Mary Kay, by the way, keeps in touch with our Office Manager Arlene Wiese, and was in Graceville this past Saturday when her family helped celebrate Mary Crowe's 101st birthday, which was actually on July 9th. The article on Hobo Soup appeared in a section on "Eating," and showed one of the original labels used when it entered the marketplace bak in 1963. The "Eating" section opened at the History Center in the metro area on July 10th. "Food-relat- ed packages from Minnesota compa- nies include a label from Hobo Soup of Ortonville," the story stated. ***** Was good to see an old friend who stopped in one day recently to buy a case of Hobo Soup and renew his paper. Namely Dr. Bob Nelson, brother of Hank and Gene of Ortonville. Bob tended us many years back when we needed a doctor in Benson where he practiced for a while. He's now retired in St. Peter. With him was his new wife, Jeanette. The two were friends years ago during school days. She is from Bird Island. Paul Rice of Montevideo, a broth- er to Tom Rice of Big Stone City, and Evie Ulrich of Ortonville, says "I really stuck my foot in it this time!" He refers to a clipping which Dee Stre rec Tribune in Willmar. The story, with picture of Paul, is headlined "Flagman Vows to Shave Head For Charity," and goes on to say that "Paul Rice is putting his head on the line for charity. The professional flagman said he will shave his head if $2,500 is raised at the Grove Creek stock car races Saturday night to fight muscular dystrophy. He said if that much can be collected in the grandstands during the races, the winner of the Modified feature.., the evening's last race.., can shave his reddish, curly locks." We haven't heard if Paul's a baldy today or not! Here's one that might be for the record books of base- ball. Ethan Jansen, 9.year- old grandson of former resi- dent Lloyd Whiting and great grandson of the Lee Whitings of Ortonville, is a member of the Bloomington Tigers Little League baseball team. He recently completed an unassisted triple play. At his shortstop position, he caught a line drive, stepped on second base for the sec- ond out and ran to third base for the third out. Can you imagine anyone, let alone someone so young, having the savvy to know what to do?! ***** Chuckler for the Week Farmer Brown's 12 pigs are all females, so he asks Farmer Jones if he can bring them over to mate with Jones' male pigs. Jones agrees, so Brown loads his sows into his truck and drives them over to spend the day. "I've never raised pigs before," Brown says. "How will I know that piglets are on the way?" Just look for unusual behavior," replies Jones. The next morning Farmer Brown looks at his pigs and sees nothing unusual, so he loads them in the truck and brings them back to Jones' farm. The third day it's the same, so it's back to Jones' place again. Next morning Brown asks his wife, Honey, are the pigs doing anything unusual? .... Well," she says, "eleven of them are in the back of the truck and the twelfth one's honking the horn. I II WANT ADS the i 1111111 inexpensive way to shop III I Page 2 Most farmers who get out of farming do very well There is indeed life after farming. About 80 to 85 percent of farmers who leave the farm do very well with- in about four years, according to Val Farmer, psychologist and newspaper columnist who works with farm fami- lies. "They may not be doing as well financially," says Farmer about peo- ple who leave the land. "But they grow in character, develop resiliency and learn some new things about themselves. It takes awhile to find something different that they're good at. "The first two to three years are usually tough. They haven't connect- ed with what they do well. But once they make that connection, they find life is better. They're under less stress, and actually have vacations and weekends off." You can start a new, creative cycle at any age, says Farmer, who spoke at a recent Citizens' Forum on Minnesota's rural crisis. "Farmers-- and anyone for that matter-- can find something new at age 54, and go with it for another 20 years." A one-time farmer who's made a transition is Carolyn Weber, who farmed with her husband before they left the farm. Weber went back to school at the University of Minnesota-Crookston for an agricul- tural degree. "We've found we can have hope, and that we can stay in agriculture without farming," she says. And rural areas "aren't the only place you can be happy," she says. "I've made some really good friends in the city." Citizens' Forum sponsors, along with the University of Minnesota Extension Service, are KTCA televi- sion, Minnesota Public Radio, and the Star Tribune newspaper in Minneapolis. Two additional state forums are scheduled, each followed by locally based citizens' forums. The next one will be Aug. 5, with the theme, "How important is a strong rural economy to Minnesota?" It will originate from FarmFest, located at the Gilfillan Estate near Redwood Falls. The last in the forum series is Aug. 30, with the theme of "Creating a vision for the future of Minnesota agriculture." It will originate from the Fitzgerald Theater in downtown Saint Paul. Check with your county office of the University of Minnesota Extension Service for more informa- tion on the forums, and on a new web- site with hundreds of references to help rural families in crisis. You can also access it directly by entering www.extension.umn.edu, then click- ing on Rural Response. 1999 4-H fashion revue held The 1999 4-H Fashion Revue was held Thursday, July 22, at the Memorial Building in Clinton. This year's theme was "It's a sign of the Times". Registration started at 9:00 a.m. on Thursday morning with judg- ing beginning at 9:30 a.m. There are two divisions for the clothing and tex- tile project area, "Clothes You Buy" and "Clothes You Make". Each indi- vidual participated in conference judging for the two areas and they were also judged for how their gar- ment looked, otherwise known as Fashion Revue judging. Revealed at the evening public revue were the results from the Fashion Revue judging, which are as follows. Conference judging results will be made known at the county fair. "Clothes You Buy" Fashion Revue Honor Court included: Sabrina Strege, Sheila Krueger, Sally Helgeson, and Emily Haggerty. Honorable Mention went to Shelley Haggerty and Holly Krueger. The State Fair Trip went to Sabrina Strege, Alternate for State Fair is Sally Helgeson. In the "Clothes You Make" divi- sion, Fashion Revue Honor Court included: Meghan Smart, Sarah Maas, Emily Haggerty, and Sally Helgeson. Honorable Mention went Ortonville news to Shelley Haggerty, Danielle Karsky, and Sarah Maas. The State Fair Trip went to Meghan Smart, Alternate for State Fair is Sarah Maas. Thank you to all of those who par- ticipated in this year's Fashion Revue, our judges: Joanna Rustad, Diane Neisus, and Carol Maatz; Emcees: James Thompson and Kari Morrill; Photographer: Jessica Chase; and the Toqua Troopers 4-H Club for provid- ing refreshments. Also, a big thank you to J.C. Penny Catalog and Liebe Drug for two gift certificates and to the Big Stone County Highway Department for use of street signs, cones, vests, and hard hats. INDEPENDENT WANT ADS PAY All but walleyes in Week 12 of the Ortonville Independent Fishing Contest saw every category filled but walleyes, with Marcia Wondra of Ortonville winning in the northern category. Her 9 pound 15 ounce fish was weighed in at Bud's Bait of Ortonville. Don Morrill of Clinton won the perch category with his one pound entry, also weighed in at Bud's. In the bullhead category, Dean Anderson of Hartford Beach won fishing cont00 with a two pound fish,l , Hartford Beach Resort| SD. / Only the walleye this week, now at jackpots for $160, and jackpots stay the bullheads $ Several Artists To Be At Big Stone County An Iron Pour will again be part of the Big Stone County Fair. This year Kurt Dyrhaug along with Frank Heidelberg will be conducting the workshops and pour. Kurt Dyrhaug is a sculptor and adjunct instructor at the University of MN and College of Visual Arts. He has taken a new posi- tion at LaMar University, Texas start- ing in the fall. Frank Heidelberg works at Anurag Art Studio, Stillwater, where he does foundry work. He completed the metalwork for the "Korean War Memorial" locat- ed at the Minnesota State Capitol. Damon Daniels will also be involved along with several iron casting sculp- tors including Neil Thelen, David Hill, Shae O' Brien, Andrew MacGuffie, Paul Linden, Helen Slichter and Brad Hertko. Everyone is welcome to take part in the pattern making workshops on Thursday and Friday, July 29 and 30. Those have pre-registered, can decide to take part anytime. We only have supplies for a limited number of peo- ple so the remaining spots will be han- dled on a first-come-first serve basis. Everyone is also welcome to help or watch the making of the molds of the patterns made on Saturday, July 31. The cast iron pour event will take place from noon to 4 p.m. on Sunday, August 1 and lic viewing. This event has sponsored by Beardsley made possible in Southwest Humanities funds Legislature." been made by the es and Electric, R) Stattelman Lumber, State Bank, Big Ottertail Power Farmers Plumbing, Arrow Dru Dick's Auto Bank of Construction, Protection, Inc., Inc., Murray's Color Printing, of Chokio, City Bar and Lounge, Clinton Women's Anyone funds, reserving the pattern making tact Deb Swezey Gall Maxwell, Phone 839-2207 A five generation gathering and picture taking was held at Northridge Care Center recently. Families involved were the families of Lillian Danielson, Ruth Malkerson, Kerry Malkerson, Paul Maikerson and son Cody. Also there were their spouses and Dani Brandner and three sons from Bismarck ND and Lisa Malkerson Adair and Kyle Adair from the Garland, Texas area. Rose Gardens. Gladys stayed till Sat. and went with Danita to Fort Snelling. They went with the AAL group. Gladys Brehmer was a Sat. evening guest at the Edwin and Marilyn Goetsch home and enjoyed looking at the pictures of their recen trip. Gladys B. with Dean, Dorette, Alexis, Rachael and Jacob Clark family had Sun. noon lunch together and spent the afternoon together. Gladys B., Myron and Lorraine Schnaser, among others attended the Lillian Danielson, resident of Senior potluck Sunday evening at the Y Myron and Lorraine Schnaser were relatives, friends and her circle from Wed. evening supper guests at the Eidskog Church. Mr. and Mrs. Dale Bergman of Moore, OK. visited his aunt Lillian Danielson recently at Northridge. Bridge winners Friday afternoon at the Senior Center were Vi Hansen for the woman and Ken Simonitch for the men. An enjoyable afternoon was had by all. The family of the late Wm. and Sophie (Grube) Buck held a reunion at Rapid City SD on July 16-18th. Jerry and Alma Jorgenson of Ortonville and Wayne Jorgenson of St. Cloud were among family members who attended. A great time was had by all. Jerry and Alma Jorgenson attended a reunion for AAL representatives of the former Dean Meyers Agency of Fergus Falls on July 24th at Detroit Lakes. Dean and Marvel Meyers of Rapid City, SD also attended. Sunday evening visitors at the Jerry Jorgenson home were Jane and Carol Asche of Nassau and Ryan Behm of Fort Collins, CO. who is spending a few days at the Jerry Jorgenson home. Deborah Wenz was a Fri. overnight guest at Gladys Brehmer's and went home with Deb for the July 4th weekend to spend it with Deb and Tim Wenz home at Sartell till Tue. evening. They went to Glady's daughter Eric and Danita Born home at Plymouth. The next day they took a picnic lunch and went to the Lydale Gladys B. home. Much damage from storm Thursday "It was like it went in a block-wide path all the way from The Shop [of Big Stone City, SD] through the south part of Ortonville," stated Deb Wiik of Big Stone City on last Thursday's storm, which brought heavy rain and strong winds to the area. Wiik stated at her home, many trees and limbs were taken down, though the most damaging part was a 13 ton semi trailer which was picked up by the wind, moved several feet, then tipped over on its side. At the Gail and Glenda Elvecrog residence in Big Stone City, high winds picked up the top portion of a tree from one side of the house and drove it into the roof on the other side. Here in Ortonville, part of the roof of Wood's Carpet Connection was taken off, landing on Second Street. Traffic was diverted through the Sturdevant's Bumper to Bumper parking lot early Friday morning before the wreckage was cleaned up. As of presstime Monday, the National Weather Service has declaired the storm a microburst, meaning the area saw straightline winds only, not a tornado. Do you need to wind down, revitalize yourself, and awaken positive feelings that can otherwise be hindered by day-to-day stress? We at Emanuel Furniture and Carpet have been taking care of your many needs for over Sharon Falk 100 years. You can see that our range of services is always expanding. With the help of products from Colonial Candle of Cape Cod, we offer an opportunity for you to become relaxed and maintain a tie to nature's serenity. Come in to see our many new aromatherapy prod- ucts, including incense sticks, spa crystals, sachets and candles. We look forward to seeing you at Emanuet Furniture and Carpet. "A South Dakota Century Old Business" EI4APIUEL C/lltP00 HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 9arn-5:15pm; Sat. 9am-,tpm Toll free 888-4.524568 60S.4S2-4568 306 South Third Street Milbank, South Dakota 57252 Peepe00t Than Thanks to the following butinoto ant) in who helPeO make tki00 a very tucco00fu125th Couple00 Tournament thb past Without thoe Oonationt, we woulO have 00naking thb the 00ucco00ful event that it 74 apectal thank tlou to ot'00enzch ,_00ona and /14edzcat (00ente theg contibutiona to the OTHER SPONSORS OF THE COUPLES GOLF TOURNAMENT Rausch Brothers Monument Company, Inc. Northside Medical Center Cashtown Service Larson Funeral Homes Dallas I. Hanson Construction, Inc. CenBank Peter Hansen, DDS R. D. Schreiner & Associates Ortonville Auto & Supply Minnwest Bank Liebe Drug Matador Supper Club Steven Winther, DDS Ortonville Independent Big Stone Motel Pepsi Cola Company of Ortonville Marquette Bank, Big Stone Branch Ortonville Plumbing & Henrich & Sons DDD Wax Rendering Econo Lodge True Valu Hardware Bill's Super Valu Plus Big Stone Cellular, Inc. Fluegel, Helseth, McLaU'. Anderson & Brutlag, American Express FinanC Arndt's Plumbing & Barr's Electric Ken's Fireworks Dairy Queen H illtop's Theatre of State Farm Agency Dr. Ronn McDaniel, JoLee's Jewelry ORTONVILLE 1999 COUPLES GOLF TOURNAMENT COMMITTEE Jerry and Melanie Wiegman, Val and Paula Blair and Anne Johnson, Tony Rausch, Scott Simonitch, Dave and Lori Larson and Dr. Bob INDEPENDENT .,,, By JDK Another small worlder! From two different persons, both miles apart and one whom we have not heard from in years, we received the same clipping from a recent issue of the Minnesota Historical Society's "Member News" publication show- ing an article on our Hobo Soup. The first person to point out the story was Ortonville's Judy Drewicke and the second, via mail, was Mary Kay O"Hearn of Minneapolis, who once worked for this newspaper under our late father-publisher Lem back in the 1950's. Mary Kay, by the way, keeps in touch with our Office Manager Arlene Wiese, and was in Graceville this past Saturday when her family helped celebrate Mary Crowe's 101st birthday, which was actually on July 9th. The article on Hobo Soup appeared in a section on "Eating," and showed one of the original labels used when it entered the marketplace bak in 1963. The "Eating" section opened at the History Center in the metro area on July 10th. "Food-relat- ed packages from Minnesota compa- nies include a label from Hobo Soup of Ortonville," the story stated. ***** Was good to see an old friend who stopped in one day recently to buy a case of Hobo Soup and renew his paper. Namely Dr. Bob Nelson, brother of Hank and Gene of Ortonville. Bob tended us many years back when we needed a doctor in Benson where he practiced for a while. He's now retired in St. Peter. With him was his new wife, Jeanette. The two were friends years ago during school days. She is from Bird Island. Paul Rice of Montevideo, a broth- er to Tom Rice of Big Stone City, and Evie Ulrich of Ortonville, says "I really stuck my foot in it this time!" He refers to a clipping which Dee Stre rec Tribune in Willmar. The story, with picture of Paul, is headlined "Flagman Vows to Shave Head For Charity," and goes on to say that "Paul Rice is putting his head on the line for charity. The professional flagman said he will shave his head if $2,500 is raised at the Grove Creek stock car races Saturday night to fight muscular dystrophy. He said if that much can be collected in the grandstands during the races, the winner of the Modified feature.., the evening's last race.., can shave his reddish, curly locks." We haven't heard if Paul's a baldy today or not! Here's one that might be for the record books of base- ball. Ethan Jansen, 9.year- old grandson of former resi- dent Lloyd Whiting and great grandson of the Lee Whitings of Ortonville, is a member of the Bloomington Tigers Little League baseball team. He recently completed an unassisted triple play. At his shortstop position, he caught a line drive, stepped on second base for the sec- ond out and ran to third base for the third out. Can you imagine anyone, let alone someone so young, having the savvy to know what to do?! ***** Chuckler for the Week Farmer Brown's 12 pigs are all females, so he asks Farmer Jones if he can bring them over to mate with Jones' male pigs. Jones agrees, so Brown loads his sows into his truck and drives them over to spend the day. "I've never raised pigs before," Brown says. "How will I know that piglets are on the way?" Just look for unusual behavior," replies Jones. The next morning Farmer Brown looks at his pigs and sees nothing unusual, so he loads them in the truck and brings them back to Jones' farm. The third day it's the same, so it's back to Jones' place again. Next morning Brown asks his wife, Honey, are the pigs doing anything unusual? .... Well," she says, "eleven of them are in the back of the truck and the twelfth one's honking the horn. I II WANT ADS the i 1111111 inexpensive way to shop III I Page 2 Most farmers who get out of farming do very well There is indeed life after farming. About 80 to 85 percent of farmers who leave the farm do very well with- in about four years, according to Val Farmer, psychologist and newspaper columnist who works with farm fami- lies. "They may not be doing as well financially," says Farmer about peo- ple who leave the land. "But they grow in character, develop resiliency and learn some new things about themselves. It takes awhile to find something different that they're good at. "The first two to three years are usually tough. They haven't connect- ed with what they do well. But once they make that connection, they find life is better. They're under less stress, and actually have vacations and weekends off." You can start a new, creative cycle at any age, says Farmer, who spoke at a recent Citizens' Forum on Minnesota's rural crisis. "Farmers-- and anyone for that matter-- can find something new at age 54, and go with it for another 20 years." A one-time farmer who's made a transition is Carolyn Weber, who farmed with her husband before they left the farm. Weber went back to school at the University of Minnesota-Crookston for an agricul- tural degree. "We've found we can have hope, and that we can stay in agriculture without farming," she says. And rural areas "aren't the only place you can be happy," she says. "I've made some really good friends in the city." Citizens' Forum sponsors, along with the University of Minnesota Extension Service, are KTCA televi- sion, Minnesota Public Radio, and the Star Tribune newspaper in Minneapolis. Two additional state forums are scheduled, each followed by locally based citizens' forums. The next one will be Aug. 5, with the theme, "How important is a strong rural economy to Minnesota?" It will originate from FarmFest, located at the Gilfillan Estate near Redwood Falls. The last in the forum series is Aug. 30, with the theme of "Creating a vision for the future of Minnesota agriculture." It will originate from the Fitzgerald Theater in downtown Saint Paul. Check with your county office of the University of Minnesota Extension Service for more informa- tion on the forums, and on a new web- site with hundreds of references to help rural families in crisis. You can also access it directly by entering www.extension.umn.edu, then click- ing on Rural Response. 1999 4-H fashion revue held The 1999 4-H Fashion Revue was held Thursday, July 22, at the Memorial Building in Clinton. This year's theme was "It's a sign of the Times". Registration started at 9:00 a.m. on Thursday morning with judg- ing beginning at 9:30 a.m. There are two divisions for the clothing and tex- tile project area, "Clothes You Buy" and "Clothes You Make". Each indi- vidual participated in conference judging for the two areas and they were also judged for how their gar- ment looked, otherwise known as Fashion Revue judging. Revealed at the evening public revue were the results from the Fashion Revue judging, which are as follows. Conference judging results will be made known at the county fair. "Clothes You Buy" Fashion Revue Honor Court included: Sabrina Strege, Sheila Krueger, Sally Helgeson, and Emily Haggerty. Honorable Mention went to Shelley Haggerty and Holly Krueger. The State Fair Trip went to Sabrina Strege, Alternate for State Fair is Sally Helgeson. In the "Clothes You Make" divi- sion, Fashion Revue Honor Court included: Meghan Smart, Sarah Maas, Emily Haggerty, and Sally Helgeson. Honorable Mention went Ortonville news to Shelley Haggerty, Danielle Karsky, and Sarah Maas. The State Fair Trip went to Meghan Smart, Alternate for State Fair is Sarah Maas. Thank you to all of those who par- ticipated in this year's Fashion Revue, our judges: Joanna Rustad, Diane Neisus, and Carol Maatz; Emcees: James Thompson and Kari Morrill; Photographer: Jessica Chase; and the Toqua Troopers 4-H Club for provid- ing refreshments. Also, a big thank you to J.C. Penny Catalog and Liebe Drug for two gift certificates and to the Big Stone County Highway Department for use of street signs, cones, vests, and hard hats. INDEPENDENT WANT ADS PAY All but walleyes in Week 12 of the Ortonville Independent Fishing Contest saw every category filled but walleyes, with Marcia Wondra of Ortonville winning in the northern category. Her 9 pound 15 ounce fish was weighed in at Bud's Bait of Ortonville. Don Morrill of Clinton won the perch category with his one pound entry, also weighed in at Bud's. In the bullhead category, Dean Anderson of Hartford Beach won fishing cont00 with a two pound fish,l , Hartford Beach Resort| SD. / Only the walleye this week, now at jackpots for $160, and jackpots stay the bullheads $ Several Artists To Be At Big Stone County An Iron Pour will again be part of the Big Stone County Fair. This year Kurt Dyrhaug along with Frank Heidelberg will be conducting the workshops and pour. Kurt Dyrhaug is a sculptor and adjunct instructor at the University of MN and College of Visual Arts. He has taken a new posi- tion at LaMar University, Texas start- ing in the fall. Frank Heidelberg works at Anurag Art Studio, Stillwater, where he does foundry work. He completed the metalwork for the "Korean War Memorial" locat- ed at the Minnesota State Capitol. Damon Daniels will also be involved along with several iron casting sculp- tors including Neil Thelen, David Hill, Shae O' Brien, Andrew MacGuffie, Paul Linden, Helen Slichter and Brad Hertko. Everyone is welcome to take part in the pattern making workshops on Thursday and Friday, July 29 and 30. Those have pre-registered, can decide to take part anytime. We only have supplies for a limited number of peo- ple so the remaining spots will be han- dled on a first-come-first serve basis. Everyone is also welcome to help or watch the making of the molds of the patterns made on Saturday, July 31. The cast iron pour event will take place from noon to 4 p.m. on Sunday, August 1 and lic viewing. This event has sponsored by Beardsley made possible in Southwest Humanities funds Legislature." been made by the es and Electric, R) Stattelman Lumber, State Bank, Big Ottertail Power Farmers Plumbing, Arrow Dru Dick's Auto Bank of Construction, Protection, Inc., Inc., Murray's Color Printing, of Chokio, City Bar and Lounge, Clinton Women's Anyone funds, reserving the pattern making tact Deb Swezey Gall Maxwell, Phone 839-2207 A five generation gathering and picture taking was held at Northridge Care Center recently. Families involved were the families of Lillian Danielson, Ruth Malkerson, Kerry Malkerson, Paul Maikerson and son Cody. Also there were their spouses and Dani Brandner and three sons from Bismarck ND and Lisa Malkerson Adair and Kyle Adair from the Garland, Texas area. Rose Gardens. Gladys stayed till Sat. and went with Danita to Fort Snelling. They went with the AAL group. Gladys Brehmer was a Sat. evening guest at the Edwin and Marilyn Goetsch home and enjoyed looking at the pictures of their recen trip. Gladys B. with Dean, Dorette, Alexis, Rachael and Jacob Clark family had Sun. noon lunch together and spent the afternoon together. Gladys B., Myron and Lorraine Schnaser, among others attended the Lillian Danielson, resident of Senior potluck Sunday evening at the Y Myron and Lorraine Schnaser were relatives, friends and her circle from Wed. evening supper guests at the Eidskog Church. Mr. and Mrs. Dale Bergman of Moore, OK. visited his aunt Lillian Danielson recently at Northridge. Bridge winners Friday afternoon at the Senior Center were Vi Hansen for the woman and Ken Simonitch for the men. An enjoyable afternoon was had by all. The family of the late Wm. and Sophie (Grube) Buck held a reunion at Rapid City SD on July 16-18th. Jerry and Alma Jorgenson of Ortonville and Wayne Jorgenson of St. Cloud were among family members who attended. A great time was had by all. Jerry and Alma Jorgenson attended a reunion for AAL representatives of the former Dean Meyers Agency of Fergus Falls on July 24th at Detroit Lakes. Dean and Marvel Meyers of Rapid City, SD also attended. Sunday evening visitors at the Jerry Jorgenson home were Jane and Carol Asche of Nassau and Ryan Behm of Fort Collins, CO. who is spending a few days at the Jerry Jorgenson home. Deborah Wenz was a Fri. overnight guest at Gladys Brehmer's and went home with Deb for the July 4th weekend to spend it with Deb and Tim Wenz home at Sartell till Tue. evening. They went to Glady's daughter Eric and Danita Born home at Plymouth. The next day they took a picnic lunch and went to the Lydale Gladys B. home. Much damage from storm Thursday "It was like it went in a block-wide path all the way from The Shop [of Big Stone City, SD] through the south part of Ortonville," stated Deb Wiik of Big Stone City on last Thursday's storm, which brought heavy rain and strong winds to the area. Wiik stated at her home, many trees and limbs were taken down, though the most damaging part was a 13 ton semi trailer which was picked up by the wind, moved several feet, then tipped over on its side. At the Gail and Glenda Elvecrog residence in Big Stone City, high winds picked up the top portion of a tree from one side of the house and drove it into the roof on the other side. Here in Ortonville, part of the roof of Wood's Carpet Connection was taken off, landing on Second Street. Traffic was diverted through the Sturdevant's Bumper to Bumper parking lot early Friday morning before the wreckage was cleaned up. As of presstime Monday, the National Weather Service has declaired the storm a microburst, meaning the area saw straightline winds only, not a tornado. Do you need to wind down, revitalize yourself, and awaken positive feelings that can otherwise be hindered by day-to-day stress? We at Emanuel Furniture and Carpet have been taking care of your many needs for over Sharon Falk 100 years. You can see that our range of services is always expanding. With the help of products from Colonial Candle of Cape Cod, we offer an opportunity for you to become relaxed and maintain a tie to nature's serenity. Come in to see our many new aromatherapy prod- ucts, including incense sticks, spa crystals, sachets and candles. We look forward to seeing you at Emanuet Furniture and Carpet. "A South Dakota Century Old Business" EI4APIUEL C/lltP00 HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 9arn-5:15pm; Sat. 9am-,tpm Toll free 888-4.524568 60S.4S2-4568 306 South Third Street Milbank, South Dakota 57252 Peepe00t Than Thanks to the following butinoto ant) in who helPeO make tki00 a very tucco00fu125th Couple00 Tournament thb past Without thoe Oonationt, we woulO have 00naking thb the 00ucco00ful event that it 74 apectal thank tlou to ot'00enzch ,_00ona and /14edzcat (00ente theg contibutiona to the OTHER SPONSORS OF THE COUPLES GOLF TOURNAMENT Rausch Brothers Monument Company, Inc. Northside Medical Center Cashtown Service Larson Funeral Homes Dallas I. Hanson Construction, Inc. CenBank Peter Hansen, DDS R. D. Schreiner & Associates Ortonville Auto & Supply Minnwest Bank Liebe Drug Matador Supper Club Steven Winther, DDS Ortonville Independent Big Stone Motel Pepsi Cola Company of Ortonville Marquette Bank, Big Stone Branch Ortonville Plumbing & Henrich & Sons DDD Wax Rendering Econo Lodge True Valu Hardware Bill's Super Valu Plus Big Stone Cellular, Inc. Fluegel, Helseth, McLaU'. Anderson & Brutlag, American Express FinanC Arndt's Plumbing & Barr's Electric Ken's Fireworks Dairy Queen H illtop's Theatre of State Farm Agency Dr. Ronn McDaniel, JoLee's Jewelry ORTONVILLE 1999 COUPLES GOLF TOURNAMENT COMMITTEE Jerry and Melanie Wiegman, Val and Paula Blair and Anne Johnson, Tony Rausch, Scott Simonitch, Dave and Lori Larson and Dr. Bob INDEPENDENT