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July 27, 1999     The Ortonville Independent
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f .I Men's Golf Schedule THURSDAY, JULY 29 18-HOLE LEAGUE TEAM 1 TEAM 25 Robert Pflueger Dan Petersen John Mathison Dick Berens TEAM 2 TEAM 26 Glenn Nelson Ray Sailer Dennis Hullstrom John Stolpman BIG ST()NE WALLEYE LEAGUE TEAM 3 TEAM 27 Bob Ross Randy Stattelman Bryan Delage Roger Sandberg TEAM 4 TEAM 28 Bill Thyrm Virgil Sis Blair Johnson Gary Watkins TEAM 5 TEAM 15 Tim Jurgens Todd Cloos Gordon Hippen Val Rausch TEAM 6 TEAM 16 Gordon Gloege Jerry Stattelman Verden Gerber Karl Duhr TEAM 7 TEAM 17 Err Mikkelson Gerry Kunz Herb Streich Tony Rausch TEAM8 TEAM 18 Art Novek Norm Davis Wendell Paulsen Tom Gronseth TEAM9 TEAM 19 Duane Stock Bill Hartman Was Strei Mike Rausch TEAM 29 TEAM 20 Charles Radermacher Gene O'Neill Morrie Hoffman John Drewelow TEAM 11 TEAM 21 Gary Johnson Virgil Gerber Tern/Gem Randy Stock TEAM 12 TEAM 22 Aden LaCombe Brett Jacobsen Ray Thompson Jim Kaercher TENd 13 TEAM 23 Joe Beming Scott Sirnonitch Dale Rnke Ron Athey TEAM 14 TEAM 24 Gary Dinnel Tom Kindt Brant Zahrbock Bill Pansch TEAM 10 Les Iverson V' Colago BYE 9-HOLE LEAGUE TEAM1 TEAM 14 TEAM 2 TEAM 15 Randy Christenssn Joe Radermacher Jim Teske Dave Reiffenberger TEAM3 TEAM 16 Tom Kramer Tim Gapp Jim Collins Greg Strobl TEAM4 TEAM 17 Vines Stegner Ryan Dinger R. D. Schreiner Roy Retcher TEAM 5 TEAM 18 Dan Oakes Curt Bystol Mark Hughes Dan Nelson TEAM 6 TEAM 19 Mark Thompson Dave Larson Dan Welberg Jim Schmeichel TEAM7 TEAM 20 Tim Holtquig Dennis Justison Gary Thomson John Cunningham TEAM8 TEAM 21 Greg Peterson Sammy Haugen Bernie Kirchberg Dave Ellingson TEAM 9 TEAM 22 Don Donais Mike Hynnek Roger Nomes Tim Giese TEAM I0 TEAM 23 Keith Glass Tim Sdrer Dave Gruenwald Mark Gem TEAM 11 TEAM 24 Jerry Wlegman Andy Johnson Brant Nelson John Sovell State record sunfish caught TEAM 12 TEAM 25 Eric Torgerson Scott Amdt Steve Hoffmann Greg Rasset Odd as it may sound, Rebecca Zirbel of Ortley, SD set a new state record with a fish that weighed less that a pound. The orange-spotted sunfish offi- cially weighed .550 ounces. It was 3.62 inches in length with a girth of 3.34 inches. Zirbel caught the record- breaking fish on June 23, 1999 on the Big Sioux River of Grant County. Fisheries Administrator Dennis Unkenholz said if an angler should catch a possible state record fish, the first thing to do is get it weighed on a certified scale. "Under South Dakota rules, the - WEEKLY Ist 2nd 3rd S, Amdt/M. 4th S, Amdt/J. LARGE TEAM 13 Mike Swanson Art Frounfelter .J SHEI Lady golfers plan scramble for August 7th An 18-hole three-lady scramble will be held at the Ortonville Golf Course Saturday, Aug. 7, 1999. The game will begin with a shotgun start at 9 a.m. Coffee and rolls will be served from 8 to 9 a.m. Dinner will be served following play. Cash, special and raf- fle prizes will be awarded. Advance registration must be in by Wed. Aug. 4th with, current MGA Handicap card, including GHIN num- ber, name, address and phone. Cost is $25.00 per player. Only one player per team with a handicap of 20.0 or less is allowed and the maximum handicap per play; er will be capped at 45; Total team handicap will be adjusted by the coxn- mittee. Field will be limited to 36 teams. To register call Ev Johnson 320- Native Prairie Our Natural Heritage By Sonja Farmer Native Prairie: Our Natural Heritage weight must be rounded down to the nearest ounce. To replace the existing record, a fish must weigh at least one ounce more. If it breaks the record by less than an ounce, the two fish will be listed as co-holders of the record," Unkenholz said. Once a possible state record has been caught, anglers should also con- tact a Game, Fish and Parks official who will positively identify the fish and sign a record fish form. In cases where positive identification of the species is difficult, a qualified ichthy- ologist may have to look at the fish. of the # the public. 6p.m. 37.8 # 21.7 # 15.7 # 11.8# 11.3 # MinnKota Bowhunters league results (Week 7) Denny Amberg 229 Aruie V'een 233 Scott Meyer 238 Jim Cloos 249 Renee McKinney 250 Kyle Loraff 166 Scott Dahle 235 Mike Dorry 194 Blain Gatz 237 Mark Baldry 274 Mark Veen 139 Top Team Renee McKinney Mark Baldry 839-218i or send info to her at RR2 Box 12, Ortonville MN 56278. Golf carts available for rent at the Club house 320-839-3606. most will not produce a seed head  either during the first summer. The second (spring and) summer will probably require a timely mowing around the middle of May or whenever the spring aggressive weeds start to compete with the warm season grasses. Two mowings in the MUDHEN REUNION. Players pictured above, left to right in back, are Chad Verg Sis, Steve Sis, Virgil Gerber and Brent Gerber. In front are Aaron Knutson, Rick Cox and Barry Gerber. Below, Verden Gerber catches while Rick Barrett swings for cartwheeling into home plate, one of his trademarks from "the old days". Controlling weeds in spring of the second year should help Mudhens flock to reun Conservation Reserve Land (CRP) the native warm season grasses get warm se grasse off to a good start, but the weed  .... Crlljjrict :., ootiti should b monitored  _ .: ,. . ' 'onservationiSt, Dakota County with [notes by Burton Hendrickson, District Conservationist, Lac Qui Parle County] Do you have land enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP)? Did you seed some native warm season grasses in the last year or two? Be sure you understand the rules for mowing for weed control on CRP land. While it is true that fully established CRP cover should be mowed after August 1 to protect nesting wildlife, it is often necessary to mow during May, June, July, and August during the first and often the second year when trying to establish native warm season grasses. Ideally, weed pressure should be controlled as well as possible before seeding the warm season grasses. During the first season, after planting in late May or early to mid June, expect to clip the weeds down to six to eight inches once the weeds get ten to twelve inches high. Expect to mow about once per month (three to four times) during the first season. This will, of course vary from year to year, depending on moisture and heat units. Typically the warm season grasses will grow only to a height of six inches the first growing season; frk00 00'tlet0000 dfi00dr00. i i i r GRANITE VALLEY HORSESHOE CLUB Week 11- July 20, 1999 Wendell Paulsen / The Clay House Roman Karels / self Mark Nirmeman / Cashtown Service Alex Johnson / Cashtown Service Don Tiegs / Cashtown Service T.J. Ninneman / Cashtown Service Matt Thyne Al gJ'dppen / Hedge & Herberg Roger Angerhofer / Self Ryan Hagen Bert Bertleson / Donut Shop Elroy Adermann / Cashtown Service Eric Collins i Olson Comtmction Bob Johnson / Self Bob Gottsleben Drew Johnson / Cashtown Service _ Curtis Olson I Cashtown Cafe I I W/L raNGER % WIN% 21/5 38.7 .807 22/8 29.1 .733 8/3 46.9 .727 23/10 22.4 .697 16/8 25.4 .667 7/5 10.2 .583 4/3 8.8 .571 17113 24.3 .567 12/11 3.8 .521 7/7 7.0 .500 4/5 23.1 .444 14/19 11.3 .424 10/17 9.7 .370 8/19 3.7 .296 3/9 2.7 .250 4/16 2.5 .200 0122 1.9 .000 _, ii least every three to four weeks. (A by Brent Gerber possible alternative option, under certain conditions, could be a controlled spring burn in early May to remove weedy debris and stimulate warm season grasses.) The second year may or may not require as many mowings. This will depend on the type and severity of the weed pressure. Thistles or other types of perennial weeds should be controlled by spot mowing or spraying. The most important thing to remember is that warm season' grasses are slow to start in the spring and are really not very apparent until July, August, and September. This means that they need adequate sunlight and space. So, clipping should be performed in such a way as to prevent matting of clipped vegetation. Rotary and sickle bar mowers are OK, but flail-type mowers are the best because they chop the material and distribute it more evenly on the surface. Never clip shorter than 6 inches. Good, thick stands of native warm season grasses take two to five years to become established. Once they are established they provide a hardy and highly desirable habitat for pheasants and other wildlife. On July 16 and 17, several members of the once infamous Odessa Mudhens gathered in Ortonville and Odessa for a reunion. The event included a social, a golf tournament, a picnic lunch, softball game and the traditional smart talk and loud laughter. Virgil and LeVon Gerber (the manager and first lady of Mudhen lore) hosted the social which allowed us all to get back up to date with one another's lives. Curiously, the conversation included a lot more political discussion than I remembered taking place during our ball playing days. As I recall, though we did discuss Jesse Ventura during both periods of time. On Saturday morning, Rick Barrett, Chad Gustafson and Brent Gerber shamed the group and walked off with the coveted Mudhen Reunion Golf Cups. The golfing wasn't much better than the baseball was years ago, but there was certainly less risk of injury. However, Carol Gustafson, sensitive to the Crazy Days event in Ortonville that day, was afflicted with a rare case of shopper's toe and walked Off tlae' course On the' sixth hole. Following golf, we progressed to our "field of dreams", Mudhen's Stadium in Odessa. After a delicious picnic lunch we braved the propect of taking batting practice with the "old hardball". The sight of Verden Gerber shagging flies in the outfield was akin to the thrill of viewing the Great Walendas in the circus. You know the prospect of tragedy was only a missed step away. Fortunately, disaster was averted. A softball game including wives, children, fathers, uncles, you name it followed and a great time was had by all. After what seemed like hours of play to the adults and just minutes to the children, the game ended a tie. The game was highlighted by a memorable cartwheel from Rick Barrett as he crossed the plate but was marred by Jay Sammon's decision to use Rick's circling legs as a target as if he were in a carnival game. Rick wasn't hurt and Jay did not win a prize. It was at this point, where the foolishness began and I reallzed my age. Bob Cox and Barry Gerber started to talk as if the Mudhens felt based on the the group in course if this team would need a least significant enhanced Mudhen's stadium. It was then re )resenting constituents were money going into Strei, a local typical philosophy whi( Mudhens back to As the debate spill over into a three kids started of light beer and muscles started we just went and laughing loud. A general consensuS It wouldn't take to High scores for Ortonv!lle High School Gracevzlle Gun C?sU.RandyWard, DustinJohnson ' sports lust around the Paul Koch, Dave Wollschaler, Gary Johnson, Glen Danielson 2, Vince Kehoe, Don Bahr, Don Forcier 24 - Paul Koch 2, Bill Fischer, Bob Watkins, Dustin Johnson 2, Vince Kehoe 2, Bob Orton 3, Neil Fritz, Jim Hipple 2, Gary Johnson, Matt Hippie, Paul Brandenburger, Glen Danielson, Don Bahr. 23 - Delmer Hauschild 3, Bob Watkins 2, Paul Brandenburger, Josh Behrens, Randy Behrens, Jim Hippie, Richard Brown. Youth League Ryan Pansch 7 Keith Clark 14 Grant Litchson 12, 13 Zach Lane 13, 19, 7 Jake Kleindl 13, 10 -- II II II I I " Our Wlkllife and Rsh cannot survive unless our Pleose do l,,our part.. , The Ortonville High School Fall Sports Season which includes Football, Volleyball, and Cross Country will begin in a few short weeks. Athletes are reminded to take care of a number of items before getting ready for their particular sport. First, all athletes must have a current physical on hand in the athletic director's office. Athletes in Minnesota are required to have a physical every three years. If players have had a serious illness or injury during the past year, it's a good idea to see a physician for safety sake. Most sports require a specialized type of shoe. Athletes should consider purchasing their shoes early enough so they can be broken in; this avoids blisters and other foot problems. Also, get in the habit of drinking I Ienty of water each day. Athletes ' drink a minimum of eight 8 :e glasses of water each day. This get them into the habit of ! 'ating their muscles early on. Proper clothing will help athletes be more comfortable once they begin practice. Loose fitting, light weight, light colored clothing will allow the body to stay cooler. And finally, The importance of being physically ready to participate in your sport cannot be underestimated. Today's athlete must be in good physical condition before they begin playing their sport. This allows the athlete to work and improve on skills without becoming too fatigued. Being in good physical condition before the. start of the sports season means they can improve their specific sports condition needed once the season has begun. Many Ortonville athletes take part in the summer conditioning programs that are offered at OHS. They are the athletes who will be ready to play once August rolls around. Unfortunately, there are athletes that choose to wait until the start of the season. What usually happens to this type of athlete is they are not physically ready to play, suffer more aches and pains, are more susceptible to injury, and for all practical purposes behind the athletes who have worked out. OHS athletes have more opporturities than most in the surrounding area to get in good shape, thanks to the Trojan Gym Summer Conditioning Program and the Female The Conditioning conditioning students Tuesday, and pick and workout  Each session minutes. meets at the Room, where work and circuit OHS speed. The Female also meets on Thursday at 5 This program specific needs concentrates stabilizing footwork, session lasts There is no either prol athletes pay ts put into the m retum is Page 6 00INDEPENDENT f .I Men's Golf Schedule THURSDAY, JULY 29 18-HOLE LEAGUE TEAM 1 TEAM 25 Robert Pflueger Dan Petersen John Mathison Dick Berens TEAM 2 TEAM 26 Glenn Nelson Ray Sailer Dennis Hullstrom John Stolpman BIG ST()NE WALLEYE LEAGUE TEAM 3 TEAM 27 Bob Ross Randy Stattelman Bryan Delage Roger Sandberg TEAM 4 TEAM 28 Bill Thyrm Virgil Sis Blair Johnson Gary Watkins TEAM 5 TEAM 15 Tim Jurgens Todd Cloos Gordon Hippen Val Rausch TEAM 6 TEAM 16 Gordon Gloege Jerry Stattelman Verden Gerber Karl Duhr TEAM 7 TEAM 17 Err Mikkelson Gerry Kunz Herb Streich Tony Rausch TEAM8 TEAM 18 Art Novek Norm Davis Wendell Paulsen Tom Gronseth TEAM9 TEAM 19 Duane Stock Bill Hartman Was Strei Mike Rausch TEAM 29 TEAM 20 Charles Radermacher Gene O'Neill Morrie Hoffman John Drewelow TEAM 11 TEAM 21 Gary Johnson Virgil Gerber Tern/Gem Randy Stock TEAM 12 TEAM 22 Aden LaCombe Brett Jacobsen Ray Thompson Jim Kaercher TENd 13 TEAM 23 Joe Beming Scott Sirnonitch Dale Rnke Ron Athey TEAM 14 TEAM 24 Gary Dinnel Tom Kindt Brant Zahrbock Bill Pansch TEAM 10 Les Iverson V' Colago BYE 9-HOLE LEAGUE TEAM1 TEAM 14 TEAM 2 TEAM 15 Randy Christenssn Joe Radermacher Jim Teske Dave Reiffenberger TEAM3 TEAM 16 Tom Kramer Tim Gapp Jim Collins Greg Strobl TEAM4 TEAM 17 Vines Stegner Ryan Dinger R. D. Schreiner Roy Retcher TEAM 5 TEAM 18 Dan Oakes Curt Bystol Mark Hughes Dan Nelson TEAM 6 TEAM 19 Mark Thompson Dave Larson Dan Welberg Jim Schmeichel TEAM7 TEAM 20 Tim Holtquig Dennis Justison Gary Thomson John Cunningham TEAM8 TEAM 21 Greg Peterson Sammy Haugen Bernie Kirchberg Dave Ellingson TEAM 9 TEAM 22 Don Donais Mike Hynnek Roger Nomes Tim Giese TEAM I0 TEAM 23 Keith Glass Tim Sdrer Dave Gruenwald Mark Gem TEAM 11 TEAM 24 Jerry Wlegman Andy Johnson Brant Nelson John Sovell State record sunfish caught TEAM 12 TEAM 25 Eric Torgerson Scott Amdt Steve Hoffmann Greg Rasset Odd as it may sound, Rebecca Zirbel of Ortley, SD set a new state record with a fish that weighed less that a pound. The orange-spotted sunfish offi- cially weighed .550 ounces. It was 3.62 inches in length with a girth of 3.34 inches. Zirbel caught the record- breaking fish on June 23, 1999 on the Big Sioux River of Grant County. Fisheries Administrator Dennis Unkenholz said if an angler should catch a possible state record fish, the first thing to do is get it weighed on a certified scale. "Under South Dakota rules, the - WEEKLY Ist 2nd 3rd S, Amdt/M. 4th S, Amdt/J. LARGE TEAM 13 Mike Swanson Art Frounfelter .J SHEI Lady golfers plan scramble for August 7th An 18-hole three-lady scramble will be held at the Ortonville Golf Course Saturday, Aug. 7, 1999. The game will begin with a shotgun start at 9 a.m. Coffee and rolls will be served from 8 to 9 a.m. Dinner will be served following play. Cash, special and raf- fle prizes will be awarded. Advance registration must be in by Wed. Aug. 4th with, current MGA Handicap card, including GHIN num- ber, name, address and phone. Cost is $25.00 per player. Only one player per team with a handicap of 20.0 or less is allowed and the maximum handicap per play; er will be capped at 45; Total team handicap will be adjusted by the coxn- mittee. Field will be limited to 36 teams. To register call Ev Johnson 320- Native Prairie Our Natural Heritage By Sonja Farmer Native Prairie: Our Natural Heritage weight must be rounded down to the nearest ounce. To replace the existing record, a fish must weigh at least one ounce more. If it breaks the record by less than an ounce, the two fish will be listed as co-holders of the record," Unkenholz said. Once a possible state record has been caught, anglers should also con- tact a Game, Fish and Parks official who will positively identify the fish and sign a record fish form. In cases where positive identification of the species is difficult, a qualified ichthy- ologist may have to look at the fish. of the # the public. 6p.m. 37.8 # 21.7 # 15.7 # 11.8# 11.3 # MinnKota Bowhunters league results (Week 7) Denny Amberg 229 Aruie V'een 233 Scott Meyer 238 Jim Cloos 249 Renee McKinney 250 Kyle Loraff 166 Scott Dahle 235 Mike Dorry 194 Blain Gatz 237 Mark Baldry 274 Mark Veen 139 Top Team Renee McKinney Mark Baldry 839-218i or send info to her at RR2 Box 12, Ortonville MN 56278. Golf carts available for rent at the Club house 320-839-3606. most will not produce a seed head  either during the first summer. The second (spring and) summer will probably require a timely mowing around the middle of May or whenever the spring aggressive weeds start to compete with the warm season grasses. Two mowings in the MUDHEN REUNION. Players pictured above, left to right in back, are Chad Verg Sis, Steve Sis, Virgil Gerber and Brent Gerber. In front are Aaron Knutson, Rick Cox and Barry Gerber. Below, Verden Gerber catches while Rick Barrett swings for cartwheeling into home plate, one of his trademarks from "the old days". Controlling weeds in spring of the second year should help Mudhens flock to reun Conservation Reserve Land (CRP) the native warm season grasses get warm se grasse off to a good start, but the weed  .... Crlljjrict :., ootiti should b monitored  _ .: ,. . ' 'onservationiSt, Dakota County with [notes by Burton Hendrickson, District Conservationist, Lac Qui Parle County] Do you have land enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP)? Did you seed some native warm season grasses in the last year or two? Be sure you understand the rules for mowing for weed control on CRP land. While it is true that fully established CRP cover should be mowed after August 1 to protect nesting wildlife, it is often necessary to mow during May, June, July, and August during the first and often the second year when trying to establish native warm season grasses. Ideally, weed pressure should be controlled as well as possible before seeding the warm season grasses. During the first season, after planting in late May or early to mid June, expect to clip the weeds down to six to eight inches once the weeds get ten to twelve inches high. Expect to mow about once per month (three to four times) during the first season. This will, of course vary from year to year, depending on moisture and heat units. Typically the warm season grasses will grow only to a height of six inches the first growing season; frk00 00'tlet0000 dfi00dr00. i i i r GRANITE VALLEY HORSESHOE CLUB Week 11- July 20, 1999 Wendell Paulsen / The Clay House Roman Karels / self Mark Nirmeman / Cashtown Service Alex Johnson / Cashtown Service Don Tiegs / Cashtown Service T.J. Ninneman / Cashtown Service Matt Thyne Al gJ'dppen / Hedge & Herberg Roger Angerhofer / Self Ryan Hagen Bert Bertleson / Donut Shop Elroy Adermann / Cashtown Service Eric Collins i Olson Comtmction Bob Johnson / Self Bob Gottsleben Drew Johnson / Cashtown Service _ Curtis Olson I Cashtown Cafe I I W/L raNGER % WIN% 21/5 38.7 .807 22/8 29.1 .733 8/3 46.9 .727 23/10 22.4 .697 16/8 25.4 .667 7/5 10.2 .583 4/3 8.8 .571 17113 24.3 .567 12/11 3.8 .521 7/7 7.0 .500 4/5 23.1 .444 14/19 11.3 .424 10/17 9.7 .370 8/19 3.7 .296 3/9 2.7 .250 4/16 2.5 .200 0122 1.9 .000 _, ii least every three to four weeks. (A by Brent Gerber possible alternative option, under certain conditions, could be a controlled spring burn in early May to remove weedy debris and stimulate warm season grasses.) The second year may or may not require as many mowings. This will depend on the type and severity of the weed pressure. Thistles or other types of perennial weeds should be controlled by spot mowing or spraying. The most important thing to remember is that warm season' grasses are slow to start in the spring and are really not very apparent until July, August, and September. This means that they need adequate sunlight and space. So, clipping should be performed in such a way as to prevent matting of clipped vegetation. Rotary and sickle bar mowers are OK, but flail-type mowers are the best because they chop the material and distribute it more evenly on the surface. Never clip shorter than 6 inches. Good, thick stands of native warm season grasses take two to five years to become established. Once they are established they provide a hardy and highly desirable habitat for pheasants and other wildlife. On July 16 and 17, several members of the once infamous Odessa Mudhens gathered in Ortonville and Odessa for a reunion. The event included a social, a golf tournament, a picnic lunch, softball game and the traditional smart talk and loud laughter. Virgil and LeVon Gerber (the manager and first lady of Mudhen lore) hosted the social which allowed us all to get back up to date with one another's lives. Curiously, the conversation included a lot more political discussion than I remembered taking place during our ball playing days. As I recall, though we did discuss Jesse Ventura during both periods of time. On Saturday morning, Rick Barrett, Chad Gustafson and Brent Gerber shamed the group and walked off with the coveted Mudhen Reunion Golf Cups. The golfing wasn't much better than the baseball was years ago, but there was certainly less risk of injury. However, Carol Gustafson, sensitive to the Crazy Days event in Ortonville that day, was afflicted with a rare case of shopper's toe and walked Off tlae' course On the' sixth hole. Following golf, we progressed to our "field of dreams", Mudhen's Stadium in Odessa. After a delicious picnic lunch we braved the propect of taking batting practice with the "old hardball". The sight of Verden Gerber shagging flies in the outfield was akin to the thrill of viewing the Great Walendas in the circus. You know the prospect of tragedy was only a missed step away. Fortunately, disaster was averted. A softball game including wives, children, fathers, uncles, you name it followed and a great time was had by all. After what seemed like hours of play to the adults and just minutes to the children, the game ended a tie. The game was highlighted by a memorable cartwheel from Rick Barrett as he crossed the plate but was marred by Jay Sammon's decision to use Rick's circling legs as a target as if he were in a carnival game. Rick wasn't hurt and Jay did not win a prize. It was at this point, where the foolishness began and I reallzed my age. Bob Cox and Barry Gerber started to talk as if the Mudhens felt based on the the group in course if this team would need a least significant enhanced Mudhen's stadium. It was then re )resenting constituents were money going into Strei, a local typical philosophy whi( Mudhens back to As the debate spill over into a three kids started of light beer and muscles started we just went and laughing loud. A general consensuS It wouldn't take to High scores for Ortonv!lle High School Gracevzlle Gun C?sU.RandyWard, DustinJohnson ' sports lust around the Paul Koch, Dave Wollschaler, Gary Johnson, Glen Danielson 2, Vince Kehoe, Don Bahr, Don Forcier 24 - Paul Koch 2, Bill Fischer, Bob Watkins, Dustin Johnson 2, Vince Kehoe 2, Bob Orton 3, Neil Fritz, Jim Hipple 2, Gary Johnson, Matt Hippie, Paul Brandenburger, Glen Danielson, Don Bahr. 23 - Delmer Hauschild 3, Bob Watkins 2, Paul Brandenburger, Josh Behrens, Randy Behrens, Jim Hippie, Richard Brown. Youth League Ryan Pansch 7 Keith Clark 14 Grant Litchson 12, 13 Zach Lane 13, 19, 7 Jake Kleindl 13, 10 -- II II II I I " Our Wlkllife and Rsh cannot survive unless our Pleose do l,,our part.. , The Ortonville High School Fall Sports Season which includes Football, Volleyball, and Cross Country will begin in a few short weeks. Athletes are reminded to take care of a number of items before getting ready for their particular sport. First, all athletes must have a current physical on hand in the athletic director's office. Athletes in Minnesota are required to have a physical every three years. If players have had a serious illness or injury during the past year, it's a good idea to see a physician for safety sake. Most sports require a specialized type of shoe. Athletes should consider purchasing their shoes early enough so they can be broken in; this avoids blisters and other foot problems. Also, get in the habit of drinking I Ienty of water each day. Athletes ' drink a minimum of eight 8 :e glasses of water each day. This get them into the habit of ! 'ating their muscles early on. Proper clothing will help athletes be more comfortable once they begin practice. Loose fitting, light weight, light colored clothing will allow the body to stay cooler. And finally, The importance of being physically ready to participate in your sport cannot be underestimated. Today's athlete must be in good physical condition before they begin playing their sport. This allows the athlete to work and improve on skills without becoming too fatigued. Being in good physical condition before the. start of the sports season means they can improve their specific sports condition needed once the season has begun. Many Ortonville athletes take part in the summer conditioning programs that are offered at OHS. They are the athletes who will be ready to play once August rolls around. Unfortunately, there are athletes that choose to wait until the start of the season. What usually happens to this type of athlete is they are not physically ready to play, suffer more aches and pains, are more susceptible to injury, and for all practical purposes behind the athletes who have worked out. OHS athletes have more opporturities than most in the surrounding area to get in good shape, thanks to the Trojan Gym Summer Conditioning Program and the Female The Conditioning conditioning students Tuesday, and pick and workout  Each session minutes. meets at the Room, where work and circuit OHS speed. The Female also meets on Thursday at 5 This program specific needs concentrates stabilizing footwork, session lasts There is no either prol athletes pay ts put into the m retum is Page 6 00INDEPENDENT