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July 27, 1999     The Ortonville Independent
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ROOTS IN MINNESOTA recently were Hans and kien, Telemark region. The couple jour- n, located near Browerville. taken at Sherman's Studio, in the same wedding photo had been taken in son Tommy, 8, and Remy, 12 1/2, is at right. family travels to ta to retrace roots Hauge of Skien, journeyed the third time their roots in the guests of family, was a sister to to America in the .ns' grandfather to near for work, as was for children in his wife there in 1903. the Browerville and returned to father was 7, Hans family and the writing back and they came to the U.S. for the first time. This year, the family had their photo taken in the same building as their grandparents' wedding photo in 1903, at the present day Sherman's Studio (then Lee's Studio) in Ortonville. Ingunn said the family was excited to be in the same place as their grandparents had been many years ago, and the family dressed in their clothing for special occasions. Each region in Norway has a particular design to their clothing even today. Hanson and his family also traveled to Norway last July to retrace their roots, and the two families still exchange many cards and letters. "Next year, we would like to also see Washington state, because we have family there also," says Hans. ..... We plan t0 come back here every two year if we can/' Ingunn adds. and Tommy, 8 ...... "Everyone is very friendly,and we States and his love to see where our grandparents in 1995 when had lived." Schoen (continued from page lb) value of the trust yearly for 15 years. The trust should earn more than 6 percent annually, which means the principal will grow over time, as will the size of the payments to the Schoens. At the end of 15 years, the payments cease, and the trust, which then could be worth $1.5 million, reverts to the Minnesota Waterfowl Association. That would be a windfall for the 7,500-member, nonprofit conservation orga- nization, allowing it to preserve and restore other lands. McGinty said his group likely will be able to leverage other state, federal or foundation dol- lars to match the $1.5 million, meaning mil- lions of dollars eventually could be used to protect waterfowl habitat statewide. "Not only is Warren doing something really significant, but it will have a bigger impact around the rest of the state," McGinty said. "This will be a new vehicle for protecting habi- tat. not only in Minnesota but around the Midwest." Others will benefit There is one drawback for hunters who enjoy hunting on public lands: Unlike land that is bought by the state or federal govern- ments and converted into public hunting areas, these lands remain private. The landowners continue to pay property taxes, an aspect that pleases local governments, But McGlnty and Fish and Wildlife Service officials say other people besides the landowners will see the results of the im- proved habitat and its benefits to wildlife. Two public hunting areas abut the property, and deer, waterfowl and pheasants raised on the land will scatter to adjoining [ands. Plus, the habitat restoraUon will improve water quality in the nearby lakes, Thieike and Swenson. "Sportsmen will benefit," said Wayne Hen- derson, a wildlife biologist with the Fish and Wildlife Service who has been involved with the project. "They'll hunt deer and pheasant and ducks that are raised here. This is truly an impressive area." So impressive that the state at one time wanted to buy six square miles for waterfowl habitat. Landowners weren't interested in sell- ing, and the idea was dropped. Now, a signifi- cant piece of that area will be preserved for- ever. During a recent visit to the property, Schoen pointed out favorite places where he hunted ducks, geese and pheasants. The land- scape has changed in recent years -- high water has turned cattail sloughs into lakes. "This was a beautiful little weed patch for pheasants," he said, pointing to a basin brim. ruing with water. A 50-year-old hunting cabin that Schoen and his friends used to walk to now sits almost in Swenson Lake. The memories remain. "1 really enjoyed it out here," Schoen said, looking over the green rolling landscape and glistening blue waters visitedthis day by peli- cans, Canada geese, mallards, wood ducks, cormorants and other waterfowl. "I feel ood that it will be preserved." UMM spring quarter Dean's List named Vaughn Kelly of Ortonville was among the students named to the Dean's List at the University of Minnesota, Morris for spring quarter, 1999. To be eligible for the Dean's List, a student must have a grade point average of 3.5 on a 4.0 scale, be registered for a minimum of 12 credits, complete all credits for which they are registered, and carry at leasC  two-thirds of these credits on the A- B-C-D-N grading system. are I INDEPENDENT WANT ADS BRING QUICK RESULTS! ] Army still use help with some peg[ who Could help with g, spackling, and repair, and then we should contact: m, (Volunteer Army .at the United In Montevideo, dates will on the level of Sponse. There is interested ! mouraged with ADS BIG STONE AREA COMMUNITY THEATRE PRESENTS A THREE-ACT DINNER THEATRE COMEDY "More Than Meets the Eye" AUGUST 8, 9, 10 NEW LIFE COMMUNITY CENTER N. MINNESOTA STREET, ORTONVILLE FOR RESERVATIONS CALL: ISABEL, 839-2901 OR -- , SANDY, 839-6222 _ -- -."'', DINNER 6:15 PM  ) / CURTAIN 7:30 PM  I (Q ENJOYING THE JULY CHRISTMAS LIGHTS was this group at the Lakeshore RV Park a week ago Saturday evening. The group decorated their trailers and tents to celebrate "Christmas in July Crazy Day", held Saturday in Ortonville. Court report (Week of July 20th, 1999) MINNESOTA HWY PATROL Steven Alan Wordes, Renville, Speeding 65/55, Fined $35, Surcharge $25, Court Costs $15. Shannon A. Yeske, Aberdeen, SD., Speeding 77/55, Fined $65, Surcharge $25, Court Costs $15. Curtis T. Bliss, Fairway, KS, Speeding 76/55, Fined $65, Surcharge $25, Court Costs $15. Cheryl Elaine Kieso, Watertown, SD, Seatbelt Violation, Fined $25, Surcharge $25, Court Costs $10. Arid Donald Perchel, Litchfietd, Speeding 64/55, Fined $35, Surcharge $25, Court Costs $15. Doris Jean Redford, Big Stone City, SD, Speeding 69/55, Fined $45, Surcharge $25, Court Costs $15. Patricia Ann Heldt, Alexandria, Speeding 69/55, Fined $45, Surcharge $25, Court Costs $15. Gary Lee Nielsen, Warner, SD, Speeding 65/55, Fined $35, Surcharge $25, Court Costs $15. Richard Alan Seidel, Bison, SD, Speeding 69/55, Fined $45, Surcharge $25, Court Costs $15. ORTONVILLE POLICE DEPT, Daniel Ryan Brandenburger, Nassau, Fail Report Accident, Disposition Cont'd for Dismissal Michael J. Zagurski, Fremont, NE, Speeding 44/30, Fined $45, Surcharge $25, Court Costs $15. BIG STONE CO. SHERIFF Vicki Jean Bartz, Browns Valley, Speeding 51/40, Fined $45, Surcharge $25, Court Costs $15. Steven Robert Walter, Ortonville, Drive After Cancellation, Fined $300, Unsupervised Probation for 6 months. Douglas Duane Bahr, Appleton, Theft, Fined $1000, Stayed $850. Surcharge $25, Court Costs $10, Jail/ Prison: 100 days stayed for 1 yrs., Unsupervised Probation for I yrs. Troy Donald Carrington, Graceville, Assault Fifth Degree, Fined $500, Stayed $290, Surcharge $25, Court Costs $10, Jail/Prison Stayed 30 days for 1 yrs, Supervised Probation for 1 yr Rodney Dennis Mithun, Cyrus, Theft, Fined $3000, Stayed $2800, Surcharge $25, Court Costs $10, Jail/Prison 2 days Stayed 365 days for 1 yrs. DNR Bruce Allan Lundin, Hanley Falls, I Walleye Over Limit, Fined $75, Surcharge $25, Court Costs $15. i i , ANTIQUE ESTATE AUCTION - SATURDAY, JULY 31, 1999, 10:00 A.M. FROM PINE RIVER, MR, 2-1/2 MILES NORTH ON 371 [his auchon offers some exceplional antique household and primitive decor, including several early Red Wing salt glaze crocks, iugs arid churns, many bottom signed and some with buttertty marking Many unusual antiques have been in the Blundt fatuity for generations and since the passing of Mrs Biundt her large accumulatiOn will be offered to the highest bidder without reserve Antique oak furniture, 0rientl tugs, wicker lurnttuee, glassware, stoneware. Columbia phonograph wilh horn. ve/old hand sewn linen and fancywork, vintage clolhing. Aladdin lamps. Baird wall clock advertising Gartield lea - "Crees Constipalion and eslores Complexion." Gemlan tm wind-up sailor, 20- gallon sleam Ihreshmg water cooler, 1800s Angora goal chaps, wooden fishing plugs and related. 10- place gun cabinet, 1939 N Y. 12' wooden guide canoe. Winchester firearms and accessories, horse drawn cutter sleigh and roadgrader, 1967 Sears Scorpion snowmobile. 1965 Volkswagen woodie station wagon. Calilornia car. sound body and mechanical and mucll more. 10% BP Complete listing 218-587- 3008, FAX 218-587-3025 HEARTLAND AUCTION COMPANY; auctioneer, James Pelerson, 71-21, i ii NORTHEAST ORTHOPAEDIC ...... CENTER ........ Serving N.E. South Dakota and Western Minnesota for 13 years Seeing patients weekly at the Ortonville Hospital. Call Lori Larson at 1-320-839-2502 for an appointment. WE NOW ACCEPT MEDICARE ASSI6NMENT or 1-800-658-4763 Mallard Pointe Business Park Watertown, SD L Seemon, D. Mkheei 1. Verier, M.D. ten B. Kolodychdc, M.D. Senior Housing Minnesota's "older" consumers today have many more housing options than previous generations of seniors. They demand quality, inde- pendence and choice, which has led to the creation of over 1600 senior housing communities of every type, including: market rate and federally- subsidized apartments, some with assisted living services; adult foster care; board and lodging; and non-certified boarding care homes. Pleasant View Apartments in Appleton is one of the finest examples of independent, market rate apartment com- plexes in this area. For more "llF"qm "ll Yleasat information on Pleasant View or other housing opportunities View ot[ available in this area, call Judy at /Pl)leton 320-289-1163. Win SlOOO Cash Every Friday! -"or I entry at 8, 9 and 10pro party. Live entertainment and great specials Lots of easy ways to qualify. Weekday Cash drawings every Monday, Tuesday, & Wednesday for S200 to SSO0 and entry for the Grand Prize. Grand Prize drawings July 28th starting at 6pro for a total of SlO, O00 and the $2S,000 Grand Prize. i/ I: You Win, You I[[! Choose Your Prize ple Diamonds" machines We've given away 11 boats, 6 ATV's & 2 lawn tractors since February Don't miss your chance to win! 1999  INDEPENDENT Page 3b ROOTS IN MINNESOTA recently were Hans and kien, Telemark region. The couple jour- n, located near Browerville. taken at Sherman's Studio, in the same wedding photo had been taken in son Tommy, 8, and Remy, 12 1/2, is at right. family travels to ta to retrace roots Hauge of Skien, journeyed the third time their roots in the guests of family, was a sister to to America in the .ns' grandfather to near for work, as was for children in his wife there in 1903. the Browerville and returned to father was 7, Hans family and the writing back and they came to the U.S. for the first time. This year, the family had their photo taken in the same building as their grandparents' wedding photo in 1903, at the present day Sherman's Studio (then Lee's Studio) in Ortonville. Ingunn said the family was excited to be in the same place as their grandparents had been many years ago, and the family dressed in their clothing for special occasions. Each region in Norway has a particular design to their clothing even today. Hanson and his family also traveled to Norway last July to retrace their roots, and the two families still exchange many cards and letters. "Next year, we would like to also see Washington state, because we have family there also," says Hans. ..... We plan t0 come back here every two year if we can/' Ingunn adds. and Tommy, 8 ...... "Everyone is very friendly,and we States and his love to see where our grandparents in 1995 when had lived." Schoen (continued from page lb) value of the trust yearly for 15 years. The trust should earn more than 6 percent annually, which means the principal will grow over time, as will the size of the payments to the Schoens. At the end of 15 years, the payments cease, and the trust, which then could be worth $1.5 million, reverts to the Minnesota Waterfowl Association. That would be a windfall for the 7,500-member, nonprofit conservation orga- nization, allowing it to preserve and restore other lands. McGinty said his group likely will be able to leverage other state, federal or foundation dol- lars to match the $1.5 million, meaning mil- lions of dollars eventually could be used to protect waterfowl habitat statewide. "Not only is Warren doing something really significant, but it will have a bigger impact around the rest of the state," McGinty said. "This will be a new vehicle for protecting habi- tat. not only in Minnesota but around the Midwest." Others will benefit There is one drawback for hunters who enjoy hunting on public lands: Unlike land that is bought by the state or federal govern- ments and converted into public hunting areas, these lands remain private. The landowners continue to pay property taxes, an aspect that pleases local governments, But McGlnty and Fish and Wildlife Service officials say other people besides the landowners will see the results of the im- proved habitat and its benefits to wildlife. Two public hunting areas abut the property, and deer, waterfowl and pheasants raised on the land will scatter to adjoining [ands. Plus, the habitat restoraUon will improve water quality in the nearby lakes, Thieike and Swenson. "Sportsmen will benefit," said Wayne Hen- derson, a wildlife biologist with the Fish and Wildlife Service who has been involved with the project. "They'll hunt deer and pheasant and ducks that are raised here. This is truly an impressive area." So impressive that the state at one time wanted to buy six square miles for waterfowl habitat. Landowners weren't interested in sell- ing, and the idea was dropped. Now, a signifi- cant piece of that area will be preserved for- ever. During a recent visit to the property, Schoen pointed out favorite places where he hunted ducks, geese and pheasants. The land- scape has changed in recent years -- high water has turned cattail sloughs into lakes. "This was a beautiful little weed patch for pheasants," he said, pointing to a basin brim. ruing with water. A 50-year-old hunting cabin that Schoen and his friends used to walk to now sits almost in Swenson Lake. The memories remain. "1 really enjoyed it out here," Schoen said, looking over the green rolling landscape and glistening blue waters visitedthis day by peli- cans, Canada geese, mallards, wood ducks, cormorants and other waterfowl. "I feel ood that it will be preserved." UMM spring quarter Dean's List named Vaughn Kelly of Ortonville was among the students named to the Dean's List at the University of Minnesota, Morris for spring quarter, 1999. To be eligible for the Dean's List, a student must have a grade point average of 3.5 on a 4.0 scale, be registered for a minimum of 12 credits, complete all credits for which they are registered, and carry at leasC  two-thirds of these credits on the A- B-C-D-N grading system. are I INDEPENDENT WANT ADS BRING QUICK RESULTS! ] Army still use help with some peg[ who Could help with g, spackling, and repair, and then we should contact: m, (Volunteer Army .at the United In Montevideo, dates will on the level of Sponse. There is interested ! mouraged with ADS BIG STONE AREA COMMUNITY THEATRE PRESENTS A THREE-ACT DINNER THEATRE COMEDY "More Than Meets the Eye" AUGUST 8, 9, 10 NEW LIFE COMMUNITY CENTER N. MINNESOTA STREET, ORTONVILLE FOR RESERVATIONS CALL: ISABEL, 839-2901 OR -- , SANDY, 839-6222 _ -- -."'', DINNER 6:15 PM  ) / CURTAIN 7:30 PM  I (Q ENJOYING THE JULY CHRISTMAS LIGHTS was this group at the Lakeshore RV Park a week ago Saturday evening. The group decorated their trailers and tents to celebrate "Christmas in July Crazy Day", held Saturday in Ortonville. Court report (Week of July 20th, 1999) MINNESOTA HWY PATROL Steven Alan Wordes, Renville, Speeding 65/55, Fined $35, Surcharge $25, Court Costs $15. Shannon A. Yeske, Aberdeen, SD., Speeding 77/55, Fined $65, Surcharge $25, Court Costs $15. Curtis T. Bliss, Fairway, KS, Speeding 76/55, Fined $65, Surcharge $25, Court Costs $15. Cheryl Elaine Kieso, Watertown, SD, Seatbelt Violation, Fined $25, Surcharge $25, Court Costs $10. Arid Donald Perchel, Litchfietd, Speeding 64/55, Fined $35, Surcharge $25, Court Costs $15. Doris Jean Redford, Big Stone City, SD, Speeding 69/55, Fined $45, Surcharge $25, Court Costs $15. Patricia Ann Heldt, Alexandria, Speeding 69/55, Fined $45, Surcharge $25, Court Costs $15. Gary Lee Nielsen, Warner, SD, Speeding 65/55, Fined $35, Surcharge $25, Court Costs $15. Richard Alan Seidel, Bison, SD, Speeding 69/55, Fined $45, Surcharge $25, Court Costs $15. ORTONVILLE POLICE DEPT, Daniel Ryan Brandenburger, Nassau, Fail Report Accident, Disposition Cont'd for Dismissal Michael J. Zagurski, Fremont, NE, Speeding 44/30, Fined $45, Surcharge $25, Court Costs $15. BIG STONE CO. SHERIFF Vicki Jean Bartz, Browns Valley, Speeding 51/40, Fined $45, Surcharge $25, Court Costs $15. Steven Robert Walter, Ortonville, Drive After Cancellation, Fined $300, Unsupervised Probation for 6 months. Douglas Duane Bahr, Appleton, Theft, Fined $1000, Stayed $850. Surcharge $25, Court Costs $10, Jail/ Prison: 100 days stayed for 1 yrs., Unsupervised Probation for I yrs. Troy Donald Carrington, Graceville, Assault Fifth Degree, Fined $500, Stayed $290, Surcharge $25, Court Costs $10, Jail/Prison Stayed 30 days for 1 yrs, Supervised Probation for 1 yr Rodney Dennis Mithun, Cyrus, Theft, Fined $3000, Stayed $2800, Surcharge $25, Court Costs $10, Jail/Prison 2 days Stayed 365 days for 1 yrs. DNR Bruce Allan Lundin, Hanley Falls, I Walleye Over Limit, Fined $75, Surcharge $25, Court Costs $15. i i , ANTIQUE ESTATE AUCTION - SATURDAY, JULY 31, 1999, 10:00 A.M. FROM PINE RIVER, MR, 2-1/2 MILES NORTH ON 371 [his auchon offers some exceplional antique household and primitive decor, including several early Red Wing salt glaze crocks, iugs arid churns, many bottom signed and some with buttertty marking Many unusual antiques have been in the Blundt fatuity for generations and since the passing of Mrs Biundt her large accumulatiOn will be offered to the highest bidder without reserve Antique oak furniture, 0rientl tugs, wicker lurnttuee, glassware, stoneware. Columbia phonograph wilh horn. ve/old hand sewn linen and fancywork, vintage clolhing. Aladdin lamps. Baird wall clock advertising Gartield lea - "Crees Constipalion and eslores Complexion." Gemlan tm wind-up sailor, 20- gallon sleam Ihreshmg water cooler, 1800s Angora goal chaps, wooden fishing plugs and related. 10- place gun cabinet, 1939 N Y. 12' wooden guide canoe. Winchester firearms and accessories, horse drawn cutter sleigh and roadgrader, 1967 Sears Scorpion snowmobile. 1965 Volkswagen woodie station wagon. Calilornia car. sound body and mechanical and mucll more. 10% BP Complete listing 218-587- 3008, FAX 218-587-3025 HEARTLAND AUCTION COMPANY; auctioneer, James Pelerson, 71-21, i ii NORTHEAST ORTHOPAEDIC ...... CENTER ........ Serving N.E. South Dakota and Western Minnesota for 13 years Seeing patients weekly at the Ortonville Hospital. Call Lori Larson at 1-320-839-2502 for an appointment. WE NOW ACCEPT MEDICARE ASSI6NMENT or 1-800-658-4763 Mallard Pointe Business Park Watertown, SD L Seemon, D. Mkheei 1. Verier, M.D. ten B. Kolodychdc, M.D. Senior Housing Minnesota's "older" consumers today have many more housing options than previous generations of seniors. They demand quality, inde- pendence and choice, which has led to the creation of over 1600 senior housing communities of every type, including: market rate and federally- subsidized apartments, some with assisted living services; adult foster care; board and lodging; and non-certified boarding care homes. Pleasant View Apartments in Appleton is one of the finest examples of independent, market rate apartment com- plexes in this area. For more "llF"qm "ll Yleasat information on Pleasant View or other housing opportunities View ot[ available in this area, call Judy at /Pl)leton 320-289-1163. Win SlOOO Cash Every Friday! -"or I entry at 8, 9 and 10pro party. Live entertainment and great specials Lots of easy ways to qualify. Weekday Cash drawings every Monday, Tuesday, & Wednesday for S200 to SSO0 and entry for the Grand Prize. Grand Prize drawings July 28th starting at 6pro for a total of SlO, O00 and the $2S,000 Grand Prize. i/ I: You Win, You I[[! Choose Your Prize ple Diamonds" machines We've given away 11 boats, 6 ATV's & 2 lawn tractors since February Don't miss your chance to win! 1999  INDEPENDENT Page 3b