Newspaper Archive of
The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
Lyft
July 29, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
PAGE 1     (1 of 22 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 1     (1 of 22 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
July 29, 2003
 

Newspaper Archive of The Ortonville Independent produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




IN oons, rDveoewsEoer,n,00,ve00o00muEn,t, " NDENT o .... WHEAT CROPS in many a year is what area farmers are saying of this year's crop, har- underway. In photo above, you see Greg Streich working on aT40-acre field west of Big According to Renee Athey of Ortonville Farmers Elevator, yields are running anywhere per acre, with excellent quality. House Wednesday for new Outpat,ent Clinic Services House this to celebrate the of the new .will begin at 4 by Robert Staff; Hospital President of Health president of Foundation David Dinnel. 4:30 addition will be held every 10 ling a space The Into the new addi- tion from its current location west of the Ortonville Hospital. Big Stone Therapies will also relo- cate into the Outpatient Services Center. The area allocated for Big Stone Therapies includes ample room to house all services currently provid- ed by Big Stone Therapies. A Specialist Physician Outreach Area is a new addition to OAHS, and offers a space for specialists to visit with their patients and consult wth local physicians. OAHS Radiology Services has also expanded as a result of the new center. Another radiology room has been added, so there are now two rooms available. Addditionally, an inhouse CT Scanner and an area des- ignated for women's services are included in the Radiology Center. Also included in the Outpatient Clinic is a state-of-the-art, 1200 square feet space allocated for chemotherapy treatment. The Northside Medical Clinic will be closed on Friday, August 1 to allow physicians and staff to move into their new location. The official opening date of the center has been set for Monday, August 4. Staff members at OAHS are excit- ed about this new addition, and feel that the new Outpatient Clinic will be a wonderful asset to the area. The public is invited to attend the Open House and take a tour of the new clinic at Ortonville Area Health Services. Celebration festivities will begin at 4:00 p.m. and will run until 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday. Refreshments will be offered and prizes vail be given during the open house. hears presentation Development Services Economic met in a spe- July 14 to from and to discuss OWner of in Ivanhoe, to present the ways in which his business can assist the EDA with their duties. Development Services had sent a proposal to the EDA in which the firm would manage the daily and ongoing administration of Ortonville's EDA, and a staff member would attend EDA and City Council meetings as direct- ed. According to Olson, his company has many employees who offer a vari- ety of experience, the ability to be flexible and traveling mileage is not a concern to the company. Karen Pollard, a representative with Development Services, was also (Continued on page 3) sought for "Miss lie Area" pageant 2003 the Ortonville contestants must have lived in the area 11 or 12 for at least one year by August of this for year. Miss Ortonville Area Competitors held during must be single, must never have been  enter must be a married, and have no children. Additionally, Additionally, she must be in good Dm Ortonville greeted TRAM riders as they ay afternoon. Some of the greeters are shown Area Tourism volunteer Georgia Kolb, driving Wore red cowboy hats and purple shirts. Those are, left to right, Lorrayne Karn, Anna Rothi, Kaercher. standing with her school and commu- nity, possess high morale character, and not use alcohol, tobacco or other controlled substances. Winning the title of Miss Ortonville Area allows young women to participate as a visiting queen in all parades and any other functions that may occur throughout the year in con- junction with the Chamber of Commerce and/or the Miss Ortonville Area Royalty Committee. Deadlines for anyone wishing to enter as a can- didate is August 12. Forms can be dropped off at the Big Stone Lake Area Chamber of Commerce office. Forms may also be picked up at the office. Marlyce Thompson, a volunteer for the pageant, notes the only change in this year's contest is that no spon- sors will be used. "The girls will just be able to sign up and go from there, they do not need to worry about find- ing a sponsor," said Thompson. Young girls wishing to enter the Little Miss competition must be enter- ing into the first grade this fall. Judging will be non-competitive luck of the draw. Dresses are required for the Little Miss portion of the pageant, but need not be formal. Anyone with questions on entering either portion of the competition may contact Marlyce Thompson at 839- 2991 (work) or 273-2314 (home). Council hears positive audit, w, II hold city-w,de pick up Ortonville's city council received its annual audit at their regular meet- ing last Monday. Tom Koop of Larson, Allen Weischairs and Company (LAWCO) attended the meeting to review the City's financial audit. According to Koop, the purpose of his presentation was to give an overview about the findings of the audit. He stated the process used dur- ing the audit was to gather numbers to ensure that they fairly reflect what happened financially in 2002. Koop mentioned that the auditors checked that all policies and proce- dures were followed by city officials when doing the books. He commend- ed the Council because auditors found no errors or violations of the legal compliance guide. He also reviewed with Councilmembers the financial results of the audit. According to Koop, cities should try to have an sufficient reserves on hand for the first half of a year, because cities do not generate much of their income before July. He mentioned that Ortonville's general fund was slightly low last year. He advised the Council to look for ways to secure the reserve amount and to make sure the reserves do not drop into an unstable range. Koop also praised Councilmembers for being under bud- get in almost every expenditure cate- gory. He felt that this was not because there had been alot of cuts, but because the City had created a very conservative budget. Koop congratulated the coun- cilmembers on a good financial audit.According to him, the city's financial stability is good, the record keeping is clean, and in general, it was a very positive auditor's report. iA motion was made by coun- cdmembers to accept the audit report. The motion was seconded and carried. Roger Anderson, Ortonville City Public Works Director, was also pre- sent at the meeting, and advised the Council of the costs of holding a city- wide appliance pick up. The idea of a pick up for large household items was given at the last meeting, and Councilmembers asked Anderson to research the costs of this type of pick Clarification In the July 15, 2003 issue of The Ortonville Independent the Notice of Expiration of Redemption for Big Stone County appeared on the legal page with no amount due figures list- ed. The notice was published, with the -amounts due included, in the July 22nd issue and also appears in this issue. The Ortonville Independent editors apologize for any confusion this may have caused. up. According to Anderson, he con- tacted Northern Waste Management, and was quoted a price range of $5 to $25 per item, depending on the size of the item. Anderson mentioned he also checked with Minnkota Salvage of Chokio, and learned they would pick up all they could fit into a trailer for the price of $250 per load. Anderson said the city would be responsible for placing all items in a central location, but informed the Council that Minnkota Salvage said they could fit about $4,000 worth of items into one trailer. He did also mention that Minnkota Salvage will only take metal items. Televisions, toilets, and other similar household items will not be taken by the salvage company. It was the general consensus of Councilmember. to hold the curbside pick up. The Council will announce (Continued on page 3) HAVING A GOOD TIME on Big Stone Lake is Matt Verheul of Sioux Falls, SD. Matt is a recent Dental School graduate. His parents, Dick and Rita Verheul, have a cabin on the Island View Addit,on along the Minnesota side of Big Stone Lake. Matt is the grandson of Viola Hansen of Ortonville. Second Annual Riverside Trail Ride set for August 1-3 The Second Annual Riverside Trail Ride will be August 1-3 at the camp- ground at the foot of Big Stone Lake. The first ride will begin this Friday, August 1 at 7:00 p.m. Saturday will consist of two rides, beginning at 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m., and Sunday's ride will begin at 10:00 a.m. The cost for being a part of the trail ride is $10 per rider or $25 per family. Additional entertainment includes a dance on Saturday night, with music provided by the live band "Independence". Additionally, a mechanical bull will be available on Friday and Saturday night, so those interested can test their skills in bull riding. Prizes will be given away includ- ing a Colt that will be raffled off. Additionally, trophies will be awarded to the oldest rider, oldest couple par- ticipating, trailering horse the farthest, and for the saddle club with the most riders. Free pop will be offered to riders during the Saturday afternoon ride. Concessions will be available on-site throughout the weekend, and water and bathrooms are also accessible on- site. Everyone who has access to a horse and is interested in joining the fun and festivities, is invited to come and "Cowboy Up" for a good time. For more information, contact Clark Mastel at RR1 Box 402, Ortonville, MN 56278, or 320-839- 2863. TANDEM TRAM RIDERS Bill and Mary Mobeck of Harris are pictured above enjoying their ride on a tan- dem bike during Sunday's TRAM festivities in Ortonville. The bike is a tandem-recumbent bike. The Mobecks are both in theFr seventies. IN oons, rDveoewsEoer,n,00,ve00o00muEn,t, " NDENT o .... WHEAT CROPS in many a year is what area farmers are saying of this year's crop, har- underway. In photo above, you see Greg Streich working on aT40-acre field west of Big According to Renee Athey of Ortonville Farmers Elevator, yields are running anywhere per acre, with excellent quality. House Wednesday for new Outpat,ent Clinic Services House this to celebrate the of the new .will begin at 4 by Robert Staff; Hospital President of Health president of Foundation David Dinnel. 4:30 addition will be held every 10 ling a space The Into the new addi- tion from its current location west of the Ortonville Hospital. Big Stone Therapies will also relo- cate into the Outpatient Services Center. The area allocated for Big Stone Therapies includes ample room to house all services currently provid- ed by Big Stone Therapies. A Specialist Physician Outreach Area is a new addition to OAHS, and offers a space for specialists to visit with their patients and consult wth local physicians. OAHS Radiology Services has also expanded as a result of the new center. Another radiology room has been added, so there are now two rooms available. Addditionally, an inhouse CT Scanner and an area des- ignated for women's services are included in the Radiology Center. Also included in the Outpatient Clinic is a state-of-the-art, 1200 square feet space allocated for chemotherapy treatment. The Northside Medical Clinic will be closed on Friday, August 1 to allow physicians and staff to move into their new location. The official opening date of the center has been set for Monday, August 4. Staff members at OAHS are excit- ed about this new addition, and feel that the new Outpatient Clinic will be a wonderful asset to the area. The public is invited to attend the Open House and take a tour of the new clinic at Ortonville Area Health Services. Celebration festivities will begin at 4:00 p.m. and will run until 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday. Refreshments will be offered and prizes vail be given during the open house. hears presentation Development Services Economic met in a spe- July 14 to from and to discuss OWner of in Ivanhoe, to present the ways in which his business can assist the EDA with their duties. Development Services had sent a proposal to the EDA in which the firm would manage the daily and ongoing administration of Ortonville's EDA, and a staff member would attend EDA and City Council meetings as direct- ed. According to Olson, his company has many employees who offer a vari- ety of experience, the ability to be flexible and traveling mileage is not a concern to the company. Karen Pollard, a representative with Development Services, was also (Continued on page 3) sought for "Miss lie Area" pageant 2003 the Ortonville contestants must have lived in the area 11 or 12 for at least one year by August of this for year. Miss Ortonville Area Competitors held during must be single, must never have been  enter must be a married, and have no children. Additionally, Additionally, she must be in good Dm Ortonville greeted TRAM riders as they ay afternoon. Some of the greeters are shown Area Tourism volunteer Georgia Kolb, driving Wore red cowboy hats and purple shirts. Those are, left to right, Lorrayne Karn, Anna Rothi, Kaercher. standing with her school and commu- nity, possess high morale character, and not use alcohol, tobacco or other controlled substances. Winning the title of Miss Ortonville Area allows young women to participate as a visiting queen in all parades and any other functions that may occur throughout the year in con- junction with the Chamber of Commerce and/or the Miss Ortonville Area Royalty Committee. Deadlines for anyone wishing to enter as a can- didate is August 12. Forms can be dropped off at the Big Stone Lake Area Chamber of Commerce office. Forms may also be picked up at the office. Marlyce Thompson, a volunteer for the pageant, notes the only change in this year's contest is that no spon- sors will be used. "The girls will just be able to sign up and go from there, they do not need to worry about find- ing a sponsor," said Thompson. Young girls wishing to enter the Little Miss competition must be enter- ing into the first grade this fall. Judging will be non-competitive luck of the draw. Dresses are required for the Little Miss portion of the pageant, but need not be formal. Anyone with questions on entering either portion of the competition may contact Marlyce Thompson at 839- 2991 (work) or 273-2314 (home). Council hears positive audit, w, II hold city-w,de pick up Ortonville's city council received its annual audit at their regular meet- ing last Monday. Tom Koop of Larson, Allen Weischairs and Company (LAWCO) attended the meeting to review the City's financial audit. According to Koop, the purpose of his presentation was to give an overview about the findings of the audit. He stated the process used dur- ing the audit was to gather numbers to ensure that they fairly reflect what happened financially in 2002. Koop mentioned that the auditors checked that all policies and proce- dures were followed by city officials when doing the books. He commend- ed the Council because auditors found no errors or violations of the legal compliance guide. He also reviewed with Councilmembers the financial results of the audit. According to Koop, cities should try to have an sufficient reserves on hand for the first half of a year, because cities do not generate much of their income before July. He mentioned that Ortonville's general fund was slightly low last year. He advised the Council to look for ways to secure the reserve amount and to make sure the reserves do not drop into an unstable range. Koop also praised Councilmembers for being under bud- get in almost every expenditure cate- gory. He felt that this was not because there had been alot of cuts, but because the City had created a very conservative budget. Koop congratulated the coun- cilmembers on a good financial audit.According to him, the city's financial stability is good, the record keeping is clean, and in general, it was a very positive auditor's report. iA motion was made by coun- cdmembers to accept the audit report. The motion was seconded and carried. Roger Anderson, Ortonville City Public Works Director, was also pre- sent at the meeting, and advised the Council of the costs of holding a city- wide appliance pick up. The idea of a pick up for large household items was given at the last meeting, and Councilmembers asked Anderson to research the costs of this type of pick Clarification In the July 15, 2003 issue of The Ortonville Independent the Notice of Expiration of Redemption for Big Stone County appeared on the legal page with no amount due figures list- ed. The notice was published, with the -amounts due included, in the July 22nd issue and also appears in this issue. The Ortonville Independent editors apologize for any confusion this may have caused. up. According to Anderson, he con- tacted Northern Waste Management, and was quoted a price range of $5 to $25 per item, depending on the size of the item. Anderson mentioned he also checked with Minnkota Salvage of Chokio, and learned they would pick up all they could fit into a trailer for the price of $250 per load. Anderson said the city would be responsible for placing all items in a central location, but informed the Council that Minnkota Salvage said they could fit about $4,000 worth of items into one trailer. He did also mention that Minnkota Salvage will only take metal items. Televisions, toilets, and other similar household items will not be taken by the salvage company. It was the general consensus of Councilmember. to hold the curbside pick up. The Council will announce (Continued on page 3) HAVING A GOOD TIME on Big Stone Lake is Matt Verheul of Sioux Falls, SD. Matt is a recent Dental School graduate. His parents, Dick and Rita Verheul, have a cabin on the Island View Addit,on along the Minnesota side of Big Stone Lake. Matt is the grandson of Viola Hansen of Ortonville. Second Annual Riverside Trail Ride set for August 1-3 The Second Annual Riverside Trail Ride will be August 1-3 at the camp- ground at the foot of Big Stone Lake. The first ride will begin this Friday, August 1 at 7:00 p.m. Saturday will consist of two rides, beginning at 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m., and Sunday's ride will begin at 10:00 a.m. The cost for being a part of the trail ride is $10 per rider or $25 per family. Additional entertainment includes a dance on Saturday night, with music provided by the live band "Independence". Additionally, a mechanical bull will be available on Friday and Saturday night, so those interested can test their skills in bull riding. Prizes will be given away includ- ing a Colt that will be raffled off. Additionally, trophies will be awarded to the oldest rider, oldest couple par- ticipating, trailering horse the farthest, and for the saddle club with the most riders. Free pop will be offered to riders during the Saturday afternoon ride. Concessions will be available on-site throughout the weekend, and water and bathrooms are also accessible on- site. Everyone who has access to a horse and is interested in joining the fun and festivities, is invited to come and "Cowboy Up" for a good time. For more information, contact Clark Mastel at RR1 Box 402, Ortonville, MN 56278, or 320-839- 2863. TANDEM TRAM RIDERS Bill and Mary Mobeck of Harris are pictured above enjoying their ride on a tan- dem bike during Sunday's TRAM festivities in Ortonville. The bike is a tandem-recumbent bike. The Mobecks are both in theFr seventies.