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Ortonville, Minnesota
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August 4, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
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August 4, 1921
 

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THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT i ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 1921 NUMBER 13 BOXING AL MAKES HIT WITH FANS Rounds of Boxing by Fast Bouts Crowd W i t h Entertainment. who last Friday night show put on by the local Legion, showed enthusiasm for the sport :OnPiete satisfaction with the by the Legionaires. card of three fast pre- "four rounds each, and go of six rounds, making of boxing, provided entertainment for more and made them all ducats had been well Conditions could not have It was cool enough so could work at a good the crowd was too much tlte conteses to notice any The leafrcanopied ravine of the City Park place for the staging Lfor about a half hour on ac- lights, and non- of those in the preliminar- about 8:30 ,le there. Few Present tho the ntmber in view of the fact the debut of the boxing bunch of kids hung to side of the side of the ring, and great sport there dur- for the evening between Paul Beck and Milton Grice of Big weighing in at 138. fastest bout of the even- the at the fighting dur- rounds. The men tray- Pace for the flrmt two rOUnds but the speed was tell on" their wind. Both center of the ring at the second round. the "defensive began to do Work with body blows round, and had the best Beck gets the first third even. and "Young" Os- on page 8) to Convene At xt Wednesday annual meeting of the Big Stone-Traverse Association will be ednesday, August 10, at Bankers representing houses in these two" expected to be in atten- ass6ciation will hold at 5:00 ,that is scheduled secretary of the association, is ex- meeting, .and .will .ad- Mr. Chapman, a Minnesota, is al- meeting. program for the after- been announced. The will  be devoted problems o] impo- r&apos; Rates ? For Minnesota Fair  < rates of a fare to the Minnesota Sate 3 to 10, .have .been the railroads. Tickets September 2 to 10, includes all o northern Iowa; South De- as far west as Sioux ; North Dakota as Wahpeton, Far- Forks; and Wisconsin and south as Super- Eau Claire, and La expotion in history Tor the half million Will file thru the gates. $:121,600 are offerr of educational ex- improvements are being made to eXhibits and care f,Jr program fen- never seen in he will be the of Lieutenant James auto to a low-flying of the grandstand diving horse, girl, will leap from a feet in the air, into water. The gigan- featured in 190, )n a greater scale, Saturday, Sep- Y. Contract of Library Room room in the southwest corner of the basement of the Li- brary for the next ten years was given the City of Ortonville thru an agreement which was made with the Library last Monday night at the coun- cil meeting. The provisions of this agreement state that the City shall furnish the light and water during this period, and provide the necessary care for the operation of the heating plant. The library, as its part of the agreement, will buy the fuel needed, and give the city the use of the room for ten years, beginning August "1, without any charges. This contract is made possible on account of the City having paid one- half of the expense of installing the heating system i the library. This room in the southwest corner of the Library basement has ben used as the offices of the City Clerk and the meeting place of the council since before th first of the year. Tourist Camp at Graceviile Razed During the week some of the fire- places set up on the tourist grounds, south of the lake, were broken up by vandals and rendered unfit for use. To decent people actions of this kind are hard to explain or understand. Just why these rough-necks whose physical extension above the ears is as solid as a concrete pier, and whose bump of decency and consideration must look like the excavation for a celler should commit depredations of this kind cannot be reasonably ex- plained. Their sense ,of decency and pride in their surroundings would re- strain them if they possessed any sense of this or any other variety. Neve having had anything at home, they, of course, are unable to appre- ciate it anywhere else.Graceville Enterprise. FOOD PRODUCTION IN DANGER, IS WARNING Inadequate Credit, Unfair Deflation, High Freights Declared Ruining Farmers. St. Paul, Aug. 3.---Congress must act immediately to give armers re- lief from high freight rates, inade- quate credit, foreign competition and inefficient marketing if it  expects to restore nationwide prosperity. That is the warning sent to Washington today by the Minnesota Farm Bureau Federation. It accompanied a de- tailed summary of the agricultural problems of the state, supported by evidence of specific injuries suffered by the producers as a-result of pres- ent economic conditions. The Minnesota Federation also out- lined specific remedies, urging speedy legislative action to put them into effect. The complete statement with its supporting evidence was presented to all members of the joint congres- sional committee, undecr Representa- tive Sydney Anderson, which is in- vestigating agricultural conditon,. Five recommendations were laid be- fore congress by the Minnesota fed- eration, as follows: Finance.--Credit facilities must be adjusted to the needs Of agricaltural production and financing. The 30 to 90 day loan suited to ordinary com- mercial and industrial enterprises is not equally adapted to the needs of agriculture; it puts the farmer under a serious financial handicap as com- pared to the manufacturer and mer- chant. Transportation.-- Railroad freight -rates musi;be reduced to a level that will restore the movemenb of tim necessities of life, before the frowners' purchasing power ca be restored or the consumer can be benefited by the decline.in the-original selling price of farm products. Foreign Competition. -- American agriCUlture dlannot prosper unless it is accorded th same tariff protection that is accorded other American in- dustry. So long as the farmer is cm- pelled to buy on a lOtected market, be must e allowed to sell on a pro- tected ma'rket, or be reduced by com- petition with foreign peasants and peons to a condition disastrous and unthinkable. Marketing.  C0-operation of the producers in distributing their pro- ducts is entitled to a fair trial in open competition with the existing sys- tem, and congress should enact neces. sary clarifying legislation to guaran- tee the right of the producePand the consumer to this trial. Taxation.The farmers of Minne- sota are virtually unanimous in op- position to the enactment of a .en- oral sales ta, a tax on land holdinK and repeal of the excess profits tax. Commerce and 4ndustry are so de- pendent of the farmers' normal pur- chasing power, the statement said, 'that restoration of that purchasing power is absolutely essential to bring the whole economic fabric of the United States back to normalcy. J, D. Ross returned the first of the w from an auto trip thru the northern pat of, the state. Duluth, ,Virginia, and other points were visited on the trip. COUNCIL DECLARES WAR ON BARLEYCORN Best Cellars Endangered If Proposed Ordinance Is Passed--Has First and Second Readings. Drastic action against the posses- sion Of leverages containing mow than tle lawful amount of alcohol is the aim of the proposed ordinance which received first and second roan- ings at the council meeting last Mon- day evening, August 1. Final action on this ordinance, which if passed will be number 131, will be taken when the members of the council hold their regular meeting next month. The proposed addition to the city laws is defined as "an order providing for search warrant and condemning property so found in unlawful use and penalty thereof." It provides that complaint on oath" to any magistrate authorized to is- sue warrants in criminal cases can be made by ahy person having evi- dence that persons are in possession of liquors in violation to the pro- posed ordinance. If the person has in possession for the purpose of selling, giving away, bartering, delivering, transporting, or otherwise disposing of any spirituous malts, fermented or vinous liquors the magistrate shall is- sue a searcht warrant to search for and sieze this property:. The finding of this, according to the ordinance, shall be considered prima  facie evidence, and no further evi- dence of guilt shall be required of the prosecution. The penalty lrescribed y the pro- posed ordinance for any person found guilty according to its terms shall be a fine of not less than $50 and not more than $100, or imprisonment in the city jail for not less than ,30 days and not ,more than 90 days. Applian- ces and materials confiscated shall be destroyed. Arrangements which have been made by the members of the First Congregational church of this place make it possible for the Roy. Paul Bockhoven of St. Charles to conduct services here during the month of August. Rev. and Mrs. Bockhoven will arrive Friday. During their stay here they will live in rooms upstairs in the H. W. Sarvis residence which have been furnished by the members of the congregation. Officers For Foster ......... Township Are Elected Officers for the newly organized township of Foster were named last Saturday, July 30, wben the first elec- tion there was held. Foster which is Big Stone county-s newest township, was created when the county commissioners, at a post- poned meeting held July 11, voted unanimously to divide the township then known as Prior, calling the wes- lern and smaller half Foster. The petition for this division was sub- mitted to the county board early in the year, and carried the signatures of more than 125 voters in that vi- cinity. Candidates for the various offices having been named, the polling was conducted in the regular legal way, resulting as follows: SuprvisorsKlaus Knudson, Abel Eastman, and Berg Nelson. TreasurerIngval Kvatum. ClerkJulius Skundberg. Justices of PeaceCharles Salmon- son and C. A. Peterson. Constables--J. P. Wilke and Gee. Hastings. The election was held at the Sunny- side school house, District No. 62. The new town board will officiate until the regular annual township election next March. LUTHERAN SERVICE DRAWS BIG CROWD Ten Congregations Participate--$00 To 1,000 People Attend Meetings. Joint services held by Norwegian Lutheran congregations in this sec- tion last Sunday at Chautauqua Park drew a crowd estimated to number from 800 to 1000. Ten congregations from this part of Minnesota and the eastern part of South Dakota took part in the services. The morning service was attended by about 500 people. Rev. J. Walseth of this place conducted altar services, and the Rev. M. O. Andrews of Whea- ton preached the morning sermon. His theme was centered on an appeal to the young people of the churches to hear the call to devote themselves to church and state work, particular- ly in local congregations. Roy. E. I. Strom of Watson who spoke at the afternoon service had as his subject, "The Value of Bible Study." He urged that a study of the Bible should be begun early in life so that it would become a habit. The Chautauqua auditorium w a s packed for the afternoon meeting. The singing of the Joint Choir of almost a hundred voices was one of the big features of the meeting. They sang "If With All Your Hearts," a part from the famous "Elijah," and two chorals. Also "Evening Prayer," by Beethoven, which was very good. The choir was directed by Rev. E. S. Belgum of Appleton. Mts. Carl Ol- son of Clinton sang Kipling's "Re- cessional," and Miss Brunstuem of Ap- pleton sang at the morning service. The Appletont Louisburg and Clin- ton choirs were also on the program. A considerable amount was received in the collection which was taken for the Church Fund. The money in this fund is loaned to needy churches for building and improvements. This is the first service of this kind that these churches have held. The idea of this meeting originated with Rev. E. S. Belgum of Appleton and Rev. $. M. Moo of Clinton, and they were the principal forces in starting it and putting it across. Tho no defi- nite arrangements were made for another similar meeting next year, those who attended were very much in favor of it, and it is not unlikely .that one will be held, next year. .berer, Drink Crazed Tries to.,Leap From Train Alex Judge, a laborer bound for Wheaton for the harvest, became de- mented on the Milwaukee passenger train Tuesday morning, the result of a seven day moonshine jag, and tried to throw himself out of the window of the train, but was forci- bly prevented by Conductor Harry Sooth, "Dutch" Hausauer and some of the paengers. He was turned over to Officer Lyttleton here, ,who de- tained him over night in the bastile and he went on his way rejoicing he next morning. In spite of its name this moonshine is not a light drink. Graceviile Enterprise. Board of Education Elects Officers School board officers who will serve for the coming term were elected at a meeting of the Board of Education last Monday evening at the First Na- tional bank. The officers for the newly organized board are as fol- lows: president, Mrs. Belle Shuma- ker; secretary, J. E. Palmer; and treasurer, Dr. E. N. Schoen. No other business than the allow- ing of a few bills was done at the meeting. Tearchers' Salaries For 1921 Increase 50 Per Cent $25,76.60 SPENT IN YEAR 1920-21 Sale of books and supplies, $620.24; AS AGAINST LITTLE MORE Building fund, $6.39; Interest and THAN $18,000 PREVIOUSLY. sinking fund, $149.48; and all other sources, $1,390.58, making a total for Expenditures made by the Orton- all receipts qf $62,354.45. vilte Public school duringthe school Disbursements coming under the year of 1920-21 for teachers' salaries heading of Instruction were the larg- amounted to $25,576.60, according to est on that list, the P-nount for the the annual report of the secretary of various branches being $28,277.71, the board of education. This amount 'which was divided as follaws: Teach- is an increase of ahnost 50 per cent er's wages, $25,576.60; Text books, over that spent a year ago, when sal- $1,124.86; Supplies, $1,495.93, and Li- aries for teacher-s amounted to but Prohibition Agents Get Man for Moonshining Federal prohibition enforcement agents arrested Robert O. H'eidtke, a farmer living four miles north of Or- tonville on the West road to Clinton, after obtaining evidence both in the form of the manufactured goods and his plant. A ten gallon still was dis- cbvered by the federal agents and con- fiscated. Heidtke had been operating a ten- gallon still for some time, and had beech enjoying a thriving business, ac- cording to reports. The wet goods he manufactured was made from a mix- t.ure of molasses and yeart, and three days were required in the distilling of it, it is said. At present he is confined to the county jail, officials here waiting for a federal marshal to come and take him to Fergus Falls where he will be arraigned in federal court. This is one of the first drives made in this county againstthe illicit man- ufacture and sale of intoxicating drinks in violation to the federal laws. Law Does Not Apply To Threshing Work Threshing operations are not cov- ered by the workmen's compensation law, according to a letter received by the state leader of county agents, F. E. Balmer, from F. A. Duxbury, chairman of the Industrial Commis- sion of Minnesota. Mr. Duxbury says that the supreme court of the state has decided that the business of threshing as far labor is exempt from the operation of the law. Mr. Duxbury, however, suggests to threshermen that the common law li- ability arising from negligence does prevail in threshing operations and that while there is no law requiring insurance of the risk involved, "busi- ness prudence might dictate protec- tion by insurance against this com- mon law liability." FIFTY CREAMERIES JOIN STATE AGENCY Second Movement To Centralize C 9- operative Marketing Wins Support. Fifty co-operative creameries have joined the new statewide marketing agency, the Minnesota Co-operative Creameries association, Inc. Th Minnesota Farm Bureau Fed. eration today announced the results of the first week of a drive to unite the co-operative creameries of the state into one strong central associa- tion. Two hundred shares of stock, each share representing 50,000 pounds of butterfat handled annually, have been subscribed by local creameries, federal officials said. Every creamery in Dodge and Chi- sago counties reached during the first week's drive joined the new central agency it was announced. The Glen- coo Co-operative creamery took twelve shares, and creameries at Rush City and Mankato took eight shares apiece. "The cseamery association is meet- ing with success as remarkable as that of the statewide livestock mar- keting agency," A. J. McGuire, or- ganization manager of the associa- tion, said. "The rapid response of the producers to an organization design- ed to improve marketing conditions and cheapen transportation proves that centralization of co-operative selling is the next step to the proper step in the solution of agricultural problems." Loses Otit On Chance to Bum Ride; Stones Train When Floyd Edwards, a transient, found that the blind of the Fargo pas- senger was guarded Sunday morning, preventing him from getting some free transportation, he sent a barrage of stones at the train as it went by. Now he is in the county jail. BOXCAR BANDITS KILL 1; ANOTHER VICTIM CRITICAL Three Bandits Hold Up Five Harvest Hands On Freight N e a r Correli Monday Night. One man is dead, another has but a fighting chance for life and three others are suffering serious bruises a the result of a boxcar holdup and bat- tle staged early Tuesday morning on the Milwaukee road about three miles east of CorrelL The dead mn is: Charles Obeg, 45 years old, who lived for a time this spring at llZ Ninth Street, South, Minneapolia Russel Hanson, aged 19, of Monte- video, another one of the victims is now in the hospital at Appleton in a serious condition. Severe loss of blood has left him in a weakened con- dition, with little hopes for his recov- ery. The three other victims gave their names as F. J. Brabec, aged 16, of Montevideo; Bertal Henley, aged 16, also of Montevideo, and H. N. Rich- ardson, aged 32, of Howard Lake. It was Hanson's, Brabec's, and Hen- ley's first trip from home. Oberg, Hanson and three compan- ions boarded thru coast freight train, No. 263, extra, at Montevideo about midnight, and three other men get into the same box car at Appletom Two of these men were armed with pistols. The three held up the five and then forced them to jump from the rapidly moving train. Oherg was killed by the fall and his body muti- lated. Hanson fell under the wheels of the cars and his leg was severed. Their three companions were knocked unconscious and remained in that con- dition until 5:00 a. m. when they noti- fied the Swift county authorities, who informed the Big Stone county offi- cials. Coroner B. R. Karn took charge of Oberg's body and brought him to the morgue here. From papers found on the dead man it was supposed that he lived either in Minneapolis Or Red Wing, or had relatives there. John Hausauer, detective for the Milwaukee road, and county authori- ties immediately took u the arch for three assailants. Word was re- ceived here Wednesday that two sus- pects were held by the Benson au- thorities, and on Thursday Mr. Hau- sauer left for that place to determine their connection with the crime. The men were described by their victims are being from 30 to 35 years old, one tall, another medium siged, and the third, a short stfcky man. The short man wore a dark overcoat, overalls and a dark cap. The others wore handkerchiefs over their faces. The crew which took the train from Montevideo to Aberdeen reported tha no one had left itheir train between those points ,and points west wex notified to be on the lookout. It is supposed tha$ the three men went thru to Aberdeen. Word was received from Minneapolis that Charles Oberg lived at the room- ing house of J. Tures, 112 Ninth street Soth, from April 11 to April 2u, this year. Mrs. Tures said she knew little about him except that he seem- ed interested in the purchase of lane. Prominent Otrey Farmer Dies. Fred Wiley, prominent Otrey farm- er, died suddenly late Thursday after- noon while he was lelping with threghing on his farm. Heart failure is reported to have been the cause of his death. Mr. Wiley was about 55 years old at the time of his death. | County Ranks High In Seal Sale Campaign Seal sale returns for Big Stone Together with two other transients, county, resulting from the campaign Edwards had planned to leave Orton- which was carried on proceeding and viile Sundalr  morning via "blind bag- during the Christmas season, amount- gage." Their plans were not kept aed to $453.89, according to the report secret tho, and John Hausauer, rail- of the Minnesota Public Health "Asso- rad detective, set out to nip the plan. elation. When the train backed up to get on the Fargo track, it went ast and gave them the slip, and then started aiad full steam. Edwards gathered up some good sized rocks, and as the train passed him, bombarded "Dutch" Hausauer who stood guard in the blinds. John Regarding the outcome of the seal sales for the counties of the state, the state health association says: The returns from the last seal sale according to counties while they can- not be used as a basis for comparison between counties because of the di- little over $18,000, Mr. Palmer, secre- tary of the board said. Salary requirements for the coming year will continue to be about the same as for this last year he said. While in some instances there was a chance to make a reduction without imparing the standard set, increases iu salaries in the case of some of the instructors counterbalanced it, and ex- pendittres for the coming year will brary, $80.32. = General control cost $895.61, the school board being paid $292.41 and t Hausauer who was at the switch soon 603.20 going to sundry items. [ took him in charge, and he was led- Operation of the school rquired god in the counw jail. $4,552.09 for the school year. Wednesday he was arraigned be- Janitor's wages and suppliesifore Judge MacMurpheyin municipal amounted to $2228.61, fuel, light, court. He demanded an examination, water, and other needs $1,749.20, and and the case was postponed to Satur- sundries $474.28. day forenoon when the hearing will $596.79 was spent for maintenance, be held. $329.28 going for repairs on the build- be about the same. ing, $125.46 for repairs on equipment, I Sixteen guests who came here in The secretary's report further and $142.05 for various items. I cars arc bebg entertained at the P. showed that cash on hand when the New equipment added to the school I M. C. Lindquist home this week. They report was made out, July 17, amount- during the past year cost $690.04, are Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Johnson ed to $22,888.93. The state appor- while other outlays amounted to[ and daughters Alice and May of Port- tionment this year amounted to $2,- $378.00. , land, Oregon, Mr. and Mrs. A. A. 633.10, and special state aid. added The report of both the secretary  of'Westburg of Wil[mar, Mrs. Westburg $4,735.00 to 'the treasury. Special the board, Mr. PRimer and the treas-t bcing a daughter of the Lindquists, tax/s netted $29,098.08, while the lo- urer, Win. S. Utley, were accepted by I and Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Lavine mad cal mill taxes amounted to $832.65. the board of education at a meeting[ children of Duluth and Miss Inga Other eceipts were as follows: which was hem about a week ago. Gunderson of Hibbing. versity of population, show that every county obtained enough from the campaign to assure some health work this year. Those whose returns feff below the quota set and who feel that their fu.-s are di.appointingty tow mu. make. a special effort to as- sure success for each undertaking however small and in that way show the county people that the amount t]ey spend for Ctu'istmas seals will repay many times over. Other counties near here responded to the alpeal to buy seals in about the same degree and contributed as follows: Traverse county, $37t.08; Stevens, $580.6, and Lac qui Parle, $512.65. Ctnpared with this the work of the Public Health Associa- f Ion for lig Stone county did work equal to, and in some cases surpas- Sing, that of other ounties. THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT i ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 1921 NUMBER 13 BOXING AL MAKES HIT WITH FANS Rounds of Boxing by Fast Bouts Crowd W i t h Entertainment. who last Friday night show put on by the local Legion, showed enthusiasm for the sport :OnPiete satisfaction with the by the Legionaires. card of three fast pre- "four rounds each, and go of six rounds, making of boxing, provided entertainment for more and made them all ducats had been well Conditions could not have It was cool enough so could work at a good the crowd was too much tlte conteses to notice any The leafrcanopied ravine of the City Park place for the staging Lfor about a half hour on ac- lights, and non- of those in the preliminar- about 8:30 ,le there. Few Present tho the ntmber in view of the fact the debut of the boxing bunch of kids hung to side of the side of the ring, and great sport there dur- for the evening between Paul Beck and Milton Grice of Big weighing in at 138. fastest bout of the even- the at the fighting dur- rounds. The men tray- Pace for the flrmt two rOUnds but the speed was tell on" their wind. Both center of the ring at the second round. the "defensive began to do Work with body blows round, and had the best Beck gets the first third even. and "Young" Os- on page 8) to Convene At xt Wednesday annual meeting of the Big Stone-Traverse Association will be ednesday, August 10, at Bankers representing houses in these two" expected to be in atten- ass6ciation will hold at 5:00 ,that is scheduled secretary of the association, is ex- meeting, .and .will .ad- Mr. Chapman, a Minnesota, is al- meeting. program for the after- been announced. The will  be devoted problems o] impo. r' Rates ? For Minnesota Fair  < rates of a fare to the Minnesota Sate 3 to 10, .have .been the railroads. Tickets September 2 to 10, includes all o northern Iowa; South De- as far west as Sioux ; North Dakota as Wahpeton, Far- Forks; and Wisconsin and south as Super- Eau Claire, and La expotion in history Tor the half million Will file thru the gates. $:121,600 are offerr of educational ex- improvements are being made to eXhibits and care f,Jr program fen- never seen in he will be the of Lieutenant James auto to a low-flying of the grandstand diving horse, girl, will leap from a feet in the air, into water. The gigan- featured in 190, )n a greater scale, Saturday, Sep- Y. Contract of Library Room room in the southwest corner of the basement of the Li- brary for the next ten years was given the City of Ortonville thru an agreement which was made with the Library last Monday night at the coun- cil meeting. The provisions of this agreement state that the City shall furnish the light and water during this period, and provide the necessary care for the operation of the heating plant. The library, as its part of the agreement, will buy the fuel needed, and give the city the use of the room for ten years, beginning August "1, without any charges. This contract is made possible on account of the City having paid one- half of the expense of installing the heating system i the library. This room in the southwest corner of the Library basement has ben used as the offices of the City Clerk and the meeting place of the council since before th first of the year. Tourist Camp at Graceviile Razed During the week some of the fire- places set up on the tourist grounds, south of the lake, were broken up by vandals and rendered unfit for use. To decent people actions of this kind are hard to explain or understand. Just why these rough-necks whose physical extension above the ears is as solid as a concrete pier, and whose bump of decency and consideration must look like the excavation for a celler should commit depredations of this kind cannot be reasonably ex- plained. Their sense ,of decency and pride in their surroundings would re- strain them if they possessed any sense of this or any other variety. Neve having had anything at home, they, of course, are unable to appre- ciate it anywhere else.Graceville Enterprise. FOOD PRODUCTION IN DANGER, IS WARNING Inadequate Credit, Unfair Deflation, High Freights Declared Ruining Farmers. St. Paul, Aug. 3.---Congress must act immediately to give armers re- lief from high freight rates, inade- quate credit, foreign competition and inefficient marketing if it  expects to restore nationwide prosperity. That is the warning sent to Washington today by the Minnesota Farm Bureau Federation. It accompanied a de- tailed summary of the agricultural problems of the state, supported by evidence of specific injuries suffered by the producers as a-result of pres- ent economic conditions. The Minnesota Federation also out- lined specific remedies, urging speedy legislative action to put them into effect. The complete statement with its supporting evidence was presented to all members of the joint congres- sional committee, undecr Representa- tive Sydney Anderson, which is in- vestigating agricultural conditon,. Five recommendations were laid be- fore congress by the Minnesota fed- eration, as follows: Finance.--Credit facilities must be adjusted to the needs Of agricaltural production and financing. The 30 to 90 day loan suited to ordinary com- mercial and industrial enterprises is not equally adapted to the needs of agriculture; it puts the farmer under a serious financial handicap as com- pared to the manufacturer and mer- chant. Transportation.-- Railroad freight -rates musi;be reduced to a level that will restore the movemenb of tim necessities of life, before the frowners' purchasing power ca be restored or the consumer can be benefited by the decline.in the-original selling price of farm products. Foreign Competition. -- American agriCUlture dlannot prosper unless it is accorded th same tariff protection that is accorded other American in- dustry. So long as the farmer is cm- pelled to buy on a lOtected market, be must e allowed to sell on a pro- tected ma'rket, or be reduced by com- petition with foreign peasants and peons to a condition disastrous and unthinkable. Marketing.  C0-operation of the producers in distributing their pro- ducts is entitled to a fair trial in open competition with the existing sys- tem, and congress should enact neces. sary clarifying legislation to guaran- tee the right of the producePand the consumer to this trial. Taxation.The farmers of Minne- sota are virtually unanimous in op- position to the enactment of a .en- oral sales ta, a tax on land holdinK and repeal of the excess profits tax. Commerce and 4ndustry are so de- pendent of the farmers' normal pur- chasing power, the statement said, 'that restoration of that purchasing power is absolutely essential to bring the whole economic fabric of the United States back to normalcy. J, D. Ross returned the first of the w from an auto trip thru the northern pat of, the state. Duluth, ,Virginia, and other points were visited on the trip. COUNCIL DECLARES WAR ON BARLEYCORN Best Cellars Endangered If Proposed Ordinance Is Passed--Has First and Second Readings. Drastic action against the posses- sion Of leverages containing mow than tle lawful amount of alcohol is the aim of the proposed ordinance which received first and second roan- ings at the council meeting last Mon- day evening, August 1. Final action on this ordinance, which if passed will be number 131, will be taken when the members of the council hold their regular meeting next month. The proposed addition to the city laws is defined as "an order providing for search warrant and condemning property so found in unlawful use and penalty thereof." It provides that complaint on oath" to any magistrate authorized to is- sue warrants in criminal cases can be made by ahy person having evi- dence that persons are in possession of liquors in violation to the pro- posed ordinance. If the person has in possession for the purpose of selling, giving away, bartering, delivering, transporting, or otherwise disposing of any spirituous malts, fermented or vinous liquors the magistrate shall is- sue a searcht warrant to search for and sieze this property:. The finding of this, according to the ordinance, shall be considered prima  facie evidence, and no further evi- dence of guilt shall be required of the prosecution. The penalty lrescribed y the pro- posed ordinance for any person found guilty according to its terms shall be a fine of not less than $50 and not more than $100, or imprisonment in the city jail for not less than ,30 days and not ,more than 90 days. Applian- ces and materials confiscated shall be destroyed. Arrangements which have been made by the members of the First Congregational church of this place make it possible for the Roy. Paul Bockhoven of St. Charles to conduct services here during the month of August. Rev. and Mrs. Bockhoven will arrive Friday. During their stay here they will live in rooms upstairs in the H. W. Sarvis residence which have been furnished by the members of the congregation. Officers For Foster ......... Township Are Elected Officers for the newly organized township of Foster were named last Saturday, July 30, wben the first elec- tion there was held. Foster which is Big Stone county-s newest township, was created when the county commissioners, at a post- poned meeting held July 11, voted unanimously to divide the township then known as Prior, calling the wes- lern and smaller half Foster. The petition for this division was sub- mitted to the county board early in the year, and carried the signatures of more than 125 voters in that vi- cinity. Candidates for the various offices having been named, the polling was conducted in the regular legal way, resulting as follows: SuprvisorsKlaus Knudson, Abel Eastman, and Berg Nelson. TreasurerIngval Kvatum. ClerkJulius Skundberg. Justices of PeaceCharles Salmon- son and C. A. Peterson. Constables--J. P. Wilke and Gee. Hastings. The election was held at the Sunny- side school house, District No. 62. The new town board will officiate until the regular annual township election next March. LUTHERAN SERVICE DRAWS BIG CROWD Ten Congregations Participate--$00 To 1,000 People Attend Meetings. Joint services held by Norwegian Lutheran congregations in this sec- tion last Sunday at Chautauqua Park drew a crowd estimated to number from 800 to 1000. Ten congregations from this part of Minnesota and the eastern part of South Dakota took part in the services. The morning service was attended by about 500 people. Rev. J. Walseth of this place conducted altar services, and the Rev. M. O. Andrews of Whea- ton preached the morning sermon. His theme was centered on an appeal to the young people of the churches to hear the call to devote themselves to church and state work, particular- ly in local congregations. Roy. E. I. Strom of Watson who spoke at the afternoon service had as his subject, "The Value of Bible Study." He urged that a study of the Bible should be begun early in life so that it would become a habit. The Chautauqua auditorium w a s packed for the afternoon meeting. The singing of the Joint Choir of almost a hundred voices was one of the big features of the meeting. They sang "If With All Your Hearts," a part from the famous "Elijah," and two chorals. Also "Evening Prayer," by Beethoven, which was very good. The choir was directed by Rev. E. S. Belgum of Appleton. Mts. Carl Ol- son of Clinton sang Kipling's "Re- cessional," and Miss Brunstuem of Ap- pleton sang at the morning service. The Appletont Louisburg and Clin- ton choirs were also on the program. A considerable amount was received in the collection which was taken for the Church Fund. The money in this fund is loaned to needy churches for building and improvements. This is the first service of this kind that these churches have held. The idea of this meeting originated with Rev. E. S. Belgum of Appleton and Rev. $. M. Moo of Clinton, and they were the principal forces in starting it and putting it across. Tho no defi- nite arrangements were made for another similar meeting next year, those who attended were very much in favor of it, and it is not unlikely .that one will be held, next year. .berer, Drink Crazed Tries to.,Leap From Train Alex Judge, a laborer bound for Wheaton for the harvest, became de- mented on the Milwaukee passenger train Tuesday morning, the result of a seven day moonshine jag, and tried to throw himself out of the window of the train, but was forci- bly prevented by Conductor Harry Sooth, "Dutch" Hausauer and some of the paengers. He was turned over to Officer Lyttleton here, ,who de- tained him over night in the bastile and he went on his way rejoicing he next morning. In spite of its name this moonshine is not a light drink. Graceviile Enterprise. Board of Education Elects Officers School board officers who will serve for the coming term were elected at a meeting of the Board of Education last Monday evening at the First Na- tional bank. The officers for the newly organized board are as fol- lows: president, Mrs. Belle Shuma- ker; secretary, J. E. Palmer; and treasurer, Dr. E. N. Schoen. No other business than the allow- ing of a few bills was done at the meeting. Tearchers' Salaries For 1921 Increase 50 Per Cent $25,76.60 SPENT IN YEAR 1920-21 Sale of books and supplies, $620.24; AS AGAINST LITTLE MORE Building fund, $6.39; Interest and THAN $18,000 PREVIOUSLY. sinking fund, $149.48; and all other sources, $1,390.58, making a total for Expenditures made by the Orton- all receipts qf $62,354.45. vilte Public school duringthe school Disbursements coming under the year of 1920-21 for teachers' salaries heading of Instruction were the larg- amounted to $25,576.60, according to est on that list, the P-nount for the the annual report of the secretary of various branches being $28,277.71, the board of education. This amount 'which was divided as follaws: Teach- is an increase of ahnost 50 per cent er's wages, $25,576.60; Text books, over that spent a year ago, when sal- $1,124.86; Supplies, $1,495.93, and Li- aries for teacher-s amounted to but Prohibition Agents Get Man for Moonshining Federal prohibition enforcement agents arrested Robert O. H'eidtke, a farmer living four miles north of Or- tonville on the West road to Clinton, after obtaining evidence both in the form of the manufactured goods and his plant. A ten gallon still was dis- cbvered by the federal agents and con- fiscated. Heidtke had been operating a ten- gallon still for some time, and had beech enjoying a thriving business, ac- cording to reports. The wet goods he manufactured was made from a mix- t.ure of molasses and yeart, and three days were required in the distilling of it, it is said. At present he is confined to the county jail, officials here waiting for a federal marshal to come and take him to Fergus Falls where he will be arraigned in federal court. This is one of the first drives made in this county againstthe illicit man- ufacture and sale of intoxicating drinks in violation to the federal laws. Law Does Not Apply To Threshing Work Threshing operations are not cov- ered by the workmen's compensation law, according to a letter received by the state leader of county agents, F. E. Balmer, from F. A. Duxbury, chairman of the Industrial Commis- sion of Minnesota. Mr. Duxbury says that the supreme court of the state has decided that the business of threshing as far labor is exempt from the operation of the law. Mr. Duxbury, however, suggests to threshermen that the common law li- ability arising from negligence does prevail in threshing operations and that while there is no law requiring insurance of the risk involved, "busi- ness prudence might dictate protec- tion by insurance against this com- mon law liability." FIFTY CREAMERIES JOIN STATE AGENCY Second Movement To Centralize C 9- operative Marketing Wins Support. Fifty co-operative creameries have joined the new statewide marketing agency, the Minnesota Co-operative Creameries association, Inc. Th Minnesota Farm Bureau Fed. eration today announced the results of the first week of a drive to unite the co-operative creameries of the state into one strong central associa- tion. Two hundred shares of stock, each share representing 50,000 pounds of butterfat handled annually, have been subscribed by local creameries, federal officials said. Every creamery in Dodge and Chi- sago counties reached during the first week's drive joined the new central agency it was announced. The Glen- coo Co-operative creamery took twelve shares, and creameries at Rush City and Mankato took eight shares apiece. "The cseamery association is meet- ing with success as remarkable as that of the statewide livestock mar- keting agency," A. J. McGuire, or- ganization manager of the associa- tion, said. "The rapid response of the producers to an organization design- ed to improve marketing conditions and cheapen transportation proves that centralization of co-operative selling is the next step to the proper step in the solution of agricultural problems." Loses Otit On Chance to Bum Ride; Stones Train When Floyd Edwards, a transient, found that the blind of the Fargo pas- senger was guarded Sunday morning, preventing him from getting some free transportation, he sent a barrage of stones at the train as it went by. Now he is in the county jail. BOXCAR BANDITS KILL 1; ANOTHER VICTIM CRITICAL Three Bandits Hold Up Five Harvest Hands On Freight N e a r Correli Monday Night. One man is dead, another has but a fighting chance for life and three others are suffering serious bruises a the result of a boxcar holdup and bat- tle staged early Tuesday morning on the Milwaukee road about three miles east of CorrelL The dead mn is: Charles Obeg, 45 years old, who lived for a time this spring at llZ Ninth Street, South, Minneapolia Russel Hanson, aged 19, of Monte- video, another one of the victims is now in the hospital at Appleton in a serious condition. Severe loss of blood has left him in a weakened con- dition, with little hopes for his recov- ery. The three other victims gave their names as F. J. Brabec, aged 16, of Montevideo; Bertal Henley, aged 16, also of Montevideo, and H. N. Rich- ardson, aged 32, of Howard Lake. It was Hanson's, Brabec's, and Hen- ley's first trip from home. Oberg, Hanson and three compan- ions boarded thru coast freight train, No. 263, extra, at Montevideo about midnight, and three other men get into the same box car at Appletom Two of these men were armed with pistols. The three held up the five and then forced them to jump from the rapidly moving train. Oherg was killed by the fall and his body muti- lated. Hanson fell under the wheels of the cars and his leg was severed. Their three companions were knocked unconscious and remained in that con- dition until 5:00 a. m. when they noti- fied the Swift county authorities, who informed the Big Stone county offi- cials. Coroner B. R. Karn took charge of Oberg's body and brought him to the morgue here. From papers found on the dead man it was supposed that he lived either in Minneapolis Or Red Wing, or had relatives there. John Hausauer, detective for the Milwaukee road, and county authori- ties immediately took u the arch for three assailants. Word was re- ceived here Wednesday that two sus- pects were held by the Benson au- thorities, and on Thursday Mr. Hau- sauer left for that place to determine their connection with the crime. The men were described by their victims are being from 30 to 35 years old, one tall, another medium siged, and the third, a short stfcky man. The short man wore a dark overcoat, overalls and a dark cap. The others wore handkerchiefs over their faces. The crew which took the train from Montevideo to Aberdeen reported tha no one had left itheir train between those points ,and points west wex notified to be on the lookout. It is supposed tha$ the three men went thru to Aberdeen. Word was received from Minneapolis that Charles Oberg lived at the room- ing house of J. Tures, 112 Ninth street Soth, from April 11 to April 2u, this year. Mrs. Tures said she knew little about him except that he seem- ed interested in the purchase of lane. Prominent Otrey Farmer Dies. Fred Wiley, prominent Otrey farm- er, died suddenly late Thursday after- noon while he was lelping with threghing on his farm. Heart failure is reported to have been the cause of his death. Mr. Wiley was about 55 years old at the time of his death. | County Ranks High In Seal Sale Campaign Seal sale returns for Big Stone Together with two other transients, county, resulting from the campaign Edwards had planned to leave Orton- which was carried on proceeding and viile Sundalr  morning via "blind bag- during the Christmas season, amount- gage." Their plans were not kept aed to $453.89, according to the report secret tho, and John Hausauer, rail- of the Minnesota Public Health "Asso- rad detective, set out to nip the plan. elation. When the train backed up to get on the Fargo track, it went ast and gave them the slip, and then started aiad full steam. Edwards gathered up some good sized rocks, and as the train passed him, bombarded "Dutch" Hausauer who stood guard in the blinds. John Regarding the outcome of the seal sales for the counties of the state, the state health association says: The returns from the last seal sale according to counties while they can- not be used as a basis for comparison between counties because of the di- little over $18,000, Mr. Palmer, secre- tary of the board said. Salary requirements for the coming year will continue to be about the same as for this last year he said. While in some instances there was a chance to make a reduction without imparing the standard set, increases iu salaries in the case of some of the instructors counterbalanced it, and ex- pendittres for the coming year will brary, $80.32. = General control cost $895.61, the school board being paid $292.41 and t Hausauer who was at the switch soon 603.20 going to sundry items. [ took him in charge, and he was led- Operation of the school rquired god in the counw jail. $4,552.09 for the school year. Wednesday he was arraigned be- Janitor's wages and suppliesifore Judge MacMurpheyin municipal amounted to $2228.61, fuel, light, court. He demanded an examination, water, and other needs $1,749.20, and and the case was postponed to Satur- sundries $474.28. day forenoon when the hearing will $596.79 was spent for maintenance, be held. $329.28 going for repairs on the build- be about the same. ing, $125.46 for repairs on equipment, I Sixteen guests who came here in The secretary's report further and $142.05 for various items. I cars arc bebg entertained at the P. showed that cash on hand when the New equipment added to the school I M. C. Lindquist home this week. They report was made out, July 17, amount- during the past year cost $690.04, are Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Johnson ed to $22,888.93. The state appor- while other outlays amounted to[ and daughters Alice and May of Port- tionment this year amounted to $2,- $378.00. , land, Oregon, Mr. and Mrs. A. A. 633.10, and special state aid. added The report of both the secretary  of'Westburg of Wil[mar, Mrs. Westburg $4,735.00 to 'the treasury. Special the board, Mr. PRimer and the treas-t bcing a daughter of the Lindquists, tax/s netted $29,098.08, while the lo- urer, Win. S. Utley, were accepted by I and Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Lavine mad cal mill taxes amounted to $832.65. the board of education at a meeting[ children of Duluth and Miss Inga Other eceipts were as follows: which was hem about a week ago. Gunderson of Hibbing. versity of population, show that every county obtained enough from the campaign to assure some health work this year. Those whose returns feff below the quota set and who feel that their fu.-s are di.appointingty tow mu. make. a special effort to as- sure success for each undertaking however small and in that way show the county people that the amount t]ey spend for Ctu'istmas seals will repay many times over. Other counties near here responded to the alpeal to buy seals in about the same degree and contributed as follows: Traverse county, $37t.08; Stevens, $580.6, and Lac qui Parle, $512.65. Ctnpared with this the work of the Public Health Associa- f Ion for lig Stone county did work equal to, and in some cases surpas- Sing, that of other ounties. THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT ORTONVILLE MINN., THURSDAY, AUGUST 4. 1921 NUMBER 13 t BOXING MAKES, HIT WITH s of Boxin by Fast Boui Crowd Wit h as who go of nix rounds, mak/ng being, provided r dats had been well conditions could not have enough so good the creel was l the Contessa to notice any The lOnG--pied :y Park the stagin about ahaif hour on as+ with Ughts, and non- "  people there. Few present the the nb e great iport then du rldser for the evea I Paul Milton Gri of Bi the .greive at the g d en but the speed wu bell on tbe wind. Boh the ring ut l the "the 'defsive is began to do woxk wish body blo round, md had the best Beck gets the to Convene At meetdg of Big +Stone-Traverse Assoch io day, A It1 znkets re] ho in expected to be seeretarf weting, ned win Mhammeta, is al. m amouneed. The : will ' be de.ted a fal far Norris t aWahpeton, Far and Wionsin gates. ,g $12 t,600  uffer impvements a being de to and san f+Jr tg au to a low-flying t grandstand r's tie g her, Ill lv from a in the air, into water The gttan- COUNC1Lx + DECLARES /LUTHERAN SERVICE Prohibition Agents Get y Room WAR ON --BARLEYCORN DRAWS__BIG CROWD Man for__Moonshining southwesl Best Cella Endangered If Prolmsed Ten Congregationm Partb.ipa00 Federal prohibition enfoeraent of the bont of the Li Ordinance Is psed--Has First TO 1.000 People Attetad brary for the next ten yeols w and Sond Readings. MeetingL farmer living four given the City of Ortenville th a -- -- agreement which w made with th( Dstie tion against the posses- Joint rviees held by Noegi after obtaining evidence both Library tastMondaynfghtattheeoun, sion  beverages eonteJning moz Lutheran conggations in thi s goods and ell meeting. M3an the lawful ot of aieohdi il tion ]t Sunday at Chautauquapark his plant The provisions of this agreemenl the aim of the proposed ordlnane d a wd estimated to number cbvetedbythefederalagentsdon- the City shall which ceived Ten congregations light and water during this period lugs at the council meeting ]t Men- from this part of Minneta and the Heidtke had been operating a ton- and pvide the nssary care fol day evening, August 1. part of South Dakota took gallon still for me time, and had the operation of the heating plant, on this oz'dinance, which if passed will part in the so.ices, been enjoying a thriving busln, as- The libry as its part of th be nmnber 131, The moxivg se cording to ports. The wet goods he agrment, will bay the fuel needed mbe of the council by about 500 people, manulotured w made fm a mix- d give the ct ]ar meeting next month. e of mdisea d yeart, and th days were nqmred in the dmtlltiz for en yea. begiing August .i The ppod addition to the elty without any charge pviding of i, it is said. This contract is poaslhle peal At prent he is confined to t] so found in unlawful young people of the eoty jsil, officials here waiting for half of the expense of Inslalllng th penalty therf." to come and take heating system i the library, and state work, particu]ar him to Fergus Falls whe he will be This room in the to y magistte thorized to i ly in Lal congregations, arraigned in federal eot+L of the Library basement has belll sue walnuts in eminaI   Rev. E. L Stem of Watch Who This is one of the flt dris made used as t]W mTl of the City Clerk be made by ahy pern having eel- spoke at the afternoon ie had in this county against/the illicit ma- meetin den that persons  in  his subject, "The Value and sale of intexiting in violation to the federat sin before tht first of the year. of liqrs in violation to the prO- Study." He ged that a study of posed ordinance. If the perso hs in the Bib]  mid he began early in Tourist Camp at p?SS essin for the P of eelllllg, life so that it would become u habit" away, btering, delivering, The Chautauqua auditorium was Law Does Not Apply -- tsperting, or otherwise disposing packed for the afternoon mting. TO Thr4thin' Work Dming the wk me of any spiritao malts, fermtd or The singing of the Joint Choir of -- 9laces set up on the tourist grounds vinous [iquor the magistrate shall is- almost a hundred voices was one o Threshing operations aI not coy- south of the lake. were bken up b] sue a rehl want to areh for the big featus of the mooing. They emd by the workmen's mpention vandals and ndered unfit for use d siee thl ppert. Hearts," a To dent people actions of this kind The finding o! thin, arding to the part from the famous "Elijah," and law, arding to a letter received by a hard to explain or ordinal, shall be ( msldred p two ehorals. A] "Eveulng Pyer," the state leader of unty agents, F. Just why th rough-nks who fae evidee, and e further , by Beethoven, which was very good. E. Balmer, from F. A+ Dby, chasten of the Industrial Cois- physil extension above the ea i deuce of guilt hall be required The ehulr was dirted by Rev. E+ S. Mr. DuNbUIT says Belgum of Appleton. M. Car] 01- that the aupreme court of the state bum, of dncy The penalt F p Cnton sang Kipling's "Re- has dided that the business of musi posed ordinance for y person found ssiona]," and Mis Bnstu of Ap- threshing as fatr labor is exempt guilty cording to its tes shall be piston sang at the moing ice. from the operation of the law, Mr. cannot a free of ot ls than 0 nd not The Appleton Loulsburg d CIin- Duxbur Y however, auggests to more than $100, or impnment in tea ehoira were also on the pgram. their sundlnl wotqd  the city jail for not less than 0 days A eonsidehle amount was ived thnshe that the common law li- ability ariting fm negiigen ds pomused d not ,more than 90 day& Applian- which prevail in thtshing operatio and ense of ms o an coati--ted shall he rite Church Fund. The money that while the is no Law qulring lqe hving had ything at he destroyecL loaned to needy churches for insee of the risk involved, "busi- bdilding and mpr0ments. they, of course, are mble to late it auywhere Aangements which have been qJs is the first sei of this kind ness pden might dictate ptec. Enterprl . made by the membem of the First shushes have held. The lion by Jnsur agalt this sum+ -- Congregation] church of this ple Id of this meeting riginated with men law liability." FOOD PRODUCTION IN mak i po**ib,e for the P. Cant Pv. E. S. Belm o Applet ad Roy. , M. Moo of Clinton, and they FIFTY CREAMERIES DANGER, IS WARNING he dr the er+ the pmap+ JOIN STATE AGENCY -- August. Roy, d it nd putting it oss. -- Inadequate Cedit, Unfair will rive Fday. I)udng their #ay nits aangeats we made for TO Cmtrale C- High llts Dared here t y wi ve in o upstar another similar meeting next year, operative Marketig Wina Ruhfing Farmera, ! in the H. w. Sarvis residenc which those who Support. -- have been furnished by the membe of it, and ]t is St. paul, Aug. 8.ongles act immediate.]y to giv e arre t4 t af th ngreg Ellen. vll be held, next year. Flit F o-eperatt ceriea have joined the new storewide rketing lief fm high freight rates, leads 0cerlt For Foster the Minnesota CO-operatlve quote credit, foreign competition an Drink Crazed , I lneff.di*nt +lf It" eq' + pspety. That  Th Mmta P'ra Bu F' ' today notmesd the lts is tl wing nt to Washington Officers for the newly Alex Judge, a labour bound for firs t week of a dve to unite today by to.ship o Foster wen named las4 Wheaten for the haest, bece de- It aompanied Saturday, July 30+ when the first else. on the Milwkee the perative entries of the of the agiltul was held. one stng central assia. train Tuesday morning, the tion" Two hundred shaa of stk, problems of the state, supported by a .en day moonshine jag, ar tried each share mpsenting 50,O00 pounds evidence of specific injuries suffend township, ws to throw himlf out of the handle d nually, have the county commissioners, at a window of the %rain, but was - h poned meeting bold creer, conditions, bly pvented by Conductor Harry t unaaimoly South, "Dutch" Hausauer and some o Every eery in Dodge and Chi- lined spifl remedies, urging spely Lhe pange,  counties ached during the first legislative tlen to put them into te and smaller haft Foster. Th to Offer Lyttleten hen, 'who de- joined the new fontal The mplete statemt with petition for this divisi was sub. rained him over night in the hostile agency it w announced. The Glen- it ppertlng evidence was psented mitred to the cunty bard early ir and he wet on his way rejoicing he co e Co_opetiv e eamery ok twelve to $11 members of the joint coheres- the year, and caried the signature slonal committee, under Repnta- of mo than 15 votera In that next moing, In spite of t drink, shares, and ameri at Rush City flee Sydney Aden, which is in+ cinlty. Enterprise, ght sharon apie. Vtigatiag airtultuml Candidates for the various +'The came aacciatlon is meet- Fivereammenda swere laid he- having been named, the peWng ing with suece*  rkable as tht in the regular legal Board of Education tha t of the statewide ]ivtk m. fore ongre by e Minnota fed- way, Elects OffilN[r$ keting agency, ', A. J. McGuire, or- etion,  follows: " resulting  follows: SupisorKlaus Knudson Abel -- ganiaat!en manager of the asia- Finanee,xdit fadilitit The new town board will offieiat No other biness than the allow- 0S Otit On Chance to Eestm, and Berg Neln, of?ee tion, sad- The rapld response of the adjusted to th needs bf agtltttral Tnmsr--lngval Kvatum. for the coming term pducers to  orgamatlon de!gn- production and financing. The 30 to Clerk-3"ulis Skundberg. a meeting of the Boa d ed to improve marketing oonditzons 90 day lo stalled o nrdinarf o Justls of Peatffi--Char es Salmon- lust Monday evnmg  '1 and obpe trsporttlon pves and industr/al enterprise is not lly adapted to the needs of son and C. A petern tlonai hank. The officers for that ntrahtlon of ewoperatwe agriotum; it puts the fer tmde Cons ab es--J P. Wilke and Gee+ nly organized heard are as ful- selhng IS the ext step to te PPe a rious fiaarial handip ae m- Hastings. lows: pnsident, M elle Sha- p m ,he solution of agaltural tO the manufacturer and mer- The eleCtion was held at the Sunny- ker; sty* J. E. PMr; d ohlems. side hl house, District No. 62. treasur, Dr. g. N+ Schwa, n. ' Transportatle--Raiiroad freight until the gular annul tshlp ng of a few bdls was do e at the ,ates must  t i redud to a level that " / ' + n Bum Ride; Stones Train will resto th6 movemen of the eltlon next Mah. / nleetmg. ife, befo the fae' - When Floyd Edwards, a transient BOXCAR BANDITS KILL 1; ANOTHER VICTIM CRITICAL Three Bandits Hold Up Five Harvest Hands On Freight N e a r Correli Monday Night One man is dead, another has but a fighting chance for life and three nthe an suffering serious bais the sdt of a boxcar holdup and bat+ tie staged early Tuesda F morning the Milwattkee read about three mt[ east of CorrelL The dead mama is: Charles ObeY-g, 45 years old, who llvd for a time this spring at 112 Ninth Street, South, MiPOH Russe] Hahn, aged 19, of Monte- vidoo, another one of the victi l w in the hospital at AppIeton in a me.errs ndition. Seve Loss of blood has left him in a weakened o dition, with lttie hop for his reov- e'he-" three other victims ga nes  F. J. Brahe, aged 16, of Montevid; Bertal Henley, aged 16. also o Montevideo, and H. N. Rid- ardson, aged 32, of Howard Lake. It was Hanson's, Brabec's, +rod Hen- ley's flt tp from home. Oberg, Hmon and th oompan- io boarded then ast fright tral. No. 268, ext., at Montevideo about midnight, d th other ma get into the same box car at Appleto Two of these men were armed with pistols+ The three held up the five and then forced them to jump from the rapidly moving train. Obg killed hy the fall and his body muti- lated. Hahn fl under the wheels of the ears and his leg w red. Their  epanion re kaooked uaeonioaa d mmai4 i that o ditlon tfl 5:O0 .  when they noti- fied the SwHt nty authoritie who informed the Big Stone eom - rials. Ccaer B. IL Ka took arge of Oberg's body and brought  to the morgue he. From paper renal the dead man it was ppomd that he lived either n Mltmeapolis or Rid Wing, or had latives there. John Hausauer. detecti for the Milwaukee ad. d ot authorb ti Samoa.rely took p tha for three aasailts. Word was - ived he Wednesday that two au+ pects wen held by the Bunsen Wl. thorlties, and on Thday Mr. Hau+ sar left for tha t pla to determine their eonntion with the crim The men were described by their vietlms an being from 30 to 85 ye uld- one tall, another me&urn sled. d the third a aort stagy ma The short man wore a dark over--t, overalls d a dark cap, The others w hdkehiefs or their fag The w whleh took the train fn Moutevid to Aberdm poted tha no one had left ttheir train between tho points ,mid points wt w notified to be on the lOOltoat. It is supposed tha$ the th men ent th to Aberdn. Word was ived from Minneapolis that Charles Oherg lived at the rm- lug he of J. Tus, 112 Ninth stlt Soath, from April 11 to April 20. this ye. M. Tres said she knew litt about him except that he seem- ed intenste in the prch of ]a. pminent Otrey Farmer Dte Fred Wiley, pminent Otrey fa- er, died saddenly late Thursday after- noon whim he was helping with threshing on his fa Hear failure s reputed to have b the  of h dth. Mr. Wiley w about 5 purchasing power cam be ,y the farm produeta. Fereiga psper unless it oter dustry. So long ms the faer Is to buy Tearchers' Salaries For 'ftheF ......... 'ears +ld at the tm'e of his deaL seater was guarded Sunday moing County Ranks High Ill preventing him fm getting so 1921 Increase 50 Per Cent ..............  .... b ..... s.,  Ca..i of stones at the train  it went b -- Now he is in the county jail. Sl sale rets for Big Sto applies, $620.24; Together with two other transiem county, ulting from the campaign AS AGAINST LITTLE MORE Building fund, ,$89; Interest and had planned to leave Oron which w carried on peeding and THAN $1,000 PREVIOUSLY. sinking fund, $149A8; and all other vi/le Sundl morniltg  "blind, bag- drin8 the Chritma on, +t- -- sou, $1,390.58, me.klng a total for gage," Their plans were not kept a ed to $43.89, akordlng to the npert Expenditus made by the all ripts of $6254.45. cet tho, and John Hausauer, rail- of the Minnesota Pblle Health Aso+ Dishuments eomlng under the roal det6tive t ot to ip the pl. eiatinn. petition with foreign pedants yr of 1920 21 znr acners arte heading of ltcion were the larg  When  in k up to t] g81g e omo of the al peons to a condition distro amounted to $25,576.60, acording to the ou the Fargu track it nt :east d sales for the unties of the state unthinkable, the annual leport el ha tary og brhes belng $28277.7J, gave them the slip nod then started the tats h alth - iat'  s' " ahtsud full sty+ The vetoes fm the last seal sale Marketing.--C0-operatlon of the , s e soc mn y. hm, bombarded ."Dutch" Hauauer between euntiez beeu of the di- producers in distributing their p per nt er's wage, $2576.60; Text boo, . Ed.ads gathared up som good according to counties while they n- duct is entitled to a fair spent a year ago, when sol- $1,124.861 SuppIies, $1,495.93, and Li. d ks and as the train passed t be ud as a b for e ar's brary, g80.32. ' no asia omp eontnl cost $g95.6I, who stood guard in the hhnds. Jo n I rsity of palti0]l , 8how that ez open eompetLtion with the existing sys tern, and congress should enact n. sary clarifying legislation to guaran= te the right of the produ#and the Taxatton.--The ferm virtnaily to the and npeal of the excess profits tax. Commee and industry an DO de= pendent of the famers' nnrmal pro'- chasing power, the statem tt tat eatomtgin of that pu eha power is ablutely et ntlal o b the whole eonomie abie ef United States btck to nomaley. if, D. Ross trtumel the first of the wek fm an tmto tt4p northern pat of the state. iVirginto, and other on the tttl little over $18,O00, Mr. Palms tary of the board todd. - board being p $292.41 d I Hauuer who was at the switda n I county obtained enough fm the Salary requirements for the sum ng 603 2O gei.g to udry items ' tnk him in chm'ge d he was led i m to as u o health ork " ' 'l " ' lea pmgn s s w year wdl ntmue to be about tto Operation of the hodi rquired ged m the eom,ty nil. h s year T o e w m ta+ fell same as for this It year he said $4,S62.09 for the seh o o l y ea r. Wednesday he w armlgned be-] beiv:, the quota set and who feel While in some instances then .as s Janitor's wages and suppl.ies] fore Judge MacMphey in m,nic!pal! thst their fu-ds are dLppointlngl 1 hance to mke a reduotlon. WlOUl amounted to $228.61, fuel, light, ceurt. He demanded an exammatton, i low ma make a special effort Io as- xmparing the starard set, increases water , aml other ds $1,749.20, and and the ease was postponed to Satur. su sucres s for each undertaking !  .......... he . Ofeete dt?; ......... s $474,25. I ................... he h ............................ d in th ..... how pendittlre for the coming yr Will $829.28 going for npai on the build- ! -- t]ey spend for Christm eals v+uIL s to counter a ano i, an e . $96.s9 was spent for mmnte, be held. th e eount eople that the amou be shoat the gara, ing, $125.46 for repairs on equipment I Sxtren gusts who came here inl pav ma y tLmes over The ntary's report farther and $142.05 for vlos items, cers al being entertained at the P. Ot]ereounti near he Slnded showed that rash on hand when the New equipment added to the schl I M. C. Lindquist home this week The, I to the apeal to b   s n abeu nport was made oat, July 17, ouat* dring the pt year cost $69O.O4, are Mr. d M Thomas Johnson I the ee degl d contributed ed to 22,888.93. The state upper- hile other outlays ounted tolanddaughtersAliandMa,ofPort.[fdilowa: 'rrar  uaty, $37; tionmt this year ounted to $,- $378,00. Iand, Oregon, Mr. gad  A. A, ' Stevens, $80.g6. and La qi Pare 688.10, and speis] state aid added Th e eport of both the entary' op t Wtbutg of Wilfred, Mrs. Wetburg I $512.G5, Ccenpared with this the $4,735.00 to 'the tr. Special the board, Mr. Palmer and the trea being a daughter of the Llrdquists, t.k of the .Public Health Associa- tams letted 129,0, while the l ur, Wm. S. '2t]ey wen pted by d Mr. and MI. S. W. Lavine dJ U, fr  Stone eotmty did work ill mill taxe amounted to $882.$5. the board of edutlon at a raeetl,vl! chi]dr of Dnlut   lnga *qmfl th d  sn cas rpa. Other i+eipt were m whld was held about a week ago. I Gundeon of Hibbin. i ing, that of other ounie ' t :s 2,,, ................... THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT i ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 1921 NUMBER 13 BOXING AL MAKES HIT WITH FANS Rounds of Boxing by Fast Bouts Crowd W i t h Entertainment. who last Friday night show put on by the local Legion, showed enthusiasm for the sport :OnPiete satisfaction with the by the Legionaires. card of three fast pre- "four rounds each, and go of six rounds, making of boxing, provided entertainment for more and made them all ducats had been well Conditions could not have It was cool enough so could work at a good the crowd was too much tlte conteses to notice any The leafrcanopied ravine of the City Park place for the staging Lfor about a half hour on ac- lights, and non- of those in the preliminar- about 8:30 ,le there. Few Present tho the ntmber in view of the fact the debut of the boxing bunch of kids hung to side of the side of the ring, and great sport there dur- for the evening between Paul Beck and Milton Grice of Big weighing in at 138. fastest bout of the even- the at the fighting dur- rounds. The men tray- Pace for the flrmt two rOUnds but the speed was tell on" their wind. Both center of the ring at the second round. the "defensive began to do Work with body blows round, and had the best Beck gets the first third even. and "Young" Os- on page 8) to Convene At xt Wednesday annual meeting of the Big Stone-Traverse Association will be ednesday, August 10, at Bankers representing houses in these two" expected to be in atten- ass6ciation will hold at 5:00 ,that is scheduled secretary of the association, is ex- meeting, .and .will .ad- Mr. Chapman, a Minnesota, is al- meeting. program for the after- been announced. The will  be devoted problems o] impo- r' Rates ? For Minnesota Fair  < rates of a fare to the Minnesota Sate 3 to 10, .have .been the railroads. Tickets September 2 to 10, includes all o northern Iowa; South De- as far west as Sioux ; North Dakota as Wahpeton, Far- Forks; and Wisconsin and south as Super- Eau Claire, and La expotion in history Tor the half million Will file thru the gates. $:121,600 are offerr of educational ex- improvements are being made to eXhibits and care f,Jr program fen- never seen in he will be the of Lieutenant James auto to a low-flying of the grandstand diving horse, girl, will leap from a feet in the air, into water. The gigan- featured in 190, )n a greater scale, Saturday, Sep- Y. Contract of Library Room room in the southwest corner of the basement of the Li- brary for the next ten years was given the City of Ortonville thru an agreement which was made with the Library last Monday night at the coun- cil meeting. The provisions of this agreement state that the City shall furnish the light and water during this period, and provide the necessary care for the operation of the heating plant. The library, as its part of the agreement, will buy the fuel needed, and give the city the use of the room for ten years, beginning August "1, without any charges. This contract is made possible on account of the City having paid one- half of the expense of installing the heating system i the library. This room in the southwest corner of the Library basement has ben used as the offices of the City Clerk and the meeting place of the council since before th first of the year. Tourist Camp at Graceviile Razed During the week some of the fire- places set up on the tourist grounds, south of the lake, were broken up by vandals and rendered unfit for use. To decent people actions of this kind are hard to explain or understand. Just why these rough-necks whose physical extension above the ears is as solid as a concrete pier, and whose bump of decency and consideration must look like the excavation for a celler should commit depredations of this kind cannot be reasonably ex- plained. Their sense ,of decency and pride in their surroundings would re- strain them if they possessed any sense of this or any other variety. Neve having had anything at home, they, of course, are unable to appre- ciate it anywhere else.Graceville Enterprise. FOOD PRODUCTION IN DANGER, IS WARNING Inadequate Credit, Unfair Deflation, High Freights Declared Ruining Farmers. St. Paul, Aug. 3.---Congress must act immediately to give armers re- lief from high freight rates, inade- quate credit, foreign competition and inefficient marketing if it  expects to restore nationwide prosperity. That is the warning sent to Washington today by the Minnesota Farm Bureau Federation. It accompanied a de- tailed summary of the agricultural problems of the state, supported by evidence of specific injuries suffered by the producers as a-result of pres- ent economic conditions. The Minnesota Federation also out- lined specific remedies, urging speedy legislative action to put them into effect. The complete statement with its supporting evidence was presented to all members of the joint congres- sional committee, undecr Representa- tive Sydney Anderson, which is in- vestigating agricultural conditon,. Five recommendations were laid be- fore congress by the Minnesota fed- eration, as follows: Finance.--Credit facilities must be adjusted to the needs Of agricaltural production and financing. The 30 to 90 day loan suited to ordinary com- mercial and industrial enterprises is not equally adapted to the needs of agriculture; it puts the farmer under a serious financial handicap as com- pared to the manufacturer and mer- chant. Transportation.-- Railroad freight -rates musi;be reduced to a level that will restore the movemenb of tim necessities of life, before the frowners' purchasing power ca be restored or the consumer can be benefited by the decline.in the-original selling price of farm products. Foreign Competition. -- American agriCUlture dlannot prosper unless it is accorded th same tariff protection that is accorded other American in- dustry. So long as the farmer is cm- pelled to buy on a lOtected market, be must e allowed to sell on a pro- tected ma'rket, or be reduced by com- petition with foreign peasants and peons to a condition disastrous and unthinkable. Marketing.  C0-operation of the producers in distributing their pro- ducts is entitled to a fair trial in open competition with the existing sys- tem, and congress should enact neces. sary clarifying legislation to guaran- tee the right of the producePand the consumer to this trial. Taxation.The farmers of Minne- sota are virtually unanimous in op- position to the enactment of a .en- oral sales ta, a tax on land holdinK and repeal of the excess profits tax. Commerce and 4ndustry are so de- pendent of the farmers' normal pur- chasing power, the statement said, 'that restoration of that purchasing power is absolutely essential to bring the whole economic fabric of the United States back to normalcy. J, D. Ross returned the first of the w from an auto trip thru the northern pat of, the state. Duluth, ,Virginia, and other points were visited on the trip. COUNCIL DECLARES WAR ON BARLEYCORN Best Cellars Endangered If Proposed Ordinance Is Passed--Has First and Second Readings. Drastic action against the posses- sion Of leverages containing mow than tle lawful amount of alcohol is the aim of the proposed ordinance which received first and second roan- ings at the council meeting last Mon- day evening, August 1. Final action on this ordinance, which if passed will be number 131, will be taken when the members of the council hold their regular meeting next month. The proposed addition to the city laws is defined as "an order providing for search warrant and condemning property so found in unlawful use and penalty thereof." It provides that complaint on oath" to any magistrate authorized to is- sue warrants in criminal cases can be made by ahy person having evi- dence that persons are in possession of liquors in violation to the pro- posed ordinance. If the person has in possession for the purpose of selling, giving away, bartering, delivering, transporting, or otherwise disposing of any spirituous malts, fermented or vinous liquors the magistrate shall is- sue a searcht warrant to search for and sieze this property:. The finding of this, according to the ordinance, shall be considered prima  facie evidence, and no further evi- dence of guilt shall be required of the prosecution. The penalty lrescribed y the pro- posed ordinance for any person found guilty according to its terms shall be a fine of not less than $50 and not more than $100, or imprisonment in the city jail for not less than ,30 days and not ,more than 90 days. Applian- ces and materials confiscated shall be destroyed. Arrangements which have been made by the members of the First Congregational church of this place make it possible for the Roy. Paul Bockhoven of St. Charles to conduct services here during the month of August. Rev. and Mrs. Bockhoven will arrive Friday. During their stay here they will live in rooms upstairs in the H. W. Sarvis residence which have been furnished by the members of the congregation. Officers For Foster ......... Township Are Elected Officers for the newly organized township of Foster were named last Saturday, July 30, wben the first elec- tion there was held. Foster which is Big Stone county-s newest township, was created when the county commissioners, at a post- poned meeting held July 11, voted unanimously to divide the township then known as Prior, calling the wes- lern and smaller half Foster. The petition for this division was sub- mitted to the county board early in the year, and carried the signatures of more than 125 voters in that vi- cinity. Candidates for the various offices having been named, the polling was conducted in the regular legal way, resulting as follows: SuprvisorsKlaus Knudson, Abel Eastman, and Berg Nelson. TreasurerIngval Kvatum. ClerkJulius Skundberg. Justices of PeaceCharles Salmon- son and C. A. Peterson. Constables--J. P. Wilke and Gee. Hastings. The election was held at the Sunny- side school house, District No. 62. The new town board will officiate until the regular annual township election next March. LUTHERAN SERVICE DRAWS BIG CROWD Ten Congregations Participate--$00 To 1,000 People Attend Meetings. Joint services held by Norwegian Lutheran congregations in this sec- tion last Sunday at Chautauqua Park drew a crowd estimated to number from 800 to 1000. Ten congregations from this part of Minnesota and the eastern part of South Dakota took part in the services. The morning service was attended by about 500 people. Rev. J. Walseth of this place conducted altar services, and the Rev. M. O. Andrews of Whea- ton preached the morning sermon. His theme was centered on an appeal to the young people of the churches to hear the call to devote themselves to church and state work, particular- ly in local congregations. Roy. E. I. Strom of Watson who spoke at the afternoon service had as his subject, "The Value of Bible Study." He urged that a study of the Bible should be begun early in life so that it would become a habit. The Chautauqua auditorium w a s packed for the afternoon meeting. The singing of the Joint Choir of almost a hundred voices was one of the big features of the meeting. They sang "If With All Your Hearts," a part from the famous "Elijah," and two chorals. Also "Evening Prayer," by Beethoven, which was very good. The choir was directed by Rev. E. S. Belgum of Appleton. Mts. Carl Ol- son of Clinton sang Kipling's "Re- cessional," and Miss Brunstuem of Ap- pleton sang at the morning service. The Appletont Louisburg and Clin- ton choirs were also on the program. A considerable amount was received in the collection which was taken for the Church Fund. The money in this fund is loaned to needy churches for building and improvements. This is the first service of this kind that these churches have held. The idea of this meeting originated with Rev. E. S. Belgum of Appleton and Rev. $. M. Moo of Clinton, and they were the principal forces in starting it and putting it across. Tho no defi- nite arrangements were made for another similar meeting next year, those who attended were very much in favor of it, and it is not unlikely .that one will be held, next year. .berer, Drink Crazed Tries to.,Leap From Train Alex Judge, a laborer bound for Wheaton for the harvest, became de- mented on the Milwaukee passenger train Tuesday morning, the result of a seven day moonshine jag, and tried to throw himself out of the window of the train, but was forci- bly prevented by Conductor Harry Sooth, "Dutch" Hausauer and some of the paengers. He was turned over to Officer Lyttleton here, ,who de- tained him over night in the bastile and he went on his way rejoicing he next morning. In spite of its name this moonshine is not a light drink. Graceviile Enterprise. Board of Education Elects Officers School board officers who will serve for the coming term were elected at a meeting of the Board of Education last Monday evening at the First Na- tional bank. The officers for the newly organized board are as fol- lows: president, Mrs. Belle Shuma- ker; secretary, J. E. Palmer; and treasurer, Dr. E. N. Schoen. No other business than the allow- ing of a few bills was done at the meeting. Tearchers' Salaries For 1921 Increase 50 Per Cent $25,76.60 SPENT IN YEAR 1920-21 Sale of books and supplies, $620.24; AS AGAINST LITTLE MORE Building fund, $6.39; Interest and THAN $18,000 PREVIOUSLY. sinking fund, $149.48; and all other sources, $1,390.58, making a total for Expenditures made by the Orton- all receipts qf $62,354.45. vilte Public school duringthe school Disbursements coming under the year of 1920-21 for teachers' salaries heading of Instruction were the larg- amounted to $25,576.60, according to est on that list, the P-nount for the the annual report of the secretary of various branches being $28,277.71, the board of education. This amount 'which was divided as follaws: Teach- is an increase of ahnost 50 per cent er's wages, $25,576.60; Text books, over that spent a year ago, when sal- $1,124.86; Supplies, $1,495.93, and Li- aries for teacher-s amounted to but Prohibition Agents Get Man for Moonshining Federal prohibition enforcement agents arrested Robert O. H'eidtke, a farmer living four miles north of Or- tonville on the West road to Clinton, after obtaining evidence both in the form of the manufactured goods and his plant. A ten gallon still was dis- cbvered by the federal agents and con- fiscated. Heidtke had been operating a ten- gallon still for some time, and had beech enjoying a thriving business, ac- cording to reports. The wet goods he manufactured was made from a mix- t.ure of molasses and yeart, and three days were required in the distilling of it, it is said. At present he is confined to the county jail, officials here waiting for a federal marshal to come and take him to Fergus Falls where he will be arraigned in federal court. This is one of the first drives made in this county againstthe illicit man- ufacture and sale of intoxicating drinks in violation to the federal laws. Law Does Not Apply To Threshing Work Threshing operations are not cov- ered by the workmen's compensation law, according to a letter received by the state leader of county agents, F. E. Balmer, from F. A. Duxbury, chairman of the Industrial Commis- sion of Minnesota. Mr. Duxbury says that the supreme court of the state has decided that the business of threshing as far labor is exempt from the operation of the law. Mr. Duxbury, however, suggests to threshermen that the common law li- ability arising from negligence does prevail in threshing operations and that while there is no law requiring insurance of the risk involved, "busi- ness prudence might dictate protec- tion by insurance against this com- mon law liability." FIFTY CREAMERIES JOIN STATE AGENCY Second Movement To Centralize C 9- operative Marketing Wins Support. Fifty co-operative creameries have joined the new statewide marketing agency, the Minnesota Co-operative Creameries association, Inc. Th Minnesota Farm Bureau Fed. eration today announced the results of the first week of a drive to unite the co-operative creameries of the state into one strong central associa- tion. Two hundred shares of stock, each share representing 50,000 pounds of butterfat handled annually, have been subscribed by local creameries, federal officials said. Every creamery in Dodge and Chi- sago counties reached during the first week's drive joined the new central agency it was announced. The Glen- coo Co-operative creamery took twelve shares, and creameries at Rush City and Mankato took eight shares apiece. "The cseamery association is meet- ing with success as remarkable as that of the statewide livestock mar- keting agency," A. J. McGuire, or- ganization manager of the associa- tion, said. "The rapid response of the producers to an organization design- ed to improve marketing conditions and cheapen transportation proves that centralization of co-operative selling is the next step to the proper step in the solution of agricultural problems." Loses Otit On Chance to Bum Ride; Stones Train When Floyd Edwards, a transient, found that the blind of the Fargo pas- senger was guarded Sunday morning, preventing him from getting some free transportation, he sent a barrage of stones at the train as it went by. Now he is in the county jail. BOXCAR BANDITS KILL 1; ANOTHER VICTIM CRITICAL Three Bandits Hold Up Five Harvest Hands On Freight N e a r Correli Monday Night. One man is dead, another has but a fighting chance for life and three others are suffering serious bruises a the result of a boxcar holdup and bat- tle staged early Tuesday morning on the Milwaukee road about three miles east of CorrelL The dead mn is: Charles Obeg, 45 years old, who lived for a time this spring at llZ Ninth Street, South, Minneapolia Russel Hanson, aged 19, of Monte- video, another one of the victims is now in the hospital at Appleton in a serious condition. Severe loss of blood has left him in a weakened con- dition, with little hopes for his recov- ery. The three other victims gave their names as F. J. Brabec, aged 16, of Montevideo; Bertal Henley, aged 16, also of Montevideo, and H. N. Rich- ardson, aged 32, of Howard Lake. It was Hanson's, Brabec's, and Hen- ley's first trip from home. Oberg, Hanson and three compan- ions boarded thru coast freight train, No. 263, extra, at Montevideo about midnight, and three other men get into the same box car at Appletom Two of these men were armed with pistols. The three held up the five and then forced them to jump from the rapidly moving train. Oherg was killed by the fall and his body muti- lated. Hanson fell under the wheels of the cars and his leg was severed. Their three companions were knocked unconscious and remained in that con- dition until 5:00 a. m. when they noti- fied the Swift county authorities, who informed the Big Stone county offi- cials. Coroner B. R. Karn took charge of Oberg's body and brought him to the morgue here. From papers found on the dead man it was supposed that he lived either in Minneapolis Or Red Wing, or had relatives there. John Hausauer, detective for the Milwaukee road, and county authori- ties immediately took u the arch for three assailants. Word was re- ceived here Wednesday that two sus- pects were held by the Benson au- thorities, and on Thursday Mr. Hau- sauer left for that place to determine their connection with the crime. The men were described by their victims are being from 30 to 35 years old, one tall, another medium siged, and the third, a short stfcky man. The short man wore a dark overcoat, overalls and a dark cap. The others wore handkerchiefs over their faces. The crew which took the train from Montevideo to Aberdeen reported tha no one had left itheir train between those points ,and points west wex notified to be on the lookout. It is supposed tha$ the three men went thru to Aberdeen. Word was received from Minneapolis that Charles Oberg lived at the room- ing house of J. Tures, 112 Ninth street Soth, from April 11 to April 2u, this year. Mrs. Tures said she knew little about him except that he seem- ed interested in the purchase of lane. Prominent Otrey Farmer Dies. Fred Wiley, prominent Otrey farm- er, died suddenly late Thursday after- noon while he was lelping with threghing on his farm. Heart failure is reported to have been the cause of his death. Mr. Wiley was about 55 years old at the time of his death. | County Ranks High In Seal Sale Campaign Seal sale returns for Big Stone Together with two other transients, county, resulting from the campaign Edwards had planned to leave Orton- which was carried on proceeding and viile Sundalr  morning via "blind bag- during the Christmas season, amount- gage." Their plans were not kept a ed to $453.89, according to the report secret tho, and John Hausauer, rail- of the Minnesota Public Health "Asso- rad detective, set out to nip the plan. elation. When the train backed up to get on the Fargo track, it went ast and gave them the slip, and then started aiad full steam. Edwards gathered up some good sized rocks, and as the train passed him, bombarded "Dutch" Hausauer who stood guard in the blinds. John Regarding the outcome of the seal sales for the counties of the state, the state health association says: The returns from the last seal sale according to counties while they can- not be used as a basis for comparison between counties because of the di- little over $18,000, Mr. Palmer, secre- tary of the board said. Salary requirements for the coming year will continue to be about the same as for this last year he said. While in some instances there was a chance to make a reduction without imparing the standard set, increases iu salaries in the case of some of the instructors counterbalanced it, and ex- pendittres for the coming year will brary, $80.32. = General control cost $895.61, the school board being paid $292.41 and t Hausauer who was at the switch soon 603.20 going to sundry items. [ took him in charge, and he was led- Operation of the school rquired god in the counw jail. $4,552.09 for the school year. Wednesday he was arraigned be- Janitor's wages and suppliesifore Judge MacMurpheyin municipal amounted to $2228.61, fuel, light, court. He demanded an examination, water, and other needs $1,749.20, and and the case was postponed to Satur- sundries $474.28. day forenoon when the hearing will $596.79 was spent for maintenance, be held. $329.28 going for repairs on the build- be about the same. ing, $125.46 for repairs on equipment, I Sixteen guests who came here in The secretary's report further and $142.05 for various items. I cars arc bebg entertained at the P. showed that cash on hand when the New equipment added to the school I M. C. Lindquist home this week. They report was made out, July 17, amount- during the past year cost $690.04, are Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Johnson ed to $22,888.93. The state appor- while other outlays amounted to[ and daughters Alice and May of Port- tionment this year amounted to $2,- $378.00. , land, Oregon, Mr. and Mrs. A. A. 633.10, and special state aid. added The report of both the secretary  of'Westburg of Wil[mar, Mrs. Westburg $4,735.00 to 'the treasury. Special the board, Mr. PRimer and the treas-t bcing a daughter of the Lindquists, tax/s netted $29,098.08, while the lo- urer, Win. S. Utley, were accepted by I and Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Lavine mad cal mill taxes amounted to $832.65. the board of education at a meeting[ children of Duluth and Miss Inga Other eceipts were as follows: which was hem about a week ago. Gunderson of Hibbing. versity of population, show that every county obtained enough from the campaign to assure some health work this year. Those whose returns feff below the quota set and who feel that their fu.-s are di.appointingty tow mu. make. a special effort to as- sure success for each undertaking however small and in that way show the county people that the amount t]ey spend for Ctu'istmas seals will repay many times over. Other counties near here responded to the alpeal to buy seals in about the same degree and contributed as follows: Traverse county, $37t.08; Stevens, $580.6, and Lac qui Parle, $512.65. Ctnpared with this the work of the Public Health Associa- f Ion for lig Stone county did work equal to, and in some cases surpas- Sing, that of other ounties.