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Ortonville, Minnesota
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August 4, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
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-'PAGE 2 i .i i i ,'l"ff im IF " - THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT THURSDAY, AUG It is too bad for any couple of Iron- "IIou could you have d ey-mooners to wait until they get to. dearest?" he asked. Middle West Joins Grain Grade Fight Congress Told Ten States Approve Demand For Changes In Standards, Wheat growers who have urged changes in federal grain grades so that spring wheat would be graded as it was under the old Minnesota standards, now have the support of organized farmers in the ten other states. The presidents and secretaries of ten state farm bureau federations, meeting in St. Paul. passed a resolu- tion urging congre to pass the Steenerson bill which would change ederal grades to conform to Minne- sota's old spring wheat standards. In a letter to members of the agri- cultural committee of the lower house of congress, the Minnesota Farm BuG reau federation this week pointed out that the bill is supported by the whole grain production region of the central west. The action of the midwlest farm bureau conference, representing the Dakotas, Wisconsin, Ohio, Mis- souri, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Ne-I braska and Iowa, proves that Minne- sota farme] are not asking special favors, and that other grain states have no objection to changes in spring wheat grades, the letter says. Seeking Substitutes For Corn Ensilage For regions in which the se&son is too short for corn-growing, the staff of the Northeast agricultural experi- ment station near Duluth is seeking to find substitutes for corn for use in the making of silage. M. J. Thomp- son superintendent of the station, in his report for 1920 just issued, an- nounces progress in the statenent that sunflowers are now the major sil- age crop for the Duluth station. Other silage crops which have been tried Out with more or less success are clover-timothy, millet, rutabaga tops, and potatoes. Mr. Thompson says that clover-timothy silage has always been eaten ravenously by the stock; millet has proved rather in- ferior on account of over-ripeness and dryness, and rutabaga tops were eat- en freely and were not only palatable but probably stimulated milk produc- tion above all other feeds. Potato] silage, to which 2 per cent of corn I meal was added to stimulate fre- mentation, proved an exceptionally good feed for milking cattle. The 1920 report of the Duluth sta- . 1 tion is full of interesting materml, showing how progress is being made in working out the farm problems of regions like that around Duluth. A DISTINCTION WORTH MAKING. For so many years farmers have been fought in their efforts to im- prove marketing by organized grain exchanges that there is a tendency for them to think of all elements in the grain trade as predatory and vi- cious. There is, however, a keen dis- tinction to be made, and this the Equi- ty Exchange learned early in its busi- ness career. There were Chamber of Commerce firms that wanted to be ordinarily intelligent and commercial- Trying to Foresee Future of Forests Mnnesota's forest experiment sta- tion workers, under the general di- rection of E. G. Cheney, are making a survey to find out the amount and character of the forest products to which the country will have to turn when the virgin timber is gone and industries begins to use the "second growth." The field work of this survey is be- mg directed by Thorvald S. Hansen, Assistant superintendent of the Clo- quet forest experiment station. Mr. Hanson has two crews in the field who are making an intensive examination of at least three sections in each town- ship thruout the countries inspected. Two lines, a half mile apart, are ran thru these sections, and on these lines are designated 32 plots placed at 5- chain intervals. For each of these plots a complete count of second growth products is made, and size and age are carefully recorded. With data from a sufficiently large area all types of cut-over land will be represented. With this information and the known area of the cut-over region it will be possibly to tell approximately of what the second crop of timber consists and what can be looked for in the future. The surveys also hope to obtain some information on the virgin timber still standing so that it may be known how long it will be before the lumber- men will have to attack the second growth. Land-Clearing Farmers Eager for War Explosives Farmers in the cut-over regions of Minnesota who have stumps to r- move are jumping at the opportunity offered by the government thru the University of Minnesota to get left- over explosives with which to do their stump blasting. The announcement made last week that the United States government had allotted 37 carloads of picric acid to Minnesota to be distributed among land-clearing farmers at about half the prices that farmers have been paying for other explosives, was met with eager interest on the part of the farmers. As soon as the word went out, county agents in the 18 counties to which the allotments have been as- signed began to get inquires. The meetings being held this week at coun- ty seats and elsewhere to acquaint far- mers with the opportunity to secure a high grade explosive at greatly re- duced rates, and to acqua|nt them with its use, have been largely attended. Following each meeting orders have poured in. Those in charge of the cam.paign be- lieve that Minnesota's allotment will be quickly absorbed. Thru the coun- I MICKIE SAYS ly honest with the farmers.    The element in the grain trade that is incapable of fairness towards far- mers, is made up of those whose ex-i lllr_ ploitations will become, first unpro- fitable, and next impossible by the es- tablis1ment of direct merchandising and the elimination of speculative spreads. Middlemen who are useless I will fade into oblivion. Practices that I abstract slices of profits without add-t ing to the directness of dealing will I became obsolete. There are today in{ the grain exchanges, many men "and t firms who are willing to deal with the VuRcv- farmer organizations, giving the far- "V | ! Plh[ . mers the benefits, and sidestepping a  OOQ,," ,h,) whole array of exploitive charges in grain marketing. Millers as a rule " m_mJ are not to be classed with grain ]llttIll[I}[l(t(ll[l speculators in the fight against far- reefs. They are the real customers of the farmers, (he only ones "who can[ use the farmers' graiw [  TO THE PUBLIC iii We wish to announce to the people of Ortonville and the vicinity that The CITY TAILOR SHOP o a shop for ladies and gentlemen who appreciate the worth of good tailoring, is now open for busi- ness. We speciMize in TAILOR-MA DE CLOTHES CLEANING AND PRESSING REMODELLING AND REPAIRING OF ALL KINDS Work done neatly and at prices very reasonable- Located opposite the M. M. Johnson Furniture Store. Clothes pressed while you wait. A. W. YOUNG, Proprietor nil I III I Oh! These Literary Persons. Two friends--Jim and Bill meet. Each has just read a book that the Florida to begin their apologies for l "Well, lover, I may as othea- is unfamiliar ,with. NeitSher they are sure to be overheard. So it i My right eye is made of wishes to admit that he doesn't know happened: , ] "Never mind that, the other man's book. Their conver- 'Darling,' she said, tremblingly, "I "so are the diamonds in sat|on sounds somethitxg like this: *--I have a confession to make. Can/ment ring." "'Lo, Bill. Just read a fine book-- you ever forgive me for deceiving 'Romping Around.' Great stuff." you?" The Ads are "You bet." ty agents, thezefore, they are urging farmers to file their orders early in order to get the pries quoted seven cents a pound plus freight charges of about two cents from Sparta, Wis. If the supply at Sparta is exhausted, ad- ditional stock will have to be shipped from New Mexico which will greatly increase the freight charge. All or- ders should be placed with county agents or local bankers. Bond Refund Forms Ready. Forms of highway bond reimburse- ment resolutions for adoption of coun- ty boards of commissioners were pre- pared this week by C. H. Christopher- son, assistant attorney general. O. L. Kipp, chief construction engineer in the highway department is supplying copies to county attorneys and audi- tors. The forms have the approval of representatives of bond houses besides insuring uniformity and compliance with the statutes. Prevention is better than cure in! the poultry business as in any other department of life. Filth, dampness, improper ventilation, improper feed- "Then you've read it?" "Oh, yeh. Good character work Jim." 'Whatddye .mean--character work: 'It's a book of travel, Bill." "You misunderstand me, Jim. I mean it's got lots of character." ,,Oh p, ,, " , I Yep--that s what I mean. Lots of; character. * * * By the way have you read the book that I've just finish- ed--'A Beast of Burden?' "'A Beast of Burden? Lemmel think * * * Oh, yeah, I remember I that book. Sure I've read it. And I / it's a fine horse story too." t "Horse story? Aren't you mistaken i Jim? It isn't a horse story. It's about a poor boob whe went thru life with ing, and introducing infected birds in- a thousand burdens." to the yard are common causes of dis- "Of course it]is, Bill. You misun- ease. Clean the dropping boards I derstand me. I simply meant he was daily, and then sprinkle them with t a horse for punishment." 4oad dust, coal ashes, or land-plaster t "Oh!"--New York Herald. to absorb the liquid excrement. New straw should be put into the nests Verily, it is the man who prepares every two or three weeks or oftener, for aa emergency, who keeps hi sails cspecially if it becomes damp or dirty. Whitewash the quarters once a year at least, late in summer or early in the fall. After service one Sunday in one of St. Petersburg's churches the minister of the flock met a young woman who had been attending his services oc- casionally. "Miss, I was wondering whether or not you would care to join us in the new missionary movement!" asked the pastor. "Sure " replied the young miss, "I'm crazy to try it. Is it anything like the fox trot ?" The young lady had been stepping out with a man several years her sen- ior, and this had caused her mother considerable worry "Why do girls of eighteen marry men of sixty?" ssked the bewildered mother. "Mother," replied Miss I. Sippi, "the modern girl is developing a conscience. She prefers an inheritance to ali- mony." Some men are absolutely straight --others "three for a quarter." Some fellows think the secret tb success is a box of raisins, five pounds of sugar and a cake of years. trimmed and his ship in order, that successfully goes thru the gale. Do you know you can roll IOct$ from one of GENUINE "BULL"DURHAM TOBACCO ? Credit at his bank a wonderful help to man, in business or farming. If you have an imm ate need for additio$ funds come in and talk over. N i If you have not s s bee: need, in order to provid r"a( to for your future requi#F a ments, an account he:[i now, properly handl : that i lo"1th r will be well worth y , , O rojemcti while. z b . iag e ' We will make the wafg tel easy. [ ;e la :lit|on ,  and INVESTMENT VALUE When a nan first looks at our "Glenbrook" Model he is captured by the exquisite finish and long, graceful lines. He realizes that it is an unusual art creation--a newer and finer conception of the five passenger vehicle. And then comes a trial on the road--one thrilling exlrienee behind the motor that accelerates from five to twenty-five nailes per hour in nine seconds flat. That ride is never for- gotten and it leads inevitably to proud, enthusiastic adoption. Later comes indisputable proof of low gasoline consumption, long life of tires and care-free, untroubled mileage. And last --but far from least--comes the confidence and respect that only fine products command. Here, surely, is amazing investment value at $1635. PAIGE-DETROIT MOTOR CAR CO., DTROIT, M/cldO Manufaero- of Patae Molar CArs  Motor Tr P.4cu quoted f. o. b. Doit The PARK GARAG E . ., -'PAGE 2 i .i i i ,'l"ff im IF " - THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT THURSDAY, AUG It is too bad for any couple of Iron- "IIou could you have d ey-mooners to wait until they get to. dearest?" he asked. Middle West Joins Grain Grade Fight Congress Told Ten States Approve Demand For Changes In Standards, Wheat growers who have urged changes in federal grain grades so that spring wheat would be graded as it was under the old Minnesota standards, now have the support of organized farmers in the ten other states. The presidents and secretaries of ten state farm bureau federations, meeting in St. Paul. passed a resolu- tion urging congre to pass the Steenerson bill which would change ederal grades to conform to Minne- sota's old spring wheat standards. In a letter to members of the agri- cultural committee of the lower house of congress, the Minnesota Farm BuG reau federation this week pointed out that the bill is supported by the whole grain production region of the central west. The action of the midwlest farm bureau conference, representing the Dakotas, Wisconsin, Ohio, Mis- souri, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Ne-I braska and Iowa, proves that Minne- sota farme] are not asking special favors, and that other grain states have no objection to changes in spring wheat grades, the letter says. Seeking Substitutes For Corn Ensilage For regions in which the se&son is too short for corn-growing, the staff of the Northeast agricultural experi- ment station near Duluth is seeking to find substitutes for corn for use in the making of silage. M. J. Thomp- son superintendent of the station, in his report for 1920 just issued, an- nounces progress in the statenent that sunflowers are now the major sil- age crop for the Duluth station. Other silage crops which have been tried Out with more or less success are clover-timothy, millet, rutabaga tops, and potatoes. Mr. Thompson says that clover-timothy silage has always been eaten ravenously by the stock; millet has proved rather in- ferior on account of over-ripeness and dryness, and rutabaga tops were eat- en freely and were not only palatable but probably stimulated milk produc- tion above all other feeds. Potato] silage, to which 2 per cent of corn I meal was added to stimulate fre- mentation, proved an exceptionally good feed for milking cattle. The 1920 report of the Duluth sta- . 1 tion is full of interesting materml, showing how progress is being made in working out the farm problems of regions like that around Duluth. A DISTINCTION WORTH MAKING. For so many years farmers have been fought in their efforts to im- prove marketing by organized grain exchanges that there is a tendency for them to think of all elements in the grain trade as predatory and vi- cious. There is, however, a keen dis- tinction to be made, and this the Equi- ty Exchange learned early in its busi- ness career. There were Chamber of Commerce firms that wanted to be ordinarily intelligent and commercial- Trying to Foresee Future of Forests Mnnesota's forest experiment sta- tion workers, under the general di- rection of E. G. Cheney, are making a survey to find out the amount and character of the forest products to which the country will have to turn when the virgin timber is gone and industries begins to use the "second growth." The field work of this survey is be- mg directed by Thorvald S. Hansen, Assistant superintendent of the Clo- quet forest experiment station. Mr. Hanson has two crews in the field who are making an intensive examination of at least three sections in each town- ship thruout the countries inspected. Two lines, a half mile apart, are ran thru these sections, and on these lines are designated 32 plots placed at 5- chain intervals. For each of these plots a complete count of second growth products is made, and size and age are carefully recorded. With data from a sufficiently large area all types of cut-over land will be represented. With this information and the known area of the cut-over region it will be possibly to tell approximately of what the second crop of timber consists and what can be looked for in the future. The surveys also hope to obtain some information on the virgin timber still standing so that it may be known how long it will be before the lumber- men will have to attack the second growth. Land-Clearing Farmers Eager for War Explosives Farmers in the cut-over regions of Minnesota who have stumps to r- move are jumping at the opportunity offered by the government thru the University of Minnesota to get left- over explosives with which to do their stump blasting. The announcement made last week that the United States government had allotted 37 carloads of picric acid to Minnesota to be distributed among land-clearing farmers at about half the prices that farmers have been paying for other explosives, was met with eager interest on the part of the farmers. As soon as the word went out, county agents in the 18 counties to which the allotments have been as- signed began to get inquires. The meetings being held this week at coun- ty seats and elsewhere to acquaint far- mers with the opportunity to secure a high grade explosive at greatly re- duced rates, and to acqua|nt them with its use, have been largely attended. Following each meeting orders have poured in. Those in charge of the cam.paign be- lieve that Minnesota's allotment will be quickly absorbed. Thru the coun- I MICKIE SAYS ly honest with the farmers.    The element in the grain trade that is incapable of fairness towards far- mers, is made up of those whose ex-i lllr_ ploitations will become, first unpro- fitable, and next impossible by the es- tablis1ment of direct merchandising and the elimination of speculative spreads. Middlemen who are useless I will fade into oblivion. Practices that I abstract slices of profits without add-t ing to the directness of dealing will I became obsolete. There are today in{ the grain exchanges, many men "and t firms who are willing to deal with the VuRcv- farmer organizations, giving the far- "V | ! Plh[ . mers the benefits, and sidestepping a  OOQ,," ,h,) whole array of exploitive charges in grain marketing. Millers as a rule " m_mJ are not to be classed with grain ]llttIll[I}[l(t(ll[l speculators in the fight against far- reefs. They are the real customers of the farmers, (he only ones "who can[ use the farmers' graiw [  TO THE PUBLIC iii We wish to announce to the people of Ortonville and the vicinity that The CITY TAILOR SHOP o a shop for ladies and gentlemen who appreciate the worth of good tailoring, is now open for busi- ness. We speciMize in TAILOR-MA DE CLOTHES CLEANING AND PRESSING REMODELLING AND REPAIRING OF ALL KINDS Work done neatly and at prices very reasonable- Located opposite the M. M. Johnson Furniture Store. Clothes pressed while you wait. A. W. YOUNG, Proprietor nil I III I Oh! These Literary Persons. Two friends--Jim and Bill meet. Each has just read a book that the Florida to begin their apologies for l "Well, lover, I may as othea- is unfamiliar ,with. NeitSher they are sure to be overheard. So it i My right eye is made of wishes to admit that he doesn't know happened: , ] "Never mind that, the other man's book. Their conver- 'Darling,' she said, tremblingly, "I "so are the diamonds in sat|on sounds somethitxg like this: *--I have a confession to make. Can/ment ring." "'Lo, Bill. Just read a fine book-- you ever forgive me for deceiving 'Romping Around.' Great stuff." you?" The Ads are "You bet." ty agents, thezefore, they are urging farmers to file their orders early in order to get the pries quoted seven cents a pound plus freight charges of about two cents from Sparta, Wis. If the supply at Sparta is exhausted, ad- ditional stock will have to be shipped from New Mexico which will greatly increase the freight charge. All or- ders should be placed with county agents or local bankers. Bond Refund Forms Ready. Forms of highway bond reimburse- ment resolutions for adoption of coun- ty boards of commissioners were pre- pared this week by C. H. Christopher- son, assistant attorney general. O. L. Kipp, chief construction engineer in the highway department is supplying copies to county attorneys and audi- tors. The forms have the approval of representatives of bond houses besides insuring uniformity and compliance with the statutes. Prevention is better than cure in! the poultry business as in any other department of life. Filth, dampness, improper ventilation, improper feed- "Then you've read it?" "Oh, yeh. Good character work Jim." 'Whatddye .mean--character work: 'It's a book of travel, Bill." "You misunderstand me, Jim. I mean it's got lots of character." ,,Oh p, ,, " , I Yep--that s what I mean. Lots of; character. * * * By the way have you read the book that I've just finish- ed--'A Beast of Burden?' "'A Beast of Burden? Lemmel think * * * Oh, yeah, I remember I that book. Sure I've read it. And I / it's a fine horse story too." t "Horse story? Aren't you mistaken i Jim? It isn't a horse story. It's about a poor boob whe went thru life with ing, and introducing infected birds in- a thousand burdens." to the yard are common causes of dis- "Of course it]is, Bill. You misun- ease. Clean the dropping boards I derstand me. I simply meant he was daily, and then sprinkle them with t a horse for punishment." 4oad dust, coal ashes, or land-plaster t "Oh!"--New York Herald. to absorb the liquid excrement. New straw should be put into the nests Verily, it is the man who prepares every two or three weeks or oftener, for aa emergency, who keeps hi sails cspecially if it becomes damp or dirty. Whitewash the quarters once a year at least, late in summer or early in the fall. After service one Sunday in one of St. Petersburg's churches the minister of the flock met a young woman who had been attending his services oc- casionally. "Miss, I was wondering whether or not you would care to join us in the new missionary movement!" asked the pastor. "Sure " replied the young miss, "I'm crazy to try it. Is it anything like the fox trot ?" The young lady had been stepping out with a man several years her sen- ior, and this had caused her mother considerable worry "Why do girls of eighteen marry men of sixty?" ssked the bewildered mother. "Mother," replied Miss I. Sippi, "the modern girl is developing a conscience. She prefers an inheritance to ali- mony." Some men are absolutely straight --others "three for a quarter." Some fellows think the secret tb success is a box of raisins, five pounds of sugar and a cake of years. trimmed and his ship in order, that successfully goes thru the gale. Do you know you can roll IOct$ from one of GENUINE "BULL"DURHAM TOBACCO ? Credit at his bank a wonderful help to man, in business or farming. If you have an imm ate need for additio$ funds come in and talk over. N i If you have not s s bee: need, in order to provid r"a( to for your future requi#F a ments, an account he:[i now, properly handl : that i lo"1th r will be well worth y , , O rojemcti while. z b . iag e ' We will make the wafg tel easy. [ ;e la :lit|on ,  and INVESTMENT VALUE When a nan first looks at our "Glenbrook" Model he is captured by the exquisite finish and long, graceful lines. He realizes that it is an unusual art creation--a newer and finer conception of the five passenger vehicle. And then comes a trial on the road--one thrilling exlrienee behind the motor that accelerates from five to twenty-five nailes per hour in nine seconds flat. That ride is never for- gotten and it leads inevitably to proud, enthusiastic adoption. Later comes indisputable proof of low gasoline consumption, long life of tires and care-free, untroubled mileage. And last --but far from least--comes the confidence and respect that only fine products command. Here, surely, is amazing investment value at $1635. PAIGE-DETROIT MOTOR CAR CO., DTROIT, M/cldO Manufaero- of Patae Molar CArs  Motor Tr P.4cu quoted f. o. b. Doit The PARK GARAG E . ., "  [Trying to Foresee Mzddle West Joln  - f For + future 0 es8 Grain Grade Fight!  ....... ,s +:-, ............. -- tion worke, under the general di- Coagre Told Ten States Approve rection of E, G. Cheney, aN klng a Dim&rid For Changes I uey to find nlt the ount and In st,ndrda, i ehacter of the foist products to -- e ed: whiek the antry will have to tu Wheat .grwdrel rhm-ha adgs i .... th ........ imber i ....... t sp ng wo grad , growth." t was der he old MJnneBota' " e ' The field work of thzs su y is be standards now have the lppor of, organized faers in the tel other ! rag.directed byTholed S, Hanna, scares Asmstant penntndent of the CI Th e" , f q net fot exriment station, Mr, psldents and stnes o , el wh tn st faro bau fedtis Hnhastwocslnthefi d e   Pa [ solu' a making an intensive exinatlon -otmugr t: S con n ePaSod a  t of at ]et th sections in ech ..... gl g r P s ship thout the counties ipected. 8teen.on bill vhleh wId hge . s a half mile a a to . , Two hpe ap rt, Tederfd grades eonfom to Minne- I thru these stions and on the lines ta's old aping wheat standard , p In a letter  mber the a ri are dzgnat 32 plots plied at 5- , s of g - thai n inteals. For each of these cultural commlttee of the lower house corn ]e ut of  nd mu federation this wk pointed out g P , , g p g o tbe en , . west The acrid f the midwt' of cut-over land will be pnted. u n o . i With this information and the known fens bur eonfenee, pntxng .... the Dakota*, W ......... Ohio, Is-aif thetitaVerxrYing ltoilwlh u, ads, ndana  N p Y PP. Y. b 1 ' ,  the cond crop of umber ssts and rusks and own. pves that Mmne- what e be lked for in the future. ta fe  not asMng special The SuIwe3rs a] hope to obtn rs, and e that other gr*n stateS,sore e informati ..... he virgin timber no ohj ctxon to change ]n spring stilI standing so that it may be known whea grades, the letter nays. ; how long it x]] be hefo the lumber- .  i men will have to attack the second Seeking Substitutes ' g-oth For Corn Ensilagel -- [ Land-Clearing Farmers For regi i which the n i Ea=er for War Exlosives too short for corn-gwing, the staff[  '':La%lual " - , ................ ---; ............ ut le eeklng Mesota who have stumps to rg to find subst lutes for  for u in  "urn th o u "t te making of slage. M.J. Thp-om;Ved a b  thePmgo :t trhenP n, n perintendent of the staen in [ . . y g v Ms rt for 1920 use is ued ' Uutvermt of Mmneta t get left P , J s , -, over explosives with whieh to do thei] ns progress m the statont t blti ttt sunflowers ae now the major sil-[ s ttp rig. __ , . m for the Duluth station [ "the nnounent me t w age p . that the United State govemenl Other silage eps which leave been ] had allotted 3/ carloads of piere acid tried ut wit& more or  ee ..... b -- "b --" top, p . . , P  the prices that fae have been says that elor-tmothy silage h . for ther ex Io yes a et way$ hn eaten ranly by the iP ylng 3 P sl , w s m f ...... tanet ....... ener sea sand I ................................ n'ynes, a ga top e l to which the ailotment have been sa- fely and we not ony palatable si ed be an to t i ms The but probably smulatod ndlk produc - gn g. ge. q , t'o ab 1 other feed Potato Imeetmgsbelngheldthlswkateun- ] to ewhie h 2 s f e ' y ats ld elsewhere to acquaint f mass, per ten o o mers vth the opportunity to secure ml w added to stimulate fre- -- -- I ' " " ' e i 11 a alga gre exp oslve a geatly - g g , i its u have een largely attended. The 1920 report of the Duluth sta-, ., e de lion s fl of nterest ng materallFllwlP g eh mtlng t  have showing h progre is being del Preen' eh f th ea " be working out the f pb s Of '. hos m urge o e al . - here that Minnesota's allotment will Iglons IIke that around Dvluth. be qulekly absorbed. Th the court- A DISTINCTION WORTH MAKING. For  my yea faers have been fght in their efforts to im- pe mketing by organized gndn ehang that the  a tendency fer them to thlnk ef all elements in the grain trade & predator and v- cio There is, however, a kn ds- finlion to be made. and this the Equi- t Exchge learned ely in its busi- ness career. The we Chber o Caramels fires that wanted to be ordily intel}igent and commercial- ly honest with the farme. The element in the grin trade that lnpable of faiess towards far- mere, is made up of tho whe ex- poltatio dtl beceme, first unp fitable, and next impossible b the es- tishraent of direct merehandlsing and the iminatlon of spulative s Mdlemen who a u] wl fade into 6blivio Practices that abtt slices ef pfits tbeut add. ins to the direness ef dealing will h*cne obsolete. The  today ir the grain ehges, many men  rims who are wtling to de with the faer orgarzations, gng the far me the benfit, sad ideepplng * where array of exploitive ch-ges ir gadn marketing. Mme a a le are not to be classed vth gra Keculators in the fight agmnst f. mere. Th  the 1 eutcrs ol the farmers, the orJy ones ho eat u the farmers' r MICKIE SAys TO THE PUBLIC. We wish to announce to the people of Ortenville , and the vicinity that t The CITY TAILOR SHOP a shop for ladies and gentlemen who appreciate the worth of good tailoring, is now open for bUsi- [ hess, " We specialize in t TAILOR-MADE CLOTHES CLEANING AND PRESSING ! REMODELLING AND I REPAIRING OF ALL KINDS ' Work done neatly and at prices very reasonable I Located opposite the M, M. 3ohnson Furniture Store+ | Clothes pressed while you wail i A.W. YOUNG, Proprietor ty agents, therefore, they a urging i OhZ These hterary Persona [ It is too bvd for y couple of hon-'l "lIou could you I fa,ers to file their orders early in I Two fr end  m and B mee ey-mooue to wait til they get tc I dea,st ?" he asked. order to get the prs quoed--sen; Each h t ad a bk that the Florida to begin their apologies for "WeL lover. I m. nts a pound pl freight charges of ethe is unfiliar wlt. Nei0her they are su to be overheard. So it; My.right eye is m about to ets from Sparta, Wis If I wishes to admit that he don't know happened: I "Nc,r mind that the supp y at Sp.rt s haus ed, ad- the other man's baok. Their nve-I "ar .g," she sa d, tmbling]y, "I "so a the diamonc tienal stk will have to be spped[ satinn surds omcthi, like ths - .I ha a confession ta make Can I ent tig " from New Mexico which will gatly . 'Lo Bill" Just reada fine book you ever forgiveorgi meme ffar dvtngdivtng -- ince the freight charge. Al or- , .' " , -- yen +" --The--The AAds e n agents or local barkers. , 'Then you've rd it?" Bd Redy. "''Oh, yeh. Good charter work, Forms of highway bond reimburse- Jam. ent resolutions for adotion of eou- WhatIdYe eanhctr work, ped ............................. this w'k bY C" H' Cnristopher- its a sok"Yu sundetand ......... Bill" me' "T'm" I You Net son, sJstant attornev geraL O. L me,)nhzts got ]ets of character"  FApp, chief eotction enginr in . . ...... hwayd ..................... Ye ............... L ..... i Cll copies to county attorneys and audi e haraeter- * * * By the wy have+ turin The forms have the approva o you rad the book that Ire jt fimsh- IlL , - rep entatlves of bond hours b des dA Beast of Burden .' nurng unformty and compli "'A Bet of Bur? Lemme / with the s atu . think * * * Oh, yeah, I member. -- -- -- that book. Sure I've read it. . . Prevention is better than cure in it's a fine hor story too." Credit at his bank the PultrY business as in any theri "Hor stry? Aren't you mistaken  wonderful help to department of life. Filth, dampness, film ? It isn't a hor story, It's about improper veutiIation, improper feed. a poor boob whe went th life wit h -- man, in business m to the yard a eomtnon causes of dis- +'Of course is, Bill. You misun- ins, and introducing infected birds in- a thousand bul us." fnrllliIlg. ease. Cle the dropping board derstand me. I simply meant he was daily and then sprinkle them with a horse for punishment," If yop road dust, coal ashes, or land-plaster "Oh!"--New York Herald every two or th wks or oftener, for aa emergency, who keeps hi sails to absorb the liquid excrement New -- ate need for straw should be put into the nts Verily. it is the man who ppal funds come especially if it h#come s damp or diltY, i trJmm I and his ship in order, over. Whitewh the quters once a ye successfully goes thru the g-le. aleast late in summer or early in the If yOU have not fall. After service one Sunday in one of St. peteburg's churches the minister ef the flock met a young woman who had bn attending his rviees oc- casScnally. "Miss, I w wderlng whether or not you would ea to join  in the new misory movement" aske of the pastor. Orl I "sure," plied the young miss, "I'm crazy to iry it. ls it anything like the fex trot?" The yomg lady ad been steppln out with a man several years her sen ior, and this had ue her mothez eousideble worry. "Why do girls of eighteen mrr men of sixty?" ked the bewilderec mother. "Mothe," replied Miss I, Sippi, "th modern girl is developing a nsclence She prefers an inheritance to ali- mony." NUI| ......................... ht "BULL'DURHAM thers "three for a quarter."  TOBA:O of sugar d a cake of years. success is a box of isins, five pounds need, in order to Doyen  JI for your yOU ten roll ments, an account now, properly will be well worth while, We will make the easy. INVESTMENT VALUE When a  first looks at our "Glenbruk" Model he is captured by the ekquisite finish and long, grac*ful lines. He realizes that it is an unustml art creation--a newer and frees" conception of the five passenger vehicle. And then comes a trial on she road--one thrilling experience behind the motor that accelerates from five to twenty-five miles per hour in nine seconds flat. That ride is never for- gotten and it leads inevitably to lm'd, enthtmiastic adoption. Later comes indisputable pro of lo w gasoline coneumlYlon , long life of tires and care-free, untroubled mileage. And last --but far freaxl least--comes the confidence and respect that only fine products command. Here, r.trely,ls arnazlng investment value at $1635. pAIGB.DETROIT MOTOR CAR C+ DETltorr. Ita The PARK GARAGE -'PAGE 2 i .i i i ,'l"ff im IF " - THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT THURSDAY, AUG It is too bad for any couple of Iron- "IIou could you have d ey-mooners to wait until they get to. dearest?" he asked. Middle West Joins Grain Grade Fight Congress Told Ten States Approve Demand For Changes In Standards, Wheat growers who have urged changes in federal grain grades so that spring wheat would be graded as it was under the old Minnesota standards, now have the support of organized farmers in the ten other states. The presidents and secretaries of ten state farm bureau federations, meeting in St. Paul. passed a resolu- tion urging congre to pass the Steenerson bill which would change ederal grades to conform to Minne- sota's old spring wheat standards. In a letter to members of the agri- cultural committee of the lower house of congress, the Minnesota Farm BuG reau federation this week pointed out that the bill is supported by the whole grain production region of the central west. The action of the midwlest farm bureau conference, representing the Dakotas, Wisconsin, Ohio, Mis- souri, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Ne-I braska and Iowa, proves that Minne- sota farme] are not asking special favors, and that other grain states have no objection to changes in spring wheat grades, the letter says. Seeking Substitutes For Corn Ensilage For regions in which the se&son is too short for corn-growing, the staff of the Northeast agricultural experi- ment station near Duluth is seeking to find substitutes for corn for use in the making of silage. M. J. Thomp- son superintendent of the station, in his report for 1920 just issued, an- nounces progress in the statenent that sunflowers are now the major sil- age crop for the Duluth station. Other silage crops which have been tried Out with more or less success are clover-timothy, millet, rutabaga tops, and potatoes. Mr. Thompson says that clover-timothy silage has always been eaten ravenously by the stock; millet has proved rather in- ferior on account of over-ripeness and dryness, and rutabaga tops were eat- en freely and were not only palatable but probably stimulated milk produc- tion above all other feeds. Potato] silage, to which 2 per cent of corn I meal was added to stimulate fre- mentation, proved an exceptionally good feed for milking cattle. The 1920 report of the Duluth sta- . 1 tion is full of interesting materml, showing how progress is being made in working out the farm problems of regions like that around Duluth. A DISTINCTION WORTH MAKING. For so many years farmers have been fought in their efforts to im- prove marketing by organized grain exchanges that there is a tendency for them to think of all elements in the grain trade as predatory and vi- cious. There is, however, a keen dis- tinction to be made, and this the Equi- ty Exchange learned early in its busi- ness career. There were Chamber of Commerce firms that wanted to be ordinarily intelligent and commercial- Trying to Foresee Future of Forests Mnnesota's forest experiment sta- tion workers, under the general di- rection of E. G. Cheney, are making a survey to find out the amount and character of the forest products to which the country will have to turn when the virgin timber is gone and industries begins to use the "second growth." The field work of this survey is be- mg directed by Thorvald S. Hansen, Assistant superintendent of the Clo- quet forest experiment station. Mr. Hanson has two crews in the field who are making an intensive examination of at least three sections in each town- ship thruout the countries inspected. Two lines, a half mile apart, are ran thru these sections, and on these lines are designated 32 plots placed at 5- chain intervals. For each of these plots a complete count of second growth products is made, and size and age are carefully recorded. With data from a sufficiently large area all types of cut-over land will be represented. With this information and the known area of the cut-over region it will be possibly to tell approximately of what the second crop of timber consists and what can be looked for in the future. The surveys also hope to obtain some information on the virgin timber still standing so that it may be known how long it will be before the lumber- men will have to attack the second growth. Land-Clearing Farmers Eager for War Explosives Farmers in the cut-over regions of Minnesota who have stumps to r- move are jumping at the opportunity offered by the government thru the University of Minnesota to get left- over explosives with which to do their stump blasting. The announcement made last week that the United States government had allotted 37 carloads of picric acid to Minnesota to be distributed among land-clearing farmers at about half the prices that farmers have been paying for other explosives, was met with eager interest on the part of the farmers. As soon as the word went out, county agents in the 18 counties to which the allotments have been as- signed began to get inquires. The meetings being held this week at coun- ty seats and elsewhere to acquaint far- mers with the opportunity to secure a high grade explosive at greatly re- duced rates, and to acqua|nt them with its use, have been largely attended. Following each meeting orders have poured in. Those in charge of the cam.paign be- lieve that Minnesota's allotment will be quickly absorbed. Thru the coun- I MICKIE SAYS ly honest with the farmers.    The element in the grain trade that is incapable of fairness towards far- mers, is made up of those whose ex-i lllr_ ploitations will become, first unpro- fitable, and next impossible by the es- tablis1ment of direct merchandising and the elimination of speculative spreads. Middlemen who are useless I will fade into oblivion. Practices that I abstract slices of profits without add-t ing to the directness of dealing will I became obsolete. There are today in{ the grain exchanges, many men "and t firms who are willing to deal with the VuRcv- farmer organizations, giving the far- "V | ! Plh[ . mers the benefits, and sidestepping a  OOQ,," ,h,) whole array of exploitive charges in grain marketing. Millers as a rule " m_mJ are not to be classed with grain ]llttIll[I}[l(t(ll[l speculators in the fight against far- reefs. They are the real customers of the farmers, (he only ones "who can[ use the farmers' graiw [  TO THE PUBLIC iii We wish to announce to the people of Ortonville and the vicinity that The CITY TAILOR SHOP o a shop for ladies and gentlemen who appreciate the worth of good tailoring, is now open for busi- ness. We speciMize in TAILOR-MA DE CLOTHES CLEANING AND PRESSING REMODELLING AND REPAIRING OF ALL KINDS Work done neatly and at prices very reasonable- Located opposite the M. M. Johnson Furniture Store. Clothes pressed while you wait. A. W. YOUNG, Proprietor nil I III I Oh! These Literary Persons. Two friends--Jim and Bill meet. Each has just read a book that the Florida to begin their apologies for l "Well, lover, I may as othea- is unfamiliar ,with. NeitSher they are sure to be overheard. So it i My right eye is made of wishes to admit that he doesn't know happened: , ] "Never mind that, the other man's book. Their conver- 'Darling,' she said, tremblingly, "I "so are the diamonds in sat|on sounds somethitxg like this: *--I have a confession to make. Can/ment ring." "'Lo, Bill. Just read a fine book-- you ever forgive me for deceiving 'Romping Around.' Great stuff." you?" The Ads are "You bet." ty agents, thezefore, they are urging farmers to file their orders early in order to get the pries quoted seven cents a pound plus freight charges of about two cents from Sparta, Wis. If the supply at Sparta is exhausted, ad- ditional stock will have to be shipped from New Mexico which will greatly increase the freight charge. All or- ders should be placed with county agents or local bankers. Bond Refund Forms Ready. Forms of highway bond reimburse- ment resolutions for adoption of coun- ty boards of commissioners were pre- pared this week by C. H. Christopher- son, assistant attorney general. O. L. Kipp, chief construction engineer in the highway department is supplying copies to county attorneys and audi- tors. The forms have the approval of representatives of bond houses besides insuring uniformity and compliance with the statutes. Prevention is better than cure in! the poultry business as in any other department of life. Filth, dampness, improper ventilation, improper feed- "Then you've read it?" "Oh, yeh. Good character work Jim." 'Whatddye .mean--character work: 'It's a book of travel, Bill." "You misunderstand me, Jim. I mean it's got lots of character." ,,Oh p, ,, " , I Yep--that s what I mean. Lots of; character. * * * By the way have you read the book that I've just finish- ed--'A Beast of Burden?' "'A Beast of Burden? Lemmel think * * * Oh, yeah, I remember I that book. Sure I've read it. And I / it's a fine horse story too." t "Horse story? Aren't you mistaken i Jim? It isn't a horse story. It's about a poor boob whe went thru life with ing, and introducing infected birds in- a thousand burdens." to the yard are common causes of dis- "Of course it]is, Bill. You misun- ease. Clean the dropping boards I derstand me. I simply meant he was daily, and then sprinkle them with t a horse for punishment." 4oad dust, coal ashes, or land-plaster t "Oh!"--New York Herald. to absorb the liquid excrement. New straw should be put into the nests Verily, it is the man who prepares every two or three weeks or oftener, for aa emergency, who keeps hi sails cspecially if it becomes damp or dirty. Whitewash the quarters once a year at least, late in summer or early in the fall. After service one Sunday in one of St. Petersburg's churches the minister of the flock met a young woman who had been attending his services oc- casionally. "Miss, I was wondering whether or not you would care to join us in the new missionary movement!" asked the pastor. "Sure " replied the young miss, "I'm crazy to try it. Is it anything like the fox trot ?" The young lady had been stepping out with a man several years her sen- ior, and this had caused her mother considerable worry "Why do girls of eighteen marry men of sixty?" ssked the bewildered mother. "Mother," replied Miss I. Sippi, "the modern girl is developing a conscience. She prefers an inheritance to ali- mony." Some men are absolutely straight --others "three for a quarter." Some fellows think the secret tb success is a box of raisins, five pounds of sugar and a cake of years. trimmed and his ship in order, that successfully goes thru the gale. Do you know you can roll IOct$ from one of GENUINE "BULL"DURHAM TOBACCO ? Credit at his bank a wonderful help to man, in business or farming. If you have an imm ate need for additio$ funds come in and talk over. N i If you have not s s bee: need, in order to provid r"a( to for your future requi#F a ments, an account he:[i now, properly handl : that i lo"1th r will be well worth y , , O rojemcti while. z b . iag e ' We will make the wafg tel easy. [ ;e la :lit|on ,  and INVESTMENT VALUE When a nan first looks at our "Glenbrook" Model he is captured by the exquisite finish and long, graceful lines. He realizes that it is an unusual art creation--a newer and finer conception of the five passenger vehicle. And then comes a trial on the road--one thrilling exlrienee behind the motor that accelerates from five to twenty-five nailes per hour in nine seconds flat. That ride is never for- gotten and it leads inevitably to proud, enthusiastic adoption. Later comes indisputable proof of low gasoline consumption, long life of tires and care-free, untroubled mileage. And last --but far from least--comes the confidence and respect that only fine products command. Here, surely, is amazing investment value at $1635. PAIGE-DETROIT MOTOR CAR CO., DTROIT, M/cldO Manufaero- of Patae Molar CArs  Motor Tr P.4cu quoted f. o. b. Doit The PARK GARAG E . .,