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The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
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August 4, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
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August 4, 1921
 

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PAGE 4 THE ORTONTILLE INDEPENDENT THURSDAY, t I NORTH PRIOR l William Spalinger of Clinton spent Sunday with his parents. Sol.Gustafson and daughter Olga were callers in this vicinity Sunday. Mrs. E. Hammerberg spent Satur- day afternoon with Mrs. Sam Erick- "son. Mr. and Mrs. Bennie Stegner visited at the O. P. Scholberg home Sunday evening. Mr. and Mrs. Herman Nagel and family .were Graceville callers last Wednesday. Hugo Andersn carn up Monday morning to assist with the thleshing at Eli Stotesbery's. A number of young folks gathered at the E. Stotsbery home Sunday evening. All enjoyed a good time. Mr .and Mrs. Herman Nagel, Mr. and Mrs. Tom Schlffnme, and Mr. and Mrs. Hugo Schlimme spent last Sun- day at the Jens Rudi home. Miss Mary Spalinger and Miss Lydia Stotesbery were in Ortonville Wednesday. While there Miss Spal- inger had her tonsils removed. Frank Rosenthal is busy nowadays cutting out the underbrush on his lots on the north side of Marie avenue, and making them have the appearance of a beautiful little park extending several hundred feet along the avenue. Mr. and Mrs. Barie were Appleton callers Thursday. Miss Kathryn Fruetel visited in Correll Thursday. Mr. and Mrs. Barie and tamily spent Sunday in Dawson. Mrs. Ella Shepard is visiting at Glenwood Lake this wc.):. Hildegard Roske is spending a few days visiting relatives in Boy& Mr. and Mrs. Albert Roske and family visited in Boyd Sunday. Relatives from Johnson visited at the P. W. Fruetel home Sanday. Mr. and Mrs. J. Cordeman and fam- ily motored to Appleton Thursday. Merald and George Bottge return- ed from Renville Monday afternoon. Miss Helen Hartkopf spent a week visiting at the Mike Luchsinger hems. Mr. anti Mrs. John Larson, Mr. and C.G. Johnson and Matt Luchsinger Mrs. Alfred Hammner, and Mr. and motored to Watertown, S. D., Satur- g, lrs. Ed. Gustafson spent Sunday ad- day. ternoon a, the He r'aa: Nagel h)me. Fred Hanes was appointed night @ watchman at a meeting held Monday I ODESSA i night" O E. A. Menzel autoed to Wheaten Friday. Mrs. Wolf returned to her home at Lester Prairie, Friday. Miss Anna Edquist and Miss Gladys Lenz were Ortonville callers Satur- day. Miss Emily Mayne of Big Stone City spent Tuesday with Miss Alice (SS. Rev. Melinat and family returned Saturday from their two weeks out- hug at Big Stone Lake. Mr. and Mrs. Albert Schwandt and family and Miss Gertrude Menzel autoed to Montevideo Sunday to spend the day with George Schwandt and his fm.ily. Miss Ella Maves went to Milbank Tuesday for a short visit with friends. Miss Elsie Poirier returned from Appleton Sunday accompanied by her little nephew, Master Fernalld. The Musical Concerli given at the village hall Tuesday evening by the Lien brothers, two blind boys, was not well attended but the boys cer- tainly did their parts well. It is wonderful to see them play piano, clarinet and violin extremely well and so train their voices when so handicapped. @ .l FOSTER Henry Ford returned to his home at St. Joseph, Me., yesterday. Grain is all cut in this vicinity and staekfng seems to. be the order of the day. Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Miller of Huron, S. D., are guests at the Sauer cottage this week. The Misses Wolff, professional nurses from St. Paul, are spending va- cation at Foster. Mr. and Mrs. Jas. A. McRae antl farrly and Miss Josie Forde of Grace- ville spent Spnday here. Mr. and Ma, s. E. J. O'Neill, Mrs. R. A Costello and Miss Mabbie O'Neill of Graceville spent Sunday here Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Hitchcock of Mitchell, S. D., are stopping at the Douglas Hotel for a couple of weeks, Capt. "Dad" Douglas chaperoned a large party of cottagers on a boat ride to Bonanza Springs Monday af- ternoon. Mrs. W. H. Vallalacey and daughter Catherine, Harry J. Biisborrow, Hen- ry Ford and Ed. Douglas autoed to Graeeville Tuesday evening. Mr. and Mrs. H. G. Ndchols of Los Angeles, Calif., arrived here Satur- day for a two weeks outing, and are guests at the Douglas Hotel. The Misses Emily and Louise Bar- ton who have been guests at the It. M. Barton cottage for the past month, returned to their home in St. Paul last Saturday. Oscar Briggs of Ortonville was here Sunday, his duties as game warden being to see that  no illegal fishing was done here either by non-residents or local Isaac Waltons. A party of Wheaten people under the peonal charge of Representative O. C. Newmann were here Sunday and were among the fortunate one. who caught a good string of fish. Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Bless and Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Rumphel of Weston, Missouri, returned to the Malifi cot- tage last Saturday after a weeks vis- it at Winnipeg and other points The following Gracevilleites were registered at the Douglas Hotel Sun- day: Mesdames C. W. Luetke and M. O'Brien, Miss Kathryn] William and Richard O'Brien, L. A, Lien and S. Olson. It is reported that Joe Magee, gen- erally known here as "the mocus," is the busiest man along Foster beach. But just what 0ant business consist ef no one sems to know with any degree of certainty. Mr. and Mrs. Dean Lightner and children of AbeFdeen , who have been at the Herreid cottage for the past three weeks, will leave for home Fri- day and a little later the cottage will again be occupied by the Herrieds` Mrs. Jacob Luchsinger returned Sunday from visiting relatives in Hol- loway. Mr. and Mrs. Mike Luchsinger and family visited the Chas. Wise home Sunday. Ben Zimmerman had his tonsils re- moved this week at the Ortonville hospital. Mrs. R. B. Hudson of Ortonvitle is spending a few days visiting relatives in Correll. Miss Anne and Carl Edquist and William Nitz visited in Correll Tues- day night. Ed. Johnson went to Appleton Monday where he had some dental work done. Mrs. Dawson, Mrs. Jorgenson and Miss Grace Lorenz visited Mrs. Ethel Donk Friday. R. B. Hudson and John Gowan of Ortonvile were business callers in Correll Tuesday. Mr. and Mrs. Mike Luchsinger and Miss Helen Vaughan were Appleton visitors Saturday. Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Conright of Montevideo visited at the P. D. Vau- ghan home Monday. A. Roske and Rudolph Roske mo- tored to Kandiyohi Monday morning where 'the latter returned to work. Mr. and Mrs. Ole Oehler an( daughter of St. Paul spent a few (lays visiting at the A. L. Woods home. Mrs. Chas. Barie, Mrs. W. Shepherd, Mrs. Ella Shepherd and Mrs. Ethel Donk were visitors in Appleton Sat- lrday. Mrs. Clarence Johnson returned Tuesday frc)m Watertown, S. D., where she has been visiting at the James McMillan home. Mrs. Charles Hudson entertained a few of her neighbors Thursday after- noon at a sewing bee iven in honor of Mrs. R. B. Hudson of Ortonville. Taking A Share In Home Bread-Making The youthful bread-makers who have participated in the breadamaking contests of the boys and girls clubs thruout Minnesota this year are put- ting their knowledge of bread-making to practical uses. They are making the bread or helping to make the bread used in their homes, according to T. A. Erickson, state leader of boys and girls club work at University Farm. Mr. Erickson gets his infor- mation directly from the youthful bread-makers, The year has been one of the best in the history of such contests. The enrolment has been more than 4,000, and a larger percentage than usum carried the work thru to completion. Commrfity and county contests have been made community events and as a result many counties are planning bread-making team demonstrations for their fairs this summer and fall. Shocks 250 Acres In 8 Days. Carl Meyer eims he is the cham- pion shocker of .Minnesota. He start- ed work Friday morning, July 15, for T. C. Mobraaten, five miles west of Elbow Lake. Two binders were cut- ting in the field, and about ten acres of grain had been cut when Mr. Meyer started work. He shocked the last of 250 acres Monday afternoon at 3:55 o'clock. He was idle about a half a day because of rain so the actual time of shocking was about eight days. At the end of the run Mr. Meyer had caught up with the two binders. Meyer shocks with a fork. He said it is harder work, but faster. He not only makes claim to speed but defies anyone to put up shodns better than his. The grain shocked on Friday and Saturday before the big storm, all stood. Some of the straw was very Halls Takes First In Five Mile Auto Race First money in the 5-mile race on the program staged by the American Legion post of Sturgis, S. D., there last Thursday, was A. S. Halls' re- ward for participation in that event. He covered the distance in 5 minutes, 42 seconds, winning over a field of six cars in the fast car division. In addition to winning this he took third in the qualifying events, and third place in the 15-mile special race. First place in ,he qualifying event was won by a Mr. Rhiley who driving a Hudson special broke the world's record for that distance over a half-mile dirt track. He did the distance in 5 minutes, 38 seconds. Rhiley broke another world's record when he negotiated the 15-mile dis- tance in 17 minutes, 6 seconds. A better pIace in the fifteen mite event was assund Halls, and his performance showed that he was qualified for it. However, on mak- ing the first turn in this event he went off the track when he lost his bearings on account of the dust of the lead car. He lost his position, but pulled back to the track unhurt, and nosed up to third position. Ginther driving the ChaI,mers Spe- cial won second place in the Slower Car class. He qualified by making the mile in 36 seconds, and in one of the races made the 5 miles in 6:01. "Jack" McCoy with his McCoy's Special took second plaGe in the 15- mile event. His qualifying time for the mile was 35:4-5. More than 4000 people saw the final events of the racing card on Thurs- day. NOTICE FARMERS. The Ortonville Cement Post & Tile .Works will be open Saturday, August 6th, also Saturday evening until 10:00 o'clock, and if there is anything you want at any other time call Otto Ja- cobsen, phone 168-L. Bargains in plows, manure spreaders, cream sep- arators and also a stock of Deering and McCormick corn binder repairs. --Advt. Figures Say An Education Pays The following from the Clevelano Plain Dealer will be of interest to the boy who wonders whether an educa- tion pays: Fewer than one per cent of the men of America are college graduates, yet this one per cent has furnished 55 per cent of our presidents, 69 per cent of our supreme court justices, 35 per cent of our members of congress, 62 per cent of our secretaries of state. A recent official compilation shows that of 5,000.000 men with no school- ing 3,131 attained creditable distinc- tion of one kind or another, of 2,000,- 000 with high school 1,245 attained distinction, whil of 1,000,000 college trained men, 5,768 attained distinc- tion. Such figures cannot be miscon- strued. They point to the value of education. heavy, and the fields averaged about the normal amoun of straw. NOTICE. Any party having claim aainst the Artichoke & Correll Telephone Company Should present their claim at the Clinton State Bank for pay- ment not later than August ]&, 1921. Any claims presented after this date will not be paid. 12-3 , C.F. HANSON, Secretary. Cut Alfalfa When New Shoots Start from Crown Just when to cut alfalfa and how many times to harvest a crop in one season are questions which have re- ceived studied attention from experts in the United States Department of Agriculture and the various experi- ment stations in alfalfa-producing states. Ordinarily it is a good time to cut alfalfa for hay when the new shoots have started from the crown, and from one-tenth to one-fifth of th plants are in flower. But these two conditions do not always occur at the same time. However, the farmer with a little experience, and keeping in mind the flower and new shoots, soon is able to tell when his alfalfa crop should be cut. The farmer's best judgment will be called into play, with preference given to the welfare of the plant rather than the size of the crop. Experiments on government plats seem to prove that cUtting is not es- sential to the  elfare of the plant, but this is only a means of getting hay. Plats of alfalfa that have not been cut in six years are in better physical condition today than those that have been cut regularly. Government agri- cultural experts lean strongly toward fewer crops of alfalfa a year, imlding that as large tonnage can be secured, for example, with three as with four cuttings, and with less Mbor. Empha- sis is laid on the necessity of leaving time enough after the last harvest to permit the plants to get a healthy growth, approximately 4 inches, be- fore frost. At the band concert in Williams park last Sunday, a tourist and a na- tive were discussing the high prices. "Do you know, Mrs. St. Peters- burg," asked the woman from Miss- issippi, "the meat markets here are going to put heavy rails around the counters ?" "What in the world can that be A good shocker is expected to keep, for?" bewilderedly asked Mrs. St. up with one binder. Meyer caught Pete. up to two binders after they had a "It's for the customers to grip when I start of about ten acres. Is there they hear " ,, anyone ready to dispute his claim as the 'gh prices.". I the champion shocker of Minnesota ? --Have you any furnished rooms for I Grant County (Elbow "Lake) Her- tireless workersThe Independent[ aid. Want Ads. t I CHURCH NOTICES ' Eids Lutheran Church (Eleven miles northeast of Ortonville) Rev. S. M. Moe of Clinton, Pastor. Services next Sunday at 11:00 o'clock. The Ladies'. Aid and the Young People's Societies will give an ice cream social at the home of Jens Dobak Sunday evening, August 7. Catechumen class meets Wednes- day morning in the church. * Church of St. John. Rev: Fr. J. A. Sui'livan. There will be mass at 8:45 o'clock Sunday morning, Augast 7. First Congregational Church. Rev. Paul Bockhoven of St. Charles, Minnesota, will conduct divine serv- ices at the First Congregational church next Sunday morning, August 7, at 10:45 o'clock, Everybody is cordially invited to attend. Swedish M. E. Church. A. J. Anderson, Pastor Regular services on the second Sun- day of each month at 10:30 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. @ @ Pleasant Valley Methodist Episcopal Church. Rev. H. B. Adams. Regular services every Sunday af- ternoon at three o'clock. Sunday school at twelve o'clock. Trinity Lutheran Church. August Bartling, Pastor. Service every Sunday at 10:00 a. m. or 2:00 p. m. Gerrnan language. Sunday school after each service English language. Christtan Science. Sunday service at 10:45 a. m. Wednesday service at 8:00 p. m. All are welcame to these services. Fre, reading room in their hall (Shumaker building). Open every Tuesday and Friday from 3 to 5 p. m. Norwegian Lutheran. Rev. J. Walseth, Pastor. There will be no services here next Sunday. Services will be held at Mil- bank at 11:00 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. The morning service will be conducted in the Norwegian language, and the evening service in English. Zion Lutheran Church. Rev. Arnold Nelson, Pastor. There will be no services here this coming Sunday, August 7. Services will be held in the Zion Lutheran church here a week from Sunday. Methodist EpieopuL Rev. G. L. Haggans, Pastor. All grades of the Methodist Sun- day School will meet at 9:45. Preach- ing service at 10:45. Theme,--"Har- vest Time in the Kingdom of God." There will be no evening services un- til further notice.. United Evangelical Church, F. W. Agte, Pastor. CorrellSunday school at 10:30 a. m. Preaching at 7:30 p. m. Odessa--Preaching service at 10:00. a.m. Sunday school at 11:00 a. m. K. L. C. E. at 8:00 p. m. Seinle Schoollmuse--Sunday school at 2:00 p. m; preaching at 3:00 p. m. Akron Township Church--Services discontinued. The public is cordially invited to meet with us at all of these services- The Church of Good Fellowship. United Evangelical Church. Rev. J. H. Mayne, Pastor Big Stone City.--Preaehing services at 10:00 a.m. Sunday school at 11:00 a.m. K. L. C. E. meeting at 7:30 p. m. Preaching services at 8:00 p. m. Prayer meeting and Bible Class will be held every Wednesday evening at 8:00 p. m. JohnsonPreaching services every alternate Sunday'at 3:00 p. m. AdelaidePreaching services every other Sunday at 2:30 p. m. Everybody is cordially invited to at- tend these meetings. Hypocrite--A kid who comes school with a smile on his face. to The Independent of retting help and trouble. /ugust Victor Reco00: . kre Here t EILM, The Jewel The large numb@i of, people who are s patrons, together witl nev customers wh satisfied, is a sure indication that our food of the best. \\; Our Bakery each dg.V makes pastrieS,* equalldd. They are alwa:.ys newly-baked' some. i Tim KORNE,R KAle, I i // f Potter & Gowan, 0'roprietors. .New COvera Aprons Amazan mid Garm, T he Best B'y Test Just Ln--A Nic, Ass ortment i i i i ii If not, then let us the EMPEROR FURNACE will heat rooms comfortably at all All the heat s dehverd t t rooms--notup the chimne.' ,r 1 t e basement. " ir akes but httle fuel to op ra this furnace as there is post ;iv  ly no waste of heat.  ( ROOMS WARMBASEME AIGUST LIND0000 ORTONVILLE, - i I Ill I PAGE 4 THE ORTONTILLE INDEPENDENT THURSDAY, t $ I NORTH PRIOR | # William Spalinger of Clinton spent Sunday with his parents. Sol Gustafson and daughter Olga were callers in this vicinity Sunday. Mrs. E. Hammerberg spent Satur- day afternoon with Mrs. Sam Erick- on. Mr. and Mrs. Bennie Stegner visited at the O. P. Scholberg home Sunday evening. Mr. and Mrs. Herman Nagel and family .were Graceville callers last Wednesday. Hugo Andern carnc up Monday morning to assist with the thleshing at Eli Stotesbery's. . number of young folks gathered at the E. Stotsbery home Sunday evening. All enjoyed a good time. Mr .and Mrs. Herman Nagel, Mr. and Mrs. Tom Schlirnme, and Mr. and Mrs. Hugo Schlimme spent last Sun- day at the Jens Rudi home. Miss Mary Spalinger and Miss Lydia Stotesbery were in Ortonville Wednesday. While there Miss Spal- inter had her tonsils removed. Mr. and Mrs. John Larson, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred I-Iammner, and Mr. and Llrs. Ed. Gustafson .pent Sunday af- ternoon a the Hcrua: Nagel hue. @ I ODESSA I @ 4, E. A. Menze] autoed to Wheaten Friday. Mrs. Wolf returned to her home at Lester Prairie, Friday. Miss Anna Edquist and Miss Gludys Lenz were Ortonville callers Satur- day. Miss Emily Mayne of Big Stone City spent Tuesday with Miss Alice S$. Roy. Melinat and family returned Saturday from their two weeks out- iug at Big Stone Lake. Mr. and Mrs. Albert Schwandt and family and Miss Gertrude Menzel autoed to Montevideo Sunday to spend the day with George Schwandt and his fmily. Miss Ella Mares went to Milbank Tuesday for a short visit with friends. Miss Elsie Poirier returned from Appleton Sunday accompanied by her little nephew, Master Fernalld. The Musical Concer$ given at the village hall Tuesday evening by the Lien brothers, two blind boys, was nat well attended but the boys cer- tainly did their parts well. It is wonderful to see them play piano, clarinet and violin extremely well and so train their voices when so handicapped. @ FOSTER Henry Ford returned to his home at St. Joseph, Me., yesterday. Grain is all cut in this vicinity and staeking seems to be the order of the day. Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Miller of Huron S, D., are guests at the Sauer cottage this week. The Misses Wolff, professiona nurses from St. Paul, are spending va- cation at Foster Mr. and Mrs. Jas. A. McRae anti family and Miss Josie Forde of Grace- ville spent Snday here. Mr. and Mrs. E. J. O'Neill, Mrs. R. A Costello and Miss Mabbie O'Neill of Graceville spent Sunday here Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Hitchcock of Mitchell, S. D., are stopping at the Douglas Hotel for a couple of weeks, Capt. "Dad" Douglas chaperoned a large party of cottagers on a boat ride to Bonanza Springs Monday af- ternoon. Mrs. W. H. Vallacey and daughter Catherine, Harry J. Bilsborrow, Hen- ry Ford and Ed. Douglas autoed to Graceville Tuesday evening. Mr. and Mrs. H. G. N4chols of Los Angeles, .Calif., arrived here Satur- day for a two weeks outing, and are guests at the Douglas Hotel. The Misses Emily and Louise Bar- ton who have been guests at the H. M. Barton cottage for the past month, returned to their home in St. Paul last Saturday. Oscar Briggs of Ortonville was here Sunday, his duties as game warden being to see thaC no illegal fishing was done here either by non-residents or local Isaac Waltons. A party of Wheaten people under the peonal charge of Representative O. C. Newmann were here Sunday and were among the fortunate one. who caught a good string of fish. Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Bless and Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Rumphel of Weston, Missouri, returned to the Malin cot- tage last Saturday after a weeks vis- it at Winnipeg and other points,.=., The following Gracevilleites were registered at the Douglas Hotel Sun- day: Mesdames C. W. Luetke and M. O'Brien, Miss Kathryn: William and Richard O'Brin, L. A. Lien and S. Olson. It is reported that Joe Magee, gen- erally known here as "the mocus;' is the busiest man along Foster beach. But just what that business consist of no one sem to know with any degree of certainty. Mr. and Mrs. Dean Lightner and children of Abeleen, who have been at the Herreid 'cottage for the past three weeks, will leave for home Fri- day and a little later the cottage will again be occupied by the Herrieds. Frank Rosenthal is busy nowadays cutting out the underbrush on his lots on the north side of Marie avenue, and making them have the appearance of a beautiful little park extending several hundred feet along the avenue. CORRELL NEWS e Mr. and Mrs. Boric were Appleton callers Thursday. Miss Kathryn Fruetel visited in Correll Thursday. Mr. and Mrs. Barie and iamfly spent Sunday in Dawson. Mrs. Ella Shepard is visiting at Glenwood Lake this wc.}:. Hildegard Roske is spending a few days visiting relatives in Boyd. Mr. and Mrs. Albert Roske and family visited in Boyd Sunday. Relatives from Johnson visited at the P. W. Fruetel home Snday. Mr. and Mrs. J. Cordeman and fam ily motored to Appleton Thursday. Merald and George Bottge return- ed from Renville Monday afternoon. Miss Helen Hartkopf spent a week visiting at the Mike Luchsinger heron. C. G. Johnson and Matt Luchsinger motored to Watertown, S. D., Satur- day. Fred Hanes was appointed night watchman at a meeting held Monday night. Mrs. Jacob Luchsinger returned Sunday from visiting relatives in Hol- loway. Mr. and Mrs. Mike Luchsinger and family visited the Chas. Wise home Sunday. Ben Zimmerman had his tonsils re- moved this week at the Ortonville hospital. Mrs. R. B. Hudson of Ortonville is spending a few days visiting relatives in Correll. Miss Anne and Carl Edquist and William Nitz visitgd in Correll Tues- day night. Ed. Johnson went to Appleton Monday where he had some dental work done. Mrs. Dawson, Mrs. Jorgenson and Miss Grace Lorenz visited Mrs. Ethel Donk Friday. R. B. Hudson and John Gowan of Ortonville wePe business callers in Correll Tuesday. Mr. and Mrs. Mike Luchsinger and Miss Helen Vaughan were Appleton visitors Saturday. Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Conright of Montevideo visited at the P. D. Vau- than home Monday. A. Roske and Rudolph Roske mo- tored to Kandiyohi Monday morning where 'the latter returned to work. Mr. and Mrs. Ole Oehler one daughter of St. Paul spent a few days visiting at the A. L. Woods home. Mrs. Chas. Boric Mrs. W. Shepherd, Mrs. Ella Shepherd and Mrs. Ethel Donk were visitors in Appleton Sat- irday. Mrs. Clarence Johnson returned Tuesday frcm. Watertown, S. D., where she has been visiting at the James McMillan home. Mrs. Charles Hudson entertained a few of her neighbors Thursday after- noon at a sewing bee iven in honor of Mrs. R. B. Hudson of Ortonville. Taking A Share ]n Home Bread-Making The youthful bread-makers who have participated in the broad,making contests of the boys and girls clubs thruout Minnesota this year are put- ting their knowledge of bread-making to practical uses. They are making the bread or helping to make the bread used in their homes, according to T. A. Erickson, state leader of bo:,'s and girls club work at Universit Farm. Mr. Erickson gets his infor- mation directly from the youthful bread-makers, The year has been one of the best in the history of such contests. The enrolment has been more than 4,000, and a larger percentage than usum carried the work thru to completion. Commtmity and county contests have been made community events and as a result many counties are planning bread-making team demonstrations for their fairs this summer and fall. Shocks 250 Acres In 8 Days. " Carl Meyer ims he is the cham- pion shocker of Minnesota. He start- ed work Friday morning, July 15, for T. C. Mobraaten, five miles west of Elbow Lake. Two binders were cut- ting in the field, and about ten acres of grain had been cut when Mr. Meyer started work. He shocked the last of 250 acres Monday afternoon at 3:55 o'clock. He was idle about a half a day because of rain so the actual time of shocking was about eight days. At the end of the run, Mr. Meyer had caught up with the two binders. Meyer shocks with a fork. He said it is harder work, but faster. He not only makes claim to speed but defies anyone to put up shodns better than his. The grain shocked on Friday and Saturday before the big storm, all stood. Some of the straw was very leavy, and the fields averaged about the normal amount of straw. A good shocker is expected to keep up with one binder. Meyer caught up to two binders after they had a start of about ten acres. Is there anyone ready to dispute his claim as the champion shocker of Minnesota? Grant County {Elbow "Lake) Her- ald. Halls Takes First In Five Mile Auto Race First money in the 5-mile race on the program staged by the American Legion post of Sturgis, S. D., there last Thursday, was A. S. Halls' re- ward for participation in that event. He covered the distance in 5 minutes, 42 seconds, winning over a field of six cars in the fast car division. In addition to winning this he took third in the qualifying events, and third place in the 15-mile special race. First place in *,he qualifying event was won by a Mr. Rhiley who driving a Hudson special broke the world's record for that distance over a half-mile dirt track. He did the distance in 5 minutes, 38 seconds. Rhiley broke another world's record when he negotiated the 15-mile dis- tance in 17 minutes 6 seconds. A better piece in the fifteen mite event was assumd Halls, and his performance showed that he was qualified for it. However, on mak- ing the first turn in this event he went off the track when he lost his bearings on account of the dust of the lead car. He lost his position, but pulled back to the track unhurt, and nosed up to third position. Ginther driving the Chal,rners Spe- cial won second place in the Slower Car class. He qualified by making the mile in 36 seconds, and in one of the races made the 5 miles in 6:01. "Jack" McCoy wFch his McCoy's Special took second pla6e in the 15- mile event. His qualifying time for the mile was 35:4-5. More than 4004) people saw the final events of the racing card on Thurs- day. NOTICE FARMERS. The Ortonville Cement Post & Tile .Works will be open Saturday August 6th, also Saturday evening until 10:00 o'clock, and if there is anything you want tt any other time call Otto Ja- cobsen, phone 168-L. Bargains in plows, manure spreaders, cream sep- arators and also a stock of Deering and McCormick corn binder repairs. --Advt. Figures Say An Education Pays The following from the Clevelana Plain Dealer will be of interest to the boy who wonders whether an educa- tion  pays: Fewer than one per cent of the men of America are college graduates, yet this one per cent has furnished 55 per cent of our presidents, 69 per cent of our supreme court justices, 35 per cent of our members of congress, 62 per cent of our secretaries of state. A recent official compilation shows that of 5,000,000 men with no school- ing 3,131 attained creditable distinc- tion of one kind or another, of 2,000,- 000 with high school 1,245 attained distinction, whil of 1,000,000 college trained men, 5fl68 atained distinc- tion. Such figures cannot be miscon- strued. They point to the value of education. NOTICE. Any party having claim aainst the Artichoke & Correll Telephone Company should present their claim at the Clinton State Bank for pay- ment not later than August l&, 1921. Any claims presented after this date will not be paid. 12-3 C. F. HANSON, Secretary. Cut Alfalfa When New Shoots Start from Crown Just when to cut alfalfa and how many times to harvest a crop in one season are questions which have re- ceived studied attention from experts in the United States Department of Agriculture and the various experi- ment stations m alfalfa-producing states. Ordinarily it is a good time to cut alfalfa for hay when the new shoots have started from the crown, and from one-tenth to one-fifth of th plants are in flower. But these two conditions do not always occur at the same time. However, the farmer with a little experience, and keeping in mind the flower and new shoots, soon is able to tell when his alfalfa crop should be cut. The farmer's best judgment will be called into play, with preference given to the welfare of the plant rather than the size of the crop. Experiments on government plats seem to prove that cUtting is not es- sential to the  elfare of the plant, but this is only a means of getting hay. Plats of alfalfa that have not been cut in six years are in better physical condition today than those that have been cut regularly. Government agri- cultural experts lean strongly toward fewer crops of alfalfa a year, holding that as large tonnage can be secm.ed, for example, with three as with fern' cuttings, and with less labor. Empha- sis is laid on the necessity of leaving time enough after the last harvest to permit the plants to get a healthy growth, approximately 4 inches, be- fore frost. At the band concert in Williams park last Sunday, a tourist and a na- tive were discussing the high prices. "Do you know, Mrs. St. Peters- burg," asked the woman from Miss- issippi, "the meat markets here are going to put heavy rails around the counters ?" "What in the world can that be for?" bewilderedly asked Mrs. St. Pete. "It's for the customers to grip when they hear the high prices." Have you any furnished rooms for tireless workersThe Independent Want Ads, J CHURCH NOTICES Eids Lutheran Church (Eleven miles northeast of Ortonville) Rev. S. M. Moo of Clinton, Pastor. Services next Sunday at 11:00 o'clock. The Ladies', Aid and the Young People' Societies will give an ice cream social at the home of Jens Dobak Sunday evening, August 7. CaLechumen class meets Wedne'- day morning in the church. @ @ @ Church of St. John. Rev. Fr. J. A. Sui'livan. There will be mass at 8:45 o'clock Sunday morning, August 7. First Congregational Church. Rev. Paul Bockhoven of St. Charles, Minnesota, will conduct divine serv- ices at the First Congregational church next Sunday morning, August 7, at 10:45 o'clock, Everybody is cordially invited to attend. Swedish M. E. Church, A. g. Anderson, Faster Regular services on the second Sun- day of each month at 10:30 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. Pleasant Valley Methodist Episcopal Church. Rev. H. B. Adams. Regular services every Sunday af- ternoon at three o'clock. Sunday school at twelve o'clock. @ @ *1, Trinity Lutheran Church, August Battling, Pastor. Service every Sunday at 10:00 a. m. or 2:00 p. m. German language. Sunday school after each service English language. Christian Science. Sunday service at 10:45 a. m. Wednesday service at 8:00 p. m. All are welcone to these services. Fre eating room in their hall (Shumaker ui ding). Open every Tuesday and |'ri ay from 3 to 5 p. m. Norwegian Lutheran. Roy. J. Walseth, Pastor. There will be no services here next Sunday. Services will be held at Mil- bank at 11:00 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. The morning service will be conducted in the Norwegian language, and the evening service in English. Zion Lutheran Church. Rev. Arnold Nelson, Pastor. There will be no services here this coming Sunday, August 7. Services will be held in the Zion Lutheran church here a week from Sunday. Methodist Episcopal. Roy. G. L. Haggans, Pastor. All grades of the Methodist Sun- day School will meet at 9:45. Preach- ing service at 10:45. Theme,"Har- vest Time in the Kingdom of God." There will be no evening services un- til further notice. United Evangelical Church. F. W. Agte, Pastor. CorrellSunday school at 10:30 a. m. Preaching at 7:30 p. m. OdessaPreaching service at 10:00. a.m. Sunday school at 11:00 a. m. K. L. C. E. at 8:00 p. m. Steinle SchoolhouseSunday school at 2:00 p. m; preaching at 3:00 p. m. Akron Township Church--Services discontinued. The public is cordially invited to meet with us at all of these services- The Church of Good Fellowship. United Evangelical Church. Rev. J. H. Mayne, Pastor Big Stone City.Preaching services at 10:00 a.m. Sunday school at 11:00 a.m. IC L. C. E. meeting at 7:30 p. m. Preaching services at 8:00 p. m. Prayer meeting and Bible Class will be held every Wednesday evening at 8:00 p. m. JohnsonPreaching services every alternate Sunday 'at 3:00 p. m. AdelaidePreaching services every other Sunday at 2:80 p. m. Everybody is cordially invited to at- tend these meetings. I I Ill I ! Hypocrite---A kid who cumes to] school with a smile on his face. The of getting help and trouble. 00agust Victor Recoff t Here P/00LM, The Jewel00 The large numbeA oitpeople who are patrons, together witK nev/customers satisfied, is a sure indication that our of the best. \\; Our Bakery each dgy makes equalldd. They are alwa:ys some. Tl00e I00:{)RNE:R KA Potter & Gowan, 'roprietors. .New Cdvera 1 Aprons Amazan mid Garm T he Best  / B'y Test ] Just LnA Nic Ass rtmen 1 98c $1 TYI,ER'S VarieB00 Sto00 Ortonvillr, Mi  II i 1 1 1 i i [ iii i l i I llll In Cold If not, then let us the EMPEROR FURNACE will heat rooms comfortably at all All the heat is delivered roomsnot up the the basement. "Takes but little fuel to this furnace as there is ly no waste of heat. ROOMS WARM--BASEMENT M/GUST L ORTONVILLE. I III I I II IJ J JJ / PAGE 6 THE oR'roNVILLE INDEPENDENT THURSDAY, AY Hypoerite--A kdd who emes I to --The Independent W with a sadie on hie face. I of etting help elimi and tubl i ORTH PRIOR -I William Spa[ingot of Clinton spefft Sday with his pnts. Sol .Guetafn d daughter Olga were ca]Mrs in this viidty Sunday. M E. Hmerberg spent Satur- day aftemn with Mrs. Sam Eek- m Mr. and Mrs. Bonnie Stegner visited at the O. P. Scholberg home Sunday euing. Mr. and Mrs. He.an Nagel and fandly ye Greville oilers It Wednesday. Hugo Anderson rme up Monday rning to assist with the thlcshing at Ell Stetesbery's. A nuralr of yog folks gathered at the i Stotsbery home Sday ening. All enjoyed a good time. Mr .d M. Hewn Nagel, bit. and M. Tom Schlime, and Mr. d Mrs. Hugo Schlimme spent ast Sun day at the Jen Rudi home. Miss Mary Spalinger d Miss Lydia Stotesbery were hi Otnlle Wednesday. While there Miss Spal inger had her tonsils removed. Mr, and Mr John Larson, Mr. and M. Alfred l:ammner, and Mr. and J. Ed. Gustafson spen Sunday af- " ternonn a the teJ an Nagel hm, e. i ODESSA E. A- Menzel autol to Wht Friday. Mrs. Wolf tuet to her home at Lester FrJe, day. Miss Anna Edqust and Miss Gladys Lenz were OrtonJlle callers satur- day. Mis Emily Mayne of Biz Stone City spent Tuesday with Mis Alice Oeus. Roy. Mellnat and family tued Saturday from their two weeks out- g at Big Stone Lake. Mr. d Mrs. Abert Sehwdt d family and Ms Crtde Menl teed to Montevideo Sday to spehd the day with George Sehandt and his arly. MJs ta Mares went to Milbank Tuesday f a short vislt with fends. Mi Elsie polrler reture f Appleton Sundy aompauied by hel Htth nephew. Master Feld The Mucal Centers given at th tillage ba Tuesday evenlng by th Lien brother, two blind boys, wa ot wel attended but the boys ee tmnly did their p well It i woderfl   them play pio claret d vion extely wel ud  rn their is when haadip. FOSTER Hen W Ford lzturned to h]a h, at S Joseph, Me., yesrcmy. Grda is all cut in tMs vtetaty and iflv4t- tt be the order of the day. Mr. and Mr Ed. Miller of Htrol & D..  aests at the Saer tm tis w Te Mis Wolff. profsiol nurses fm St. Pan. a spendi.g va- st.on at Foster. Mr. avd Mrs. Jas A. McBse  lately and MA Josie Ferric of Grace- lle pent Snday her Mr. d Mrs. E. J. 02qetlL M. R. A Costello and Mtss Mabbie O'Neill of Greville pet Snnday here Mr. d Mr E E. lfiteheoek of Mitchell. S. D.. are stopping at tha DOuglas Hotel for a couple of wks. Capt. "Dad" Dougl chepen*d a large party of cottagers on a boat ride  Bonza Sprns's Monday af- ternoon. Mrs. W. H. Vaaeey and daughter Cathez4ne. Harry J. Blsho. H- ry Ford d Ed. Dgl autoed to Gille Tuesday evemng. Mr. and Mrs. H. G. N4chols of Los AnZleS. Calif., ard here Satur- day for a two wks eutlng, and are gaest at the Douglas Hotel The s Ermy ld Louise B- ton who have been guests at the H. M. Batten ttage for the pat montk retred to their home n SL Paul l Saturday. Frank Rontha] is busy uowlays I i . Halls Takes First In euttmg out the underbsh on his lets I ...... - CHURCH NOTICES on the uorth side of Marie av. lve fflue AU d making them have the appeance  . EIdB Lutha Chuh Legion post of Sturgis, S, D. there Roy. & M. Moe of Clmton. of a beautiful tittle vark extending th First money m the 5-m]e re on yen rMMs northet of O several hundred f a nag he aven, e pgr staged by the Amedcau last Thursday, w A. S. Halls' . Seie next Sunday ! CORRELL NEWS Th uadles' eat?era Thursday. Mi Kathryn Fte] sited Jn Corll Thuday. Mr. and M. Barie and fmfly spent Sunday in Dawn. Mr Ella Sheprd ts siting at Glenwood Lake this we,i:. HIdegard Roske is apendlng a few days vsiting latis in Royd. Ir. and Mrs. Abert Roske and family visited in Boyd Sunday. Relatives fm the P. W. Fruetel ome Sunday. ily motored to Appleton Thursday. Merald and George Bottge ed from Renvile Monday aftervoon, Mies Helen Hartkapf spent a wk sitag at the Mike Luchsinger hom. C. G. Johnson and Matt Luchinger motored to Watertown S. D. Satu;-- day. Fred Hunts was appointed night watchman at a meting held Monday nght. M Jacob Luehsinger returned Sunday frnm visltng relatives in Ho. leway. Mr. end Mrs. Mike Lhsngerand fily slted the Chas. Wise home Sday. Ben Zimmermau had ls tonsils re. moved ths week at the Ortonvill hpital. Mrs. P B. Hudson of Ortonlle  pnding a f daye vlsiting latives in Coll. Miss Ae nd Carl Edquist and Willlam Nitz vsitd in Carroll Tues. day night. Ed. Johnson went t App]eter Mnnday where he had me dental work dent. M. Dawson, Mrs, Jorgenson and Mi Grace Lorenz qsited Mrs. Ethel Dank FrMay. R, R. Hudson and John Gow o Ortonvilte wept busine ealle In Correl Tuesday. Me. and Mrs. Mike Luebsinge t and Miss Heen Vaughan were Appleton visitors Saturday. Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Coraqght ef Monev/de v/cited at the P. D. Van- ghan ho Monday. A. Roske and ]udolph Roshe m toed to Ksndiyoh Monday meting I wh 'the latter returr.ed to work. [ Mr. and M. nit Oehler a daughter of SL Paul spent a few days vsing at the A. L Woods home. Mrs. Ch. Bae, Mrs. W. Shepherd, Mr Ella Shephe and Mr Ethel Dank we vito in Appleton Sat- *rday. Mrs. Clarence Johron turned Tuesday from Watering, S. D. whe she hal been vsRng at the Jam MeMillan home. Mrs. Charles Hndn entertned a few of her neighbors Thursday after- noon at a stng bee given in honor of M. R. B. Hudson of Ortendlle. Taking A Share In Home Bread-Making The youthful bd-mkers who have participated in the bread-making ntests of the bos d girls clubs thlout Minnesota this ye  put- ring their knowledge of brd-making to prtil uK. They are kng tha b-.ad or helping to ke the bad uzd in their homes, ording to T, A. Ericksan, state leader of bns and girls club work at Ihdvsit Farm., Mr. Efleson gets MS infor- mation directly from the youthful bad-makers, The year ha been one of the best ia the history of such ntest The elment hal bern mo than 4,0OO, and {t hrger pentage than uua carried the work thru to eamp[tion Community and unty eantet haw been made ommunity events and ult many counti are plannin read-mklng team d.monstratlom He vered the distan Jn  minutes. Yog People's Societies will give 42 eonde, winning over a fletd of an ice eleam social at the home oi the fast e division. Jens Dobak Sunday evening, Auu In addition to winmng thin he took 7 irr in the quifylng eve.is, an0 day mong ie the church. third place in the 15-mile spial @  re. First place in the qualifying , Church of St. John. event wae won hy a Mr. Rhiey whn Rev Ft. J. A. StJiv driving a hudson special broke the world's rerd f, r that listanee over The will he mass at 8:45 o'clock a half-mile dlrt track. e did thel Sunday moing. August 7. in 5 minutes, 38 Rhliey hke ano h ..... ]d's ord Flint CougregatlonaI Chur. negotiated the 15-miM dis- I Roy. Pau Rkhen of Sk Char es 6 sonds. Minnesota, wil} conduct A better pla in the fiftean mil at the First Congregational event was surred Halls, morning. August portal.lance showed that o'clk. verybody i qualified for it, [owever ing the first tum in this went off the track when he lost his Swedish M E. Chnh. beangs on account of the dust of the A J And rson Fto r.  sllon, . . . e , r uldgabackHe O ;e st trhkPunurt, abl dayRVlecrmr:  th3ed m Sm 3 nosed up to third position. . 7"30 m ' " Ginther driving the Charmers S " p.. Special took seconct plae in the 15- Sunday school at twel o'clock. ctal n second P[O m the ]wer P nt Valley Methodist Eplseopal Car class. He qualified hy making the Church. mile in 36 seconds, and in one of the Rev. H. B. Adds. res made the 5 miles in fi:0L Regu] services every Sunday M- "Jk' McCoy wth his MeCoy's temoon at three o'clock mile event His qualifying time fo @ the mile was 35:4-5. Trinlly Lnth Church. More than 400O people saw the final events of the racing card en Thurs- day. NOTICE FARMERS. The Orto.qlie Cement Post & Tile Works qll he open Saturday, Augmt 6th. al Saturday ening til I0:00 o'clock aud if there is anyhng you want at any other time call Otto 3a- eobson, phone 168-L Bargains plows, manure spreaders, cre arators and also a stock of Deeri: and MeCoiek corn binder rep --Advt. Figures Say An Education Pays The folIowing fm the Cllan Plain Dealer will be of interest to the boy who wondel whether an eda- tio pays: Fewer th one per et of the men of Ameri a eolMgo gadtmte, yet this o per ut has furnished 55 per cent of our presidents, 69 per cent of our supine court jtiees, 85 per nt of our membe of eangrs, 62 per nt of our secretaries of state A recent official eompllatlon shows that of 5,OOO,OOO  qth no SchoOl- ing 3,131 attained cdltable d/stttc. tion of one kind or other, of 2,OO0,- ooo with high sehoal t,24fi attained distinction, whil of 1,0OO,000 college trained man, 5,768 attained dietinc- tion. Such figures not be mtscon. armed. They point to the value of edueatlon, -- sTicE -- Any party having cli m ainst the Argiehoke & Correi[ Tehone Comply Should psent their claim at the Clinton State Bank for pgy- ment not later than August 1 1921. Any elmms presented after this date will not be pdd. 12-3 t C. F, HANSON. Seetary. Cut Alfalfa When New Shoots Start from Crown Jst when to rut a[alfa mad hew many times to hest a cp in one sson a questions which have . id studed attention from exper s in the United States Department of Agriculture and the various experi, mt stations in alfalfa-produein states, Ordlniiy it is a good time tt cut alfalfa for hay when the ne shoots have started from the wn and. from one tenth to on.fifth of th plants a in fior. But these two conditions do not always our at the same time. However, the farmer wit a little experience d keeping n m nd the flor and ew shoots, soon able t tell when his alv.lfa op should be cut. The fm'mer'a best Judgnlent will be Called into play, with pfenee give to the welfar of the plt rather than the size of the crop. August Bmling, Ptor. Service every Sunday m. or 2:0O p. m. German Igaage. Sunday chl after each rdce Evglsh lap.tag*. / Sunday semite at 10:4 m m. Wednesday eerviee at 8:OO p. m. All are welcome to these rvtee F, ladig morn in their hall (Shaber bulldlag). Open every Tuesday and Friday from 3 to 5 p. r Norgin Lutheran. Roy. Sv Waeth, Pastor. There will be no services here Sunday. Serviee bank at I:OO a. m. and 7:80 p. m. The morning service will be conducted in the No.regina Igage and ening slee in English zi Lutheran Church. RoY. Arnold Nelson, Pater. There will coming Sunday, August 7. will he held in the Zion church he a week fm Sunday, Method,t EleOptt. Roy. G. L. Havana, Pzror. All grades of the Methodist S- day School will meet at 9:5. Freh- ing servi at 10:45. Theme,--"Har- vest Time in the Kingdom of God." e will be no evening siees un- til further noti. F. W. Agte. Pm2.or. Cell--Sundsy school at i0:80 a. m. lhhing at 7:30 p. m. OdesPreacMng iee at 10:00. m. Sunday chooi 8t 11:00 a. m. K. L C. E. at 8:0 p m. Steinle SchlheuSunday School at 2:00 p. ; prehmg at $:OO p. m. Akin Twnship Chweh--Serce d[contind. The public is rdlalty invited t meet with us at all of th rcew The Chh of Geod Fellowht Unlted Evangelica I Chareh. Roy. J. H. Mayne, Ptor Big Stone Clty.--Peeaching seree at 10:0o $. r. Stmdy sbool at 11:0  IL L C. E. mtig at 7:30 p. u Preach/g seis at 8:0 p. m, ayer mtlng and Bible C]$ Will e hem every Wednesday evevlng at :00 p. m, ' Jolm--'ing rvi ever 7 alternate Sday at 3:OO p. m. AdehtidPre]dmg services ery [ other Sday at 2:30 p. Everybody is eordia//y invited to at tend these meetings. August Victor Are Here PALM, The Jewel , Gee Wi The large numbeobpeople who are s patrons together witK" nov/customers wb satisfied, is a mu'e indication that our foo of the st.  I Our Bakery each dY makes pastris equalled. They are ahvys newly-baked some. The KORNt['R KA Potter & Gowan, 'roprletots. // .New C6ver00 Aprons Amazan laid Garn T he Rest B:y Test Just Im--A Ni Assortment 98c $1.1 TY[ ER Varieq St Or tanvi? M Oer BrJg of Ortvfll was her or their fairs this summer and fdl Stmday, hls duties a game warde, helng pt see that' no illegal fishing Shds 25O Acres In S Iys. was de he either by n-dents ' CI Mey , he is the ehan or  Isaa Wtona pion shocker of.innesot. He start- " ed work Friday morMng, July 15, fol O ! P Eha Lahe Two blnd were nt-  Newmann we here Snan n n thee a d " add were o t e o  n aun  ng It f rtte ohm f rain who era ht a od tn f g had bee cut wheu r go g h Meyer started woZ He sheeke, the  nd M  E  d r t of 26O s onday afteo aed Mr  W Rumphe of Weston at 5 oeeoI He  de about bo re to h aln ce hdf a day because o rain  th tge t Saturday ater a wks  t t of holn w u t at W,pe and to points eight ay At the end ef th n The fowg Grte   Meye had aught up th the twa nder rvetered at the Dou Hote S Experiments on govement plats seem to prove that eptting is not e seatial to the  elfare of tha plant, but this is only a means of getting hay, Plats of alfalfa that have not been cut r, mx yea a in better phyl cod*on today than those that hew been cut mblarly. Coverameat agri- cultural expert I strngiy towed fear ps of alfalfa a year, hoIdlng that  arge tonnage esu be eared, f ampe, wth three  wtb four cuttings, d with leea Ior. mphe- sic is laid on the neity of lng time enough after the last hsrvst to permit the plants to get a hlthy growth, appximately 4 inches, be- fore ft IsYour In Cold W, ' If rot, then let us toll the EMPEROR FURNACE will heat ,l! the heat is delivered day: Mesdames c. W, Luetke d Meyer shkswlth afork. Hesad At M. O'Brien, Miss Kathryn,* Willlam it ia harder work, but ftr. He nat the bd concert in Willlms ' Takes bllt little I to o only rashes claim to speed hut defies park lt Sunday, a touflst nd  ha- and Richard 021rich. L A. Lia mid anyone to pat up shs better than "Do you mnw. M. et. Pete- ]y no w&qte Of heat, tlve were dtming the hlgh Fds. this ftlrnace as there is s. oh,0 his. The graln shked on Friday burg," asked tha wmaa from Miss- [f la ported that J Magee, n: and Saturday before the big sto, isslppi, "the meat markets here are erxllYthe buslestlmamanhertIon  "theFosterm,"behis all stood. Some of the straw w ry gelng to put heavy rIs ound the Rut Just what  ness const heavy, and the fiel amged about counters?" the nar amt of straw. "What i the world can that be! ef no o m to Imow with V A oodshn " g eher Is ezpeeted to keep *, . degree of certainty, up with o bi tier Me r  h for bellderedly asked Mrs 8 i| yrenXe. who ve bn s*t of ot n . Is there .. t:s for he,y:to to g whenl!  , %%y'.:tc..for the pt .ny .... d to st. , tm  ' near te gh po,, ]1 ORTONYILLE 'e@llrulff/12rv:hor me  th% chP/'sheekr Of =Jmleta? --Ha ...... furuished ...... II ttage -- rant County (Elbow Lake H- tlet rk "  .n be .upied by the He.lode ald. Wt Ad e.s--The lnde.n.tL| . -- PAGE 4 THE ORTONTILLE INDEPENDENT THURSDAY, t $ I NORTH PRIOR | # William Spalinger of Clinton spent Sunday with his parents. Sol Gustafson and daughter Olga were callers in this vicinity Sunday. Mrs. E. Hammerberg spent Satur- day afternoon with Mrs. Sam Erick- on. Mr. and Mrs. Bennie Stegner visited at the O. P. Scholberg home Sunday evening. Mr. and Mrs. Herman Nagel and family .were Graceville callers last Wednesday. Hugo Andern carnc up Monday morning to assist with the thleshing at Eli Stotesbery's. . number of young folks gathered at the E. Stotsbery home Sunday evening. All enjoyed a good time. Mr .and Mrs. Herman Nagel, Mr. and Mrs. Tom Schlirnme, and Mr. and Mrs. Hugo Schlimme spent last Sun- day at the Jens Rudi home. Miss Mary Spalinger and Miss Lydia Stotesbery were in Ortonville Wednesday. While there Miss Spal- inter had her tonsils removed. Mr. and Mrs. John Larson, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred I-Iammner, and Mr. and Llrs. Ed. Gustafson .pent Sunday af- ternoon a the Hcrua: Nagel hue. @ I ODESSA I @ 4, E. A. Menze] autoed to Wheaten Friday. Mrs. Wolf returned to her home at Lester Prairie, Friday. Miss Anna Edquist and Miss Gludys Lenz were Ortonville callers Satur- day. Miss Emily Mayne of Big Stone City spent Tuesday with Miss Alice S$. Roy. Melinat and family returned Saturday from their two weeks out- iug at Big Stone Lake. Mr. and Mrs. Albert Schwandt and family and Miss Gertrude Menzel autoed to Montevideo Sunday to spend the day with George Schwandt and his fmily. Miss Ella Mares went to Milbank Tuesday for a short visit with friends. Miss Elsie Poirier returned from Appleton Sunday accompanied by her little nephew, Master Fernalld. The Musical Concer$ given at the village hall Tuesday evening by the Lien brothers, two blind boys, was nat well attended but the boys cer- tainly did their parts well. It is wonderful to see them play piano, clarinet and violin extremely well and so train their voices when so handicapped. @ FOSTER Henry Ford returned to his home at St. Joseph, Me., yesterday. Grain is all cut in this vicinity and staeking seems to be the order of the day. Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Miller of Huron S, D., are guests at the Sauer cottage this week. The Misses Wolff, professiona nurses from St. Paul, are spending va- cation at Foster Mr. and Mrs. Jas. A. McRae anti family and Miss Josie Forde of Grace- ville spent Snday here. Mr. and Mrs. E. J. O'Neill, Mrs. R. A Costello and Miss Mabbie O'Neill of Graceville spent Sunday here Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Hitchcock of Mitchell, S. D., are stopping at the Douglas Hotel for a couple of weeks, Capt. "Dad" Douglas chaperoned a large party of cottagers on a boat ride to Bonanza Springs Monday af- ternoon. Mrs. W. H. Vallacey and daughter Catherine, Harry J. Bilsborrow, Hen- ry Ford and Ed. Douglas autoed to Graceville Tuesday evening. Mr. and Mrs. H. G. N4chols of Los Angeles, .Calif., arrived here Satur- day for a two weeks outing, and are guests at the Douglas Hotel. The Misses Emily and Louise Bar- ton who have been guests at the H. M. Barton cottage for the past month, returned to their home in St. Paul last Saturday. Oscar Briggs of Ortonville was here Sunday, his duties as game warden being to see thaC no illegal fishing was done here either by non-residents or local Isaac Waltons. A party of Wheaten people under the peonal charge of Representative O. C. Newmann were here Sunday and were among the fortunate one. who caught a good string of fish. Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Bless and Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Rumphel of Weston, Missouri, returned to the Malin cot- tage last Saturday after a weeks vis- it at Winnipeg and other points,.=., The following Gracevilleites were registered at the Douglas Hotel Sun- day: Mesdames C. W. Luetke and M. O'Brien, Miss Kathryn: William and Richard O'Brin, L. A. Lien and S. Olson. It is reported that Joe Magee, gen- erally known here as "the mocus;' is the busiest man along Foster beach. But just what that business consist of no one sem to know with any degree of certainty. Mr. and Mrs. Dean Lightner and children of Abeleen, who have been at the Herreid 'cottage for the past three weeks, will leave for home Fri- day and a little later the cottage will again be occupied by the Herrieds. Frank Rosenthal is busy nowadays cutting out the underbrush on his lots on the north side of Marie avenue, and making them have the appearance of a beautiful little park extending several hundred feet along the avenue. CORRELL NEWS e Mr. and Mrs. Boric were Appleton callers Thursday. Miss Kathryn Fruetel visited in Correll Thursday. Mr. and Mrs. Barie and iamfly spent Sunday in Dawson. Mrs. Ella Shepard is visiting at Glenwood Lake this wc.}:. Hildegard Roske is spending a few days visiting relatives in Boyd. Mr. and Mrs. Albert Roske and family visited in Boyd Sunday. Relatives from Johnson visited at the P. W. Fruetel home Snday. Mr. and Mrs. J. Cordeman and fam ily motored to Appleton Thursday. Merald and George Bottge return- ed from Renville Monday afternoon. Miss Helen Hartkopf spent a week visiting at the Mike Luchsinger heron. C. G. Johnson and Matt Luchsinger motored to Watertown, S. D., Satur- day. Fred Hanes was appointed night watchman at a meeting held Monday night. Mrs. Jacob Luchsinger returned Sunday from visiting relatives in Hol- loway. Mr. and Mrs. Mike Luchsinger and family visited the Chas. Wise home Sunday. Ben Zimmerman had his tonsils re- moved this week at the Ortonville hospital. Mrs. R. B. Hudson of Ortonville is spending a few days visiting relatives in Correll. Miss Anne and Carl Edquist and William Nitz visitgd in Correll Tues- day night. Ed. Johnson went to Appleton Monday where he had some dental work done. Mrs. Dawson, Mrs. Jorgenson and Miss Grace Lorenz visited Mrs. Ethel Donk Friday. R. B. Hudson and John Gowan of Ortonville wePe business callers in Correll Tuesday. Mr. and Mrs. Mike Luchsinger and Miss Helen Vaughan were Appleton visitors Saturday. Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Conright of Montevideo visited at the P. D. Vau- than home Monday. A. Roske and Rudolph Roske mo- tored to Kandiyohi Monday morning where 'the latter returned to work. Mr. and Mrs. Ole Oehler one daughter of St. Paul spent a few days visiting at the A. L. Woods home. Mrs. Chas. Boric Mrs. W. Shepherd, Mrs. Ella Shepherd and Mrs. Ethel Donk were visitors in Appleton Sat- irday. Mrs. Clarence Johnson returned Tuesday frcm. Watertown, S. D., where she has been visiting at the James McMillan home. Mrs. Charles Hudson entertained a few of her neighbors Thursday after- noon at a sewing bee iven in honor of Mrs. R. B. Hudson of Ortonville. Taking A Share ]n Home Bread-Making The youthful bread-makers who have participated in the broad,making contests of the boys and girls clubs thruout Minnesota this year are put- ting their knowledge of bread-making to practical uses. They are making the bread or helping to make the bread used in their homes, according to T. A. Erickson, state leader of bo:,'s and girls club work at Universit Farm. Mr. Erickson gets his infor- mation directly from the youthful bread-makers, The year has been one of the best in the history of such contests. The enrolment has been more than 4,000, and a larger percentage than usum carried the work thru to completion. Commtmity and county contests have been made community events and as a result many counties are planning bread-making team demonstrations for their fairs this summer and fall. Shocks 250 Acres In 8 Days. " Carl Meyer ims he is the cham- pion shocker of Minnesota. He start- ed work Friday morning, July 15, for T. C. Mobraaten, five miles west of Elbow Lake. Two binders were cut- ting in the field, and about ten acres of grain had been cut when Mr. Meyer started work. He shocked the last of 250 acres Monday afternoon at 3:55 o'clock. He was idle about a half a day because of rain so the actual time of shocking was about eight days. At the end of the run, Mr. Meyer had caught up with the two binders. Meyer shocks with a fork. He said it is harder work, but faster. He not only makes claim to speed but defies anyone to put up shodns better than his. The grain shocked on Friday and Saturday before the big storm, all stood. Some of the straw was very leavy, and the fields averaged about the normal amount of straw. A good shocker is expected to keep up with one binder. Meyer caught up to two binders after they had a start of about ten acres. Is there anyone ready to dispute his claim as the champion shocker of Minnesota? Grant County {Elbow "Lake) Her- ald. Halls Takes First In Five Mile Auto Race First money in the 5-mile race on the program staged by the American Legion post of Sturgis, S. D., there last Thursday, was A. S. Halls' re- ward for participation in that event. He covered the distance in 5 minutes, 42 seconds, winning over a field of six cars in the fast car division. In addition to winning this he took third in the qualifying events, and third place in the 15-mile special race. First place in *,he qualifying event was won by a Mr. Rhiley who driving a Hudson special broke the world's record for that distance over a half-mile dirt track. He did the distance in 5 minutes, 38 seconds. Rhiley broke another world's record when he negotiated the 15-mile dis- tance in 17 minutes 6 seconds. A better piece in the fifteen mite event was assumd Halls, and his performance showed that he was qualified for it. However, on mak- ing the first turn in this event he went off the track when he lost his bearings on account of the dust of the lead car. He lost his position, but pulled back to the track unhurt, and nosed up to third position. Ginther driving the Chal,rners Spe- cial won second place in the Slower Car class. He qualified by making the mile in 36 seconds, and in one of the races made the 5 miles in 6:01. "Jack" McCoy wFch his McCoy's Special took second pla6e in the 15- mile event. His qualifying time for the mile was 35:4-5. More than 4004) people saw the final events of the racing card on Thurs- day. NOTICE FARMERS. The Ortonville Cement Post & Tile .Works will be open Saturday August 6th, also Saturday evening until 10:00 o'clock, and if there is anything you want tt any other time call Otto Ja- cobsen, phone 168-L. Bargains in plows, manure spreaders, cream sep- arators and also a stock of Deering and McCormick corn binder repairs. --Advt. Figures Say An Education Pays The following from the Clevelana Plain Dealer will be of interest to the boy who wonders whether an educa- tion  pays: Fewer than one per cent of the men of America are college graduates, yet this one per cent has furnished 55 per cent of our presidents, 69 per cent of our supreme court justices, 35 per cent of our members of congress, 62 per cent of our secretaries of state. A recent official compilation shows that of 5,000,000 men with no school- ing 3,131 attained creditable distinc- tion of one kind or another, of 2,000,- 000 with high school 1,245 attained distinction, whil of 1,000,000 college trained men, 5fl68 atained distinc- tion. Such figures cannot be miscon- strued. They point to the value of education. NOTICE. Any party having claim aainst the Artichoke & Correll Telephone Company should present their claim at the Clinton State Bank for pay- ment not later than August l&, 1921. Any claims presented after this date will not be paid. 12-3 C. F. HANSON, Secretary. Cut Alfalfa When New Shoots Start from Crown Just when to cut alfalfa and how many times to harvest a crop in one season are questions which have re- ceived studied attention from experts in the United States Department of Agriculture and the various experi- ment stations m alfalfa-producing states. Ordinarily it is a good time to cut alfalfa for hay when the new shoots have started from the crown, and from one-tenth to one-fifth of th plants are in flower. But these two conditions do not always occur at the same time. However, the farmer with a little experience, and keeping in mind the flower and new shoots, soon is able to tell when his alfalfa crop should be cut. The farmer's best judgment will be called into play, with preference given to the welfare of the plant rather than the size of the crop. Experiments on government plats seem to prove that cUtting is not es- sential to the  elfare of the plant, but this is only a means of getting hay. Plats of alfalfa that have not been cut in six years are in better physical condition today than those that have been cut regularly. Government agri- cultural experts lean strongly toward fewer crops of alfalfa a year, holding that as large tonnage can be secm.ed, for example, with three as with fern' cuttings, and with less labor. Empha- sis is laid on the necessity of leaving time enough after the last harvest to permit the plants to get a healthy growth, approximately 4 inches, be- fore frost. At the band concert in Williams park last Sunday, a tourist and a na- tive were discussing the high prices. "Do you know, Mrs. St. Peters- burg," asked the woman from Miss- issippi, "the meat markets here are going to put heavy rails around the counters ?" "What in the world can that be for?" bewilderedly asked Mrs. St. Pete. "It's for the customers to grip when they hear the high prices." Have you any furnished rooms for tireless workersThe Independent Want Ads, J CHURCH NOTICES Eids Lutheran Church (Eleven miles northeast of Ortonville) Rev. S. M. Moo of Clinton, Pastor. Services next Sunday at 11:00 o'clock. The Ladies', Aid and the Young People' Societies will give an ice cream social at the home of Jens Dobak Sunday evening, August 7. CaLechumen class meets Wedne'- day morning in the church. @ @ @ Church of St. John. Rev. Fr. J. A. Sui'livan. There will be mass at 8:45 o'clock Sunday morning, August 7. First Congregational Church. Rev. Paul Bockhoven of St. Charles, Minnesota, will conduct divine serv- ices at the First Congregational church next Sunday morning, August 7, at 10:45 o'clock, Everybody is cordially invited to attend. Swedish M. E. Church, A. g. Anderson, Faster Regular services on the second Sun- day of each month at 10:30 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. Pleasant Valley Methodist Episcopal Church. Rev. H. B. Adams. Regular services every Sunday af- ternoon at three o'clock. Sunday school at twelve o'clock. @ @ *1, Trinity Lutheran Church, August Battling, Pastor. Service every Sunday at 10:00 a. m. or 2:00 p. m. German language. Sunday school after each service English language. Christian Science. Sunday service at 10:45 a. m. Wednesday service at 8:00 p. m. All are welcone to these services. Fre eating room in their hall (Shumaker ui ding). Open every Tuesday and |'ri ay from 3 to 5 p. m. Norwegian Lutheran. Roy. J. Walseth, Pastor. There will be no services here next Sunday. Services will be held at Mil- bank at 11:00 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. The morning service will be conducted in the Norwegian language, and the evening service in English. Zion Lutheran Church. Rev. Arnold Nelson, Pastor. There will be no services here this coming Sunday, August 7. Services will be held in the Zion Lutheran church here a week from Sunday. Methodist Episcopal. Roy. G. L. Haggans, Pastor. All grades of the Methodist Sun- day School will meet at 9:45. Preach- ing service at 10:45. Theme,"Har- vest Time in the Kingdom of God." There will be no evening services un- til further notice. United Evangelical Church. F. W. Agte, Pastor. CorrellSunday school at 10:30 a. m. Preaching at 7:30 p. m. OdessaPreaching service at 10:00. a.m. Sunday school at 11:00 a. m. K. L. C. E. at 8:00 p. m. Steinle SchoolhouseSunday school at 2:00 p. m; preaching at 3:00 p. m. Akron Township Church--Services discontinued. The public is cordially invited to meet with us at all of these services- The Church of Good Fellowship. United Evangelical Church. Rev. J. H. Mayne, Pastor Big Stone City.Preaching services at 10:00 a.m. Sunday school at 11:00 a.m. IC L. C. E. meeting at 7:30 p. m. Preaching services at 8:00 p. m. Prayer meeting and Bible Class will be held every Wednesday evening at 8:00 p. m. JohnsonPreaching services every alternate Sunday 'at 3:00 p. m. AdelaidePreaching services every other Sunday at 2:80 p. m. Everybody is cordially invited to at- tend these meetings. I I Ill I ! Hypocrite---A kid who cumes to] school with a smile on his face. The of getting help and trouble. 00agust Victor Recoff t Here P/00LM, The Jewel00 The large numbeA oitpeople who are patrons, together witK nev/customers satisfied, is a sure indication that our of the best. \\; Our Bakery each dgy makes equalldd. They are alwa:ys some. Tl00e I00:{)RNE:R KA Potter & Gowan, 'roprietors. .New Cdvera 1 Aprons Amazan mid Garm T he Best  / B'y Test ] Just LnA Nic Ass rtmen 1 98c $1 TYI,ER'S VarieB00 Sto00 Ortonvillr, Mi  II i 1 1 1 i i [ iii i l i I llll In Cold If not, then let us the EMPEROR FURNACE will heat rooms comfortably at all All the heat is delivered roomsnot up the the basement. "Takes but little fuel to this furnace as there is ly no waste of heat. ROOMS WARM--BASEMENT M/GUST L ORTONVILLE. I III I I II IJ J JJ /