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Ortonville, Minnesota
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August 4, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
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AUGUST 4, 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT i PAGE 7 The Farmers Corner DIYOTED ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF FARMERS AND FARMER'S CLUBS. Tonnage Hauled Over Country Roads necessity o---O-fkeeping the coun n in good condition is show report recently compiled by the uOf Markets and Crop Esti- nited States Department of showing the extent to are used in hauling farm to market. According to the which shows the tonnage of hauled on country roads, g the yearly average for the t from 1915 to 1919, there were of these 11 crops hauled for acres of land. The average f the 11 crops hauled on each year for the period amounted to 86,560,000 11 crops referred to in the are corn, wheat, oats, barley, flaxseed, cotton (including potatoes, and cultiva- Time Is --Date Changed Will serve as a reminder that Time is drawing near. For Years Seed Corn Time has 10-20. This year, on the early season and the state of the corn crop,Seed Will be September 5-15. of Seed Corn Time put millions of dollars of farmers of Mnne a farmer has to thank in selecting and storing Orchard and Garden i Three main shoots are enough to leave on dahlia plants. Too many shoots make small flowers. Watch for the second brood of cur- rant wom. Arsenate of lead put on as soon as they appear will get them. Gruss an Teplitz rose in Portland, Oregon, has produced more than 200 flowers in one season. Lawn clippings make good mulch to put about everbearing strawber- ries. Gradus is an excellent garden pea  both from point of production and qdality. Keep the leaves tied up over cauli- flower heads if you would have white heads. Powdered sulphur and arsenate of lead at the rate of nine parts of sul- phur to one lead is recommended for mildew on roses. Perennial flower seed may be sown now. Transplant the seedlings as soon as large enough to sheltered places in "the garden or better yet, to a cold frame. Many will bloom next year. The common elder, and especially the cut-leaved elder made excellent growth this spring amd were excep- tionally fine as ornaments about the yard during the middle of June. Crop Prospects Are Failing Fast J. E. Kernan, chairman of the grain before time for killirg and warehouse commission of Wis- Iin,, hmt .entemberl consin, who has just completed a trip o " ar nruout tne spring wheat states, in- g od crop the following ye . , .......... ra selection- moreover, hasl cmamg rne oest pars o vonmna, Lhe corn belt far northward, declares his opinion that government eref 3re has become a stanle/crop estimates of July 1 will fail far :innq.sota, and with the in- short of being rea]ized. -4-nstead of t L- ' ............... ] 80,000,000 bushels of spring wheat in lie tlVeS:OCK ln(tul,ry [t - th ....... ' ......... n 2 North' Dakota, he looks for not over SilO, 1[ Will U2 J[IOl- , U d. 65,000,000; and in Minnesota he would and the Public. of the publii to the the public's dependence on are things that need era- when there is a disposi- part of many to feel that is asking too much. The been stated admirably M. Baruch, who gave such service as chairman of the stries board, in the July hum- Atlantic Monthly. destroy our own agri- and extend-our sources distantly and precarious- not see to it that our are jbell and fairly paid services. The farm gives men as well as food, their vitality and renewed from the exports intelligence and unintelligence. Only the geades of mentality and will remain on, or seek, unless agriculture is of being pursued with and adequate cam- Hence to (mbitter and the farmer is to dry contaminate the vital f the nation .... flourish or decline with brief, is the reason for attitude toward the of the farmer today. ' 0 Circles Boost The Price of Eggs circle in Burnsvilte town- county, according to its j " une, showed that mem- 26 cents per dozen local merchants were and 19 cents a dozen in is more, the egg circle larger demand for eggs supply. Fair Dates Set. 20, 21, 22, 23, were de- as the dates for the i921 Fair at a meeting l board Monday night.! lews. , ! figure several million short of the government's 35,000,000. In Montana, if filling is good he looks for a p- sible crop of 25,000,000. Dry weather has rushed grain to maturity too fast, Mr. McKernan de- clared; black rust s already destroy- ing many fields; while the Red River valley has already been nearly ruined in large sections. He found good rye in sections hu oats and wheat generally light. Can't Meet Call For Home Economics Teachers !' The home economics division of the University of Minnesota, between July 1, 1920, and July 1, 1921, re- ceived 254 requests for teachers in grade, high, and normal schools, col- leges, and universities. It was able to supply just'34 teachers with the degree of Bachelor of Science to meet this demand. Eight of these were experienced and 26 were inexperien- ced teachers. The average salary at which these teachers were placed was $1,350 annually, or a total for the 34 of $45,900 annuLlly. The largest number of requests for teachers came from Minnesota, 197. The next largest from Iowa and South Dakota, 11 each. Other requests came from Alabama, Arizona, Flori- da, Illinois, Kansas, Michigan, Mon- tana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Okla- homa, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Utat, Vir- ginia, Wisconsin, Washington, and Wyoming. i , i We will pay the following prices for junk: Ola Iron, $6.00 to $10.00 per ton Copper and heavy Brass,4c to 8c per pound. Old Rags, cent per pound. Old Rubbers anb Tires, cent to I cent per pound. Pipe Fittings, Brass Goods, Belting and Hose carried in stock. Acetylene Welding. "The Ortonville Found W. F. MULLICA, Prop. Phone 23 rl Every Respect" says the Good Judge You get more genuine chew- ing satisfaction from the Real Tobacco Chew than you ever got from the ordinary kind. The good tobacco taste lasts so long--a small chew of this class of tobacco lasts "much longer than a big chew. of the old kind. That's why it costs less to use. , Any man who has used both kinds will tell you that. Pat ul) i two tles is a long fine-cut tobacco RIGHT GUT is a short-cut tobacco MARKET LE'I'TEI( Cattle 5,500. I)ryfeds nomm- inally steady, grass cattle un- evenly 25c or more lower. Calve 1,500. Market 50c lower, packer tops $8.00. Hogs 5,000. Market steady to 25c lower, bulk $8.50 to $0.50, good and choice pigs $10.25. Sheep 1,900. Market steady to strong. I South St. Paul, Minn., August 1, I 1921: August opened with an increas-I ed supply of cattle here and at lead-.i ing outside markets, seven large cen- ters showing a gain of 18,000 over last Monday. Practically no dryfeds arrived here, these being nom- inally steady. Grass cattle met generally slow sale at prices averaging fully 25 cents or more lower that at last week's close. Best Dakota grass fat steers topped to , city butchers at $7.75, with bst load lot going to outsiders at $7.50. Bulk of the grass steers suitable for beef purposes cashed at $7.00 to $5.50. Best grass cows and heifers from $6 to around $7, with the bulk cashing i from $3.50 to $5.50. Canners and l cutters sustained relatively little toss, selling from $2.00 to $3.50. Bologna bulls sokl from $3.25 to $4.50. A 50c cut in veals placed packer tops at $8. seconds mostly $5. Desirable heavy feeders went mostly from $4 to $6, stock steers largely $3 to $5, with "(logs" down to $2.50. Hogs opened steady to lower, range $8.00 to $10.90, bulk $8.50 to $10.5'9, good and choice pigs $10.25. Bulk good native lambs $8.50 at $8.75, good and choice ewes $3.50 at $4.00, fairly ' good Montana yearling and two-year- old wethers averaging 99 pounds at $6.00. Minnesota Fifth Richest Farming State Minnesota is'the fifthrichest farm- ing S;ate in the union, according to figures just received at University Farm, St. Paul, from the census bu- reau. The total worth of all farm property in Minnesota, according to these figures is $3,787,420,118. Only four other states are richer. These states are Iowa, whose farm proper- If its anything "Mechanical" and you, think it cannot be done-- take it to Hall's No shop in this sec- tion so complete in mechanical equip- ment or manned by more expert mechan- ics. , A. S. HALLS Ortonville ty is worth $8,525,270,956; Illinois, 6,66(i,t t',235;" Texas 54,461,579,497,- Nebraska, $4,193,825,242. By far the richest part of the coun- try, also, is the west north centrm section, which inchules the states of Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, North Da- kota, South Dakota, Nebraska, and l * Kansas. The total value ofi farm property in these states amounts :u $27,984,547,351. This is $10,000,000,- 000 in excess of the east north central I : section, including Ohio, Indiana, Illi- nois, Michigan, and Wisconsin. MAKE YOUR CHOICE ")elco-Light certainly is a big help on the farina. Electricity is so much more cleaner, safer and convenignt than oil lamps." This is what Mrs. Wm. Herkelmaan, Elwood, Iowa, writes. Also, "The benefits we de- rive from Delco-Light more than pays for the installation." Write for Catalog S. A. BARR, Dealer THERE'S A SATISFIED USER NEAR YOU ttention Dairymen ii lullll i iiii iiii i iI WE ARE PAYING FOR BUTTERFAT UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE SPECIAL PREMIUM FOR SWEET CREAM t I i ii ill i ii i i ii ii Ort0nville I(e :ream & Butter 0,. "Pfluegers don't make all the ice cream but they nmke the best." roll Ill illl II I ill Ill II Horse-lovers will be given a real treat this year at the horse show of the MINNESOTA STATE FAIR September 3 to 10  , Illll I I II I Illl II I child can l out a PICTORIAL REVIEW P?ITTERN , with the help of the Patented Cutting and Construction Guides furnished free with every Pictorial Revie Pattern L a rr 2 f Each piece of the pattern is perforated with identi/ying letter m cotvesltgl with the httem shown oa the Cutting Guide FOR SALE BY Pioneer St0000]'e Co=Operative Company Professional and Business Directory C. E. SIGLOH For Expert W,00,00oSERVIcEELECTRIC REPAIRING Phone 284-L Ortonville, Minn. JOE BAYER & SON Of the Ortonville Tailoring Co. All kinds of cleaning and pressing neatly done. Suits Made to Order. Ortonville, Minn. | Light Hauling of all Kinds t " / Express and Baggage ] elephone 287 Ortonville, Minn. 1 PAUL DIRNBAUER Brick Layer and Plasterer Stone Mason and All Kinds of Cement Work. Ortonville, Minn. R.F.D. PETERSON & SON rD ay Line Big Stone Lake Ice Phone 38 Ortonville, Minn. ARTAH PUDER All Kinds of Plastering and Stucco Work. Big Stone City, S. Dak. Kodak o00,.o PRINTING ENLARGI}IG Prompt, Quality Service, Moderate Prices. THE REED STUDIO Ortonville Minn. DR. R. D. RIFENBARK j OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN, One block uphill fran Gunderson s Drug Store Vapor-Sulphur Cabinet Treatments (For rheumatism, neuritis, etc.) F. L. BROWN t T.E 00EWELER i i Ortonville, Minnesota 4t FOR TRUCK SERVICE 'and any kind of light and heavy draying Hausauer Bros. PHONE 268 All Orders Given Prompt Attentio A. B. KAIRCflER Attorney at Law  Odd Fellows Building 0rtonville, Minn. DR. F. W. DUNN. Chiropractor ORTONVILLE, MINN. Xray Spinographical Laboratory 12-13-14-15-16 Shumaker Bldg. Col. Wm. Wellendorf AUCTIONEER 30 years' experience. No practic- ing on your property. Call or write me early and get in on an early date. Ortonville, Minnesota J: A. JOHNSON PIANO TUNING. AND REPAIRING PHONES---Residee. 14 Furnlture Store- 88 All Work Guaranteed Ortonville, Mhmmota.  ,--- .... WILL FINCH Experienced laintr Phone 235-L All Work Guaranteed JOHN MALMQUIST Interior Demratlng and Artistie Sign Painting Phone 2-L OrtonviHe, Mhmeta. ELMER SALSBURY al'HE WELL DIGGEI Fifteen Years' Experinm Ortonville, Minn.. R.F.D. Illl II mlnllll I I all : , YoU Need Prin.ting We Do Printing Let us get together and b lie OiffOlWRl[ HIKPglIIkeHT /i:ii AUGUST 4, 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT i PAGE 7 The Farmers Corner DIYOTED ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF FARMERS AND FARMER'S CLUBS. Tonnage Hauled Over Country Roads necessity o---O-fkeeping the coun n in good condition is show report recently compiled by the uOf Markets and Crop Esti- nited States Department of showing the extent to are used in hauling farm to market. According to the which shows the tonnage of hauled on country roads, g the yearly average for the t from 1915 to 1919, there were of these 11 crops hauled for acres of land. The average f the 11 crops hauled on each year for the period amounted to 86,560,000 11 crops referred to in the are corn, wheat, oats, barley, flaxseed, cotton (including potatoes, and cultiva- Time Is --Date Changed Will serve as a reminder that Time is drawing near. For Years Seed Corn Time has 10-20. This year, on the early season and the state of the corn crop,Seed Will be September 5-15. of Seed Corn Time put millions of dollars of farmers of Mnne a farmer has to thank in selecting and storing Orchard and Garden i Three main shoots are enough to leave on dahlia plants. Too many shoots make small flowers. Watch for the second brood of cur- rant wom. Arsenate of lead put on as soon as they appear will get them. Gruss an Teplitz rose in Portland, Oregon, has produced more than 200 flowers in one season. Lawn clippings make good mulch to put about everbearing strawber- ries. Gradus is an excellent garden pea  both from point of production and qdality. Keep the leaves tied up over cauli- flower heads if you would have white heads. Powdered sulphur and arsenate of lead at the rate of nine parts of sul- phur to one lead is recommended for mildew on roses. Perennial flower seed may be sown now. Transplant the seedlings as soon as large enough to sheltered places in "the garden or better yet, to a cold frame. Many will bloom next year. The common elder, and especially the cut-leaved elder made excellent growth this spring amd were excep- tionally fine as ornaments about the yard during the middle of June. Crop Prospects Are Failing Fast J. E. Kernan, chairman of the grain before time for killirg and warehouse commission of Wis- Iin,, hmt .entemberl consin, who has just completed a trip o " ar nruout tne spring wheat states, in- god crop the following ye . , .......... ra selection- moreover, hasl cmamg rne oest pars o vonmna, Lhe corn belt far northward, declares his opinion that government eref 3re has become a stanle/crop estimates of July 1 will fail far :innq.sota, and with the in- short of being rea]ized. -4-nstead of t L- ' ............... ] 80,000,000 bushels of spring wheat in lie tlVeS:OCK ln(tul,ry [t - th ....... ' ......... n 2 North' Dakota, he looks for not over SilO, 1[ Will U2 J[IOl- , U d. 65,000,000; and in Minnesota he would and the Public. of the publii to the the public's dependence on are things that need era- when there is a disposi- part of many to feel that is asking too much. The been stated admirably M. Baruch, who gave such service as chairman of the stries board, in the July hum- Atlantic Monthly. destroy our own agri- and extend-our sources distantly and precarious- not see to it that our are jbell and fairly paid services. The farm gives men as well as food, their vitality and renewed from the exports intelligence and unintelligence. Only the geades of mentality and will remain on, or seek, unless agriculture is of being pursued with and adequate cam- Hence to (mbitter and the farmer is to dry contaminate the vital f the nation .... flourish or decline with brief, is the reason for attitude toward the of the farmer today. ' 0 Circles Boost The Price of Eggs circle in Burnsvilte town- county, according to its j " une, showed that mem- 26 cents per dozen local merchants were and 19 cents a dozen in is more, the egg circle larger demand for eggs supply. Fair Dates Set. 20, 21, 22, 23, were de- as the dates for the i921 Fair at a meeting l board Monday night.! lews. , ! figure several million short of the government's 35,000,000. In Montana, if filling is good he looks for a p- sible crop of 25,000,000. Dry weather has rushed grain to maturity too fast, Mr. McKernan de- clared; black rust s already destroy- ing many fields; while the Red River valley has already been nearly ruined in large sections. He found good rye in sections hu oats and wheat generally light. Can't Meet Call For Home Economics Teachers !' The home economics division of the University of Minnesota, between July 1, 1920, and July 1, 1921, re- ceived 254 requests for teachers in grade, high, and normal schools, col- leges, and universities. It was able to supply just'34 teachers with the degree of Bachelor of Science to meet this demand. Eight of these were experienced and 26 were inexperien- ced teachers. The average salary at which these teachers were placed was $1,350 annually, or a total for the 34 of $45,900 annuLlly. The largest number of requests for teachers came from Minnesota, 197. The next largest from Iowa and South Dakota, 11 each. Other requests came from Alabama, Arizona, Flori- da, Illinois, Kansas, Michigan, Mon- tana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Okla- homa, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Utat, Vir- ginia, Wisconsin, Washington, and Wyoming. i , i We will pay the following prices for junk: Ola Iron, $6.00 to $10.00 per ton Copper and heavy Brass,4c to 8c per pound. Old Rags, cent per pound. Old Rubbers anb Tires, cent to I cent per pound. Pipe Fittings, Brass Goods, Belting and Hose carried in stock. Acetylene Welding. "The Ortonville Found W. F. MULLICA, Prop. Phone 23 rl Every Respect" says the Good Judge You get more genuine chew- ing satisfaction from the Real Tobacco Chew than you ever got from the ordinary kind. The good tobacco taste lasts so long--a small chew of this class of tobacco lasts "much longer than a big chew. of the old kind. That's why it costs less to use. , Any man who has used both kinds will tell you that. Pat ul) i two tles is a long fine-cut tobacco RIGHT GUT is a short-cut tobacco MARKET LE'I'TEI( Cattle 5,500. I)ryfeds nomm- inally steady, grass cattle un- evenly 25c or more lower. Calve 1,500. Market 50c lower, packer tops $8.00. Hogs 5,000. Market steady to 25c lower, bulk $8.50 to $0.50, good and choice pigs $10.25. Sheep 1,900. Market steady to strong. I South St. Paul, Minn., August 1, I 1921: August opened with an increas-I ed supply of cattle here and at lead-.i ing outside markets, seven large cen- ters showing a gain of 18,000 over last Monday. Practically no dryfeds arrived here, these being nom- inally steady. Grass cattle met generally slow sale at prices averaging fully 25 cents or more lower that at last week's close. Best Dakota grass fat steers topped to , city butchers at $7.75, with bst load lot going to outsiders at $7.50. Bulk of the grass steers suitable for beef purposes cashed at $7.00 to $5.50. Best grass cows and heifers from $6 to around $7, with the bulk cashing i from $3.50 to $5.50. Canners and l cutters sustained relatively little toss, selling from $2.00 to $3.50. Bologna bulls sokl from $3.25 to $4.50. A 50c cut in veals placed packer tops at $8. seconds mostly $5. Desirable heavy feeders went mostly from $4 to $6, stock steers largely $3 to $5, with "(logs" down to $2.50. Hogs opened steady to lower, range $8.00 to $10.90, bulk $8.50 to $10.5'9, good and choice pigs $10.25. Bulk good native lambs $8.50 at $8.75, good and choice ewes $3.50 at $4.00, fairly ' good Montana yearling and two-year- old wethers averaging 99 pounds at $6.00. Minnesota Fifth Richest Farming State Minnesota is'the fifthrichest farm- ing S;ate in the union, according to figures just received at University Farm, St. Paul, from the census bu- reau. The total worth of all farm property in Minnesota, according to these figures is $3,787,420,118. Only four other states are richer. These states are Iowa, whose farm proper- If its anything "Mechanical" and you, think it cannot be done-- take it to Hall's No shop in this sec- tion so complete in mechanical equip- ment or manned by more expert mechan- ics. , A. S. HALLS Ortonville ty is worth $8,525,270,956; Illinois, 6,66(i,t t',235;" Texas 54,461,579,497,- Nebraska, $4,193,825,242. By far the richest part of the coun- try, also, is the west north centrm section, which inchules the states of Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, North Da- kota, South Dakota, Nebraska, and l * Kansas. The total value ofi farm property in these states amounts :u $27,984,547,351. This is $10,000,000,- 000 in excess of the east north central I : section, including Ohio, Indiana, Illi- nois, Michigan, and Wisconsin. MAKE YOUR CHOICE ")elco-Light certainly is a big help on the farina. Electricity is so much more cleaner, safer and convenignt than oil lamps." This is what Mrs. Wm. Herkelmaan, Elwood, Iowa, writes. Also, "The benefits we de- rive from Delco-Light more than pays for the installation." Write for Catalog S. A. BARR, Dealer THERE'S A SATISFIED USER NEAR YOU ttention Dairymen ii lullll i iiii iiii i iI WE ARE PAYING FOR BUTTERFAT UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE SPECIAL PREMIUM FOR SWEET CREAM t I i ii ill i ii i i ii ii Ort0nville I(e :ream & Butter 0,. "Pfluegers don't make all the ice cream but they nmke the best." roll Ill illl II I ill Ill II Horse-lovers will be given a real treat this year at the horse show of the MINNESOTA STATE FAIR September 3 to 10  , Illll I I II I Illl II I child can l out a PICTORIAL REVIEW P?ITTERN , with the help of the Patented Cutting and Construction Guides furnished free with every Pictorial Revie Pattern L a rr 2 f Each piece of the pattern is perforated with identi/ying letter m cotvesltgl with the httem shown oa the Cutting Guide FOR SALE BY Pioneer St0000]'e Co=Operative Company Professional and Business Directory C. E. SIGLOH For Expert W,00,00oSERVIcEELECTRIC REPAIRING Phone 284-L Ortonville, Minn. JOE BAYER & SON Of the Ortonville Tailoring Co. All kinds of cleaning and pressing neatly done. Suits Made to Order. Ortonville, Minn. | Light Hauling of all Kinds t " / Express and Baggage ] elephone 287 Ortonville, Minn. 1 PAUL DIRNBAUER Brick Layer and Plasterer Stone Mason and All Kinds of Cement Work. Ortonville, Minn. R.F.D. PETERSON & SON rD ay Line Big Stone Lake Ice Phone 38 Ortonville, Minn. ARTAH PUDER All Kinds of Plastering and Stucco Work. Big Stone City, S. Dak. Kodak o00,.o PRINTING ENLARGI}IG Prompt, Quality Service, Moderate Prices. THE REED STUDIO Ortonville Minn. DR. R. D. RIFENBARK j OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN, One block uphill fran Gunderson s Drug Store Vapor-Sulphur Cabinet Treatments (For rheumatism, neuritis, etc.) F. L. BROWN t T.E 00EWELER i i Ortonville, Minnesota 4t FOR TRUCK SERVICE 'and any kind of light and heavy draying Hausauer Bros. PHONE 268 All Orders Given Prompt Attentio A. B. KAIRCflER Attorney at Law  Odd Fellows Building 0rtonville, Minn. DR. F. W. DUNN. Chiropractor ORTONVILLE, MINN. Xray Spinographical Laboratory 12-13-14-15-16 Shumaker Bldg. Col. Wm. Wellendorf AUCTIONEER 30 years' experience. No practic- ing on your property. Call or write me early and get in on an early date. Ortonville, Minnesota J: A. JOHNSON PIANO TUNING. AND REPAIRING PHONES---Residee. 14 Furnlture Store- 88 All Work Guaranteed Ortonville, Mhmmota.  ,--- .... WILL FINCH Experienced laintr Phone 235-L All Work Guaranteed JOHN MALMQUIST Interior Demratlng and Artistie Sign Painting Phone 2-L OrtonviHe, Mhmeta. ELMER SALSBURY al'HE WELL DIGGEI Fifteen Years' Experinm Ortonville, Minn.. R.F.D. Illl II mlnllll I I all : , YoU Need Prin.ting We Do Printing Let us get together and b lie OiffOlWRl[ HIKPglIIkeHT /i:ii L 1921 THE oEroNYILLE INDEPENDEN"r PAGE 7 t i* w,,h $3525,2709(; nos,lketa, South Dakota, Nebraska c I MARKET L'I"I'R ,6(,',,e5:" Texas ,461,879,497,-J Kansas. The total val o fan Professi@Ital and -- Nebraska, $4,193,25,242. prty in these states amounts  BIIBiUSS Directory Cattle 5,5o0. I)ryfeds .nmm By far the richest part of the un- $27 984 ,47 351. This is $i0,000000,. 1,500. Market 50c lower, packer Minnet, Iowa, MisSouri No h Da- no s M chin; d Wisonsln. inally steady, gras cattle - try, also, s the west north eent 000 in excess oflhe east north n ra i evenly 25c or more ower. Calve i section, which ineles the states of sechon including Ohio, Indiana, llli- tops $8.OO. Hogs 5,OO0. Market ' TheFarmers - Corner VOYgD ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTMTIES OF FARMERS AND FARMER'S CLUB Hauled Over Country Roads keeping the un, rntly compiled by th CJp States Department ol the the f the 11 i Orchard and Garden I Three msdd shoots a enongh tc dahlia plants, Too Watch for the sond bd Aenate of lead put on a soon  key appear will get them Ge an Teplitz rose in portland, Oregon, h pduced more than 2OO in one on. La clippings make good mu] t? put shout everbearing stwber. rms. Grad is  exllent garden pea both m point of production and qdality. Kp the leaves tied up over uli- flower heads to wh ......... h]ey lead  arh ' rate of nine pats of s,'- ( includinll phur to one lead is rommended for milde on ros. Pennlal flower seed may be sown now. Transplant the " Soon as large envgh to places in'the garden or better et, tc Many ll The common elder, and especial]) the cut-leaved eider made ex]iont growth this spring d we ep. tinnily fine  oamts about the tte of the co ep,.Seed yard during the middle of June. wi]] be September 5-15. millionsf Seed Co Tree Crop Prospects Are Failing Fast d storing I J.E. Kernan, ehalrm of the grai before wahouse ommibsion consin, who has just epleted the following ye. thout the spring wheat selection, moreover, ha ctuding the bet his opinion of Jut3 with short of being alid, ,ooo,ooo bushels of spring wht iv North Dakota, witl se e as a minder thai Seed Corn Time r t0-20. bis year, or the early steady to 25c lower, bulk $8.50 to $i0.50, good and choice pigs $I0.28. Sheep 1,900. Market steady to stng. South St. Paul, Minn., August I, 1921: August opened with an incens- ed supply of ttle he and at lead- ing outskle markets, sen lge n- ters showing n gain of 18,000 or last Monday. Prti]Zy no dryfeds arrived he, the be ng nom- inally steady. Gra cattle met generally slow sale at prices averaging fully 25 cents or mo lor that at lt week's clo. Best Dakota gmss fat steers topped to elty butchers at $7.7, with st load ot going to outMers at $7.0. Bulk of the grass teers suitable for beef purposes ed at $7.OO t $50. Best grs ws and heifers from to ound $7, with the hulk eash1 $3.8O to $8.0. Canners a y little ose el]ing fm $2.OO to $3.5O. BoJogna bulls sold fm $3.25 to $4.5O. A 50c cat n veals placed paoker tops at 8. seconds mostly $5. Desirable heavy feeders went mostly  from $4 to $. stock teers large/y $3 to $5. with "dog" do to $2.5O Hng opened steady to lower, range $3.0C to $I0.90, hulk $8.0 to $I0.50. good and ehoiee pigs $10.26. Bulk good native lambs $3.5O at $8.76, good and chniee ewes $3.5O at $,00, fairly ood Montana yearlin and two-year- old wethers averang S9 pounds at Minnesota Fifth I Richest Farming State Minnesota is'the fifth Hehest fa- ng state in the unton, aecordi s to Farm, St Panl, fm the census hu- figu*s lust reived at Univelty rea The total worth of all farm I pperty in Minnesota, according I these fignr is $8,787.420,118, Only  rieher. These are Iowa, whose fan proper- MAKE YOUR CHOICE A .)c]co.Light certainly is a big help on the farm. Eleetrielty is so much more cleaner, safer d enrichment than oil Ips," This is what Mrs. Win. 14erkelman, EIwond, Iowa, writes. AIso "The benefits we d pays o the astio  Wr r Cata & BARR, Dealer THERE'S A SATISFIED USER NEAR YOU Attention Dairymen WE ARE PAYING FOR BUTTERFAT UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE SPECIAL PREMIUM FOR SWEET CREAM" Ortonvill00 Ice (ream b Buttff (o, "Pfluegers don't make all the ice cream but they make the best." ?figure several million short of the govemet's 35,00,000. In Menta of the pub]i to the f filng is good he Iook for a p. ' when "there is a d spo - maturity too fast, Mr. McKean de-  ....... . ............................... 0. If its anything a hat e d em D y eather ha hed graJ t '  '  .............. "Mechanical" pnrt of many to feel that] elated; black rust 1 nlImly destroy- . ........... h  ......... . ............... d, .... and you think /  . N. he been stated [mirably valley has atady been rly ined I M. Ranch, who ave such in large sections. He found good tries board, in the Jvy hum- generally light ........... : of  .......................... it cannot be  [ J-'l \\; ,  ...... =th,.  -- done take it  } [  \\; ( hall detrny o r o wn ag ri" ] Can't Meet Call For dlstntlv and pcaHou  e conoml Teachers lt]r' ......... ........... "id Univ:rs[:Yeentim:cesd[::le::'th' " H lr t'wJel 1 Thefarmg .... Juy l, 920 d July 1, 1921 - S drtve their tahty and glade, high, anti normal schools, col . . . v que s for teachers ir :vetr nmned f the 1 ...... d universities, i ..... hl No shop in this see- k   M ] 'ex mpove TM ed an- to s6pply just'34 tethers with the ................ O eeef ..................... ti ....... plete in ] ____ / unatelligenee Only the thi d I E" s emanc. .,ght of these ,e ..................... fd .... I  i [ I er Will . xp n were mexperien, mechanical equip- maln tn' or seek' eed tehel'" The averag tary al ment or manned by [ n unle agriculture ) wleh hose teache we pld was a of being pursued with $1,350 nually, or a total for %he 34 'r: * do, Illlnoish Kans, Michigan, Men. ent and adequate m- of $45,900 annndly ' more expert mechan- -- Hen to bitter and The arge number of quests fo its. , Horse-lovers will be given fl real treat I h the farer is to dry teaehe me fm Minneta, 197 thls year at the horse show of the o eontamlntte the vtal The nex Iges fran Iowa and Sout d fthe, ........ .'. ......................... A S HALLS MINNESOTA STATE FAIR f, is the ason tot ana, Nebraska, North Dakota Okla 0n ded attitude toward theJhoma, Ohio, Pennay ..... Utah, vi September 3, to 10 . , Circles the farmerBoos t. *tday' l Wymtng.g n a, Wisconsln, Whington, and i he Prke of Eggs ],  I] eire]en Bnslle town- pH flliun..Y thWe will pay the fllflinwing .... ....... pecor ........ [111 II n June, showed that me-' OIII lr $6.00 to $100 per t eiving 26 ets per dozen Coper and heavy Bmm4 o 8 atand" 19 cents a dozen, in O d Ra  nt peround. ger domed for eggs to I et  Petmd. spPIY - Pipe Fitting Br Geede, w a -- llin[ avid H rrled in ..... as, weree- Ortolwi]]e . u.s,o.. ...... I[J., Foundry II "y Fair at a mting ' . W.F. MULLICA, Pp. Phone ht.--[l]  Every Respect- aya the Good Judge You get more genuine chew* ; a ingsadsfaetionfromtheHeal Tobacco Chew than you ever ' got from the ordlnary kind. The good tobacco taste 1 lasts go Iong--a small chew of this class of tobacco lasts . "much longer than a big chew. .. oi the old kind. That's why : it costs legs to use. Any man who has used both kinds will tell you that. P tsObs FOR SALE BY Pioneer Store C000perative Company RIGHT JT is s short-cut tobem C. E. SIGLOH [or [xpert SERVICE WIRING REPAIRING Pbe S,I.L Ort)ill Mlnn, JOE BAYER & SON Of the Ortonville Tailnring Co* All kinds o etdng d pssing atly do. Stdt Made to Order. Ortvill Minn. JOHN SPANYERS 1 Light Hauling of all Kinds Er0re aa Baggage Telephone 287 Ortvlle. Minn. PAUL DIRNBAUER Brick Layer and Phster Ste M and All Finds of Cemet Wk. Ortvill. Minn, , it . F. D, PETERSON & SON Dray Li Ig Stone Lae Ice Phone 38 Ortanvlne, Milts, AHTAH PUDER All Kinds af Pltertag attd Stueeo Were. Big Stone ely, 8. M PalI'1N q LARGIN Prompt, qoalily Service, Me4erate THE REED STUDIO Or tonqe Mian, DR. R. D. RIFENBARK OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN One blk u roll fror Gundersu' o Store For thematic, neufi, eta) F. L. HlWN THE 3EWELER Or tonville. Minta FOR TRUCK SERVICE 'and y kind of fit ad heavy draying , Hatsaner Bros. PHONE 288 AH Orders Gv Prompt Attentn A. R. KAmCflER Anoraey tt La Odd lloa Ba OrenvlUe, Min DR. F. W. DUNN. Chiropractor ORTONVILLF MINN. Xlty Slogtphitl Leberatet T 12-13-14-15-16 Sumake al Col. Win. WeUendorf AUCTIONEER 80 years' exltritm. No e* write me eaHy d get Ia en early dat Ortvllle. MInu*eta J. A. Jotso PIANO TUNIP AbrD REPA1RLNG PHONES---ltes'tsm . 154 Fe,,aar* Stere . tS All Work Guaranteed Or tmvla Mk,amete. WILL FINCH Eerteace tait  All Work Guarteed JOHN MALMQUIST aterks tia aml Arthttle Sign Paintla s Pbmm L Otevine, EIJ4ER SAI.SBURy "THE WIgLL DIC.g a' I'lfleea Year ]gzpedua You Need Printing We De Printing Bit lelllt[ Illllql AUGUST 4, 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT i PAGE 7 The Farmers Corner DIYOTED ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF FARMERS AND FARMER'S CLUBS. Tonnage Hauled Over Country Roads necessity o---O-fkeeping the coun n in good condition is show report recently compiled by the uOf Markets and Crop Esti- nited States Department of showing the extent to are used in hauling farm to market. According to the which shows the tonnage of hauled on country roads, g the yearly average for the t from 1915 to 1919, there were of these 11 crops hauled for acres of land. The average f the 11 crops hauled on each year for the period amounted to 86,560,000 11 crops referred to in the are corn, wheat, oats, barley, flaxseed, cotton (including potatoes, and cultiva- Time Is --Date Changed Will serve as a reminder that Time is drawing near. For Years Seed Corn Time has 10-20. This year, on the early season and the state of the corn crop,Seed Will be September 5-15. of Seed Corn Time put millions of dollars of farmers of Mnne a farmer has to thank in selecting and storing Orchard and Garden i Three main shoots are enough to leave on dahlia plants. Too many shoots make small flowers. Watch for the second brood of cur- rant wom. Arsenate of lead put on as soon as they appear will get them. Gruss an Teplitz rose in Portland, Oregon, has produced more than 200 flowers in one season. Lawn clippings make good mulch to put about everbearing strawber- ries. Gradus is an excellent garden pea  both from point of production and qdality. Keep the leaves tied up over cauli- flower heads if you would have white heads. Powdered sulphur and arsenate of lead at the rate of nine parts of sul- phur to one lead is recommended for mildew on roses. Perennial flower seed may be sown now. Transplant the seedlings as soon as large enough to sheltered places in "the garden or better yet, to a cold frame. Many will bloom next year. The common elder, and especially the cut-leaved elder made excellent growth this spring amd were excep- tionally fine as ornaments about the yard during the middle of June. Crop Prospects Are Failing Fast J. E. Kernan, chairman of the grain before time for killirg and warehouse commission of Wis- Iin,, hmt .entemberl consin, who has just completed a trip o " ar nruout tne spring wheat states, in- god crop the following ye . , .......... ra selection- moreover, hasl cmamg rne oest pars o vonmna, Lhe corn belt far northward, declares his opinion that government eref 3re has become a stanle/crop estimates of July 1 will fail far :innq.sota, and with the in- short of being rea]ized. -4-nstead of t L- ' ............... ] 80,000,000 bushels of spring wheat in lie tlVeS:OCK ln(tul,ry [t - th ....... ' ......... n 2 North' Dakota, he looks for not over SilO, 1[ Will U2 J[IOl- , U d. 65,000,000; and in Minnesota he would and the Public. of the publii to the the public's dependence on are things that need era- when there is a disposi- part of many to feel that is asking too much. The been stated admirably M. Baruch, who gave such service as chairman of the stries board, in the July hum- Atlantic Monthly. destroy our own agri- and extend-our sources distantly and precarious- not see to it that our are jbell and fairly paid services. The farm gives men as well as food, their vitality and renewed from the exports intelligence and unintelligence. Only the geades of mentality and will remain on, or seek, unless agriculture is of being pursued with and adequate cam- Hence to (mbitter and the farmer is to dry contaminate the vital f the nation .... flourish or decline with brief, is the reason for attitude toward the of the farmer today. ' 0 Circles Boost The Price of Eggs circle in Burnsvilte town- county, according to its j " une, showed that mem- 26 cents per dozen local merchants were and 19 cents a dozen in is more, the egg circle larger demand for eggs supply. Fair Dates Set. 20, 21, 22, 23, were de- as the dates for the i921 Fair at a meeting l board Monday night.! lews. , ! figure several million short of the government's 35,000,000. In Montana, if filling is good he looks for a p- sible crop of 25,000,000. Dry weather has rushed grain to maturity too fast, Mr. McKernan de- clared; black rust s already destroy- ing many fields; while the Red River valley has already been nearly ruined in large sections. He found good rye in sections hu oats and wheat generally light. Can't Meet Call For Home Economics Teachers !' The home economics division of the University of Minnesota, between July 1, 1920, and July 1, 1921, re- ceived 254 requests for teachers in grade, high, and normal schools, col- leges, and universities. It was able to supply just'34 teachers with the degree of Bachelor of Science to meet this demand. Eight of these were experienced and 26 were inexperien- ced teachers. The average salary at which these teachers were placed was $1,350 annually, or a total for the 34 of $45,900 annuLlly. The largest number of requests for teachers came from Minnesota, 197. The next largest from Iowa and South Dakota, 11 each. Other requests came from Alabama, Arizona, Flori- da, Illinois, Kansas, Michigan, Mon- tana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Okla- homa, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Utat, Vir- ginia, Wisconsin, Washington, and Wyoming. i , i We will pay the following prices for junk: Ola Iron, $6.00 to $10.00 per ton Copper and heavy Brass,4c to 8c per pound. Old Rags, cent per pound. Old Rubbers anb Tires, cent to I cent per pound. Pipe Fittings, Brass Goods, Belting and Hose carried in stock. Acetylene Welding. "The Ortonville Found W. F. MULLICA, Prop. Phone 23 rl Every Respect" says the Good Judge You get more genuine chew- ing satisfaction from the Real Tobacco Chew than you ever got from the ordinary kind. The good tobacco taste lasts so long--a small chew of this class of tobacco lasts "much longer than a big chew. of the old kind. That's why it costs less to use. , Any man who has used both kinds will tell you that. Pat ul) i two tles is a long fine-cut tobacco RIGHT GUT is a short-cut tobacco MARKET LE'I'TEI( Cattle 5,500. I)ryfeds nomm- inally steady, grass cattle un- evenly 25c or more lower. Calve 1,500. Market 50c lower, packer tops $8.00. Hogs 5,000. Market steady to 25c lower, bulk $8.50 to $0.50, good and choice pigs $10.25. Sheep 1,900. Market steady to strong. I South St. Paul, Minn., August 1, I 1921: August opened with an increas-I ed supply of cattle here and at lead-.i ing outside markets, seven large cen- ters showing a gain of 18,000 over last Monday. Practically no dryfeds arrived here, these being nom- inally steady. Grass cattle met generally slow sale at prices averaging fully 25 cents or more lower that at last week's close. Best Dakota grass fat steers topped to , city butchers at $7.75, with bst load lot going to outsiders at $7.50. Bulk of the grass steers suitable for beef purposes cashed at $7.00 to $5.50. Best grass cows and heifers from $6 to around $7, with the bulk cashing i from $3.50 to $5.50. Canners and l cutters sustained relatively little toss, selling from $2.00 to $3.50. Bologna bulls sokl from $3.25 to $4.50. A 50c cut in veals placed packer tops at $8. seconds mostly $5. Desirable heavy feeders went mostly from $4 to $6, stock steers largely $3 to $5, with "(logs" down to $2.50. Hogs opened steady to lower, range $8.00 to $10.90, bulk $8.50 to $10.5'9, good and choice pigs $10.25. Bulk good native lambs $8.50 at $8.75, good and choice ewes $3.50 at $4.00, fairly ' good Montana yearling and two-year- old wethers averaging 99 pounds at $6.00. Minnesota Fifth Richest Farming State Minnesota is'the fifthrichest farm- ing S;ate in the union, according to figures just received at University Farm, St. Paul, from the census bu- reau. The total worth of all farm property in Minnesota, according to these figures is $3,787,420,118. Only four other states are richer. These states are Iowa, whose farm proper- If its anything "Mechanical" and you, think it cannot be done-- take it to Hall's No shop in this sec- tion so complete in mechanical equip- ment or manned by more expert mechan- ics. , A. S. HALLS Ortonville ty is worth $8,525,270,956; Illinois, 6,66(i,t t',235;" Texas 54,461,579,497,- Nebraska, $4,193,825,242. By far the richest part of the coun- try, also, is the west north centrm section, which inchules the states of Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, North Da- kota, South Dakota, Nebraska, and l * Kansas. The total value ofi farm property in these states amounts :u $27,984,547,351. This is $10,000,000,- 000 in excess of the east north central I : section, including Ohio, Indiana, Illi- nois, Michigan, and Wisconsin. MAKE YOUR CHOICE ")elco-Light certainly is a big help on the farina. Electricity is so much more cleaner, safer and convenignt than oil lamps." This is what Mrs. Wm. Herkelmaan, Elwood, Iowa, writes. Also, "The benefits we de- rive from Delco-Light more than pays for the installation." Write for Catalog S. A. BARR, Dealer THERE'S A SATISFIED USER NEAR YOU ttention Dairymen ii lullll i iiii iiii i iI WE ARE PAYING FOR BUTTERFAT UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE SPECIAL PREMIUM FOR SWEET CREAM t I i ii ill i ii i i ii ii Ort0nville I(e :ream & Butter 0,. "Pfluegers don't make all the ice cream but they nmke the best." roll Ill illl II I ill Ill II Horse-lovers will be given a real treat this year at the horse show of the MINNESOTA STATE FAIR September 3 to 10  , Illll I I II I Illl II I child can l out a PICTORIAL REVIEW P?ITTERN , with the help of the Patented Cutting and Construction Guides furnished free with every Pictorial Revie Pattern L a rr 2 f Each piece of the pattern is perforated with identi/ying letter m cotvesltgl with the httem shown oa the Cutting Guide FOR SALE BY Pioneer St0000]'e Co=Operative Company Professional and Business Directory C. E. SIGLOH For Expert W,00,00oSERVIcEELECTRIC REPAIRING Phone 284-L Ortonville, Minn. JOE BAYER & SON Of the Ortonville Tailoring Co. All kinds of cleaning and pressing neatly done. Suits Made to Order. Ortonville, Minn. | Light Hauling of all Kinds t " / Express and Baggage ] elephone 287 Ortonville, Minn. 1 PAUL DIRNBAUER Brick Layer and Plasterer Stone Mason and All Kinds of Cement Work. Ortonville, Minn. R.F.D. PETERSON & SON rD ay Line Big Stone Lake Ice Phone 38 Ortonville, Minn. ARTAH PUDER All Kinds of Plastering and Stucco Work. Big Stone City, S. Dak. Kodak o00,.o PRINTING ENLARGI}IG Prompt, Quality Service, Moderate Prices. THE REED STUDIO Ortonville Minn. DR. R. D. RIFENBARK j OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN, One block uphill fran Gunderson s Drug Store Vapor-Sulphur Cabinet Treatments (For rheumatism, neuritis, etc.) F. L. BROWN t T.E 00EWELER i i Ortonville, Minnesota 4t FOR TRUCK SERVICE 'and any kind of light and heavy draying Hausauer Bros. PHONE 268 All Orders Given Prompt Attentio A. B. KAIRCflER Attorney at Law  Odd Fellows Building 0rtonville, Minn. DR. F. W. DUNN. Chiropractor ORTONVILLE, MINN. Xray Spinographical Laboratory 12-13-14-15-16 Shumaker Bldg. Col. Wm. Wellendorf AUCTIONEER 30 years' experience. No practic- ing on your property. Call or write me early and get in on an early date. Ortonville, Minnesota J: A. JOHNSON PIANO TUNING. AND REPAIRING PHONES---Residee. 14 Furnlture Store- 88 All Work Guaranteed Ortonville, Mhmmota.  ,--- .... WILL FINCH Experienced laintr Phone 235-L All Work Guaranteed JOHN MALMQUIST Interior Demratlng and Artistie Sign Painting Phone 2-L OrtonviHe, Mhmeta. ELMER SALSBURY al'HE WELL DIGGEI Fifteen Years' Experinm Ortonville, Minn.. R.F.D. Illl II mlnllll I I all : , YoU Need Prin.ting We Do Printing Let us get together and b lie OiffOlWRl[ HIKPglIIkeHT /i:ii