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The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
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August 4, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
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August 4, 1921
 

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PAGE $ THE ORTONYILLE INDEPENDENT THURSDAY, AUGUST o WANT ADS ] OUNDwA pair of tire chains. Own- er cm get same by calling at this offme and paying for notice. 10-1-c HEM STITCHINCr--Have installed .Hem Stitching Machine at the home ,of Mrs. Cochra, formerly the Bentley house, on Second street. rice 10 and 15 cents per yard. AI- ;so ready to do repair work on all i:makes of sewing machines. Agency ifor the Singer machines. For hem stitching and repair work Call 329. A. L. Waddans. 5-tf-c. BARGAIN SHOE SALF_,---All Wear- .U-Well $7.98 shoes reduced to $5.98. Other lines reduced special for this sale. A.C. Saeger. FOR SAA nearly new piano at a bargain. Terms if necessary. Mar- tin Schoen, Ortonville. 8-4-c FOR SALEsLadies&apos; and Gents' Tail- ored Suits for sale at the City Tail- or Shop. *12-tf F.OR SALE--One regular truck com- bination grain and cattle rack, one "truck grain box, and one 12-20 Hei- tier tractor complete with one John Deere trigle plow, in A-No.-1 con- dition. Inquire at S & S garage, : Clinton, Minn. "13-2 OR SALE--Household furniture for sale. Phone 1250J-5. "13-1 :FOR SALE---Make ne an offer on the NEI of Section 12, twp. 121, range ; 46, located 3 miles east of Orton- vile. 160 acres.. Address N. G. " Lindgren, Berthold, N.D. "13-6 :FOR SALE--Ford Sedan, in practi- cally new condition. Inquire Ed. Gowan, Korner Kafe, Ortonville. "13-1 ]LOST--Eastman folding autographic *Kodak, uses size 116 film. Finder notify Mrs. L D. Davies, Peninsula, or call Independent office. Prob- ably lost between Peninsula and de- pot. 13-1 UITS---If you're in'need of clothes ask for Mr. Dutton or H. A. Hurley ,at the Columbian hotel, and order a good tailor made suit for the small sum. of $23.50. Satisfaction guaranteed. See them and save numey. 13-1 OR RENT One quarter section of land, three miles from Graceville, with buildings. Splendid. farm Inquire of L. A. Kaercher, Orton- ville, Minn. VCANTEDParties having land they wish plowed should write Box 594, Ortonville. I have a tractor with plows that I would like to keep busy. 13-3 A N T E DLadies' and Gents' clothes to clean and press. City Tailor Shop. A. W. Young, pro- prtetor. *12-tf Co-operative Grain Out- let Assurred In Europe " Continued "Feelers" and inquires rom European countries for large :uantities of grain direct from grow- ers in the United States, indicate that the organized farmers will have lit- tle difficulty in finding a good market for their 1921 crop and all these in- quires are coupled with the state- xnent to the effect that arrangements or payment can be made satisfactory 1to the seller. This means, that altho urope is "bankrupt" as the common .aying is, her financiers and political ]eaders are expecting to be prepared o pay for the food products they buy in this country. ..... The Equity Co-operative Exchange ]has a large file of correspondence of reliable character along the line of export demand and the supplying of export facilities to the farmer organ- zations that desire to export grain. hquiry is from Seandlnavian coun- tries, Poland, Austria and perhaps ome from oher sections thru agents ,who have not revealed the countries aking the inquiries. Reformatory Sentence for Youths. Albln Smith, 19 years old, Charles ]Leach, 18 years, and Elson Munger, j17 :years, brought to Morris charged with }burglary i nthe third degree of the elleseth store at Norcross on Novem- ber 10, plead guilty in district court loefore Judge S. A. F! 'shety Monday fternoon. All three were sentenced to the State Refomnatory at St. Cloud for terms not fixed by the coup, but vhich the law prescribes shall not e;- ceed five years George Munger, 20 Tears, and Rose Munger, 47 years, -aother of Etson ahd George Munger, leaded guilty to the offense of know- ngly receiving stolen goods. The son svas sentenced to a term not to exceed three years at the State Reformatory nd the other was given a fine of 150 or in default of payment four vnonths in the common jail of Grant ounty. All five sentenced live nea qorcross. Withthe arrest and conviction of TneSe five the mystery surrounding a %arge ,number of robberies which took )}e i this territory at Morris. El- - mw Lake, Tintah and Norcross is ap- !aremt]y solved. --Mrris Tribune. An Observant Man. . She---"You men don't know a thing out cooking. Now, how would you dtress a chicken ?" H:-'With a fur collain summer, md pumps and silk stockings in win r:  ---The Ads are newsyread them. LEGION BOXING CARNIVAL MAKES HIT WITH FANS (Continued from page 1) wood, two local men of the 155 pound class, satisfied the fans with four :.unds in which both swung some cad packed mits. Their first round ..as not sensational tho Hausauer anded some heavy blows. They mix- ed good at the beginning of the sec- ond, with honors about even During he last part of it they took tlfings easy. After a third round which much resembled the second, the men showed he fans a time in the final go. Both got in some good-blows, Hausauer rocking Oswood with one to the jaw. Hausauer was the agressive during this session, and made theround fast. Tho Oswood had the advantage o longer reach, Hausauer had the bet- tel" of things all the way. He sent his blows in with lightning speed, and they all carried a weighty argu- ment with them. Joe Petrick of Ortonville and "Smil- ing Brother" Condit of Clinton gave an exhibition that according to the opinion of fans was the favorite of the preliminaries. The round opened briskly with Condit sparring for an opening, and Petrick taking things cautious. Condit connected with a few to the face ,tho only one or two had anything behind them, while Pe- trick drove ome to the face, together with some mean hooks to the bod. Condit took them all with a smile. During the second round they clincheo a couple of times, but did some good mixing. The third round was slow for the most part Both went into the fourth with a determination to check up as many counters as possible b-, fore the end. Petrick was driving at Condit's body, and landed a hard one in the pit of the stomach. Con- dit was showing signs of ennui by this time, and a roll of fat in the region of his bent was not helping his speed any. They had some lively encoun- ters, and staged a couple of close-up mixes that pleased the fans. Petric had the margin during the greater part of the four rounds. His foot- work, together with his showing as a two arm scrapper with both the body and head as his target, made a good impre:$ ion with the crowd. Fans were impatient to see what was in store for them in the main go, and greeted the principals, Gordon Eldred of this place ann Harry "Kid" Hale of Fargo with a good applause. This bout, the account of which is cov- ered round by round, seemed to be too scientific for the fans who re- sponded better to the swash-buckling tactics of the preliminaries. There was too much clinching in their judg- ments and epithets they threw at the fighters during almost all of the six rounds did indicate that they wanted more mixing. Both men put up a good exhibition, but it failed to wm the hearts of the crowd as did the preliminaries. Fight By Rounds. First Round.--Hale opened the go with a left to the jaw, and ducked one to the head. They fell into a clinch, Eldred landing a light one on the back of the head as they broke. Eldred slipped a left to he jaw, and they clinched. Eldred got an easy right to the face and blocked one to the stomach. Hale sent across a fast one, getting Eldred on the nose, and drawing blood. Eldred retaliated with one to the face. Hale ducked a wide awing. The men were going at a fairly good speed during the entire round. Second Round.Eldd ,missed two drives at the face, and they sparred into a clinch. Hale placed two lefts on Eldred's jaw,-*and received one for the two. Hale hit Eldred on thee mouth with a fast one, and scored two. jabs on the jaw. Eldred landed his best blow of this round when he sent across a lightning left to the face. Hale misses a left swing. Third Round.The opening gun in the third rouffd was a left that Hale landed- The men clinched, and Eldred flashed in a fast left to the face as they broke. Hale hooked him in the body with a right, and they clinched again. Hale rushed Eldred when they broke but failed to land any substan- tial blows. Eldred presented Hate with one to the jaw. Both men spar- red for an openihg. Eldredslipped when he stepped off the edge of the canvass, and fell into the ropes. Hale landed .one on the jaw. They were segrated from a clinch just as the round ended. Fourth Round.---At the sound of the gong, Hale rushed EIdred in his own corner and showered him with blows on the face and body. It did not seem to effect Eldred to any extent and he retaliated with a right to the body as hie answer. ale missed one to the hesd, but oed a follow-up to de head, and a fast hook to the body, and they clinched- Eldred landed a peedy right to the jaw that ,drew  b!ood, nd they clinched again. Hale ,an.led  rigl;t and left to the face as they broke, and they went into anoflmr ctinch with only a few sec- onds of the round left Fifth Round.Both men jumped to tl e;r feet at the sound of the gong and met in the center; of tlle fng. I:ldred missed a right;but absorbed a hard left to the jaw. He returns one but misses,the second. Referee Zwiener0had trouble keeping the men from hugging, as they went into an- other clinch as soon as he parfl them. Etdred hooked Hale with a right to the body that left a red outlin The men were posing during the Iast seconds of the round. Sixth Round,--Both fighters were tired as they started the final round. They held each other off, Waiting for an opening, and Eldred was first to ORTONVILLE WINS FROM MADISON BY 4 TO 2 SCORE Timely Hitting In Sixth, With ,Triple, Nets Locals Four Runs--Fans See Good Game. After dropping the first three games of the season, the Ortonville team put new life, spiced with good judgment and timely hitting, into their play and won from Madison 4 to 2 in the game played here at Kaercher Park last Sunday. Madison played errorless ball while Ortonville booted five times, but an advantage of eight hits, coming when they counted was too much of a coun- t:erbalance, and Madison could do nothing but take defeat. The visitors fought hard until the final inning, and it was not until then that they put across their only scores of the game. It was the sixth that provided fire- works that gave Ortonville the win- ning four runs. Only in two other innings did the locals advance a man to third base, otherwise they conten- ted themselves for the ,most part with getting men on bases. Grice's three base hit with the bases loaded broke th deadlock, and started Madison tobogganing. Isler, Corneli- Minnesota's Wealth Present and Prospective (By State Auditor R. P. Chase) DO YOU KNOW That Uncle Sam gave the State Acres For common schools ................ 2,976,454 For a university ...................... 91,524 For internal improvement ...... 496,482 Swamp or overflowed lands....4,709,038 Other lands .............................. 172,463 A total of ........................ 8,445,961 That every cent ever received from the sale of land or timber or from royalty on iron ore is still in these funds. That the common school fund now amounts to $32,670,710.69. That the iron ore now under lease will add not less than $30,584,000. That much valuable land, timber and mineral belonging to this fund romains unsold and' unased. That the university permanent fund contains $2,079,217.87. That iron ore now leased will add not lbss than $2,000,000. That much valuable land, timbe and mineral belonging to the univer- sity remains unsold or unleased. That the swamp land fund amounts to $7,756,708.04. That swamp land minerals now un- der lease will add not less than $7,- 222,000. That from one iron ore lease cover- ing a lake bed the state will receive not less than $1,500,000. That there are several other lake., having enormous tonnages of ore in their beds not under lease. son, and Miller, batting in that order, That there is much timber and rain- had each hit safely, and they were oc- eral on swamp lands not sold or under cupying the paths when Grice came lease to bat. He came in when Petrick That there are millions of acres of singled, nonagricultural land in the state tim- Madison scored in the ninth, two er- rors being largely instrumental in al- lowing them to do the work. Grice had two strike-onts to his credit in this inning, and only one hit against him, but loose fielding enabled Madi- son to send the two men across. Grice on the mound for the Orion- rifle team was the star of the day. In addition to striking out nine men, he took honors with the stick, poling out three safe hits in four trips to the bat. One of these was his triple that brought in three scores, another being a double in the eighth inning. He pitched air tight ball and did not allow a free trip n balls. Petrick shared in the honors of the day, show- ing great form at the bat. He is credited with three hits in five times to bat, one of his hits being a triple. Next Sunday the Ortonville team will battle with the fast Marietta team. Marietta has been travelling in speedy company this season, and is representS] by a strong team. The score and summary Madison'-- AB R H PO A E E. Hoihjelle, If ........ 4 0 0 3 0 0 Markussen, rf ........ 4 1 1 1 1 0 Lee, 3b .................... 4 0 0 1 1 0 Nelson, c .................. 4 1 0 7 0 0 L. Hoihjelle, lb ...... 4 0 0 8 0 0 J. Wieberg, ss ........ 4 0 2 3 3 0 Lilliskov, 2b ............ 4 0 0 1 0 0 L. Wieberg, p ........ 3 0 1 0 3 0 Gjerdahl, cf ............ 3 0 1 0 0 0 Totals .................. 34 "2 5 24 7 0 Ortonville--- AB R H PO A E Petrick, 3b .............. 5 0 3 0 3 1 Zwiener, lb ............ 3 0 1 10 0 0 Wiley, c .................... 4 0 0 10 1 0 Kelly, ss .................. 4 0 1 0 0 2 ]sler, 2b 3 1 1 ,3 3 1 Cornelisen, lf .......... 4 1 2 2 0 0 Miller, cf ................ 4 1 2 2 0 0 Griee, p .................... 4 1 3 0 3 0 Bertelson, rf .......... 4 0 0 0 0 0 Totals .................. 35 4 13 27 10 4 Score by Innings-- Madison-- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2--2 Ortonville-- 0 0 0 4} 0 4 0 0 x--4 SummaryTwo base hits, Grice; three base hits, Grice and Petrick. Stolen bases, Petrick. Sacrifice hits, Zwiener. Struck out, by Grice 9, by Wieberg 7. Bases on balls, Wieberg to Isler; Grice none. Balk, Wieberg. Umpires: Levitt and Schoen. count, sending a right to the chin. Hale missed two swings, but connect- ed with the third. He followed this wii a right to the side of the head. oth exchanged blows to the face, Hale backed Eldred to ropes, and then misseo an uppercut that would have made him see pink elephants if it funded, but it didn't.  Eldred missed a slow swing, but made good a right to the side of the head. Referee Zwiener was puffing hard at the close of the round, after having broken clinch after clinch in spite of his warnings. LOCAL MARKET. (Thursday, August 4, 1921) Springs, 1 Ibs. and up ........ 20c Hens, general run .................... 16c Cox . .............................................. 10c Ducks ............................................ 1c Geese ............................................ 7c Eggs, per doz., .......................... 25c Cream .......................................... 42e Sweet Cream .............................. 45c Farmers Elevator and Fuel Company Wheat, 57 pounds .................... $1,.28 Barley, . .................................... 30-40 Oats ...: ..................................... 23 Rye ............................................. 87 Flax .......................................... 1.77 --"Try a Want Ad" is the command that the experienced friend gives you when a valued article i lost. --Them is no time to be lost--read The Idependent Want Ads m)w. admirably located and adapted to ber culture. That an acre planted to spruce or other forest trees will in the courm of a few years yield a return almost equal to that of arable land. That geologists declare 4.44 per cent of the earth's crust to be com- posed of iron That iron is the most useful as wel as the most abundant of all metals. That civilization could get along without gold useful as it is, but would perish if bereft of iron. That only a few eentur//es ag, owing to its rarity, steel was a royal etal. Today it is used by every man, woman and child in the land. That during the past century the production of s.teel has grown at a pace bordering the romantic. That in 1810 the U. S. produced 917 gross tons of steel, in 1918, 44,462,432 tons. That the world's annual production in recent years of from 150 to 17a million tons of iron ore the U. S. twice contributed more than 75 mil- lion tons thereto. That during the Wolrd War, Minne- sota producel and shipped a.s high a 45 million tons in one year, and in 1920 forwarded over 40 million ton. That during several seasons in re- cent years her shipments have been 60 per cent of the total output in the U. S.; one year over 62 per cent. That the manufacture of iron and steel products is the mightiest indus- try in America. That it has become the acknow- ledged barometer of the land's com- mercial and financial status. That the basis of this stupendous industry is the high grade iron or deposits of the Lake Superior Dis- trict, the great bulk of which at,, found in the Minnesota ranges. That the billion tons, shipped from the Lake Superior district since it development, 555 million tons thereof have come from the Mesabi, the greatest of the three Minnesota ranges; and it is, so to say, the back- bone of the steel industry in the U. S. That the total state tax on above was $1,614,026. That the state gross earnings tax on iron ore shipments amount in 1920 to $2,000,000. That Minnesota on May 1, 192.0 had 1,341,671,638 tons of merchantable iron ore within its borders. That about 12 per cent of this to- tal is located on state-owne lands and belongs to the people of this com- monwealth. That from state-owned mines last season there were shipped six million I IPAI ANO WARH--To .6UARD I N the summertime some folks take it easy and call it picnic weather while others who are providing for their future com- forts in life say that it is the ideal time to bild. You will know that this is the Ideal place to buy lumber after you once have become acquainted with oar merchandise and our busi. iess methods. Geier Lumber Co. tons of ore, under a rolalty charge of 25 cents per ton. Bonus That the state on its own lands has 30 opened mines, 22 of which for- warded ore in 1920. . The local post of the That the state owns one mine, the gion have joined forces with Missabe Mountain, covering 160 acres gion have joi\\;.ed forces with " " c - ins'r" .,..  - poses oI me nalon m a ngn: rfllCn on.a , OD m.llllOn cons oi co-, .... , " " l . , med|ate acmn on me Ieaera mercml ore. It shpped 23,555.4131 ........ compensazlon DIlI, ann In a rues tons m 1920. Ths tract alone will[ ........... h . enaors relson ano euogg, i vm|d the sc ool fund $15,000,000 m , ........ e 'oyalty by March 2, 1942. ea luesoay, srong, y urge, n That it h "i ..... port o me measu e. the as many o luon ons ol ........ .... [ Deen reporefl Iavoraoly o the won ore bearing material that mght ....... noor ,anti, ln(llCaLlons were be made valuable by concentration, measure woul pass by a That a concentrator at Babbit, jority until President Harding costing $3,000,000 may render valu- fered and in an address to the able many millions .of tons of now worthless iron bearing rock, incIud- Tuesday urged that it be the committee. It is ing several million tons of school the president's wish in the lands. be respected.--Swift County That Prof. E. K. Soper, formerly of Monitor. he State University declares Minne- sota has 56,835,000,000 tons of fuel peat. That a very large part of this be- longs to the permanent finds of the state. That Minnesota's 10,000 lakes can be made a veritable playground for central United States besides a source of revenue That evidence of gold, silver, cop- per, etc., exists on many state lands. That the proposed Great Lakes to Ocean Canal will bring Minnestota 1500 miles nearer to Europe That Minnesota has many hydro- electric sites undeveloped. That a nine-foot channel in the Mississippi rivemay mean the revival of river traffic to the great benefit of the state. That a complete system of trunk roads as provided by the Babcocx plan, would hasten development of ah resources above mentioned. That a barge canal along the St. Croix River connecting Lake Superior with the Mississippi i sfar from being an idle dream. That such a canal would be of great service to the entire state. Benson Legion Protests Don't Swear When you have fix a tire on the It's better to now to look your over and have cuts and bruises while fixin's good, We Make Them New Again. Merchants To Be Hosts of Farmers. A move-is on foot by Browns Val- ley citizens to give a free moving picture show here once a week to far- mers and their families. It is no thot this free entertainment will b given every Saturday afternoon, al. tho the day may be changed.--Brown Valley Inter-Lake Tribune. Vulcanizin Shop Be Photographed This Year on Your Birthday V HERE GOES Timely Specials For00This 98c Flashlights Small size 2 Cell Nickle Plated Light With Bulls Eye Reflector. $1.39 Large Size 2 Cell Plated Light With Bulls Eye Both these Specials complete $1.10 Kiddie Kars Here's your to get either a 2 or No. 4 Kar at a While they last offer the No. $1.10 and the at $1.75. Re $3.00 and $4.75. Pocket Knives Here you are boys--just what you been looking for. Knives, one and punch, two blades or two anda punch. .Yur Come. ......... Ratchet Screwdrivers One of the handiest household tools. No should be without one. This too] sells re at $1.25 and $1.75. Extra Special, 6-inch ............................................ Extra Special 8-inch ............................................ Ortonvi!le Hardware PAGE $ THE ORTONYILLE INDEPENDENT THURSDAY, AUGUST o WANT ADS ] OUNDwA pair of tire chains. Own- er cm get same by calling at this offme and paying for notice. 10-1-c HEM STITCHINCr--Have installed .Hem Stitching Machine at the home ,of Mrs. Cochra, formerly the Bentley house, on Second street. rice 10 and 15 cents per yard. AI- ;so ready to do repair work on all i:makes of sewing machines. Agency ifor the Singer machines. For hem stitching and repair work Call 329. A. L. Waddans. 5-tf-c. BARGAIN SHOE SALF_,---All Wear- .U-Well $7.98 shoes reduced to $5.98. Other lines reduced special for this sale. A.C. Saeger. FOR SAA nearly new piano at a bargain. Terms if necessary. Mar- tin Schoen, Ortonville. 8-4-c FOR SALEsLadies' and Gents' Tail- ored Suits for sale at the City Tail- or Shop. *12-tf F.OR SALE--One regular truck com- bination grain and cattle rack, one "truck grain box, and one 12-20 Hei- tier tractor complete with one John Deere trigle plow, in A-No.-1 con- dition. Inquire at S & S garage, : Clinton, Minn. "13-2 OR SALE--Household furniture for sale. Phone 1250J-5. "13-1 :FOR SALE---Make ne an offer on the NEI of Section 12, twp. 121, range ; 46, located 3 miles east of Orton- vile. 160 acres.. Address N. G. " Lindgren, Berthold, N.D. "13-6 :FOR SALE--Ford Sedan, in practi- cally new condition. Inquire Ed. Gowan, Korner Kafe, Ortonville. "13-1 ]LOST--Eastman folding autographic *Kodak, uses size 116 film. Finder notify Mrs. L D. Davies, Peninsula, or call Independent office. Prob- ably lost between Peninsula and de- pot. 13-1 UITS---If you're in'need of clothes ask for Mr. Dutton or H. A. Hurley ,at the Columbian hotel, and order a good tailor made suit for the small sum. of $23.50. Satisfaction guaranteed. See them and save numey. 13-1 OR RENT One quarter section of land, three miles from Graceville, with buildings. Splendid. farm Inquire of L. A. Kaercher, Orton- ville, Minn. VCANTEDParties having land they wish plowed should write Box 594, Ortonville. I have a tractor with plows that I would like to keep busy. 13-3 A N T E DLadies' and Gents' clothes to clean and press. City Tailor Shop. A. W. Young, pro- prtetor. *12-tf Co-operative Grain Out- let Assurred In Europe " Continued "Feelers" and inquires rom European countries for large :uantities of grain direct from grow- ers in the United States, indicate that the organized farmers will have lit- tle difficulty in finding a good market for their 1921 crop and all these in- quires are coupled with the state- xnent to the effect that arrangements or payment can be made satisfactory 1to the seller. This means, that altho urope is "bankrupt" as the common .aying is, her financiers and political ]eaders are expecting to be prepared o pay for the food products they buy in this country. ..... The Equity Co-operative Exchange ]has a large file of correspondence of reliable character along the line of export demand and the supplying of export facilities to the farmer organ- zations that desire to export grain. hquiry is from Seandlnavian coun- tries, Poland, Austria and perhaps ome from oher sections thru agents ,who have not revealed the countries aking the inquiries. Reformatory Sentence for Youths. Albln Smith, 19 years old, Charles ]Leach, 18 years, and Elson Munger, j17 :years, brought to Morris charged with }burglary i nthe third degree of the elleseth store at Norcross on Novem- ber 10, plead guilty in district court loefore Judge S. A. F! 'shety Monday fternoon. All three were sentenced to the State Refomnatory at St. Cloud for terms not fixed by the coup, but vhich the law prescribes shall not e;- ceed five years George Munger, 20 Tears, and Rose Munger, 47 years, -aother of Etson ahd George Munger, leaded guilty to the offense of know- ngly receiving stolen goods. The son svas sentenced to a term not to exceed three years at the State Reformatory nd the other was given a fine of 150 or in default of payment four vnonths in the common jail of Grant ounty. All five sentenced live nea qorcross. Withthe arrest and conviction of TneSe five the mystery surrounding a %arge ,number of robberies which took )}e i this territory at Morris. El- -mw Lake, Tintah and Norcross is ap- !aremt]y solved. --Mrris Tribune. An Observant Man. . She---"You men don't know a thing out cooking. Now, how would you dtress a chicken ?" H:-'With a fur collain summer, md pumps and silk stockings in win r:  ---The Ads are newsyread them. LEGION BOXING CARNIVAL MAKES HIT WITH FANS (Continued from page 1) wood, two local men of the 155 pound class, satisfied the fans with four :.unds in which both swung some cad packed mits. Their first round ..as not sensational tho Hausauer anded some heavy blows. They mix- ed good at the beginning of the sec- ond, with honors about even During he last part of it they took tlfings easy. After a third round which much resembled the second, the men showed he fans a time in the final go. Both got in some good-blows, Hausauer rocking Oswood with one to the jaw. Hausauer was the agressive during this session, and made theround fast. Tho Oswood had the advantage o longer reach, Hausauer had the bet- tel" of things all the way. He sent his blows in with lightning speed, and they all carried a weighty argu- ment with them. Joe Petrick of Ortonville and "Smil- ing Brother" Condit of Clinton gave an exhibition that according to the opinion of fans was the favorite of the preliminaries. The round opened briskly with Condit sparring for an opening, and Petrick taking things cautious. Condit connected with a few to the face ,tho only one or two had anything behind them, while Pe- trick drove ome to the face, together with some mean hooks to the bod. Condit took them all with a smile. During the second round they clincheo a couple of times, but did some good mixing. The third round was slow for the most part Both went into the fourth with a determination to check up as many counters as possible b-, fore the end. Petrick was driving at Condit's body, and landed a hard one in the pit of the stomach. Con- dit was showing signs of ennui by this time, and a roll of fat in the region of his bent was not helping his speed any. They had some lively encoun- ters, and staged a couple of close-up mixes that pleased the fans. Petric had the margin during the greater part of the four rounds. His foot- work, together with his showing as a two arm scrapper with both the body and head as his target, made a good impre:$ ion with the crowd. Fans were impatient to see what was in store for them in the main go, and greeted the principals, Gordon Eldred of this place ann Harry "Kid" Hale of Fargo with a good applause. This bout, the account of which is cov- ered round by round, seemed to be too scientific for the fans who re- sponded better to the swash-buckling tactics of the preliminaries. There was too much clinching in their judg- ments and epithets they threw at the fighters during almost all of the six rounds did indicate that they wanted more mixing. Both men put up a good exhibition, but it failed to wm the hearts of the crowd as did the preliminaries. Fight By Rounds. First Round.--Hale opened the go with a left to the jaw, and ducked one to the head. They fell into a clinch, Eldred landing a light one on the back of the head as they broke. Eldred slipped a left to he jaw, and they clinched. Eldred got an easy right to the face and blocked one to the stomach. Hale sent across a fast one, getting Eldred on the nose, and drawing blood. Eldred retaliated with one to the face. Hale ducked a wide awing. The men were going at a fairly good speed during the entire round. Second Round.Eldd ,missed two drives at the face, and they sparred into a clinch. Hale placed two lefts on Eldred's jaw,-*and received one for the two. Hale hit Eldred on thee mouth with a fast one, and scored two. jabs on the jaw. Eldred landed his best blow of this round when he sent across a lightning left to the face. Hale misses a left swing. Third Round.The opening gun in the third rouffd was a left that Hale landed- The men clinched, and Eldred flashed in a fast left to the face as they broke. Hale hooked him in the body with a right, and they clinched again. Hale rushed Eldred when they broke but failed to land any substan- tial blows. Eldred presented Hate with one to the jaw. Both men spar- red for an openihg. Eldredslipped when he stepped off the edge of the canvass, and fell into the ropes. Hale landed .one on the jaw. They were segrated from a clinch just as the round ended. Fourth Round.---At the sound of the gong, Hale rushed EIdred in his own corner and showered him with blows on the face and body. It did not seem to effect Eldred to any extent and he retaliated with a right to the body as hie answer. ale missed one to the hesd, but oed a follow-up to de head, and a fast hook to the body, and they clinched- Eldred landed a peedy right to the jaw that ,drew  b!ood, nd they clinched again. Hale ,an.led  rigl;t and left to the face as they broke, and they went into anoflmr ctinch with only a few sec- onds of the round left Fifth Round.Both men jumped to tl e;r feet at the sound of the gong and met in the center; of tlle fng. I:ldred missed a right;but absorbed a hard left to the jaw. He returns one but misses,the second. Referee Zwiener0had trouble keeping the men from hugging, as they went into an- other clinch as soon as he parfl them. Etdred hooked Hale with a right to the body that left a red outlin The men were posing during the Iast seconds of the round. Sixth Round,--Both fighters were tired as they started the final round. They held each other off, Waiting for an opening, and Eldred was first to ORTONVILLE WINS FROM MADISON BY 4 TO 2 SCORE Timely Hitting In Sixth, With ,Triple, Nets Locals Four Runs--Fans See Good Game. After dropping the first three games of the season, the Ortonville team put new life, spiced with good judgment and timely hitting, into their play and won from Madison 4 to 2 in the game played here at Kaercher Park last Sunday. Madison played errorless ball while Ortonville booted five times, but an advantage of eight hits, coming when they counted was too much of a coun- t:erbalance, and Madison could do nothing but take defeat. The visitors fought hard until the final inning, and it was not until then that they put across their only scores of the game. It was the sixth that provided fire- works that gave Ortonville the win- ning four runs. Only in two other innings did the locals advance a man to third base, otherwise they conten- ted themselves for the ,most part with getting men on bases. Grice's three base hit with the bases loaded broke th deadlock, and started Madison tobogganing. Isler, Corneli- Minnesota's Wealth Present and Prospective (By State Auditor R. P. Chase) DO YOU KNOW That Uncle Sam gave the State Acres For common schools ................ 2,976,454 For a university ...................... 91,524 For internal improvement ...... 496,482 Swamp or overflowed lands....4,709,038 Other lands .............................. 172,463 A total of ........................ 8,445,961 That every cent ever received from the sale of land or timber or from royalty on iron ore is still in these funds. That the common school fund now amounts to $32,670,710.69. That the iron ore now under lease will add not less than $30,584,000. That much valuable land, timber and mineral belonging to this fund romains unsold and' unased. That the university permanent fund contains $2,079,217.87. That iron ore now leased will add not lbss than $2,000,000. That much valuable land, timbe and mineral belonging to the univer- sity remains unsold or unleased. That the swamp land fund amounts to $7,756,708.04. That swamp land minerals now un- der lease will add not less than $7,- 222,000. That from one iron ore lease cover- ing a lake bed the state will receive not less than $1,500,000. That there are several other lake., having enormous tonnages of ore in their beds not under lease. son, and Miller, batting in that order, That there is much timber and rain- had each hit safely, and they were oc- eral on swamp lands not sold or under cupying the paths when Grice came lease to bat. He came in when Petrick That there are millions of acres of singled, nonagricultural land in the state tim- Madison scored in the ninth, two er- rors being largely instrumental in al- lowing them to do the work. Grice had two strike-onts to his credit in this inning, and only one hit against him, but loose fielding enabled Madi- son to send the two men across. Grice on the mound for the Orion- rifle team was the star of the day. In addition to striking out nine men, he took honors with the stick, poling out three safe hits in four trips to the bat. One of these was his triple that brought in three scores, another being a double in the eighth inning. He pitched air tight ball and did not allow a free trip n balls. Petrick shared in the honors of the day, show- ing great form at the bat. He is credited with three hits in five times to bat, one of his hits being a triple. Next Sunday the Ortonville team will battle with the fast Marietta team. Marietta has been travelling in speedy company this season, and is representS] by a strong team. The score and summary Madison'-- AB R H PO A E E. Hoihjelle, If ........ 4 0 0 3 0 0 Markussen, rf ........ 4 1 1 1 1 0 Lee, 3b .................... 4 0 0 1 1 0 Nelson, c .................. 4 1 0 7 0 0 L. Hoihjelle, lb ...... 4 0 0 8 0 0 J. Wieberg, ss ........ 4 0 2 3 3 0 Lilliskov, 2b ............ 4 0 0 1 0 0 L. Wieberg, p ........ 3 0 1 0 3 0 Gjerdahl, cf ............ 3 0 1 0 0 0 Totals .................. 34 "2 5 24 7 0 Ortonville--- AB R H PO A E Petrick, 3b .............. 5 0 3 0 3 1 Zwiener, lb ............ 3 0 1 10 0 0 Wiley, c .................... 4 0 0 10 1 0 Kelly, ss .................. 4 0 1 0 0 2 ]sler, 2b 3 1 1 ,3 3 1 Cornelisen, lf .......... 4 1 2 2 0 0 Miller, cf ................ 4 1 2 2 0 0 Griee, p .................... 4 1 3 0 3 0 Bertelson, rf .......... 4 0 0 0 0 0 Totals .................. 35 4 13 27 10 4 Score by Innings-- Madison-- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2--2 Ortonville-- 0 0 0 4} 0 4 0 0 x--4 SummaryTwo base hits, Grice; three base hits, Grice and Petrick. Stolen bases, Petrick. Sacrifice hits, Zwiener. Struck out, by Grice 9, by Wieberg 7. Bases on balls, Wieberg to Isler; Grice none. Balk, Wieberg. Umpires: Levitt and Schoen. count, sending a right to the chin. Hale missed two swings, but connect- ed with the third. He followed this wii a right to the side of the head. oth exchanged blows to the face, Hale backed Eldred to ropes, and then misseo an uppercut that would have made him see pink elephants if it funded, but it didn't.  Eldred missed a slow swing, but made good a right to the side of the head. Referee Zwiener was puffing hard at the close of the round, after having broken clinch after clinch in spite of his warnings. LOCAL MARKET. (Thursday, August 4, 1921) Springs, 1 Ibs. and up ........ 20c Hens, general run .................... 16c Cox . .............................................. 10c Ducks ............................................ 1c Geese ............................................ 7c Eggs, per doz., .......................... 25c Cream .......................................... 42e Sweet Cream .............................. 45c Farmers Elevator and Fuel Company Wheat, 57 pounds .................... $1,.28 Barley, . .................................... 30-40 Oats ...: ..................................... 23 Rye ............................................. 87 Flax .......................................... 1.77 --"Try a Want Ad" is the command that the experienced friend gives you when a valued article i lost. --Them is no time to be lost--read The Idependent Want Ads m)w. admirably located and adapted to ber culture. That an acre planted to spruce or other forest trees will in the courm of a few years yield a return almost equal to that of arable land. That geologists declare 4.44 per cent of the earth's crust to be com- posed of iron That iron is the most useful as wel as the most abundant of all metals. That civilization could get along without gold useful as it is, but would perish if bereft of iron. That only a few eentur//es ag, owing to its rarity, steel was a royal etal. Today it is used by every man, woman and child in the land. That during the past century the production of s.teel has grown at a pace bordering the romantic. That in 1810 the U. S. produced 917 gross tons of steel, in 1918, 44,462,432 tons. That the world's annual production in recent years of from 150 to 17a million tons of iron ore the U. S. twice contributed more than 75 mil- lion tons thereto. That during the Wolrd War, Minne- sota producel and shipped a.s high a 45 million tons in one year, and in 1920 forwarded over 40 million ton. That during several seasons in re- cent years her shipments have been 60 per cent of the total output in the U. S.; one year over 62 per cent. That the manufacture of iron and steel products is the mightiest indus- try in America. That it has become the acknow- ledged barometer of the land's com- mercial and financial status. That the basis of this stupendous industry is the high grade iron or deposits of the Lake Superior Dis- trict, the great bulk of which at,, found in the Minnesota ranges. That the billion tons, shipped from the Lake Superior district since it development, 555 million tons thereof have come from the Mesabi, the greatest of the three Minnesota ranges; and it is, so to say, the back- bone of the steel industry in the U. S. That the total state tax on above was $1,614,026. That the state gross earnings tax on iron ore shipments amount in 1920 to $2,000,000. That Minnesota on May 1, 192.0 had 1,341,671,638 tons of merchantable iron ore within its borders. That about 12 per cent of this to- tal is located on state-owne lands and belongs to the people of this com- monwealth. That from state-owned mines last season there were shipped six million I IPAI ANO WARH--To .6UARD I N the summertime some folks take it easy and call it picnic weather while others who are providing for their future com- forts in life say that it is the ideal time to bild. You will know that this is the Ideal place to buy lumber after you once have become acquainted with oar merchandise and our busi. iess methods. Geier Lumber Co. tons of ore, under a rolalty charge of 25 cents per ton. Bonus That the state on its own lands has 30 opened mines, 22 of which for- warded ore in 1920. . The local post of the That the state owns one mine, the gion have joined forces with Missabe Mountain, covering 160 acres gion have joi\\;.ed forces with " " c - ins'r" .,..  - poses oI me nalon m a ngn: rfllCn on.a , OD m.llllOn cons oi co-, .... , " " l . , med|ate acmn on me Ieaera mercml ore. It shpped 23,555.4131 ........ compensazlon DIlI, ann In a rues tons m 1920. Ths tract alone will[ ........... h . enaors relson ano euogg, i vm|d the sc ool fund $15,000,000 m , ........ e 'oyalty by March 2, 1942. ea luesoay, srong, y urge, n That it h "i ..... port o me measu e. the as many o luon ons ol ........ .... [ Deen reporefl Iavoraoly o the won ore bearing material that mght ....... noor ,anti, ln(llCaLlons were be made valuable by concentration, measure woul pass by a That a concentrator at Babbit, jority until President Harding costing $3,000,000 may render valu- fered and in an address to the able many millions .of tons of now worthless iron bearing rock, incIud- Tuesday urged that it be the committee. It is ing several million tons of school the president's wish in the lands. be respected.--Swift County That Prof. E. K. Soper, formerly of Monitor. he State University declares Minne- sota has 56,835,000,000 tons of fuel peat. That a very large part of this be- longs to the permanent finds of the state. That Minnesota's 10,000 lakes can be made a veritable playground for central United States besides a source of revenue That evidence of gold, silver, cop- per, etc., exists on many state lands. That the proposed Great Lakes to Ocean Canal will bring Minnestota 1500 miles nearer to Europe That Minnesota has many hydro- electric sites undeveloped. That a nine-foot channel in the Mississippi rivemay mean the revival of river traffic to the great benefit of the state. That a complete system of trunk roads as provided by the Babcocx plan, would hasten development of ah resources above mentioned. That a barge canal along the St. Croix River connecting Lake Superior with the Mississippi i sfar from being an idle dream. That such a canal would be of great service to the entire state. Benson Legion Protests Don't Swear When you have fix a tire on the It's better to now to look your over and have cuts and bruises while fixin's good, We Make Them New Again. Merchants To Be Hosts of Farmers. A move-is on foot by Browns Val- ley citizens to give a free moving picture show here once a week to far- mers and their families. It is no thot this free entertainment will b given every Saturday afternoon, al. tho the day may be changed.--Brown Valley Inter-Lake Tribune. Vulcanizin Shop Be Photographed This Year on Your Birthday V HERE GOES Timely Specials For00This 98c Flashlights Small size 2 Cell Nickle Plated Light With Bulls Eye Reflector. $1.39 Large Size 2 Cell Plated Light With Bulls Eye Both these Specials complete $1.10 Kiddie Kars Here's your to get either a 2 or No. 4 Kar at a While they last offer the No. $1.10 and the at $1.75. Re $3.00 and $4.75. Pocket Knives Here you are boys--just what you been looking for. Knives, one and punch, two blades or two anda punch. .Yur Come. ......... Ratchet Screwdrivers One of the handiest household tools. No should be without one. This too] sells re at $1.25 and $1.75. Extra Special, 6-inch ............................................ Extra Special 8-inch ............................................ Ortonvi!le Hardware IMAGE +MALLIOW"PAPERS mc ALL CO.IE.I COPYR,GHIES ALL R,GHIS RESERVES , 0SE SUSJEClIO UCE.SE AGREEME.I REPROSUCI,O. S,SSEMmAI,O. SlORAGE S,SlR,SUI,O. PROmS,IE0 PAGE $ THE OIrOLPILI INDIDET THURSDAY, AUGUST L o * I LEGION BOXING CARNIVAL [ WANT ADS t I MAKES HIT WITH FANS O # I -- I FOU.--A mr of i china, o-I <cntm.., +,o g. p I e  t b  n atth[ ,ond twoloealmpnottneloSpeund r nge s y g s , office and paying for nnti 10-I-c class, satisfied the fang with four ....... v. ................. unds in which both swung some HEM STITCHING---Have iastalIed had packed mite. Their first und Morn Stitching Maeblne at the ho+ .s not sentionat, tho Hausauer o ready to do palr work on all the last part of it they took tlfigs f Mrs. Coehr. foerly the anded some heavy binw They mix- Bentley hnuse on Second stet, d good at the hpginning of the sec- Frie 10 and 15 cents per yard. AI- ond, with honors about even. During kesofsewlngmaehin. AgenCy easy. Afterathildroundwhlchmueh for the Singer mae2aines. For hem leembled the second, the men showed stltehing aud repair work call 329. he fans a time in the final go. Both ,A L. Wadd 5-ff-e. got in some good blows, Hawser locking Oswood with one to the jaw. IIARGAIN SHOE SALF-AII We Hauuer wgq the ag*slve during -Wei] $7.98 shoos reduced to $5.98. this ssion. and 0node th6und fast. Other lines reduced spoeial for this I'ho Oswood had the advtage o a sal A.C. Sger. ]anger ach. Hausauer had the bet- t of things all the way, He sent 1LOR SALE--A nty  pia at a Ms blows in with lightvlng sped, 'bargain. Tes if nssary. Ma and they all rried a weighty argo- tin Schn, Ortonville. 8-4-c sent with them. ]FOR SALF-Ladies' d Gents' Taft- Joe Petriek of Ortonv2te and "Smfl- ored 8nits for sMe at the City TJl- ing Brother" CorMit of Clinton gave or Shop . *12.tf an exhibition that aording to the opinion of fans wg the favorite of OR SALEOne ga tek corn- the pilmiies. The und opened bination grain d cattle rack, e briskly with Condit sparring for trk grain bor. d n 12-20 Hei- opening, and PetTick taking things dec Lrtor mplete with o John cautious Condit connected with a D trlph plow, in A-No.-I eu few to the faen ,tho only one or two ditlan. Inquiro at S & S tarots, had anything behind them, while Pc- Clinton, Minn, "13-2 trick drove tome to the f, togeths, -- with some mean hooks to the boce. leer SALHouehMd furniture for Comiit took them a[Z with a smile. sale. Phone 12J-5, "13.1 _ During the second und they clinehen ]FOR SALE--Make me an offer on the a couple of tLe% but did some good NEK of Section 12, twp. 121, range mixing. The third und was slow 46. iated 8i mil east of Oron- for the most part. Both Went into the vill 160 re. Addss N. G. fourth with a determination to ehk Ln, Berthold, N. D, "13-6 up as man onnters as psible b fo the end. Petrlck was drivi1 ]FOR SALEFord Sedan+ in practi- at Cendlt's body, and landed a ha tally w condition. Inquire Ed, one in the pit of the tomach. C- Cwan. Kolr Kale, Or tonvilM, dit was showing gns of ennui by this "13-1 time, d a all of fat in the region of hs bent w not helping his speed ]OST--Eastm folding autographic my They had  lively enocH- Kodak, s ai 116 fllr Finder ters, and staged a couple of close-up notifY. M L D. Daes, Peninsula, mixes that plead the fs. Petrle or l Independent ole, Prob- ad the margin during the glter ably lost between Penises andld  art of the four rounds. His foot- poL ork, together with his showing  a UI'SIf you'rt in.need of clothes two a aeppor with both tins boy ak for Mr. Dalton or H. A. Hley and head at hm target, made a good at  Columbian hotel d order impre:l ion with the crowd, good tailor made nit for the Fan were impatimt to as* what m] sum of $+0. Satithcon was in tore for them in the main go, Zuanmteed. e them and aa* and greeted the principals, Gordon ey. 13-1 EIdd of this pia an Ha'y ,,Kid., Hale of Fargo with a good applause. ]FOR BENT-- One quarter tisn < This btt, the ount 4 which is coy. land. thze mles from Gvil ered nd by round, emed to be with beilding, Splendid. fan too sdetifie for the fs who re- " Inquire of L. A. Kaerh. Orlo sponded hetteto tho ash-buckling ville, Mi. tactics of the plnnies. Tbe wa too much clinching in their judg- ANTF.DParUos having land they ment and epithets they threw at the wish pld hald write Ba 594, fighto during almost all of the mix Ortadlle I Im a tetor with rounds did idicato that they wted plows that I would ifl to keeg a mLing. Both men put up a hay 18- go5 exhibition, but it faib,d to tnn the hearts of the ewd as did the peinnaries Fight By Rnd First Raund,--Hlde opened th go with a !eft to the j. and ducked one to the heal They fell hto a clioh, Eldned landing a light one on the back o the head as they hke. Eldd lipped a [e to he jaw, and they clinched. Eldd got an ey right to the fe nd blocked one to the stomach. Hale nt acro a ft .no. getting Eldred on the nose, ad drawing blood. Eldred retiated with ,,no to the face, Hale dked a wide wing. The men were going at a fairly good spd during the entire nd. ond RoundEldla ,issed two dlives at ths face, and they spaed into a clinch. Hale pld two lefts or, EdreWs,jaw,and dved o for the two. Iale hit gldred on tlh moGth with a fast one. d ored tgq jobs on the jaw. Eldred landed his be blow of this rod wb re sent acss a [ightnlng Ieft to the face HaM misses a left swing. xport demand md the supplying of Third Round.--The opening gun im g A N T E D---Ladle' d Gents e[oth to dean and p City Tailor Shop. A. w. young, p. prletor "12-ti Co-operative Grain Out- let bssurrM In Europ : C@nthued -Feelors- aod inqire fm ropeau untri for large uangitios of grain dirt from gw. er in the Unit d St ate, ind jesse tha4 the orlzed fel will have ]if te difficulty in finding a good marke or thor 1921 p aad all thee in. quig a Ul:.d With the state nent to the effect that ent ' :for payment can be made atttlsfaor to the eller. This means, that althc ]Eorope i "bankru"  the tamo+ ay/ng is, her cle and politi leaders a expecting th be ppar o pay for the food products they bu in ts otmtry. t-The Equity Coperati Ebng ]h a Ige file of orvspondeao et m reliable character along the line o xport filiti to th farmer organ- I iinna that dest to export grain. lhqulry is fm Saardlnavlan un-: , Poland, Atrla and gerhaps me from other eetio thru agentsj who have net led the tries nng the iquifle Reformatar/ Sm for Youths, Albin Smith, 19  old, Charl Iaeh, 18 yes, and Elan Mugger,/17 es, brought to Morris eberged with breviary i nth9 third degree of the etteth store t Nora el Novem- ber 10, plead guilty in district cou fn Judge 8. . llaSe*ty land+ feraoon. All thre were nnl o the Sta* Re fomatory at St Cloud r tems t treed by the eart, ut vhleh the law preselbe shall nt e: fi year (k.orge Mnnger, 20 ars, and o Mer, 47 y, +smother of Elan atgl George Mungo, eade gtlty to te offon of knew- tngig ivlng tolea geod The son  sentneed to a t nat to extend hr ye at the 8tale Reformatory ho wther wa given a fine of $150 or n defat of pamrat four onths in the eomm ji of Gt onty All five nteneed Ife nea> 1go.ross. Wth,he st and nvietoh of We the mytery arronndlng a  musher nf robberlea which took p i thh* trdtotT at Meeds, E- "ow Lake, Tntah d Norc is ap- !arenOy olved.Horel Tilmno. . A 0/mat*ant /m. at--"You men don!t Imow a thing bout e6oking. Now; how wold yon H2--*iVlth a fur eolladn sumner. d  ad lk stoengs in terY the third mmm s a left that Hale lando& The men nlinehed, and EIdred flashed in a fast left to the f us they bruke Hale hd hm tn the L,,dy with a right, d the eLhed again. Hale hsd EIdred when they broke but failed to land y substan- tial bl EIdzd prosented Hal wh nne tn the aw. Both m +psr. red fat an opening. Eldd,sRpped when be stepped off th edge of th canvass, d fell lato the rnpe Hate lended ne on zn jaw. They we sarated from a e inch ust as the round ended. Fourth Imad-At the tmd of the pong, Hal rushed EIdred in his ow eome and showered him with blow on the fe d body. It dld nu seem te effact Eldred to y tent ad he retaliated wth a right to the body n h anger ate msed on  the bead. bnt seod a folluw-up ts ',e hd, and a faat heok to the body aad they elinehd ldred landed a peedy right tu Mm Jaw thatdre bld, nd they clinched agai Hale an.led s right and lft to the fae as they bke, amt they want int nolher d,nh vth only a few  ods nf the und le Fifth RoandBoth men jnmped t tl,r fet at the und I of the gon and m in the center of ti lqag IIdd mied a right, but absorbad n hard Ift to the Jaw H retul+ one but mtss, the mi Refer Zwiener.had tnMe keeping the rnn fr hugging, as they went into an. other eh as  u he p tb. EldredhkedHalewitha rig'hi to the body that left a red otllaq The nu were  daring the hat nnds uf the round. glxth RwadBo--othflflghtm- wer '?hey held each other aff wim o DRTONVILLE WINS FROM MADISON BY 4 TO 2 SCORE Timely Hitting In Sixth, With ,Triple, Nets Locals Four Runs--Fans See Good Game. After dpping the flat thee ge of the ason, the OrtonviBe te put new life, spiced wth good judgment and lilly hitting, into their play and woo from Madison 4 to 2 L the gam played here at Kher Park ]as1 Sunday. Madison played errorless bal whil Ortonvlle booted five times, but av advantage of eight Mrs. coming wher they counted was too much of a un. erhalanee, d Madison could nothing hut take defeat. The visitors fought hard until I final luring, and it was of the game. It was the sixth that provldl fire workx that gave Ortonville the win ning four n. Onig in two ethel innings did the loesds advmme a m to third b, otheise they conten- ted themlves for the st part with getting men on bas. Griee'a thee base hit with the bes loaded bke th deadlock, and started Madison tobogganing, lsler. Corneli- son, and Miller, hatting in that order, had eh hit so:[sly, and they were oe- cupping the paths when Griee me to bat. He me in when Petrlck singtt. Madison scored iv the nth, two er- rors being largely instmenta] in al- lowing them to do the work. Grice had two strike.outs to his eredlt in this inning, and only one hit against him, but 1oo fielding ebld Madi- son to nd the two men gs. Griee on the mound for the Orton- ville team w the star of the day. !n addition to striking out nine n, hs took honors with the stick, pellet eat thee fe hits in four trips to the hal One of thee w his triple that brought in thee seos, another being a double in the eighth inning He pitched air tight ball and did not a]low a fe trip an balls, Petriek shard in the honors of the day, show- ing great fe at the hal He dited with thee hits in fl times to hat, on of ds hits being a tpie. Next Sunday the Ortonville team will battle vth the fag Marietta team. Marietta h been travellig in sPeedy company this on, and is prs&l by s strong team. The ore and summy-- Madison AB R H PO A E E. HoiheBe, If .. 4  0 8 0 Markusn, rf .... 4 1 1 1 0 L, b ............... 4 0 0 I o Ndson, e ... 4 1 o 7 0 L. Holhjlle, lb 4 0 0 8 0 J. Wleberg, ss .... 4 0 2 3 0 i.illlskov, 2b ......... 4 001 0 L. Wieberg, 3 0 1 0 0 Gjerdahi, d ...... 8 0 1 0 0 Totals ................ 34"2 5 24 7 0 Oronviil AB R H PO A E Petrek, Sb . 5 o 3 0 1 gwiener, lb . 3 0 ] 10 0 wiley, e .............. 4 0 0 10 0 KolIy. ss ....... 4 0 1 0 2 s er, gb .... 3 I 1 3 1 Cornelien, If ....... 4 1 2 '2 + 0 Miller, e ..... 4 1 2 2 0 Gr, p ................ 4 I 8 0 0 Bertelson, rf 4 0 o o 0 Totals ...... 35 4 13 27 0 4 Seo by Inung Madison-- 000000002--2 OrtoaviII 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 n x Summary--Two be hits, Gri; three base hlt Grise and Petzie.k. Stolen b, Petrid Sacrifice hits, gwiener. Sleek out, by Griee 9, by Wleherg 7. Bases on balls Wieberg to Islet: ;ri none Balk. Wiebea Umpires: L't and Schwa :aunt. nding a right to the eh Hale missed two awlngs, hut connt= ed with the third. He followed this wtl1 a right to Lhe Mde of the head. oth exchanged blows to the fe. [a[e backed Eldred to ropes, and then misses an uppercut that would have made hi see pink elephants if it nded. hut it didn't. Eldred+mied Minnesota's Wealth . I tons of ..... d ..... lalty charge f t Benson Legion Present and Prospective  ttShPet n. t I d h Bonus I ty ta At tot  . ne rded ore in 1920 - The loeb[ pt of the DO OU KNOW That the state owns one mine, the L, covering 160 acres, have joined That Unie Sam gave the State Aca For common hools ..... 2,976,454 For a university ................... 91,524 Fnr initial mprovement 496,482 Swamp or overflowed [ands 4,709,03S Other lands ................. 172,43 A total of .......... 8.445,961 That every cent the sale nf land rnyalty on in ore is fund That the common amnnnts to $2,670,71069. That the iron o will adffnot less than $30,584,00 That mh valuable land, d miner belonging to this remains od d unased. That the university 1anent fund ntalns $2,079,217.87 That ron o now leased will not Ibss th $2,OO0,0OO. land. or unlead to $7,756,7O8.O4. That swap der lea will add not less than $7,- 222,OOO. That fm o iron ore lease cover- ing a lake bed the state will ceve not less th $1,500,000 That the  seral nther lake having enormous tonnages of n i their beds not der lease, That the ix much timber and min- eral on swamp ld nnt sold or und lease. . . That there a mUnnns ef res el nonagricultural land "in the stat admirably lasted and adapted to tm. bet culture. That an re planted to sp ol other fot te will in the eou of a few yea yield a return aZmos equal to that of arable and That geologists d[are 4.44 pe ent of the rth's crust to be m posed ef iro That iron is the most uful as wei the must abundant of all metal That ivilion could get aon without gold useful aa it is, but wouc erish if befit of iron, Thor only a few atura wing to Rs rarity, steel was a ert. Today it is used hy every l m, woman d child in the land l That during the past century the; production nf steel h growls at a pa borerlng the romantic That in 1810 the U..% produced 917' gross tons of atl, in 1918, 44,42,4Z tons. iaThat the world'e nuai produoion, million tons of iron o the twee contributed me than 75 [ion tons theto. That during the Wolrd War, Mie- sata produel and shipped a high M 5 mllion teas in one yr, and in 1920 fo.arded over 4O million ton That durst veral soans in re. eont yea her .; one ye over 6 pere steel products is the mightiest indus- try in Amerin That it has become.the l&g*d barometer of the meroial d financial stat That the basis of this stupendous triet, the great bulk of which found in the Minnesota ranges. That the biillou tons. shipped rom the Lake Supeor development, have come from the Me.hi, the ceate+t of the th Miesot@ ranges; and it is, so to say, the bk- bone of the steel 4ndtry 8. That the total state tax on above w $1.614,02& Thet the state glss earnings tax an in o shipment amotmt in to $2,C0,000 That Minnesota  May 1, 1920 had I41,671.638 tons of ron o within its borders. That about 12 per cent of at Iated on statewne lands and helong to the eopie of tills corn- [I munwealth. I That fm stationed min last n tho re shipped six xJlli It shipped 28,555.4t8 tons in 1920. This yield the school fund $15,000,000 royalty by Mah 2, 1942. port of That it has my bn iron flonr ,and indinatlnns ruinable by conntration, meas woul ps That a concentrator nt Babblt, orlty costing $3,OOO,OOO may nder valu- able many. millions eel tons of now Tuesday urg worthless ,ron brmg ck, includ- ing seral million to of It is lands. That Prof. E. K. Snper, formerly of he State University dlas Minne- sota has 5635.000,00 tons of fuel peat. That a very large par of ......................... Don't That Minnesota' 10.000 veritable playground for sides a so m ..................... i ......... Swear per, eta,, edsts on many state lands. That the ppoged Gat Lakes to will ing, nneota nearer to EnPO. That Minnesota has many hydro- electric sites undeveloped. That a nine-foot channel in the Mississippi rivemay mean the vival of ricer tram to the great benefit of the state. That a mplete system of tnk ads as pvided by the Bah plan, would hten delopment of ah resources above mentioned. That a barge canal along the St. Croix River eonneeting Lake Superior with the Mississippi idle dm. That such a nal WI semite to the entire state. Merehant? Farme, A move is on foot by Browns gal. +y citizens to gi a free movhg +ctu show he o a week to fro+ mrs and the i filie It I thot this fi ente .........  .. holflt given every Saturday afteoon ai- ho he day y be changedBrowm Valley Inter-Lake 'lMbune. When you have fix a tire on the It's better to now to look over and while fixin's good. We Make Them New Again. 0rtonville Be Photographed This Year on Your Birthday ' V HERE GOF00S Timely Specials 98 Flashlights Small size 2 Cell Niekle Plated I ight With Bulls Eye Reflecto $1.39 Large Size 2 Cell Nigkle Plats, Light With Bulls Eye Reflector. $1.10 Kiddie Kars Here'l to get either a I 2 or No. 4 Kar While they last offer the No. $1.10 and the at $1.75. $3.00, and $4.75. a slow swing, but made good a fight BOIL0 WBLL[ rSEEWEATH'$ Zwn  pug hard t the loe rIg &D WARH eineh after clinch in spite of b warrants. LOCAL MARKET. (Tursday, August 4, 121) Springs, 1% lhs. d up...20 Ks general n ............ 16c Daek ..................................... 1c Oee ............................ o Cre .................................. 4 IN the aummetlme e fo Sweet Cream ................ 45e K take it eazy and n it mio weather while ather who are Farmers Elovalr aml Fuel Company Wt, 57 pounds...... ........... $128 Bley ................................ 3O-.4O Oats ...: .................................. 2 Rye ................................. 87 Flax ...................................... 177 ''ry a Wwat Ad" is tl conumnd that the OXl*edenCed fead ves y when a v aside  Ios --Then Is   to be lost--raM prvidlng for their future . forts in life say that it is the ideal time to aild You wilt know that tkla is the Ideal pia to hey lumber aft y  have become aequatated with sir merehamlhe and ear hoot. fie mtbed Geier Lumber Co. --TI Ad are newsl- th an opedn, aml Etdl Wa Ih'a t The lieimdemt Wt Ads . - Pocket Knives Here you are boys--just what you been looking for. Knives, one and punch, two blades or two and a Punch, Your Choic Ratchet Screwdrivers One of he handiest household tools, No should be without one. This oal sells at $1.25 and $1.75. Extra Special, 6-inch ..................................... r--- Extra Special 8-inch ............................. . ........... 0rtonville Hardware I PAGE $ THE ORTONYILLE INDEPENDENT THURSDAY, AUGUST o WANT ADS ] OUNDwA pair of tire chains. Own- er cm get same by calling at this offme and paying for notice. 10-1-c HEM STITCHINCr--Have installed .Hem Stitching Machine at the home ,of Mrs. Cochra, formerly the Bentley house, on Second street. rice 10 and 15 cents per yard. AI- ;so ready to do repair work on all i:makes of sewing machines. Agency ifor the Singer machines. For hem stitching and repair work Call 329. A. L. Waddans. 5-tf-c. BARGAIN SHOE SALF_,---All Wear- .U-Well $7.98 shoes reduced to $5.98. Other lines reduced special for this sale. A.C. Saeger. FOR SAA nearly new piano at a bargain. Terms if necessary. Mar- tin Schoen, Ortonville. 8-4-c FOR SALEsLadies' and Gents' Tail- ored Suits for sale at the City Tail- or Shop. *12-tf F.OR SALE--One regular truck com- bination grain and cattle rack, one "truck grain box, and one 12-20 Hei- tier tractor complete with one John Deere trigle plow, in A-No.-1 con- dition. Inquire at S & S garage, : Clinton, Minn. "13-2 OR SALE--Household furniture for sale. Phone 1250J-5. "13-1 :FOR SALE---Make ne an offer on the NEI of Section 12, twp. 121, range ; 46, located 3 miles east of Orton- vile. 160 acres.. Address N. G. " Lindgren, Berthold, N.D. "13-6 :FOR SALE--Ford Sedan, in practi- cally new condition. Inquire Ed. Gowan, Korner Kafe, Ortonville. "13-1 ]LOST--Eastman folding autographic *Kodak, uses size 116 film. Finder notify Mrs. L D. Davies, Peninsula, or call Independent office. Prob- ably lost between Peninsula and de- pot. 13-1 UITS---If you're in'need of clothes ask for Mr. Dutton or H. A. Hurley ,at the Columbian hotel, and order a good tailor made suit for the small sum. of $23.50. Satisfaction guaranteed. See them and save numey. 13-1 OR RENT One quarter section of land, three miles from Graceville, with buildings. Splendid. farm Inquire of L. A. Kaercher, Orton- ville, Minn. VCANTEDParties having land they wish plowed should write Box 594, Ortonville. I have a tractor with plows that I would like to keep busy. 13-3 A N T E DLadies' and Gents' clothes to clean and press. City Tailor Shop. A. W. Young, pro- prtetor. *12-tf Co-operative Grain Out- let Assurred In Europe " Continued "Feelers" and inquires rom European countries for large :uantities of grain direct from grow- ers in the United States, indicate that the organized farmers will have lit- tle difficulty in finding a good market for their 1921 crop and all these in- quires are coupled with the state- xnent to the effect that arrangements or payment can be made satisfactory 1to the seller. This means, that altho urope is "bankrupt" as the common .aying is, her financiers and political ]eaders are expecting to be prepared o pay for the food products they buy in this country. ..... The Equity Co-operative Exchange ]has a large file of correspondence of reliable character along the line of export demand and the supplying of export facilities to the farmer organ- zations that desire to export grain. hquiry is from Seandlnavian coun- tries, Poland, Austria and perhaps ome from oher sections thru agents ,who have not revealed the countries aking the inquiries. Reformatory Sentence for Youths. Albln Smith, 19 years old, Charles ]Leach, 18 years, and Elson Munger, j17 :years, brought to Morris charged with }burglary i nthe third degree of the elleseth store at Norcross on Novem- ber 10, plead guilty in district court loefore Judge S. A. F! 'shety Monday fternoon. All three were sentenced to the State Refomnatory at St. Cloud for terms not fixed by the coup, but vhich the law prescribes shall not e;- ceed five years George Munger, 20 Tears, and Rose Munger, 47 years, -aother of Etson ahd George Munger, leaded guilty to the offense of know- ngly receiving stolen goods. The son svas sentenced to a term not to exceed three years at the State Reformatory nd the other was given a fine of 150 or in default of payment four vnonths in the common jail of Grant ounty. All five sentenced live nea qorcross. Withthe arrest and conviction of TneSe five the mystery surrounding a %arge ,number of robberies which took )}e i this territory at Morris. El- -mw Lake, Tintah and Norcross is ap- !aremt]y solved. --Mrris Tribune. An Observant Man. . She---"You men don't know a thing out cooking. Now, how would you dtress a chicken ?" H:-'With a fur collain summer, md pumps and silk stockings in win r:  ---The Ads are newsyread them. LEGION BOXING CARNIVAL MAKES HIT WITH FANS (Continued from page 1) wood, two local men of the 155 pound class, satisfied the fans with four :.unds in which both swung some cad packed mits. Their first round ..as not sensational tho Hausauer anded some heavy blows. They mix- ed good at the beginning of the sec- ond, with honors about even During he last part of it they took tlfings easy. After a third round which much resembled the second, the men showed he fans a time in the final go. Both got in some good-blows, Hausauer rocking Oswood with one to the jaw. Hausauer was the agressive during this session, and made theround fast. Tho Oswood had the advantage o longer reach, Hausauer had the bet- tel" of things all the way. He sent his blows in with lightning speed, and they all carried a weighty argu- ment with them. Joe Petrick of Ortonville and "Smil- ing Brother" Condit of Clinton gave an exhibition that according to the opinion of fans was the favorite of the preliminaries. The round opened briskly with Condit sparring for an opening, and Petrick taking things cautious. Condit connected with a few to the face ,tho only one or two had anything behind them, while Pe- trick drove ome to the face, together with some mean hooks to the bod. Condit took them all with a smile. During the second round they clincheo a couple of times, but did some good mixing. The third round was slow for the most part Both went into the fourth with a determination to check up as many counters as possible b-, fore the end. Petrick was driving at Condit's body, and landed a hard one in the pit of the stomach. Con- dit was showing signs of ennui by this time, and a roll of fat in the region of his bent was not helping his speed any. They had some lively encoun- ters, and staged a couple of close-up mixes that pleased the fans. Petric had the margin during the greater part of the four rounds. His foot- work, together with his showing as a two arm scrapper with both the body and head as his target, made a good impre:$ ion with the crowd. Fans were impatient to see what was in store for them in the main go, and greeted the principals, Gordon Eldred of this place ann Harry "Kid" Hale of Fargo with a good applause. This bout, the account of which is cov- ered round by round, seemed to be too scientific for the fans who re- sponded better to the swash-buckling tactics of the preliminaries. There was too much clinching in their judg- ments and epithets they threw at the fighters during almost all of the six rounds did indicate that they wanted more mixing. Both men put up a good exhibition, but it failed to wm the hearts of the crowd as did the preliminaries. Fight By Rounds. First Round.--Hale opened the go with a left to the jaw, and ducked one to the head. They fell into a clinch, Eldred landing a light one on the back of the head as they broke. Eldred slipped a left to he jaw, and they clinched. Eldred got an easy right to the face and blocked one to the stomach. Hale sent across a fast one, getting Eldred on the nose, and drawing blood. Eldred retaliated with one to the face. Hale ducked a wide awing. The men were going at a fairly good speed during the entire round. Second Round.Eldd ,missed two drives at the face, and they sparred into a clinch. Hale placed two lefts on Eldred's jaw,-*and received one for the two. Hale hit Eldred on thee mouth with a fast one, and scored two. jabs on the jaw. Eldred landed his best blow of this round when he sent across a lightning left to the face. Hale misses a left swing. Third Round.The opening gun in the third rouffd was a left that Hale landed- The men clinched, and Eldred flashed in a fast left to the face as they broke. Hale hooked him in the body with a right, and they clinched again. Hale rushed Eldred when they broke but failed to land any substan- tial blows. Eldred presented Hate with one to the jaw. Both men spar- red for an openihg. Eldredslipped when he stepped off the edge of the canvass, and fell into the ropes. Hale landed .one on the jaw. They were segrated from a clinch just as the round ended. Fourth Round.---At the sound of the gong, Hale rushed EIdred in his own corner and showered him with blows on the face and body. It did not seem to effect Eldred to any extent and he retaliated with a right to the body as hie answer. ale missed one to the hesd, but oed a follow-up to de head, and a fast hook to the body, and they clinched- Eldred landed a peedy right to the jaw that ,drew  b!ood, nd they clinched again. Hale ,an.led  rigl;t and left to the face as they broke, and they went into anoflmr ctinch with only a few sec- onds of the round left Fifth Round.Both men jumped to tl e;r feet at the sound of the gong and met in the center; of tlle fng. I:ldred missed a right;but absorbed a hard left to the jaw. He returns one but misses,the second. Referee Zwiener0had trouble keeping the men from hugging, as they went into an- other clinch as soon as he parfl them. Etdred hooked Hale with a right to the body that left a red outlin The men were posing during the Iast seconds of the round. Sixth Round,--Both fighters were tired as they started the final round. They held each other off, Waiting for an opening, and Eldred was first to ORTONVILLE WINS FROM MADISON BY 4 TO 2 SCORE Timely Hitting In Sixth, With ,Triple, Nets Locals Four Runs--Fans See Good Game. After dropping the first three games of the season, the Ortonville team put new life, spiced with good judgment and timely hitting, into their play and won from Madison 4 to 2 in the game played here at Kaercher Park last Sunday. Madison played errorless ball while Ortonville booted five times, but an advantage of eight hits, coming when they counted was too much of a coun- t:erbalance, and Madison could do nothing but take defeat. The visitors fought hard until the final inning, and it was not until then that they put across their only scores of the game. It was the sixth that provided fire- works that gave Ortonville the win- ning four runs. Only in two other innings did the locals advance a man to third base, otherwise they conten- ted themselves for the ,most part with getting men on bases. Grice's three base hit with the bases loaded broke th deadlock, and started Madison tobogganing. Isler, Corneli- Minnesota's Wealth Present and Prospective (By State Auditor R. P. Chase) DO YOU KNOW That Uncle Sam gave the State Acres For common schools ................ 2,976,454 For a university ...................... 91,524 For internal improvement ...... 496,482 Swamp or overflowed lands....4,709,038 Other lands .............................. 172,463 A total of ........................ 8,445,961 That every cent ever received from the sale of land or timber or from royalty on iron ore is still in these funds. That the common school fund now amounts to $32,670,710.69. That the iron ore now under lease will add not less than $30,584,000. That much valuable land, timber and mineral belonging to this fund romains unsold and' unased. That the university permanent fund contains $2,079,217.87. That iron ore now leased will add not lbss than $2,000,000. That much valuable land, timbe and mineral belonging to the univer- sity remains unsold or unleased. That the swamp land fund amounts to $7,756,708.04. That swamp land minerals now un- der lease will add not less than $7,- 222,000. That from one iron ore lease cover- ing a lake bed the state will receive not less than $1,500,000. That there are several other lake., having enormous tonnages of ore in their beds not under lease. son, and Miller, batting in that order, That there is much timber and rain- had each hit safely, and they were oc- eral on swamp lands not sold or under cupying the paths when Grice came lease to bat. He came in when Petrick That there are millions of acres of singled, nonagricultural land in the state tim- Madison scored in the ninth, two er- rors being largely instrumental in al- lowing them to do the work. Grice had two strike-onts to his credit in this inning, and only one hit against him, but loose fielding enabled Madi- son to send the two men across. Grice on the mound for the Orion- rifle team was the star of the day. In addition to striking out nine men, he took honors with the stick, poling out three safe hits in four trips to the bat. One of these was his triple that brought in three scores, another being a double in the eighth inning. He pitched air tight ball and did not allow a free trip n balls. Petrick shared in the honors of the day, show- ing great form at the bat. He is credited with three hits in five times to bat, one of his hits being a triple. Next Sunday the Ortonville team will battle with the fast Marietta team. Marietta has been travelling in speedy company this season, and is representS] by a strong team. The score and summary Madison'-- AB R H PO A E E. Hoihjelle, If ........ 4 0 0 3 0 0 Markussen, rf ........ 4 1 1 1 1 0 Lee, 3b .................... 4 0 0 1 1 0 Nelson, c .................. 4 1 0 7 0 0 L. Hoihjelle, lb ...... 4 0 0 8 0 0 J. Wieberg, ss ........ 4 0 2 3 3 0 Lilliskov, 2b ............ 4 0 0 1 0 0 L. Wieberg, p ........ 3 0 1 0 3 0 Gjerdahl, cf ............ 3 0 1 0 0 0 Totals .................. 34 "2 5 24 7 0 Ortonville--- AB R H PO A E Petrick, 3b .............. 5 0 3 0 3 1 Zwiener, lb ............ 3 0 1 10 0 0 Wiley, c .................... 4 0 0 10 1 0 Kelly, ss .................. 4 0 1 0 0 2 ]sler, 2b 3 1 1 ,3 3 1 Cornelisen, lf .......... 4 1 2 2 0 0 Miller, cf ................ 4 1 2 2 0 0 Griee, p .................... 4 1 3 0 3 0 Bertelson, rf .......... 4 0 0 0 0 0 Totals .................. 35 4 13 27 10 4 Score by Innings-- Madison-- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2--2 Ortonville-- 0 0 0 4} 0 4 0 0 x--4 SummaryTwo base hits, Grice; three base hits, Grice and Petrick. Stolen bases, Petrick. Sacrifice hits, Zwiener. Struck out, by Grice 9, by Wieberg 7. Bases on balls, Wieberg to Isler; Grice none. Balk, Wieberg. Umpires: Levitt and Schoen. count, sending a right to the chin. Hale missed two swings, but connect- ed with the third. He followed this wii a right to the side of the head. oth exchanged blows to the face, Hale backed Eldred to ropes, and then misseo an uppercut that would have made him see pink elephants if it funded, but it didn't.  Eldred missed a slow swing, but made good a right to the side of the head. Referee Zwiener was puffing hard at the close of the round, after having broken clinch after clinch in spite of his warnings. LOCAL MARKET. (Thursday, August 4, 1921) Springs, 1 Ibs. and up ........ 20c Hens, general run .................... 16c Cox . .............................................. 10c Ducks ............................................ 1c Geese ............................................ 7c Eggs, per doz., .......................... 25c Cream .......................................... 42e Sweet Cream .............................. 45c Farmers Elevator and Fuel Company Wheat, 57 pounds .................... $1,.28 Barley, . .................................... 30-40 Oats ...: ..................................... 23 Rye ............................................. 87 Flax .......................................... 1.77 --"Try a Want Ad" is the command that the experienced friend gives you when a valued article i lost. --Them is no time to be lost--read The Idependent Want Ads m)w. admirably located and adapted to ber culture. That an acre planted to spruce or other forest trees will in the courm of a few years yield a return almost equal to that of arable land. That geologists declare 4.44 per cent of the earth's crust to be com- posed of iron That iron is the most useful as wel as the most abundant of all metals. That civilization could get along without gold useful as it is, but would perish if bereft of iron. That only a few eentur//es ag, owing to its rarity, steel was a royal etal. Today it is used by every man, woman and child in the land. That during the past century the production of s.teel has grown at a pace bordering the romantic. That in 1810 the U. S. produced 917 gross tons of steel, in 1918, 44,462,432 tons. That the world's annual production in recent years of from 150 to 17a million tons of iron ore the U. S. twice contributed more than 75 mil- lion tons thereto. That during the Wolrd War, Minne- sota producel and shipped a.s high a 45 million tons in one year, and in 1920 forwarded over 40 million ton. That during several seasons in re- cent years her shipments have been 60 per cent of the total output in the U. S.; one year over 62 per cent. That the manufacture of iron and steel products is the mightiest indus- try in America. That it has become the acknow- ledged barometer of the land's com- mercial and financial status. That the basis of this stupendous industry is the high grade iron or deposits of the Lake Superior Dis- trict, the great bulk of which at,, found in the Minnesota ranges. That the billion tons, shipped from the Lake Superior district since it development, 555 million tons thereof have come from the Mesabi, the greatest of the three Minnesota ranges; and it is, so to say, the back- bone of the steel industry in the U. S. That the total state tax on above was $1,614,026. That the state gross earnings tax on iron ore shipments amount in 1920 to $2,000,000. That Minnesota on May 1, 192.0 had 1,341,671,638 tons of merchantable iron ore within its borders. That about 12 per cent of this to- tal is located on state-owne lands and belongs to the people of this com- monwealth. That from state-owned mines last season there were shipped six million I IPAI ANO WARH--To .6UARD I N the summertime some folks take it easy and call it picnic weather while others who are providing for their future com- forts in life say that it is the ideal time to bild. You will know that this is the Ideal place to buy lumber after you once have become acquainted with oar merchandise and our busi. iess methods. Geier Lumber Co. tons of ore, under a rolalty charge of 25 cents per ton. Bonus That the state on its own lands has 30 opened mines, 22 of which for- warded ore in 1920. . The local post of the That the state owns one mine, the gion have joined forces with Missabe Mountain, covering 160 acres gion have joi\\;.ed forces with " " c - ins'r" .,..  - poses oI me nalon m a ngn: rfllCn on.a , OD m.llllOn cons oi co-, .... , " " l . , med|ate acmn on me Ieaera mercml ore. It shpped 23,555.4131 ........ compensazlon DIlI, ann In a rues tons m 1920. Ths tract alone will[ ........... h . enaors relson ano euogg, i vm|d the sc ool fund $15,000,000 m , ........ e 'oyalty by March 2, 1942. ea luesoay, srong, y urge, n That it h "i ..... port o me measu e. the as many o luon ons ol ........ .... [ Deen reporefl Iavoraoly o the won ore bearing material that mght ....... noor ,anti, ln(llCaLlons were be made valuable by concentration, measure woul pass by a That a concentrator at Babbit, jority until President Harding costing $3,000,000 may render valu- fered and in an address to the able many millions .of tons of now worthless iron bearing rock, incIud- Tuesday urged that it be the committee. It is ing several million tons of school the president's wish in the lands. be respected.--Swift County That Prof. E. K. Soper, formerly of Monitor. he State University declares Minne- sota has 56,835,000,000 tons of fuel peat. That a very large part of this be- longs to the permanent finds of the state. That Minnesota's 10,000 lakes can be made a veritable playground for central United States besides a source of revenue That evidence of gold, silver, cop- per, etc., exists on many state lands. That the proposed Great Lakes to Ocean Canal will bring Minnestota 1500 miles nearer to Europe That Minnesota has many hydro- electric sites undeveloped. That a nine-foot channel in the Mississippi rivemay mean the revival of river traffic to the great benefit of the state. That a complete system of trunk roads as provided by the Babcocx plan, would hasten development of ah resources above mentioned. That a barge canal along the St. Croix River connecting Lake Superior with the Mississippi i sfar from being an idle dream. That such a canal would be of great service to the entire state. Benson Legion Protests Don't Swear When you have fix a tire on the It's better to now to look your over and have cuts and bruises while fixin's good, We Make Them New Again. Merchants To Be Hosts of Farmers. A move-is on foot by Browns Val- ley citizens to give a free moving picture show here once a week to far- mers and their families. It is no thot this free entertainment will b given every Saturday afternoon, al. tho the day may be changed.--Brown Valley Inter-Lake Tribune. Vulcanizin Shop Be Photographed This Year on Your Birthday V HERE GOES Timely Specials For00This 98c Flashlights Small size 2 Cell Nickle Plated Light With Bulls Eye Reflector. $1.39 Large Size 2 Cell Plated Light With Bulls Eye Both these Specials complete $1.10 Kiddie Kars Here's your to get either a 2 or No. 4 Kar at a While they last offer the No. $1.10 and the at $1.75. Re $3.00 and $4.75. Pocket Knives Here you are boys--just what you been looking for. Knives, one and punch, two blades or two anda punch. .Yur Come. ......... Ratchet Screwdrivers One of the handiest household tools. No should be without one. This too] sells re at $1.25 and $1.75. Extra Special, 6-inch ............................................ Extra Special 8-inch ............................................ Ortonvi!le Hardware