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August 5, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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August 5, 2003
 

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• annual meeting brings tdeas for growth carved itself a school districts, z ]Bonanza Education gain wider usage area residents as focus of the cen- held Tuesday attended the , highlighted by :ing tours, live prizes were Liebe Pamida, Radio Lake State Park, House, Michael Patrick Moore is Coffee House and often refers to social importance of you work tsking those in s and e. Answers ranged from "good memories of fish- ing at Bonanza with my family" to "I came for the food!". The opening exercise had its intended effect; it was a relaxed, informal environment• Moore related what he had learned during a recent trip to Boston Massachusetts: "Paul Revere was a guy just doing his job" said Moore," and he was all but forgotten until Henry Wadsworth Longfellow wrote that poem about him back in the 1860's. The poem created a legend, a mystique, that eventually led to the restoration of Revere's home, the Old North Church, and a whole tourism and visitor industry in Boston." Recounting early stories of frontier visitors to the Big Stone Lake area, Moore noted that the Bonanza area has similar potential. "How did Bonanza get its name? Who lived here? What's the story behind this place?" he asked the group. "These are things I want to know!" History, according to Moore, is an important part of building an area's identity. In another anecdote Moore shared with the crowd, he related how Benjamin Franklin and friends., a group many call "America's founding fathers"•, began by meeting in a tav- ern in Philadelphia. "Just a bunch of guys getting together in a bar and talk- ing." said Moore. After a short pause, he concluded: "It just goes to show you how a small group of people can do big things." Bonanza Education Center has recently achieved status as a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation. It has also begun offering yearly memberships to individuals, families, and businesses. As coordinator Matyi Sundheim and the B-E-C board continue to work on funding options for the coming year, memberships will play a very impor- tant part in the center's future. For information on becoming a B- E-C member, or more information about the center's activities, contact Bonanza Education Center at (320) 265-6944. ENJOYS SPEAKER Patrick Moore (standing) at the annual meeting of Bonanza Education y 22nd. Or an exciting and a new Event in Kent Thiesse, The 5-6-7 in est Site, at the Gilfillan of Redwood in y of Farm Bill, and Other August 5 at Senators Dayton and echt and include Grain )rid the Farm in Rural egies for on, new event, held at 2:30 p.m. families are no Big listed; Gunter of County; and of Benson the 22 G OR TOO SMALL BONANZA EDUCATION CENTER BOARD President Brent Jacobson wows the children by making a rea iv trig bubble! Bubble making was one of the childrens activities offereo d the B-E-C annual meeting on Tuesday, July 22nd. MinnKota Bowhunters 3-D shoot results 7-22-03 Dwight Peschong , 244 Gator 206 Ron Flottmeyer 254 Bob Zahnow 229 Scott Dahle 241 Mark Baidry 247 Verlin Pierce 205 7-:29413 Doug McKinney 195 Renee McKinney 218 Jim Cioos 253 Bob Zahnow 250 Bill Welder 175 Todd Verheul 194 Sara Verheul 118 Weekly winner Jim and Bob i i i tqntique Dealers You'll love this vintage 1963 classic! It's one of the few produced Aug. 5, 1963. Very little rust and only a few wrinkles on body. Rear end ok. Able to blow a gasket when overheated. A little terreramental in cold weath- er. Becoming louder with age, may need a new muffler. Must see! Call 862-7858. many ..go with • t every vehicle and vacuumed! windshield inventory all insurance work! RE$SIVE GLASS CENTER, INC. and Linda Roggenbuck JORDEN ROGGENBUCK MN 56278 • 320-839-2255 • Toll Free 888-819-2255 iNDEPENDENTI Duck season proposed with changes, Goose season unchanged Most of South Dakota's 2003 waterfowl seasons would open Sept. 27 under a recent proposal by the state Game, Fish and Parks Commission. "Changes proposed are meant to conform to the federal framework, which will be submitted to the states in early August," said state Waterfowl Biologist Spencer Vaa of Brookings. Recommended changes for the state's duck seasons from last year include: • Change the starting date tbr the Low Plains north zone from the third Saturday in Sept. to the fourth Saturday in Septemblr. • Change the starting date for the Low Plains middle zone from the Saturday closest to Oct. 1 to the fourth Saturday in September. • Change the starting date for the High Plains season from the Saturday closest to Oct. 1 to the fourth Saturday in September. • Change the season length for pin- tails in each zone from 39 days to the same season length as other species (except canvasbacks). • Change bag limit for scaup from 3 to2. Essentially, most duck seasons would open on Saturday, Sept. 27 this year and continue through Dec. 9. Exceptions would include the Low Plains south zone, which would open Oct. ! 1 and continue through Dec. 23, and the High Plains season that would end on Jan. 1. "That is the earliest possible dates for season openings and will provide the maximum opportunity possible for duck hunting," Vaa said. Vaa also noted that there were no recommended changes for the state's 2003 goose seasons from last year. "However," he said, "goose hunting is under the same rule chapter as duck hunting, so the goose season is still open for modification during finaliza- tion if there are changes that are given with the federal framework•" Individuals can submit comment by attending the public hearing at 2 p.m., Thursday, Aug. 7, at the Brookings Inn in Brookings. Send written comments to Game, Fish and Parks, 523 E. Capitol, Pierre, S.D. 57501, or send e-mail to wildinfo@state.sd.us. Comments must include full name and address. Cornfest pageant entrants needed Cornfest committee members are still seeking contestants for the Miss Ortonville Area 2003 and Little Miss Ortonville pageants. Miss Ortonville Area contestants must be entering 1 lth or 12th grades in September, must be United States citizens, and must have lived in the area for at least one year. Additionally, they must not be married or have children. The contestant who wins the title of Miss Ortonville Area must be avail- able during the from Cornfest 2003 until Cornfest 2004 to attend parades and any other functions that may occur throughout the year in relation to the Miss Ortonville Area title• Anyone wishing to enter the pageant should return their form to the Ortonville Area Chamber of Commerce office no later than this Friday, August 8. Young girls entering into first grade by this fall are elgibile to participate in the Little Miss Ortonville Area pageant. Judging for this pageant will be luck-of-the-draw. Anyone with questions concerning either portion of the competition may contact Marlyce Thompson at 839- 2991 or 2273-2314. SOMETHING DIFFERENT 3x5 Safety Deposit Box 1/2 off a one year rental with a new qualified checldng account. "Because we caret. " o CenBanl: 113 NW 1st Street • Ortonville, MN 56278 Phone 320-839-6123 • 1-800-335-8920 • Fax 320-839-6127 Member 24-hour banking 1-877-569-2265 • www.cenbank.com FDIC • annual meeting brings tdeas for growth carved itself a school districts, z ]Bonanza Education gain wider usage area residents as focus of the cen- held Tuesday attended the , highlighted by :ing tours, live prizes were Liebe Pamida, Radio Lake State Park, House, Michael Patrick Moore is Coffee House and often refers to social importance of you work tsking those in s and e. Answers ranged from "good memories of fish- ing at Bonanza with my family" to "I came for the food!". The opening exercise had its intended effect; it was a relaxed, informal environment• Moore related what he had learned during a recent trip to Boston Massachusetts: "Paul Revere was a guy just doing his job" said Moore," and he was all but forgotten until Henry Wadsworth Longfellow wrote that poem about him back in the 1860's. The poem created a legend, a mystique, that eventually led to the restoration of Revere's home, the Old North Church, and a whole tourism and visitor industry in Boston." Recounting early stories of frontier visitors to the Big Stone Lake area, Moore noted that the Bonanza area has similar potential. "How did Bonanza get its name? Who lived here? What's the story behind this place?" he asked the group. "These are things I want to know!" History, according to Moore, is an important part of building an area's identity. In another anecdote Moore shared with the crowd, he related how Benjamin Franklin and friends., a group many call "America's founding fathers"•, began by meeting in a tav- ern in Philadelphia. "Just a bunch of guys getting together in a bar and talk- ing." said Moore. After a short pause, he concluded: "It just goes to show you how a small group of people can do big things." Bonanza Education Center has recently achieved status as a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation. It has also begun offering yearly memberships to individuals, families, and businesses. As coordinator Matyi Sundheim and the B-E-C board continue to work on funding options for the coming year, memberships will play a very impor- tant part in the center's future. For information on becoming a B- E-C member, or more information about the center's activities, contact Bonanza Education Center at (320) 265-6944. ENJOYS SPEAKER Patrick Moore (standing) at the annual meeting of Bonanza Education y 22nd. Or an exciting and a new Event in Kent Thiesse, The 5-6-7 in est Site, at the Gilfillan of Redwood in y of Farm Bill, and Other August 5 at Senators Dayton and echt and include Grain )rid the Farm in Rural egies for on, new event, held at 2:30 p.m. families are no Big listed; Gunter of County; and of Benson the 22 G OR TOO SMALL BONANZA EDUCATION CENTER BOARD President Brent Jacobson wows the children by making a rea iv trig bubble! Bubble making was one of the childrens activities offereo d the B-E-C annual meeting on Tuesday, July 22nd. MinnKota Bowhunters 3-D shoot results 7-22-03 Dwight Peschong , 244 Gator 206 Ron Flottmeyer 254 Bob Zahnow 229 Scott Dahle 241 Mark Baidry 247 Verlin Pierce 205 7-:29413 Doug McKinney 195 Renee McKinney 218 Jim Cioos 253 Bob Zahnow 250 Bill Welder 175 Todd Verheul 194 Sara Verheul 118 Weekly winner Jim and Bob i i i tqntique Dealers You'll love this vintage 1963 classic! It's one of the few produced Aug. 5, 1963. Very little rust and only a few wrinkles on body. Rear end ok. Able to blow a gasket when overheated. A little terreramental in cold weath- er. Becoming louder with age, may need a new muffler. Must see! Call 862-7858. many ..go with • t every vehicle and vacuumed! windshield inventory all insurance work! RE$SIVE GLASS CENTER, INC. and Linda Roggenbuck JORDEN ROGGENBUCK MN 56278 • 320-839-2255 • Toll Free 888-819-2255 iNDEPENDENTI Duck season proposed with changes, Goose season unchanged Most of South Dakota's 2003 waterfowl seasons would open Sept. 27 under a recent proposal by the state Game, Fish and Parks Commission. "Changes proposed are meant to conform to the federal framework, which will be submitted to the states in early August," said state Waterfowl Biologist Spencer Vaa of Brookings. Recommended changes for the state's duck seasons from last year include: • Change the starting date tbr the Low Plains north zone from the third Saturday in Sept. to the fourth Saturday in Septemblr. • Change the starting date for the Low Plains middle zone from the Saturday closest to Oct. 1 to the fourth Saturday in September. • Change the starting date for the High Plains season from the Saturday closest to Oct. 1 to the fourth Saturday in September. • Change the season length for pin- tails in each zone from 39 days to the same season length as other species (except canvasbacks). • Change bag limit for scaup from 3 to2. Essentially, most duck seasons would open on Saturday, Sept. 27 this year and continue through Dec. 9. Exceptions would include the Low Plains south zone, which would open Oct. ! 1 and continue through Dec. 23, and the High Plains season that would end on Jan. 1. "That is the earliest possible dates for season openings and will provide the maximum opportunity possible for duck hunting," Vaa said. Vaa also noted that there were no recommended changes for the state's 2003 goose seasons from last year. "However," he said, "goose hunting is under the same rule chapter as duck hunting, so the goose season is still open for modification during finaliza- tion if there are changes that are given with the federal framework•" Individuals can submit comment by attending the public hearing at 2 p.m., Thursday, Aug. 7, at the Brookings Inn in Brookings. Send written comments to Game, Fish and Parks, 523 E. Capitol, Pierre, S.D. 57501, or send e-mail to wildinfo@state.sd.us. Comments must include full name and address. Cornfest pageant entrants needed Cornfest committee members are still seeking contestants for the Miss Ortonville Area 2003 and Little Miss Ortonville pageants. Miss Ortonville Area contestants must be entering 1 lth or 12th grades in September, must be United States citizens, and must have lived in the area for at least one year. Additionally, they must not be married or have children. The contestant who wins the title of Miss Ortonville Area must be avail- able during the from Cornfest 2003 until Cornfest 2004 to attend parades and any other functions that may occur throughout the year in relation to the Miss Ortonville Area title• Anyone wishing to enter the pageant should return their form to the Ortonville Area Chamber of Commerce office no later than this Friday, August 8. Young girls entering into first grade by this fall are elgibile to participate in the Little Miss Ortonville Area pageant. Judging for this pageant will be luck-of-the-draw. Anyone with questions concerning either portion of the competition may contact Marlyce Thompson at 839- 2991 or 2273-2314. SOMETHING DIFFERENT 3x5 Safety Deposit Box 1/2 off a one year rental with a new qualified checldng account. "Because we caret. " o CenBanl: 113 NW 1st Street • Ortonville, MN 56278 Phone 320-839-6123 • 1-800-335-8920 • Fax 320-839-6127 Member 24-hour banking 1-877-569-2265 • www.cenbank.com FDIC