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August 18, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
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August 18, 1921
 

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! Ame ri ca--0000K-1 r i %  at&apos; Minn. Legionaires Did at Wil:ona Conventiov St. Paul, Minn., August 18, 1921.--! :Now that a transcription of the ro- rters notes of the Third Annual Convention of the American Legion at Winona Augtt I, 2, and 3, is avail- .able Department Headquarters has , ssued the follocing sttwmary of con- :ention actions: Dr. A. A. Van Dyke of St. :Paul "med as Department Commander ziuring coming year. R. A. Rossberg of Crookston named mationai executive committeeman to .epresent Minnesota on national exe- ,cutive committee during coming year. Two of oldest Minnesota Legion- res honored by election as vice- tate commanders. They are Dr. J. .. Gates of Kenyon and H. E. Lamb ,of Worthington. The former hoe ;three sons in war and enlisted himself at age of fifty. H. E. Lamb went to iberia at aye'of sixty-two beqause , of his expert knowledge as railway ..rain dispatcher. Honored prominent woman mem- ber; Mrs. Amy Robbins Ware of Rob- insdale, by electing her state vice- ommander. She did valiant work in the army nurse corps in France and ims written book of famous poems de- .scriptive of war incidents. Demands for adjusted compensa- ion reiterated. Measure described as 'moral obligation" rather than gift or .)onus on part of government. Sweet Bill endorsed. Co-olSeration pledged in carrying out its provisions. Removal of inefficient and unjust of* cials 'in federal vocational bureau, :public health service, and war risk bu- lreau, urged. Extension of maximum sick leave for vocational training students from sixty to one hundred and eighty days recommended. Elimination of present red tape in government dealings with service men demanded. Creation of pernanent state Legion board to get actio in government i ]elings with service men ordered. Pardon, clemency, or maudlin sym- Apathy for person convicted of often- ces against the government during he war condemned. The promiscuous and unjustified earing of the United States Uni- form condemned. ty, co-ordinating and bringing back that wonderful spirit which existed thruout the war, all working for the best interests of our country and for- getting petty jealousies which have crept in during the last two years. "Under the first phase, we must co- ordinate our units and devise ways and" means of e]iminatinK existing red tape so as to bring the men in need of help closer to that branch of the government which administers aid, so that it may be done quickly and efficiently, thereby relieving in the greatest measure possible, trouble and pain. We must also devise some way of obtaining more adequate treatment of those borderline mental cases; those men of hom there are ,many, who, due to the terrific strain to which they have been subjected, have I reached that twilight zone of mental disorder in which they would remain but temporarily if given proper treat- i ment and restored to normality, whereas, if placed in existing hospi- tals, they will not only fail to improve I as quickly as they should, but will go the other way. "Under the second phase, first comes adjusted compensatio;/, whic must be accomplished thru proving our case nat only to the bodies of .Con- gress, but to the great American peo- ple, who are just, not from the stand- point of patriotism alone, but from the standpoint of the justice and merit of our claim. Also, we must secure a better enforcement of the Soldiers Preference Act, locally, from the standpoint of the state, and fr6m a national standpoint. For the second part of the second phase laid out for us, we must put our organization on a more permanent basis of co-opera- tion with all employers of labor, so that service men shall not suffer for having served their country during its time of need. "Under the third phase of the work ahead of us, there comes to me the thot that possibly this phase in years to come will mean our greatest task. During the war, there were two great armies, that army which fought at the front, and the army which fought at home. We of the American Le- gion have now joined that great army at home, and it is time for us to take our place in cammunit;y life, carrying our share of the burden and the duty of making this country a better place I for all of us to live in, so that. future generations may look back upon this epoch in history and realize that we of the American Leion did our share not only in winning the great war, but al- :o in the gigantic task of reconstruc- tion with which we are now battling and which, please God, shall be brot Enforcement of Mongolian exelu- to a successfUl conclusion." ion laws on Pacific coast urged. [ Abolition of war tax on amvements The Farm Bureau vhen given by veteran organizatlons ecommended.. Strict enfoement of Minnesota tate soldiers preference act demand- i. Activities of ultra-radical teachers and professors in public and parochial chools denounced. Legion posts urged to increase their Americanization efforts. Legion State Headquarters instruc- ted to pro-rate Legion State dues from July first charging fifty cents for bal- ance of year. Prorating of national <tues by national headquarters urged-- lliinnesota Legion delegation to na- tional convention to bring this ques- tion to the attention of national con- wentiom $ Broader powers for Minnota state onus board of review for purpose of paying all outstanding bonus claims with least possible delay recommen- <ted. Legalizing of boxing exhibitions ]n ities of first, second, third and fourth las recommended. Amendment of state soldiers pref- erence law to provide a fairand Im- partial hearing for each applicant Jrged. Amendment of Minnesota Soldiers Peddler License law to give communi- ' ies power to grant or refuse licenses to former service men urged. This ecommendation was prompted by fact Jaat itinerant ex-service icldlers abuse the free-service license privilege ad bring ex-service men into disre- Ite. Eent of Minnesota Legion ' Commission for aid o widows and , orpha of service men and wives and ildren of disabled veterans author- Aed. Formation of Minnesota Legion Ath Board to encourage post ath- letics reeoamended. LeKionaires and citizens of Winona hearty thanked for their splendid welcome and co-operation i making the stay of Legion Auxiliary dele- gates as pleasant as possible. Fourth Annual Legion State Con- vention am] Third Annual Auxiliary tata Oonvention to be held at Vir- ginia, Minnesota, dates to be an- nounced in spring of 192.- The Legions--and The Future St. Paul, Minrg, August 18, 1921.- When the editor of the Hennepin County Legionaire asked Dr. A. A. tate Commander, to outline his pro- State oCmmander, to outline his pro- gram for the Legion d the com. bug year, Commander Van Dyke re- plied as follows: "As I see it, our work for .the next :year has three phases. First---to car- ry on and complete oar work in be- haf of our disabled. Second--To se- eure justice, equity, aml equality for the ex-erViee man, both rfro the standpoint of our relation with the government and our relation with *civilians and civilian bodies. Third-- o take our place in every communi- In Washington The Capper-Tincher bill for the regulation of grain exchanges passed the Senate on August 9, and is now with the Conference ccmmittee. It is afe to predict that the bill will be passed finally in a form to be of real service to the producer. It now abol- 1 i,'-hes transactions known as mdemm- Ues, or "puts" and "calls." by levying a prohibitive tax. It admits co-oper- ative associations to membership in legally recognized grain exchanges. As amended by the Smate it provides that the earnings of co-operative as- sociations may be distributed among bona-fide members: Dealing in fu- tures will be permitted on thirteen markets to be designated by the Sec- retary of Agriculture,, and he may compel grain exchanges to exercise di]igence in preventing the dissemina- tion of false crop reports by their members and to keep records of all transactions for his inspection and -lhat of the Department of Justice. President Harding has consented to a recess of both houses for 30 days beginning next week. Railroad legis- lation will not be taken up until after the recess. The emergency tariff is to be extended before the recess. The committees will contfnue their work on tariff and taxation. The Joint Commission for Agricultural Inquiry will continue in hearing. Before passing the McNary substi- tute for the Norris bill the Senate amendFd it so that the War Finance Corporation may lend money to or- rtlE ORTONVILLE ganizations, including co-operative organizations, for the purpose of fi- nancing exports. The provision for making loans to individuals was re- moved from the bill. It also author- izes the War Finance  " to CorpSratmn lend $100,000,000 to the Federal Farm Loan Board, which hould greatly facilitate the activities of the Board in making long-term loans to farmers. "The bill makes no chaqge in the Cor- poration's cash capital of $500,000,- 000, but reduces from $3,000,000,000 to $2,000,000,000 the authorized maxi- mum of bonds it may issue. The bill as passed provides that whenever in the opinion of the direc- tors conditions arising out of the war have brought about an abnormal sur- plus accthmulation of any staple agri- cultural product, and ordinary bank- ing facilities are inadequate to en- able producers or dealers to carry them until they can be exported in an orderly manner, the War Finance Corporation can provide the necessary advances to make possible the holding of the product pending better export conditions. The American Farm Bureau Feder- ation has presented a statement to the Senate Finance committee pro- testing against an embargo upon dye- stuffs. It was pointed out that the farmer has not asked for an embargo on agricultural commodities. An em- bargo on dyestouffs would be a dis- crimination against the farmers and in favor of a very small class of peo- ple producing dyes. During the war, when cotton so]d as high as 40 cen per pound, the cost of dyes going into fabrics even at war prices was not a very material item, but with cotton at i0 and 12 cents per pound and in- digo selling now at 70 and 75 cents per pound compared with 13 and 16 cents before the war, it becomes rela- tively an important factor in the sell- ing price of cotton goods. It's This Way. In the days when we were gettin our start, 'Twos different then than now, All a young man needed Was a team, a harrow, and plow, He worked from early morning, Till the sun sank in the west; He plowed and sowed and harrowed, Then nature did the rest. In autumn he reaped a good harvest, His farm was the best of the soil. And God's own earth yields riches To one who is willing to toil. His wife was always happy, Tho they started with hardly a cent, But under her home-made bonnet There were no rooms to rent. But nowdays, things are different, A young man must have the cash; He starts at the top of the ladder, Sometimes he comes down with a crash. But, he must have such experience Before he really can see That he is not so much wiser Than his father used to be. He thifiks he must go into business, But before he can make a good deal, He must mortgage all he possesses, And buy an automobile. His wife wears the finest of clothing, 'Tis true, she does not wear much, But they are very expensive, Silk hose, toe slippers, and such. They live in hotels in winter, In summer she goes t6 the beach; It keeps his brain a-working To make his salary reach. They blame the high cost of living, It is not that at all, But surely the cost of high living Will drive anyone to the wall. "I knew no good could came from it when we were married by a jus- tice of the peace." "No, we ought to have been mar- ried by the Secretary of War." Notice of Mortgage Foreclosure Sale. Default having been made in the conditions of a certain mortgage con- raining a Power of Sale, dated March 1, 1916, and recorded in the office of the Register of Deeds of Big Stone County, Minn., March 11, 1916, at 4 o'clock p. m. in book 5@ of mortgages on page 173 whereby N. J. Wilkins and Mary VI. Wilkins, mortgagors, mortgaged to Frank Miller, mort- gagee, the South Half (S) of the Southwest Quarter (SW 4 ) of Section Thirteen (13) and the Northwest Quarter (NW) of Section Twenty- four (24), township One Hundred twenty-one (121), Range Forty-six (46), Big Stone County, Minn., by which default the Power of Sale has become operative and no action or pro- ceeding at law having been istituted to recover the debt secured thereby or any part thereof, and there is claimed to be due on this mortgage to the date hereof the sum of Eleven Thou- sand Four Hundred Seventy-nine and fifty-four one hundredths ($11,479.54) Dollars. Now, Notice is hereby given, that by virtue of said Power said mortgage will be foreclosed and said pre/nises sold at public auction by the Sheriff of said county or his deputy on Saturday September 3, 1921 at 0 o'clock a. m. a th front door of th Court House, in Ortonville, in said county, to pay said debt, interest, attorney's fees and disbursements allowed by law. Dated June 5, 1921. FRANK MILLER, Mortgagee. A. B. K AERcHER, Attorney, Ortonville, Minn. First Pub. July 21 Last Sept. 1 INDEPENDENT NOTICE OF MORTGAGE FOR- CLOSURE SALE. Default having been made in the conditions of a certain mortgage con- taining a power of Sale, dated Febru- ary 21, 1918, and duly recorded in the office of the Register of Deeeds of Big Stone County, Minn., March 23, 1918, at 9 o'clock m m. in Book 53 of Mort- gages on page 110, whereby M. Ferch and Julia Ferch, his wife, C. J. Fetch and Matilda Ferch, his wife, C. F. Ferch and Emma Ferch his wife, mortgagors, mortgaged to the State Bank of Correll, now Farmers & Mer- chants State Bank, mortgagee, the Southeast Quarter (S.E.) of Section Twenty-one (21), Township One Hun- dred Twenty-one (121), range Forty- four (44), Big Stone County, Minne- sota, by which default the Power of Sale has become operative, and no ac- tion or proceeding at law having been instituted to eCover the debt secured thereby, or any part thereof, and there is claimed to be due on said mortgage at the date hereof the sum of Two Thousand Seven Hundred Thirty-eight and righty-nine one hundredths ($38.89) Dollars. iow, Notice Is Hereby Given, That by virtue of said power, said mortgage will be foreclosed and said premises sold at public auction by the Sheriff of said county, or his deputy, on Fri- day, August 12, 1921, at 10 o'clock a. m. at the front door of the Court House in Ortonville, in said county, to pay said debt, interest, attorney's fees, and disbursements allowed by law. Dated May 10, 1921. Farmers & Merchants State Bank of Correll, Mortgagee. A. B. Kaercher, Attorney Ortonville, Minn. Fisrt Pub. June 30. Millinery opening at th Mickel- son Millinery Store this Friday and Saturday. If its anything "Mechanical" and you think it cannot be done--take it to Hall's No shop in this sec- tion so complete in mechanical equip- ment or manned by more expert mechan- ics. A. S. HALLS Ortonville I I THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, Be Photographed This Year on Your Birthday VIKRE ORTONVII,LE f Gifts That Last i Victrolas Edisons DIAMONDS PALM, The Jeweler ###'t'#:: Let Us Serve You Whether you are really hungry or wish only for a light lunch vou will find that food prepared and served a/ne Pie House has a satisfying flavor and has the "Home Cook" taste, for it is home cooked. No substitutes are used in Pie House cooking. We use only the best ingredients. THE ])It: HOUSE C. A. BEARD, Proprietor Publicity establishes a feeling of friendliness and curity among the people of the community. CLEVELAND SIX g 5 September 1920 $1645 with cord firm August 1921 $1295 with cord No Other Car In Its Class At Such a Low Price in fact, the Cleveland is in a class by itself. It is as finely designed, in every engineering and mechanical detail, as any ear of any size or price. And it i built ha its own great mod- en plant, by men long experienced aria skilled in the building of fine ara. The Cievehmd provicl, es qualities that arenot found ha other cars Riling for much more. It will meet your every require- ment on any kind of roadway, on the boulevard, paved high- way or country road, on the straight-way ilevd road or the steepest hill. The scientific distribution of weight and the long under- dung spring construction give to the Clevelandriding comfort on rough roads not excelled by cars weighing twice as much. Sturdily built, beautifully finished and splendidly uphol. stmq! bodies are mounted on the staunch Cleveland chassis. Buy No Other Light Six Until You See the Cleveland Towing C (Fivo Putmntlors) $1295 Roadster (Three Passengers) $1291 dam (Five Pen) : . . $2295 Coupe (Four Pamasngora).. $2195 Prices f. o. b. Cievelamd Bi Four-inch Cord Tres Standard Equipment VANC.URA "AUTO COMPANY A.S. HALLS % CtNLAI. M31'OMOILg COMPANY, ! Ame ri ca--0000K-1 r i %  at' Minn. Legionaires Did at Wil:ona Conventiov St. Paul, Minn., August 18, 1921.--! :Now that a transcription of the ro- rters notes of the Third Annual Convention of the American Legion at Winona Augtt I, 2, and 3, is avail- .able Department Headquarters has , ssued the follocing sttwmary of con- :ention actions: Dr. A. A. Van Dyke of St. :Paul "med as Department Commander ziuring coming year. R. A. Rossberg of Crookston named mationai executive committeeman to .epresent Minnesota on national exe- ,cutive committee during coming year. Two of oldest Minnesota Legion- res honored by election as vice- tate commanders. They are Dr. J. .. Gates of Kenyon and H. E. Lamb ,of Worthington. The former hoe ;three sons in war and enlisted himself at age of fifty. H. E. Lamb went to iberia at aye'of sixty-two beqause , of his expert knowledge as railway ..rain dispatcher. Honored prominent woman mem- ber; Mrs. Amy Robbins Ware of Rob- insdale, by electing her state vice- ommander. She did valiant work in the army nurse corps in France and ims written book of famous poems de- .scriptive of war incidents. Demands for adjusted compensa- ion reiterated. Measure described as 'moral obligation" rather than gift or .)onus on part of government. Sweet Bill endorsed. Co-olSeration pledged in carrying out its provisions. Removal of inefficient and unjust of* cials 'in federal vocational bureau, :public health service, and war risk bu- lreau, urged. Extension of maximum sick leave for vocational training students from sixty to one hundred and eighty days recommended. Elimination of present red tape in government dealings with service men demanded. Creation of pernanent state Legion board to get actio in government i ]elings with service men ordered. Pardon, clemency, or maudlin sym- Apathy for person convicted of often- ces against the government during he war condemned. The promiscuous and unjustified earing of the United States Uni- form condemned. ty, co-ordinating and bringing back that wonderful spirit which existed thruout the war, all working for the best interests of our country and for- getting petty jealousies which have crept in during the last two years. "Under the first phase, we must co- ordinate our units and devise ways and" means of e]iminatinK existing red tape so as to bring the men in need of help closer to that branch of the government which administers aid, so that it may be done quickly and efficiently, thereby relieving in the greatest measure possible, trouble and pain. We must also devise some way of obtaining more adequate treatment of those borderline mental cases; those men of hom there are ,many, who, due to the terrific strain to which they have been subjected, have I reached that twilight zone of mental disorder in which they would remain but temporarily if given proper treat- i ment and restored to normality, whereas, if placed in existing hospi- tals, they will not only fail to improve I as quickly as they should, but will go the other way. "Under the second phase, first comes adjusted compensatio;/, whic must be accomplished thru proving our case nat only to the bodies of .Con- gress, but to the great American peo- ple, who are just, not from the stand- point of patriotism alone, but from the standpoint of the justice and merit of our claim. Also, we must secure a better enforcement of the Soldiers Preference Act, locally, from the standpoint of the state, and fr6m a national standpoint. For the second part of the second phase laid out for us, we must put our organization on a more permanent basis of co-opera- tion with all employers of labor, so that service men shall not suffer for having served their country during its time of need. "Under the third phase of the work ahead of us, there comes to me the thot that possibly this phase in years to come will mean our greatest task. During the war, there were two great armies, that army which fought at the front, and the army which fought at home. We of the American Le- gion have now joined that great army at home, and it is time for us to take our place in cammunit;y life, carrying our share of the burden and the duty of making this country a better place I for all of us to live in, so that. future generations may look back upon this epoch in history and realize that we of the American Leion did our share not only in winning the great war, but al- :o in the gigantic task of reconstruc- tion with which we are now battling and which, please God, shall be brot Enforcement of Mongolian exelu- to a successfUl conclusion." ion laws on Pacific coast urged. [ Abolition of war tax on amvements The Farm Bureau vhen given by veteran organizatlons ecommended.. Strict enfoement of Minnesota tate soldiers preference act demand- i. Activities of ultra-radical teachers and professors in public and parochial chools denounced. Legion posts urged to increase their Americanization efforts. Legion State Headquarters instruc- ted to pro-rate Legion State dues from July first charging fifty cents for bal- ance of year. Prorating of national <tues by national headquarters urged-- lliinnesota Legion delegation to na- tional convention to bring this ques- tion to the attention of national con- wentiom $ Broader powers for Minnota state onus board of review for purpose of paying all outstanding bonus claims with least possible delay recommen- <ted. Legalizing of boxing exhibitions ]n ities of first, second, third and fourth las recommended. Amendment of state soldiers pref- erence law to provide a fairand Im- partial hearing for each applicant Jrged. Amendment of Minnesota Soldiers Peddler License law to give communi- ' ies power to grant or refuse licenses to former service men urged. This ecommendation was prompted by fact Jaat itinerant ex-service icldlers abuse the free-service license privilege ad bring ex-service men into disre- Ite. Eent of Minnesota Legion ' Commission for aid o widows and , orpha of service men and wives and ildren of disabled veterans author- Aed. Formation of Minnesota Legion Ath Board to encourage post ath- letics reeoamended. LeKionaires and citizens of Winona hearty thanked for their splendid welcome and co-operation i making the stay of Legion Auxiliary dele- gates as pleasant as possible. Fourth Annual Legion State Con- vention am] Third Annual Auxiliary tata Oonvention to be held at Vir- ginia, Minnesota, dates to be an- nounced in spring of 192.- The Legions--and The Future St. Paul, Minrg, August 18, 1921.- When the editor of the Hennepin County Legionaire asked Dr. A. A. tate Commander, to outline his pro- State oCmmander, to outline his pro- gram for the Legion d the com. bug year, Commander Van Dyke re- plied as follows: "As I see it, our work for .the next :year has three phases. First---to car- ry on and complete oar work in be- haf of our disabled. Second--To se- eure justice, equity, aml equality for the ex-erViee man, both rfro the standpoint of our relation with the government and our relation with *civilians and civilian bodies. Third-- o take our place in every communi- In Washington The Capper-Tincher bill for the regulation of grain exchanges passed the Senate on August 9, and is now with the Conference ccmmittee. It is afe to predict that the bill will be passed finally in a form to be of real service to the producer. It now abol- 1 i,'-hes transactions known as mdemm- Ues, or "puts" and "calls." by levying a prohibitive tax. It admits co-oper- ative associations to membership in legally recognized grain exchanges. As amended by the Smate it provides that the earnings of co-operative as- sociations may be distributed among bona-fide members: Dealing in fu- tures will be permitted on thirteen markets to be designated by the Sec- retary of Agriculture,, and he may compel grain exchanges to exercise di]igence in preventing the dissemina- tion of false crop reports by their members and to keep records of all transactions for his inspection and -lhat of the Department of Justice. President Harding has consented to a recess of both houses for 30 days beginning next week. Railroad legis- lation will not be taken up until after the recess. The emergency tariff is to be extended before the recess. The committees will contfnue their work on tariff and taxation. The Joint Commission for Agricultural Inquiry will continue in hearing. Before passing the McNary substi- tute for the Norris bill the Senate amendFd it so that the War Finance Corporation may lend money to or- rtlE ORTONVILLE ganizations, including co-operative organizations, for the purpose of fi- nancing exports. The provision for making loans to individuals was re- moved from the bill. It also author- izes the War Finance  " to CorpSratmn lend $100,000,000 to the Federal Farm Loan Board, which hould greatly facilitate the activities of the Board in making long-term loans to farmers. "The bill makes no chaqge in the Cor- poration's cash capital of $500,000,- 000, but reduces from $3,000,000,000 to $2,000,000,000 the authorized maxi- mum of bonds it may issue. The bill as passed provides that whenever in the opinion of the direc- tors conditions arising out of the war have brought about an abnormal sur- plus accthmulation of any staple agri- cultural product, and ordinary bank- ing facilities are inadequate to en- able producers or dealers to carry them until they can be exported in an orderly manner, the War Finance Corporation can provide the necessary advances to make possible the holding of the product pending better export conditions. The American Farm Bureau Feder- ation has presented a statement to the Senate Finance committee pro- testing against an embargo upon dye- stuffs. It was pointed out that the farmer has not asked for an embargo on agricultural commodities. An em- bargo on dyestouffs would be a dis- crimination against the farmers and in favor of a very small class of peo- ple producing dyes. During the war, when cotton so]d as high as 40 cen per pound, the cost of dyes going into fabrics even at war prices was not a very material item, but with cotton at i0 and 12 cents per pound and in- digo selling now at 70 and 75 cents per pound compared with 13 and 16 cents before the war, it becomes rela- tively an important factor in the sell- ing price of cotton goods. It's This Way. In the days when we were gettin our start, 'Twos different then than now, All a young man needed Was a team, a harrow, and plow, He worked from early morning, Till the sun sank in the west; He plowed and sowed and harrowed, Then nature did the rest. In autumn he reaped a good harvest, His farm was the best of the soil. And God's own earth yields riches To one who is willing to toil. His wife was always happy, Tho they started with hardly a cent, But under her home-made bonnet There were no rooms to rent. But nowdays, things are different, A young man must have the cash; He starts at the top of the ladder, Sometimes he comes down with a crash. But, he must have such experience Before he really can see That he is not so much wiser Than his father used to be. He thifiks he must go into business, But before he can make a good deal, He must mortgage all he possesses, And buy an automobile. His wife wears the finest of clothing, 'Tis true, she does not wear much, But they are very expensive, Silk hose, toe slippers, and such. They live in hotels in winter, In summer she goes t6 the beach; It keeps his brain a-working To make his salary reach. They blame the high cost of living, It is not that at all, But surely the cost of high living Will drive anyone to the wall. "I knew no good could came from it when we were married by a jus- tice of the peace." "No, we ought to have been mar- ried by the Secretary of War." Notice of Mortgage Foreclosure Sale. Default having been made in the conditions of a certain mortgage con- raining a Power of Sale, dated March 1, 1916, and recorded in the office of the Register of Deeds of Big Stone County, Minn., March 11, 1916, at 4 o'clock p. m. in book 5@ of mortgages on page 173 whereby N. J. Wilkins and Mary VI. Wilkins, mortgagors, mortgaged to Frank Miller, mort- gagee, the South Half (S) of the Southwest Quarter (SW 4 ) of Section Thirteen (13) and the Northwest Quarter (NW) of Section Twenty- four (24), township One Hundred twenty-one (121), Range Forty-six (46), Big Stone County, Minn., by which default the Power of Sale has become operative and no action or pro- ceeding at law having been istituted to recover the debt secured thereby or any part thereof, and there is claimed to be due on this mortgage to the date hereof the sum of Eleven Thou- sand Four Hundred Seventy-nine and fifty-four one hundredths ($11,479.54) Dollars. Now, Notice is hereby given, that by virtue of said Power said mortgage will be foreclosed and said pre/nises sold at public auction by the Sheriff of said county or his deputy on Saturday September 3, 1921 at 0 o'clock a. m. a th front door of th Court House, in Ortonville, in said county, to pay said debt, interest, attorney's fees and disbursements allowed by law. Dated June 5, 1921. FRANK MILLER, Mortgagee. A. B. K AERcHER, Attorney, Ortonville, Minn. First Pub. July 21 Last Sept. 1 INDEPENDENT NOTICE OF MORTGAGE FOR- CLOSURE SALE. Default having been made in the conditions of a certain mortgage con- taining a power of Sale, dated Febru- ary 21, 1918, and duly recorded in the office of the Register of Deeeds of Big Stone County, Minn., March 23, 1918, at 9 o'clock m m. in Book 53 of Mort- gages on page 110, whereby M. Ferch and Julia Ferch, his wife, C. J. Fetch and Matilda Ferch, his wife, C. F. Ferch and Emma Ferch his wife, mortgagors, mortgaged to the State Bank of Correll, now Farmers & Mer- chants State Bank, mortgagee, the Southeast Quarter (S.E.) of Section Twenty-one (21), Township One Hun- dred Twenty-one (121), range Forty- four (44), Big Stone County, Minne- sota, by which default the Power of Sale has become operative, and no ac- tion or proceeding at law having been instituted to eCover the debt secured thereby, or any part thereof, and there is claimed to be due on said mortgage at the date hereof the sum of Two Thousand Seven Hundred Thirty-eight and righty-nine one hundredths ($38.89) Dollars. iow, Notice Is Hereby Given, That by virtue of said power, said mortgage will be foreclosed and said premises sold at public auction by the Sheriff of said county, or his deputy, on Fri- day, August 12, 1921, at 10 o'clock a. m. at the front door of the Court House in Ortonville, in said county, to pay said debt, interest, attorney's fees, and disbursements allowed by law. Dated May 10, 1921. Farmers & Merchants State Bank of Correll, Mortgagee. A. B. Kaercher, Attorney Ortonville, Minn. Fisrt Pub. June 30. Millinery opening at th Mickel- son Millinery Store this Friday and Saturday. If its anything "Mechanical" and you think it cannot be done--take it to Hall's No shop in this sec- tion so complete in mechanical equip- ment or manned by more expert mechan- ics. A. S. HALLS Ortonville I I THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, Be Photographed This Year on Your Birthday VIKRE ORTONVII,LE f Gifts That Last i Victrolas Edisons DIAMONDS PALM, The Jeweler ###'t'#:: Let Us Serve You Whether you are really hungry or wish only for a light lunch vou will find that food prepared and served a/ne Pie House has a satisfying flavor and has the "Home Cook" taste, for it is home cooked. No substitutes are used in Pie House cooking. We use only the best ingredients. THE ])It: HOUSE C. A. BEARD, Proprietor Publicity establishes a feeling of friendliness and curity among the people of the community. CLEVELAND SIX g 5 September 1920 $1645 with cord firm August 1921 $1295 with cord No Other Car In Its Class At Such a Low Price in fact, the Cleveland is in a class by itself. It is as finely designed, in every engineering and mechanical detail, as any ear of any size or price. And it i built ha its own great mod- en plant, by men long experienced aria skilled in the building of fine ara. The Cievehmd provicl, es qualities that arenot found ha other cars Riling for much more. It will meet your every require- ment on any kind of roadway, on the boulevard, paved high- way or country road, on the straight-way ilevd road or the steepest hill. The scientific distribution of weight and the long under- dung spring construction give to the Clevelandriding comfort on rough roads not excelled by cars weighing twice as much. Sturdily built, beautifully finished and splendidly uphol. stmq! bodies are mounted on the staunch Cleveland chassis. Buy No Other Light Six Until You See the Cleveland Towing C (Fivo Putmntlors) $1295 Roadster (Three Passengers) $1291 dam (Five Pen) : . . $2295 Coupe (Four Pamasngora).. $2195 Prices f. o. b. Cievelamd Bi Four-inch Cord Tres Standard Equipment VANC.URA "AUTO COMPANY A.S. HALLS % CtNLAI. M31'OMOILg COMPANY, AGE6 4o 1 that wonderful spirit which existed thruout the war, all working for the e n es s of our country and for- I e " " getting petty  alOusles whwh have (lept in during the last two years. "Under the first ghe, we must e .t- i= . . mdinate our units d devi wa,a .at" mnn. heglonalre$ and'meaa of eliminating existing Did at Wicona Cortventiol 1 led tape so as to bring the men in __ need of help closer to that branch st. Paul, Minn,. Aug, us 18, 192  o the govement which admlni te Now hat a tlanseriptinn of the ri Sd, so that it may be done quickly Iorters notes of the Third Annual l and efneiently, thereby relieving in the ,Con 'ention of the Ametan g on greater measure possible trouble arm at Winona AuguSt 1.2, and 3, is avail-! pain. Ne mast al devise some way sb/e Department Headaartols has ofohtammgmoreadeqtetatment ssued the folloCing smmary of con -of tbo borderline mental es; wention actions: I those men of Whom the a any, Dr. A, A. Van Dyk* of S "Paul ho, due to the terrific strain to moed as Department Commander] which they have been suhjted, have tJng coming yr. rehed that twilight ne of mentat R A. Rossbelg of Crkstou naml disorder in which they would remain tioi executive mmittman toi hat temporarily if glv pruper treat- eprent Minnesota on national exe ment and stol to normality, ,tive commRt dung coming year eas, Lf.piaced iR eting hospi- Two of oldest Minnesota Legion- tals, they will not only fall to impz*ve .ires honored by election  vi- as qmckly as they should, but will go tate commande, aey are Dr. J, ] the ogler way A. Gatee of Kenyon and H. E. Lamb "Under the ond pha, first *of Worthington The foyer had comes adjusted compensafio, whi thee sons in w d list ed himsell must be aomplishl th proving our t age of fifty H.E. Lamb went to c.e t only to the bodies of,Con. qibia at age bf sixty-two hee#u gress, but to the great American pen- , f his expert knowledge  railway pie, who  just, not from the stand traia dispatcher, point of patriotism alone, but fm 4onored prominent woman mere- thestandpointofthejustieeandmert er; Mr. Amy Rohbi Wa of Rob- of our him. Also, we mt sure indale, by electing her state vie abetter enforcement of the Soldiers mmder She dM valiant workn Preforence Act, locally, from the army nu rps in France and standpoint of the tate, mid fm a as written bunk of famous poems de- nahonal tandpoln For the snd scriptlve of w ineident, part of the econd phe laid nut for Demnds for adjtted ompna- us, we must put our orgiton on on rdterat Mur described -s a ma pcrment basSs of lra- 'm0ral obligation" rather than gift or cnus on ptrt of goeak Sweet Bill endorse. Coleration ledged n ar/ing out it proslons Removal of inemelent and unjust of. cials n federal vsottnal burn, * public health aervi, d war risk bn- *eau, urge Extension of xlm S]ek ee Yor votiona tirng starlets fm ixty to one hundred and eighty days tion with all employem of labor, so that service men shall not suffer for having rved their try during its eLme of need, "Under the third pha of the work ahead of us, the comes to me the thor that possLby this pha in years to me wil mn our greatest task. Duringthewar, th were two great rMes, that army which fought at the front, and the amy wMeh fought ommded. at home. We of the Amerin Le. ELimtion of present rml tape in glen have now joined that gat ay oveet dealings th 'i at heine, and it i ti for us to take men emded, our gie in emmur W life, carrying Catiun of peent state Legien our share of the burden and the duty oard to get tio in govemmentJ of making this country a better place de]n with rvi m ordered. I' for all of us to ive in, so that future Pardon, clemency.  maudlin sym-! genera.tios may Look back upon this athy for perso nvlcted of often-[ epoch m hstory and rh that we of es against the government duns lhe Amerie Leion dd our sha not he war ndemned 4 only in winning the great war, but el- The pmmeuoua sad unjustified ,o in the gigantic tak of ronstc- eafing of the Urdted States Uni- tlon with which we are now battling o condemned I and wh ch. p ease God, she be brot Enfoement of Mongolian ela- to a sussfUl conclusion" ion laws on Piflc cot urged [ Abol{tion of war tax n atmsements' The Farm nurPu hen given by vetor orizatwns In Washington eommended.. [ strict folemeat  Mita The Capper-Tincher bll for the tate soldie prefeace act de--rid- Je ulat o of ra excha e d : g i. g m ngs pas. .... lhe Senate on August 9, and is now Leglonpostsurget a her ,a. ins vine nlnltO eo rea . . seme to the producer. It now abol Amememtlon effor ts ].  , . the tranmchon known as mdemm Leg State Headqttarters rostra- ,ies o ,, ut" a d "e l] ,, b I ted to p-rat* Legion State duss from ' r p s n a s' Y ewlng t o i i iv . s n er JnUYe 7t :hsarg raftin ce:fts nfao;blaal ,pr; hibieetox s It milelhp in Y.. g mn i iegally recognized grain exehang*es. ues by natlo] headquarter u god-- s r I As amended by the Sea,ate it proddes winle set aventg :n t ode, rennet i. 2 n:" t ................................ . g . i qu - siations mag be distrlhutl among tion to the attentio of national con-  a fide me be De I" "n fu wentio o ,on - m . a mg i - Broader powers for MInnota state Ionus board of review for purpose of toayLng air outstanding bonus claims with least poshle delay commen- ded. Legalizing of boxing exbhlos n tes nf first, snd, third and fourth 1 ommeed. Amerdmt of state sodi pf- e*en law to provide a fdr and rm arfial hring for eh applicant ged. Amdmeut of Minnta 8u(llers I?eddt Lise law to give mmunl. tes power to grant or refuse ieenses to former sei n urged This leoramendat[on was prompte by ft .that itinerant ex-i lIdle abuse the free-service lieen*e privilege sam bring -aervlee men iron s- guts. EStBtllmtmt of Minneta t*glon , 'omminion for aid 4 vddows d .orphaw of ervlee men and wiv ehildrtm of dislmt vete author- ttmL Foatton of Minnesota Legion Athl Board to eroure pot ath- eevmsendmL ' lole  d eo-opratJon i making the stay of Legion Aeliary dele- gtte tm giet  potable. FoUrth Annual Legion State Con- mmion and Third Annual Auxl)iary tato Oonvention to be hem at Vr- glnl Miaesota, dates to be e Jn spring 6f 192.- The Lgions---and The Future st. Paul Min/-u_gust 18, 1921.-- Wbe the ed!to of the Hennepi County Legiormi asked Dr. tate Commsad*r, 2tate 0Ommander, *D'ma for the Legion durin the tram. Ig mr, ommr V Dyle re. plied  follows: *'A I ace it, our work for the t sat has thit phases. First-to r- ,ey on sd mgi  work i be- core idtee, equity, gr equait fr the trt[e man, both from the andpoint of our relatlo with the government and r relation vth To talm our tus will be pel rmitted on thirteen mkets to be digated by the Se. retary of Agrculta and he may compel grain oxchanges te exeise diligence in preventing the dLssemina- on of fal crop reports by thei members and to kp records of eli transitions for his insptlon and that of the Department of Justice. Ibdeut Harding has nsented to a ss of both hulas for 30 days hegineng next week Railroad legis- lation will not be teken up unl after the recess. The emergey tariff is to be exended befu the ress. The committs wil eentfnue their work on tariff and taon. The Joint Commissinn for Ageulturai Inquiry will nOn,hUe in heating, , Befo ssing the MeNary substi- tute for the Norris bill the Senate end t so that the War Finee CorIatien may lend money to nr MICE SAYS rile ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT THURSDAY, AUGUST 15. ganizations, including cooperative organizations, for the purpo of fi nancing expes The pruvsion for making loans to individuals was - moved from the bill. It al author- izes the War Finance Co,rfftion to lend $I00,000,000 to the Federal Farm lan Board, which hould greatly fac01tate the activities o the Boa,d in making Iongte loans to farmers. The bill makes no chaqge in the Cur poraton's ch eagital of $0,00, OO0, but nees from $3,000,000,0O0 to $2,OOO,O0O,O0O the authorized maxi- mum nf bonds it may ssue. The bl]I as pased provides that whenever in the opinion ef the dl- tors eonditlons arising out of the war have broaght abuut an abnormal sur- plus aectmulation of any staple agri- cultural p,duct, and ordinary bank- ing facilities are inadequate tn en- able producers or dealers to ar them until they can be exported an orderly manner, the War Fin, Corporation chn pruvide the necessary advances tu make possthle the holding of the product pending better export condition. The Amere Fa Buau Feder. atlon has presented a statement to tl,e Senate Fine cmlRtee p- tting against an embargo upon dy stuffs. It was pointed out that the faer has not asked for an embgo on agcultural mmodities. An em- bargo on dyestouffs would be a ds- crimnatnn against the faers d in favor of a very small cla ef peo- ple producing dty. During the war, when cotton sold as high  4O een, per pound, the cost of dyes going lnt fabrles even at war pric was ot t very material item, but with eottoi at 10 and 12 cents per pound and in align selling now at 7O d 75 een per pound eompazd wth 13 d 1 cents befo the war, it becwes rel, tively an impe,ant factor in the sell ing price of entton goods, It's Thh Way. In the days when we were gettin our start, 'Twas dfferent then than now, Al a young man needed Was a team, a harrow, d plow, He worked from early moig, Till the s ank u the west; He plowed and sowed and harrowed Then nature dd the lst. In autumn he aped a good harvest His farm was the bt of the snil. A.d God's own earth yleIds riches Tn one who is willing to toil. His wife was always happy, qao they started with hardly a nt, But uder her home made bonnet There were no rooms to nt. But nowdays, h ngs are d fferent, A young m must have the ch; He starts zt the top of the ladder, Sometimes he comes clown wLth a crash, Bt, he must have seh experience Before he really can see That he is not  much wiser Thau his father ud to be. He thinks he must go into buslnes, But befo he can make a good deal, He must mortgage all he possesses, And buy an automobile. tLs wife wears the finest of elothlng, 'Tis true, she do not wear much, But hey are very expen re, Silk hose, t slippers, and such. They li in hotels in winter, In ummer she gees t the beach; Lt keeps his brain a-wnrking To make his salary rek They blame the high cnst of living, It is not that at all, But surely the cost of high living WiLl drive anyone to the wall "I knew no good could came fm it when we we married hy a ju- ti of the p." "No, we ought to have be mar- tied by the eeretar] of War." LEGAL NOTICES Notice of Mortgage Foreel0ure Pal Dault having bn made in the conditions of a rtain mortgage con- tusing a Pnwer of Sale, dated Mh 1, 196, and xcorded in the omce of the Register of needs of Big Stone County, Minn, MCh 11 1916 at 4 o'elk p. m. in book 5 of mort [ on page 175, whehy N J. I and Mary 4 Wilkms, mortgagors, mortgaged to Fnk Miller, mort. gage% the South Half (S%) of the Thirteen (13) and the Northt Southwt Quarter (SWt4) ef Seti Quarter (NW) of Section Twenty- (24), One Hundred Forty-slx law. Dated Jtme 5, 1921. FRANK tILLER, Mortgagee. A. B. gAERCHER, Attaey, Ortonville, MIn Fira t Pub. 'uly 21 Last Sept. 1 NOTICE OF MORTGAGE FOR- CLOSURE SALE. Defadjt hasng b .... de  ,e Be Photographed This Year conditions of a rLain mortgage eun- ta..g, power of sai, dat Feh'u- on Your Birthday ary 21, 1918, and dul orded in tile .......... cds of Big V --IKRE Stone County, ,linn., Mh $ 1918, at 9 oeock  m. in Book 53 of blurt- gages on page II0, whereby M, Forth and duli Feh, his wife, C. J. Feh; VORTONVILL attd Matilda Fetch, his e, C. F. Feh mid Emma Perch his wife I mortgagor, mortgaged to the Stak Bank of CorH, now Fe & Me ff ......... chts State Braun, mortgage, tht Southeast quarter (S,E..) of Sector Twety-ee (2I), To--ship One Hun. ............ "'" .......... Gifts That Last fn (44), Big Stone Count, Mnn O4  t, by which default the ower o]  SaLe has home operative, and  -  ', tion or peeoding" at law having b ...... ............... :: ---- I Edi theby, or  part thereof and the is claimed to e due on said r ttg  ', at the date he.of the sm of Two Thourl Seven Hundred Thirty-eight nd Stght y-nine one hdredtht  ' , ....... ),o,s.  Vicfrnhs w, Notice Is He.by Given, That s0ns y Irt of said pow said mortgage will b folosed d said premise sold at public av.ion hy the Sheriff [ ! of ald county, or his deputy, o Fri-  , ay, A st 12' 1921, at 10 o'elk a m. at ue front door of the Ccur Ho in OrtenviLle, in said county, t pay id debt, intrust attoey' tees, mad djsburements allowed b .... , : DIAMONDS Dated May 10, II. Fe & Merckst State Bak of Coll, Mortgage, ..... he"00 .... : PALM ............... : , The Jeweler Fisrt Pub. Juv 30, --Millinery opening at th Miekel-  ' son MflILnery Sto this Friday d " " ** Saturday. If its anything "Mechanical" and you think it cannot be done--take it to Hall's No shop in this sec- tion so complete in -mechanical equip- ment or manned by more expert raechan- ins. A. S. HALLS Ortonvflle Let Us Serve You Whether you are really hungry or wish only for a light lunch you will find that food prepared and served at The Pie House has a satisfying flavor and has the "Home Cook" taste, for it is home cooked. No substitht, es are used in Pie House cooking. We use only the best ingredients. THE PIE HOUSE C. A. BEARD, Proprietor Publicity establishes a feeling of friendliness and s curity among the people of the community. ' CLEVELAND SiX s12 9 5 Sephnlmr 1920 August 1921 $1845 $1295 wlth rd  wlth ord  No Other Car In It* Class At Such a Low Price ht fach the Clwdand is in a cla by itself. It haa findy dmiltned, in every emaering and meanlcl detail, a an F eaz of any ai=e or price. And it is built in ita own Weat mud- era plant, by me Itmg experienced  akitled in the building The Ct-v provm qlitlea that arenot foend h var adlln or much more. It will meet yotw evm'y r pquir t e any Mad of roadway, on the  paved hih- way or eotmtr road, a th@ atralght.wayllevel road or tim pe*t hill. The umllfie distrllmllon of wei#:t and the long tmd**- dung opting comtucllon give tothe Cleveland ridiag comfort a rough road* not excelled by pars weighin twice u much. Sturdily built, beautully finished "and *pleadidly uphob atdvd bodie* are mounted o thin tmmph Cleveland chai Buy No Other Light Six Until You See the Cleveland pom.-hach Cord T'ea Standard Equlpmat VANCURA AUTO COMPANY A. s. % ! Ame ri ca--0000K-1 r i %  at' Minn. Legionaires Did at Wil:ona Conventiov St. Paul, Minn., August 18, 1921.--! :Now that a transcription of the ro- rters notes of the Third Annual Convention of the American Legion at Winona Augtt I, 2, and 3, is avail- .able Department Headquarters has , ssued the follocing sttwmary of con- :ention actions: Dr. A. A. Van Dyke of St. :Paul "med as Department Commander ziuring coming year. R. A. Rossberg of Crookston named mationai executive committeeman to .epresent Minnesota on national exe- ,cutive committee during coming year. Two of oldest Minnesota Legion- res honored by election as vice- tate commanders. They are Dr. J. .. Gates of Kenyon and H. E. Lamb ,of Worthington. The former hoe ;three sons in war and enlisted himself at age of fifty. H. E. Lamb went to iberia at aye'of sixty-two beqause , of his expert knowledge as railway ..rain dispatcher. Honored prominent woman mem- ber; Mrs. Amy Robbins Ware of Rob- insdale, by electing her state vice- ommander. She did valiant work in the army nurse corps in France and ims written book of famous poems de- .scriptive of war incidents. Demands for adjusted compensa- ion reiterated. Measure described as 'moral obligation" rather than gift or .)onus on part of government. Sweet Bill endorsed. Co-olSeration pledged in carrying out its provisions. Removal of inefficient and unjust of* cials 'in federal vocational bureau, :public health service, and war risk bu- lreau, urged. Extension of maximum sick leave for vocational training students from sixty to one hundred and eighty days recommended. Elimination of present red tape in government dealings with service men demanded. Creation of pernanent state Legion board to get actio in government i ]elings with service men ordered. Pardon, clemency, or maudlin sym- Apathy for person convicted of often- ces against the government during he war condemned. The promiscuous and unjustified earing of the United States Uni- form condemned. ty, co-ordinating and bringing back that wonderful spirit which existed thruout the war, all working for the best interests of our country and for- getting petty jealousies which have crept in during the last two years. "Under the first phase, we must co- ordinate our units and devise ways and" means of e]iminatinK existing red tape so as to bring the men in need of help closer to that branch of the government which administers aid, so that it may be done quickly and efficiently, thereby relieving in the greatest measure possible, trouble and pain. We must also devise some way of obtaining more adequate treatment of those borderline mental cases; those men of hom there are ,many, who, due to the terrific strain to which they have been subjected, have I reached that twilight zone of mental disorder in which they would remain but temporarily if given proper treat- i ment and restored to normality, whereas, if placed in existing hospi- tals, they will not only fail to improve I as quickly as they should, but will go the other way. "Under the second phase, first comes adjusted compensatio;/, whic must be accomplished thru proving our case nat only to the bodies of .Con- gress, but to the great American peo- ple, who are just, not from the stand- point of patriotism alone, but from the standpoint of the justice and merit of our claim. Also, we must secure a better enforcement of the Soldiers Preference Act, locally, from the standpoint of the state, and fr6m a national standpoint. For the second part of the second phase laid out for us, we must put our organization on a more permanent basis of co-opera- tion with all employers of labor, so that service men shall not suffer for having served their country during its time of need. "Under the third phase of the work ahead of us, there comes to me the thot that possibly this phase in years to come will mean our greatest task. During the war, there were two great armies, that army which fought at the front, and the army which fought at home. We of the American Le- gion have now joined that great army at home, and it is time for us to take our place in cammunit;y life, carrying our share of the burden and the duty of making this country a better place I for all of us to live in, so that. future generations may look back upon this epoch in history and realize that we of the American Leion did our share not only in winning the great war, but al- :o in the gigantic task of reconstruc- tion with which we are now battling and which, please God, shall be brot Enforcement of Mongolian exelu- to a successfUl conclusion." ion laws on Pacific coast urged. [ Abolition of war tax on amvements The Farm Bureau vhen given by veteran organizatlons ecommended.. Strict enfoement of Minnesota tate soldiers preference act demand- i. Activities of ultra-radical teachers and professors in public and parochial chools denounced. Legion posts urged to increase their Americanization efforts. Legion State Headquarters instruc- ted to pro-rate Legion State dues from July first charging fifty cents for bal- ance of year. Prorating of national <tues by national headquarters urged-- lliinnesota Legion delegation to na- tional convention to bring this ques- tion to the attention of national con- wentiom $ Broader powers for Minnota state onus board of review for purpose of paying all outstanding bonus claims with least possible delay recommen- <ted. Legalizing of boxing exhibitions ]n ities of first, second, third and fourth las recommended. Amendment of state soldiers pref- erence law to provide a fairand Im- partial hearing for each applicant Jrged. Amendment of Minnesota Soldiers Peddler License law to give communi- ' ies power to grant or refuse licenses to former service men urged. This ecommendation was prompted by fact Jaat itinerant ex-service icldlers abuse the free-service license privilege ad bring ex-service men into disre- Ite. Eent of Minnesota Legion ' Commission for aid o widows and , orpha of service men and wives and ildren of disabled veterans author- Aed. Formation of Minnesota Legion Ath Board to encourage post ath- letics reeoamended. LeKionaires and citizens of Winona hearty thanked for their splendid welcome and co-operation i making the stay of Legion Auxiliary dele- gates as pleasant as possible. Fourth Annual Legion State Con- vention am] Third Annual Auxiliary tata Oonvention to be held at Vir- ginia, Minnesota, dates to be an- nounced in spring of 192.- The Legions--and The Future St. Paul, Minrg, August 18, 1921.- When the editor of the Hennepin County Legionaire asked Dr. A. A. tate Commander, to outline his pro- State oCmmander, to outline his pro- gram for the Legion d the com. bug year, Commander Van Dyke re- plied as follows: "As I see it, our work for .the next :year has three phases. First---to car- ry on and complete oar work in be- haf of our disabled. Second--To se- eure justice, equity, aml equality for the ex-erViee man, both rfro the standpoint of our relation with the government and our relation with *civilians and civilian bodies. Third-- o take our place in every communi- In Washington The Capper-Tincher bill for the regulation of grain exchanges passed the Senate on August 9, and is now with the Conference ccmmittee. It is afe to predict that the bill will be passed finally in a form to be of real service to the producer. It now abol- 1 i,'-hes transactions known as mdemm- Ues, or "puts" and "calls." by levying a prohibitive tax. It admits co-oper- ative associations to membership in legally recognized grain exchanges. As amended by the Smate it provides that the earnings of co-operative as- sociations may be distributed among bona-fide members: Dealing in fu- tures will be permitted on thirteen markets to be designated by the Sec- retary of Agriculture,, and he may compel grain exchanges to exercise di]igence in preventing the dissemina- tion of false crop reports by their members and to keep records of all transactions for his inspection and -lhat of the Department of Justice. President Harding has consented to a recess of both houses for 30 days beginning next week. Railroad legis- lation will not be taken up until after the recess. The emergency tariff is to be extended before the recess. The committees will contfnue their work on tariff and taxation. The Joint Commission for Agricultural Inquiry will continue in hearing. Before passing the McNary substi- tute for the Norris bill the Senate amendFd it so that the War Finance Corporation may lend money to or- rtlE ORTONVILLE ganizations, including co-operative organizations, for the purpose of fi- nancing exports. The provision for making loans to individuals was re- moved from the bill. It also author- izes the War Finance  " to CorpSratmn lend $100,000,000 to the Federal Farm Loan Board, which hould greatly facilitate the activities of the Board in making long-term loans to farmers. "The bill makes no chaqge in the Cor- poration's cash capital of $500,000,- 000, but reduces from $3,000,000,000 to $2,000,000,000 the authorized maxi- mum of bonds it may issue. The bill as passed provides that whenever in the opinion of the direc- tors conditions arising out of the war have brought about an abnormal sur- plus accthmulation of any staple agri- cultural product, and ordinary bank- ing facilities are inadequate to en- able producers or dealers to carry them until they can be exported in an orderly manner, the War Finance Corporation can provide the necessary advances to make possible the holding of the product pending better export conditions. The American Farm Bureau Feder- ation has presented a statement to the Senate Finance committee pro- testing against an embargo upon dye- stuffs. It was pointed out that the farmer has not asked for an embargo on agricultural commodities. An em- bargo on dyestouffs would be a dis- crimination against the farmers and in favor of a very small class of peo- ple producing dyes. During the war, when cotton so]d as high as 40 cen per pound, the cost of dyes going into fabrics even at war prices was not a very material item, but with cotton at i0 and 12 cents per pound and in- digo selling now at 70 and 75 cents per pound compared with 13 and 16 cents before the war, it becomes rela- tively an important factor in the sell- ing price of cotton goods. It's This Way. In the days when we were gettin our start, 'Twos different then than now, All a young man needed Was a team, a harrow, and plow, He worked from early morning, Till the sun sank in the west; He plowed and sowed and harrowed, Then nature did the rest. In autumn he reaped a good harvest, His farm was the best of the soil. And God's own earth yields riches To one who is willing to toil. His wife was always happy, Tho they started with hardly a cent, But under her home-made bonnet There were no rooms to rent. But nowdays, things are different, A young man must have the cash; He starts at the top of the ladder, Sometimes he comes down with a crash. But, he must have such experience Before he really can see That he is not so much wiser Than his father used to be. He thifiks he must go into business, But before he can make a good deal, He must mortgage all he possesses, And buy an automobile. His wife wears the finest of clothing, 'Tis true, she does not wear much, But they are very expensive, Silk hose, toe slippers, and such. They live in hotels in winter, In summer she goes t6 the beach; It keeps his brain a-working To make his salary reach. They blame the high cost of living, It is not that at all, But surely the cost of high living Will drive anyone to the wall. "I knew no good could came from it when we were married by a jus- tice of the peace." "No, we ought to have been mar- ried by the Secretary of War." Notice of Mortgage Foreclosure Sale. Default having been made in the conditions of a certain mortgage con- raining a Power of Sale, dated March 1, 1916, and recorded in the office of the Register of Deeds of Big Stone County, Minn., March 11, 1916, at 4 o'clock p. m. in book 5@ of mortgages on page 173 whereby N. J. Wilkins and Mary VI. Wilkins, mortgagors, mortgaged to Frank Miller, mort- gagee, the South Half (S) of the Southwest Quarter (SW 4 ) of Section Thirteen (13) and the Northwest Quarter (NW) of Section Twenty- four (24), township One Hundred twenty-one (121), Range Forty-six (46), Big Stone County, Minn., by which default the Power of Sale has become operative and no action or pro- ceeding at law having been istituted to recover the debt secured thereby or any part thereof, and there is claimed to be due on this mortgage to the date hereof the sum of Eleven Thou- sand Four Hundred Seventy-nine and fifty-four one hundredths ($11,479.54) Dollars. Now, Notice is hereby given, that by virtue of said Power said mortgage will be foreclosed and said pre/nises sold at public auction by the Sheriff of said county or his deputy on Saturday September 3, 1921 at 0 o'clock a. m. a th front door of th Court House, in Ortonville, in said county, to pay said debt, interest, attorney's fees and disbursements allowed by law. Dated June 5, 1921. FRANK MILLER, Mortgagee. A. B. K AERcHER, Attorney, Ortonville, Minn. First Pub. July 21 Last Sept. 1 INDEPENDENT NOTICE OF MORTGAGE FOR- CLOSURE SALE. Default having been made in the conditions of a certain mortgage con- taining a power of Sale, dated Febru- ary 21, 1918, and duly recorded in the office of the Register of Deeeds of Big Stone County, Minn., March 23, 1918, at 9 o'clock mm. in Book 53 of Mort- gages on page 110, whereby M. Ferch and Julia Ferch, his wife, C. J. Fetch and Matilda Ferch, his wife, C. F. Ferch and Emma Ferch his wife, mortgagors, mortgaged to the State Bank of Correll, now Farmers & Mer- chants State Bank, mortgagee, the Southeast Quarter (S.E.) of Section Twenty-one (21), Township One Hun- dred Twenty-one (121), range Forty- four (44), Big Stone County, Minne- sota, by which default the Power of Sale has become operative, and no ac- tion or proceeding at law having been instituted to eCover the debt secured thereby, or any part thereof, and there is claimed to be due on said mortgage at the date hereof the sum of Two Thousand Seven Hundred Thirty-eight and righty-nine one hundredths ($38.89) Dollars. iow, Notice Is Hereby Given, That by virtue of said power, said mortgage will be foreclosed and said premises sold at public auction by the Sheriff of said county, or his deputy, on Fri- day, August 12, 1921, at 10 o'clock a. m. at the front door of the Court House in Ortonville, in said county, to pay said debt, interest, attorney's fees, and disbursements allowed by law. Dated May 10, 1921. Farmers & Merchants State Bank of Correll, Mortgagee. A. B. Kaercher, Attorney Ortonville, Minn. Fisrt Pub. June 30. Millinery opening at th Mickel- son Millinery Store this Friday and Saturday. If its anything "Mechanical" and you think it cannot be done--take it to Hall's No shop in this sec- tion so complete in mechanical equip- ment or manned by more expert mechan- ics. A. S. HALLS Ortonville I I THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, Be Photographed This Year on Your Birthday VIKRE ORTONVII,LE f Gifts That Last i Victrolas Edisons DIAMONDS PALM, The Jeweler ###'t'#:: Let Us Serve You Whether you are really hungry or wish only for a light lunch vou will find that food prepared and served a/ne Pie House has a satisfying flavor and has the "Home Cook" taste, for it is home cooked. No substitutes are used in Pie House cooking. We use only the best ingredients. THE ])It: HOUSE C. A. BEARD, Proprietor Publicity establishes a feeling of friendliness and curity among the people of the community. CLEVELAND SIX g 5 September 1920 $1645 with cord firm August 1921 $1295 with cord No Other Car In Its Class At Such a Low Price in fact, the Cleveland is in a class by itself. It is as finely designed, in every engineering and mechanical detail, as any ear of any size or price. And it i built ha its own great mod- en plant, by men long experienced aria skilled in the building of fine ara. The Cievehmd provicl, es qualities that arenot found ha other cars Riling for much more. It will meet your every require- ment on any kind of roadway, on the boulevard, paved high- way or country road, on the straight-way ilevd road or the steepest hill. The scientific distribution of weight and the long under- dung spring construction give to the Clevelandriding comfort on rough roads not excelled by cars weighing twice as much. Sturdily built, beautifully finished and splendidly uphol. stmq! bodies are mounted on the staunch Cleveland chassis. Buy No Other Light Six Until You See the Cleveland Towing C (Fivo Putmntlors) $1295 Roadster (Three Passengers) $1291 dam (Five Pen) : . . $2295 Coupe (Four Pamasngora).. $2195 Prices f. o. b. Cievelamd Bi Four-inch Cord Tres Standard Equipment VANC.URA "AUTO COMPANY A.S. HALLS % CtNLAI. M31'OMOILg COMPANY,