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August 19, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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August 19, 2003
 

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Editorial comment THREE-LADY GOLF SCRAMBLE was held on August 2 at the Ortonville Golf Course. Pictured above are the winners of the scramble. The first place team was Dawn Maatz, Lana Arnesson and Tillie Hoyle. In sec- ond place, Joyce Storlien, Chee Chee Halvorson and Kim Bendel. Third place winners were Joan Hasskamp, Cathy Aykens and Sandy Arcond. Fourth place honors went to Bettie Ellingson, Kristi Martin and Nancy Wattenhofer. Fifth place team was Laurie Roth, Kathy Flanders and Kari Weller. Three lady golf scramble held Aug.2, resultsposted Sixty-nine women making up 23 teams played in an 18 hole scramble at the Ortonville Golf Course on Saturday, August 2. Participants traveled to Ortonville from Benson, Madison, Dawson, Milbank, SD, Sisseton, SD, Appleton, Litchfield, Glenwood, Paynesville and Crosby to compete in the event. The first place team consisted of Dawn Maatz, Lana Arnesson and Tillie Hoyle, all from Madison. Second place was awarded to Joyce Storlien, Chee Chee Halvorson, and Kim Bendel, all from Madison as well. Third place honors went to Joan Hasskamp, Cathy Aykens and Sandy Arcond from Crosby. Bettie Ellingson, Kristi Martin and Nancy Wattenhofer, all from Litchfield, placed fourth in the scram- ble. Fifth place team was Laurie Roth, Kathy Flanders and Kari Weller, all from Paynesville. Special prizes were won by Dawn Maatz for closest to pin on Hole 6, and Joan Kasskamp for closest to pin on Hole 17. Longest putt on hole 10 was achieved by Dawn Maatz, and the longest putt on Hole 5 by Ellen Lukness. Following golL a meal was served by the Ortonville Clubhouse staff, door prizes were drawn, and winners were announced. The committee wishes to thank all those who helped make it a fun day. Check Out These Deals! 2002 CHEW CAVALIER LS - $8,750 PW, PL, CD, Moon Roof, 8,000 miles I 2000 O,SOBI SIOUEIE S13900 a 00UTO Farmer advocate, former state Rep. Chuck Brown dies (Edi. note: The following is reprinted from the Aug. 16, 2003, issue of the Mpls. Star-Tribune, to which we extend our thanks.) By Trudi Hahn Star Tribune StaffWriter As an auctioneer in the i980s, Chuck Brown found himself selling the possessions of his Swift County neighbors during tough times in farm coun- try. As a Minnesota legisla- tor, he did what he could to ease their financial pain. Brown, a DFLer who served in the state House of Representatives from 1984 to 1996, died Thurs- growth hormone that boosts milk yields in cows. It was approved by the Food and Drug Adminis- tration in 1993. "I'm very skeptical of the safety of this milk," he said in 1989. "I suspect parents in Minneapolis and St. Paul would be rather skeptical of putting this stuff over their kids' cereal as would parents of kids in rural Minnesota." After leaving the Legis- lature in 1996, he became a contract lobbyist for sev- day night at a hospi- .',NN Community Members tal in Appleton, ::.,.. ChuckBrown Invited to Hospice Minn., after becom- in 1995. He be- Supper August 19 ing ill at the Swift came ill at the County Fairgrounds Swift County Community members interested in in Appleton, said his Fairgrounds on learning more about the Rice Hospice program and the hospice volunteer wife, Becky. He was Thursday and role, are welcome to attend the 52. probably dled Memory Appreciation Supper and Brown, who had of a heart at- meeting, hosted by the Ortonville/Graceville Hospice volun- not been in ill tack. tears. It will be held Tuesday, August health, probably 19 .at 6 p.m. at the Graceville Community Center in Graceville with the meeting scheduled to begin at 7 p.m. At the meeting information regarding Rice Hospice will be pre- sented and reflections on Memory will be appreciated. All are welcome. The Ortonviile/Graceville Hospice Unit provides Hospice rooms in the Holy Trinity Hospital and the Ortonville Hospital, as well as vol- unteers for ,bereavement and advisory council positions ....... Earlier in the day, at 2 p.m. August 19,. a Bereavement team meeting will be held at the Chapel at Ortonville Area Health Services. Bloodmobile in Bellingham Aug. 26 The Red Cross Bloodmobile will be in Bellingham on Tuesday, Aug. 26, from 3-7 p.m. at the Bellingham City Hall. Walk-ins are welcome! Please take some time out of your busy summer schedule to help save a life by donating blood. Annual meet Alumni assn. set Aug. 16th Ortonville's Alumni Association Annual Meeting will be held Saturday, Aug. 16th 2003 in the Commons Area at the Ortonville School. The meeting time has been changed this year to 1 pm with an informal gathering of Ortonville Alumni following the meeting approximately 2 to 4 pro. Purpose of this meeting will be to consider and take action of business matters of the organization, including the election of four directors for the coming year. "We encourage and welcome all Ortonville Alumni to attend!" Independent Ads Get Noticed, (You're rea, ding this one aren t you?) had a heart attack, his wife said. He had been the announcer and princi- pal organizer for an an- tique-tractor-pulling con- test Thursday evening. The daytime temperature had reached 90, and dew points were in the 60s. "He was intense and passionate for rural Min- nesota," said former Rep. Doug Peterson, DFL-Mad- ison, who served with Brown in the 1990s and is the current president of the Minnesota Farmers Union. "You didn't have to worry about where Chuck Brown stood for the little guy." The farm crisis brought tough times to the family farmers in the west-cen- tral Minnesota area that Brown represented. "It was a real depres- sion in the '80s in the dis- trict," said Sen. Charlie Berg, R-Chokio. "Rapidly falling land prices and a change in lenders' atti- tudes -- many farmers were facing foreclosures." Although the two men didn't see eye to eye philo- sophically, Berg, then a DFL senator in Brown's district, said they worked together on many pieces of farm legislation, includ- ing one that provided for mediation between farm- ers and lenders. Brown also fought the legalization of bovine so- matropin (BST), a bovine eral groups, including to- bacco giant Philip Morris USA and Otter Tail Power Co. in 1997. Currently, his client list also included groups ranging from a do- mestic-violence group to the Lac qui Parle Yellow Bank Watershed District. "He was a very effective lobbyist because he had been on both sides of the chamber door," said Rep. Aaron Peterson, DFL- Madison, son of Doug Pe- terson. Aaron Peterson, a freshman legislator, cred- its Brown with helping get funds for the Lazarus Creek flood control pro- ject in Yellow Medicine County, a project de- signed 30 years ago and politically blocked ever since. In addition to his wife, Becky, survivors include four daughters, Bridget of St. Paul, Kelsey of Willmar, Minn., and Megan and Ka- tie of Appleton. Services will be held at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday at St. John's Catholic Church in Appleton. Visitation is planned Monday evening at the church. Staff writer Sharon Schmiclde contributed to this report. Trudi Hahn is at thahn@startribune.com. TAKING A PLUNGE in the dunk tank on Saturday is Sean Watkins. He is pictured above getting dunked by some of his friends. The Inde SUZETrE Office KATIE Computer EMILEE Composite! BETH BILL BOB Camera PHIL ee'# Tues., Aug. 19, Continuing the $30.00 per year Parle, Traverse I Minnesota Grant e in South bakota. counties in All others, $38.00 Postmaster: The Ortonville Ortonville, NEW ALL Big Stone, La Swift Counties February 50 March ................ 27. April ................ 25.00 May ............ ::..._22.50 June .................. 20.00 July ................... 17,50 ALL OTHERS February ........... March ................ May June July February ........... 38.00 March .............. 34.87 May ................... 28.53 June .................. 25.36 July ................. 22 19 changes not lessen The Publisher omissions in tisement is the issue or Church notes Display ads News - Classified ads - (Any ad brought to classify.) A Monday: [ A Tuesday: A Thursday: A Friday: 8 A Holidays Letters to munity issues writers should Independent and/or it might be Letters printed or address Addresses not be publi,' selves to keep letter words, and The determinin is news is If an zation for an item sidered paper. cease to receives paper sale- = paper no longer and a small particular heSS. We advertising our decision. A News: our [ own views, eral Phone 11394761 00INDEPENDENT Page 4 __ Editorial comment THREE-LADY GOLF SCRAMBLE was held on August 2 at the Ortonville Golf Course. Pictured above are the winners of the scramble. The first place team was Dawn Maatz, Lana Arnesson and Tillie Hoyle. In sec- ond place, Joyce Storlien, Chee Chee Halvorson and Kim Bendel. Third place winners were Joan Hasskamp, Cathy Aykens and Sandy Arcond. Fourth place honors went to Bettie Ellingson, Kristi Martin and Nancy Wattenhofer. Fifth place team was Laurie Roth, Kathy Flanders and Kari Weller. Three lady golf scramble held Aug.2, resultsposted Sixty-nine women making up 23 teams played in an 18 hole scramble at the Ortonville Golf Course on Saturday, August 2. Participants traveled to Ortonville from Benson, Madison, Dawson, Milbank, SD, Sisseton, SD, Appleton, Litchfield, Glenwood, Paynesville and Crosby to compete in the event. The first place team consisted of Dawn Maatz, Lana Arnesson and Tillie Hoyle, all from Madison. Second place was awarded to Joyce Storlien, Chee Chee Halvorson, and Kim Bendel, all from Madison as well. Third place honors went to Joan Hasskamp, Cathy Aykens and Sandy Arcond from Crosby. Bettie Ellingson, Kristi Martin and Nancy Wattenhofer, all from Litchfield, placed fourth in the scram- ble. Fifth place team was Laurie Roth, Kathy Flanders and Kari Weller, all from Paynesville. Special prizes were won by Dawn Maatz for closest to pin on Hole 6, and Joan Kasskamp for closest to pin on Hole 17. Longest putt on hole 10 was achieved by Dawn Maatz, and the longest putt on Hole 5 by Ellen Lukness. Following golL a meal was served by the Ortonville Clubhouse staff, door prizes were drawn, and winners were announced. The committee wishes to thank all those who helped make it a fun day. Check Out These Deals! 2002 CHEW CAVALIER LS - $8,750 PW, PL, CD, Moon Roof, 8,000 miles I 2000 O,SOBI SIOUEIE S13900 a 00UTO Farmer advocate, former state Rep. Chuck Brown dies (Edi. note: The following is reprinted from the Aug. 16, 2003, issue of the Mpls. Star-Tribune, to which we extend our thanks.) By Trudi Hahn Star Tribune StaffWriter As an auctioneer in the i980s, Chuck Brown found himself selling the possessions of his Swift County neighbors during tough times in farm coun- try. As a Minnesota legisla- tor, he did what he could to ease their financial pain. Brown, a DFLer who served in the state House of Representatives from 1984 to 1996, died Thurs- growth hormone that boosts milk yields in cows. It was approved by the Food and Drug Adminis- tration in 1993. "I'm very skeptical of the safety of this milk," he said in 1989. "I suspect parents in Minneapolis and St. Paul would be rather skeptical of putting this stuff over their kids' cereal as would parents of kids in rural Minnesota." After leaving the Legis- lature in 1996, he became a contract lobbyist for sev- day night at a hospi- .',NN Community Members tal in Appleton, ::.,.. ChuckBrown Invited to Hospice Minn., after becom- in 1995. He be- Supper August 19 ing ill at the Swift came ill at the County Fairgrounds Swift County Community members interested in in Appleton, said his Fairgrounds on learning more about the Rice Hospice program and the hospice volunteer wife, Becky. He was Thursday and role, are welcome to attend the 52. probably dled Memory Appreciation Supper and Brown, who had of a heart at- meeting, hosted by the Ortonville/Graceville Hospice volun- not been in ill tack. tears. It will be held Tuesday, August health, probably 19 .at 6 p.m. at the Graceville Community Center in Graceville with the meeting scheduled to begin at 7 p.m. At the meeting information regarding Rice Hospice will be pre- sented and reflections on Memory will be appreciated. All are welcome. The Ortonviile/Graceville Hospice Unit provides Hospice rooms in the Holy Trinity Hospital and the Ortonville Hospital, as well as vol- unteers for ,bereavement and advisory council positions ....... Earlier in the day, at 2 p.m. August 19,. a Bereavement team meeting will be held at the Chapel at Ortonville Area Health Services. Bloodmobile in Bellingham Aug. 26 The Red Cross Bloodmobile will be in Bellingham on Tuesday, Aug. 26, from 3-7 p.m. at the Bellingham City Hall. Walk-ins are welcome! Please take some time out of your busy summer schedule to help save a life by donating blood. Annual meet Alumni assn. set Aug. 16th Ortonville's Alumni Association Annual Meeting will be held Saturday, Aug. 16th 2003 in the Commons Area at the Ortonville School. The meeting time has been changed this year to 1 pm with an informal gathering of Ortonville Alumni following the meeting approximately 2 to 4 pro. Purpose of this meeting will be to consider and take action of business matters of the organization, including the election of four directors for the coming year. "We encourage and welcome all Ortonville Alumni to attend!" Independent Ads Get Noticed, (You're rea, ding this one aren t you?) had a heart attack, his wife said. He had been the announcer and princi- pal organizer for an an- tique-tractor-pulling con- test Thursday evening. The daytime temperature had reached 90, and dew points were in the 60s. "He was intense and passionate for rural Min- nesota," said former Rep. Doug Peterson, DFL-Mad- ison, who served with Brown in the 1990s and is the current president of the Minnesota Farmers Union. "You didn't have to worry about where Chuck Brown stood for the little guy." The farm crisis brought tough times to the family farmers in the west-cen- tral Minnesota area that Brown represented. "It was a real depres- sion in the '80s in the dis- trict," said Sen. Charlie Berg, R-Chokio. "Rapidly falling land prices and a change in lenders' atti- tudes -- many farmers were facing foreclosures." Although the two men didn't see eye to eye philo- sophically, Berg, then a DFL senator in Brown's district, said they worked together on many pieces of farm legislation, includ- ing one that provided for mediation between farm- ers and lenders. Brown also fought the legalization of bovine so- matropin (BST), a bovine eral groups, including to- bacco giant Philip Morris USA and Otter Tail Power Co. in 1997. Currently, his client list also included groups ranging from a do- mestic-violence group to the Lac qui Parle Yellow Bank Watershed District. "He was a very effective lobbyist because he had been on both sides of the chamber door," said Rep. Aaron Peterson, DFL- Madison, son of Doug Pe- terson. Aaron Peterson, a freshman legislator, cred- its Brown with helping get funds for the Lazarus Creek flood control pro- ject in Yellow Medicine County, a project de- signed 30 years ago and politically blocked ever since. In addition to his wife, Becky, survivors include four daughters, Bridget of St. Paul, Kelsey of Willmar, Minn., and Megan and Ka- tie of Appleton. Services will be held at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday at St. John's Catholic Church in Appleton. Visitation is planned Monday evening at the church. Staff writer Sharon Schmiclde contributed to this report. Trudi Hahn is at thahn@startribune.com. TAKING A PLUNGE in the dunk tank on Saturday is Sean Watkins. He is pictured above getting dunked by some of his friends. The Inde SUZETrE Office KATIE Computer EMILEE Composite! BETH BILL BOB Camera PHIL ee'# Tues., Aug. 19, Continuing the $30.00 per year Parle, Traverse I Minnesota Grant e in South bakota. counties in All others, $38.00 Postmaster: The Ortonville Ortonville, NEW ALL Big Stone, La Swift Counties February 50 March ................ 27. April ................ 25.00 May ............ ::..._22.50 June .................. 20.00 July ................... 17,50 ALL OTHERS February ........... March ................ May June July February ........... 38.00 March .............. 34.87 May ................... 28.53 June .................. 25.36 July ................. 22 19 changes not lessen The Publisher omissions in tisement is the issue or Church notes Display ads News - Classified ads - (Any ad brought to classify.) A Monday: [ A Tuesday: A Thursday: A Friday: 8 A Holidays Letters to munity issues writers should Independent and/or it might be Letters printed or address Addresses not be publi,' selves to keep letter words, and The determinin is news is If an zation for an item sidered paper. cease to receives paper sale- = paper no longer and a small particular heSS. We advertising our decision. A News: our [ own views, eral Phone 11394761 00INDEPENDENT Page 4 __