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August 26, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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0 IND ENrDENT heart" "A Constructive Newspaper In A Live Community" ON STATE BANK in Clinton is observing its 100th anniversary in 2003. Sevrin Steen, of Clinton State Bank, at left, and David Alberts, President of Clinton State Bank, at right, flle bank has hosted several special events this year, including a catered dinner to be served Aug. 29th. Included in this issue is a special section in recognition and celebration of the ule Clinton State Bank. n State Bank observes rs in banking industry of Clinton, is in 2003. The on Friday, May to serve the commu- services. has pub- supplement Issue, in recogni- year anniversary. cOntains bank histo- lil. Ployee profile, old /interesting informa-  Past 100 years of of the board of the Benson and directors N. W. D. C. Pick D.C. at that of directors of Sevrin Steen, s CEO/Chairman; David Alberts, who serves as the Bank President; and directors Paul Steen, Melissa Steen and James Steen. Clinton State Bank began with $60,000 in assets, and has grown throughout the years, and continues to be a homeowned bank. Currently the total assets of Clinton State Bank have reached $54 million. The original bank building was completed in 1904, and it was remod- eled in 1948 and 1962. In 1976 a new bank was constructed on the corner of Clinton's Main Street and Highway 75, and the former building was donated to the Big Stone County Day Activity Center. In 1992 the current building was extended and a larger parking area was established. Th'roughout the year they have been celebrating this milestone. Beginning in January the Clinton State Bank has held, and will be holding, drawings throughout the year each month for a $100 bill. Registrations are made in the bank lobby and on the last day of each month, the lucky person's name is drawn, and they are featured along with a bank employee in the Clinton State Bank advertisement in the news- paper. Earlier this summer the bank spon- sored a picnic dinner in a tent on Clinton's Main Street. Another special celebration feature was the Clinton State Bank-sponsored trip to see the Minnesota Twins Sunday afternoon, Aug. 24. They sponsored two chartered buses to attend the Twins game. In recognition of the 100 years, the Clinton State Bank will be serving a catered meal on Friday, Aug. 29 with serving from 5 to 7:30 p.m. at the Clinton Memorial Building. This will be hosted by the Board of Directors, officers and staff of the Clinton State Bank and the Clinton State Agency, Inc. Hout promoted to United States Army of Don and Stone City, the rank of Army on erernony was Brig. l_ea/ck II Deputy al of ROYCE Cadet by his son, His son also par- Van Hout was reassigned to ROTC Cadet Command in June following a four-year tour in Germany. He served in several positions while in Germany, including commanding the 90th Postal Company, Chief of Visual Information and Public Affairs Officer for the Combat Maneuver Training. Center and as the Protocol Officer for the CMTC. Van Hout is now serving as the Retention Programs Officer at Cadet Command at Fort Monroe, VA. promoted to Major in the United States wth his son Michael and wife, Renee dur- :on July 1. iiiii1| GRID OPENER THIS THURSDAY Aug. 28th ORTONVILLE vs B-B-E 7:00 PM AT BELGRADE ._ ,,,, Three council seats open for election Three seats are open for election on the Ortonville City Council, as fil- ing will begin today, August 26. Council seat B, currently held by Mike Dorry, Council Seat D, held by Artie Amdt and Council Seat F, held by Dan Oakes, are the seats open for filing. Anyone wishing to file tbr a seat on the city council should file before 5 p.m. on Tuesday, September 9. Those interested can file at the Ortonville City Office, located at 315 Madison Avenue. Eligible candidates include anyone who is a qualified voter for the city of Ortonville. Anyone eligible may file an affidavit of candidacy, available at City Hall, and pay a filing fee of $2 to the City of Ortonville. w Check out our web site at ww.ortonvilleindependent.comjI Ortonville Schools to open doors for 2003-04 school year Tuesday To students and staff of the Ortonville School District, Tuesday, September 2 is the date that stands in their minds, as this is the first day of the 2003-04 school year. According t(r Jeff Taylor, Superintendent of Ortonville Schools, enrollment numbers appear to be down this year at approximately 600 students. "We cannot be sure of the exact numbers until the doors open on September 2, but the estimated num- ber of students right now is about 600," said Taylor. Last year's enrollment was approximately 643 students. Taylor attributes the decrease in enrollment to a large graduating class in 2003, and a small Kindergarten class enter- ing this school year. He is anticipat- ing approximately 226 Elementary students in grades K-6, and about 373 High School students from grades 7- 12. The last day of this school year will be on June 2, with graduation cer- emonies scheduled for Sunday, May 30. "The last day of school is, of course, weather permitting," said Taylor. A new addition to the school this year will be new computers in one of the High School's computer labs. According to Taylor, state-of-the-art computers have been placed in one of the labs, which will assist the school in keeping up with technological advances. A new addition to the bus garage this year is a new bus, which was pur- chased to replace one of the older buses. According to Taylor, the new bus is a conventional bus that has a capacity of about 58 or 59 students. Work is also currently being done to renovate the steps leading to the entrance of the High School Auditorium, and a tuck-pointing pro- ject is in the works. According to Taylor, the chimney in the Kindergarten room was taken down, as the chimney has not been used for a number of years, and it was less costly to remove the chimney than to include it in the project. OHS Math students will be seeing a new tace in the classroom this year, as Justin Sawyer will be teaching .math at the high school. Justin accepted the teaching position in Ortonville after teaching math in Hinckley for part of last year. lie graduated from Northwestern in St. Paul with a Bachelor of Science degree in Math Education. Another change in staffing this year will be the absence of sixth grade teacher Joe Eustice, who was placed on active duty with the National Guard in August. According to Taylor, Kelly Vangsness, who was a half-time employee of the school as an ESL teacher, will be filling in as a long-term substitute teacher for Eustice, in addition to assuming her duties as an ESL teacher. (Continued on page 5) PREPARING THE SCHOOL for the start of the 2003-04 school year, Ortonville janitor Arlo Klapel is pictured above washing windows in one of the Elementary Classrooms. Ortonville School ianitors have been busily preparing the school building and grounds to be in top condition for the first day of school on September 2. CBSL officers step down after giving many years of service After a combined total of almost 30 years, long-time Citizens for Big Stone Lake President Wil Hansen and Treasurer Bud Knippen have stepped aside to allow new leadership into the organization. Wil Hansen moved to Ortonville in 1980. Shortly after the move, he attended a CBSL meeting to learn more about the organization. According to Wil, by the time he left the meeting, he had been voted President of the group. He has been serving as President ever since. During a recent CBSL meeting, Wil resigned from the position, and Ortonville resident Curt Bailey was voted into the office. "It seemed to be the right time to pass the position on to someone else," said Hansen, who intends to remain an active member of CBSL. According to Hansen, he will con- tinue to work closely with the group, as well as with the new President to keep CBSL up and running. "My interest has not changed, it's just time to move on," he said. have to do this." Bud Knippen also gave his resig- nation, after acting as the group's Treasurer for 11 years. He also plans to remain an active member of CBSL, and is looking forward to handing over the reigns as Treasurer. Ortonville resident Linda Bailey is the new Treasurer for Citizens for Big Stone Lake. "I know she will do a very good job, I am not worried about it," said Knippen. During Knippen's years as treasur- er, he has witnessed many generous donations to the group, for the pur- pose of maintaining Big Stone Lake. "The walleye tournaments have been very giving, and gener/dly donate anywhere from $2,000 to $5,000," he said. According to Knippen, in past years the organization has used their time and money to help develop Bonanza State Park and Education Center, and have worked closely with James Knoll Elementary lourth (Continued on page 5) Hansen's favorite part about acting as President of the organization has been the large changes he has wit- nessed throughout the years, especial- ly regarding the state of Big Stone Lake. "If you take a ride around the lake, you will be amazed, especially if you know what it used to be. When I was first acting as President, people turned away from the lake, now there is this amazing group of people fight- ing to save it," he said. Hansen also mentions that the lake was very dirty at the beginning of his role as President, primarily as a result of nutrients running into the lake. In the past years, CBSL has been suc- cessful in reducing the nutrients, and the overall state of the lake has improved. "We are way ahead of many areas with large bodies of water," he claims. According to Hansen, he has no plans to discontinue his involvement with CBSL. "I am sure I will do this until I can no longer actively partici- pate," he said. "It isn't an option, we \\; NORTHRIDGE CORNFEST ROYALTY for 2003 are Bob Peterson and Clara Hein. Hein is the great grand- mother of newly crowned Little Miss Ortonville Area Stephanie Arndt. Hein and Peterson are pictured above with Arndt. 0 IND ENrDENT heart" "A Constructive Newspaper In A Live Community" ON STATE BANK in Clinton is observing its 100th anniversary in 2003. Sevrin Steen, of Clinton State Bank, at left, and David Alberts, President of Clinton State Bank, at right, flle bank has hosted several special events this year, including a catered dinner to be served Aug. 29th. Included in this issue is a special section in recognition and celebration of the ule Clinton State Bank. n State Bank observes rs in banking industry of Clinton, is in 2003. The on Friday, May to serve the commu- services. has pub- supplement Issue, in recogni- year anniversary. cOntains bank histo- lil. Ployee profile, old /interesting informa-  Past 100 years of of the board of the Benson and directors N. W. D. C. Pick D.C. at that of directors of Sevrin Steen, s CEO/Chairman; David Alberts, who serves as the Bank President; and directors Paul Steen, Melissa Steen and James Steen. Clinton State Bank began with $60,000 in assets, and has grown throughout the years, and continues to be a homeowned bank. Currently the total assets of Clinton State Bank have reached $54 million. The original bank building was completed in 1904, and it was remod- eled in 1948 and 1962. In 1976 a new bank was constructed on the corner of Clinton's Main Street and Highway 75, and the former building was donated to the Big Stone County Day Activity Center. In 1992 the current building was extended and a larger parking area was established. Th'roughout the year they have been celebrating this milestone. Beginning in January the Clinton State Bank has held, and will be holding, drawings throughout the year each month for a $100 bill. Registrations are made in the bank lobby and on the last day of each month, the lucky person's name is drawn, and they are featured along with a bank employee in the Clinton State Bank advertisement in the news- paper. Earlier this summer the bank spon- sored a picnic dinner in a tent on Clinton's Main Street. Another special celebration feature was the Clinton State Bank-sponsored trip to see the Minnesota Twins Sunday afternoon, Aug. 24. They sponsored two chartered buses to attend the Twins game. In recognition of the 100 years, the Clinton State Bank will be serving a catered meal on Friday, Aug. 29 with serving from 5 to 7:30 p.m. at the Clinton Memorial Building. This will be hosted by the Board of Directors, officers and staff of the Clinton State Bank and the Clinton State Agency, Inc. Hout promoted to United States Army of Don and Stone City, the rank of Army on erernony was Brig. l_ea/ck II Deputy al of ROYCE Cadet by his son, His son also par- Van Hout was reassigned to ROTC Cadet Command in June following a four-year tour in Germany. He served in several positions while in Germany, including commanding the 90th Postal Company, Chief of Visual Information and Public Affairs Officer for the Combat Maneuver Training. Center and as the Protocol Officer for the CMTC. Van Hout is now serving as the Retention Programs Officer at Cadet Command at Fort Monroe, VA. promoted to Major in the United States wth his son Michael and wife, Renee dur- :on July 1. iiiii1| GRID OPENER THIS THURSDAY Aug. 28th ORTONVILLE vs B-B-E 7:00 PM AT BELGRADE ._ ,,,, Three council seats open for election Three seats are open for election on the Ortonville City Council, as fil- ing will begin today, August 26. Council seat B, currently held by Mike Dorry, Council Seat D, held by Artie Amdt and Council Seat F, held by Dan Oakes, are the seats open for filing. Anyone wishing to file tbr a seat on the city council should file before 5 p.m. on Tuesday, September 9. Those interested can file at the Ortonville City Office, located at 315 Madison Avenue. Eligible candidates include anyone who is a qualified voter for the city of Ortonville. Anyone eligible may file an affidavit of candidacy, available at City Hall, and pay a filing fee of $2 to the City of Ortonville. w Check out our web site at ww.ortonvilleindependent.comjI Ortonville Schools to open doors for 2003-04 school year Tuesday To students and staff of the Ortonville School District, Tuesday, September 2 is the date that stands in their minds, as this is the first day of the 2003-04 school year. According t(r Jeff Taylor, Superintendent of Ortonville Schools, enrollment numbers appear to be down this year at approximately 600 students. "We cannot be sure of the exact numbers until the doors open on September 2, but the estimated num- ber of students right now is about 600," said Taylor. Last year's enrollment was approximately 643 students. Taylor attributes the decrease in enrollment to a large graduating class in 2003, and a small Kindergarten class enter- ing this school year. He is anticipat- ing approximately 226 Elementary students in grades K-6, and about 373 High School students from grades 7- 12. The last day of this school year will be on June 2, with graduation cer- emonies scheduled for Sunday, May 30. "The last day of school is, of course, weather permitting," said Taylor. A new addition to the school this year will be new computers in one of the High School's computer labs. According to Taylor, state-of-the-art computers have been placed in one of the labs, which will assist the school in keeping up with technological advances. A new addition to the bus garage this year is a new bus, which was pur- chased to replace one of the older buses. According to Taylor, the new bus is a conventional bus that has a capacity of about 58 or 59 students. Work is also currently being done to renovate the steps leading to the entrance of the High School Auditorium, and a tuck-pointing pro- ject is in the works. According to Taylor, the chimney in the Kindergarten room was taken down, as the chimney has not been used for a number of years, and it was less costly to remove the chimney than to include it in the project. OHS Math students will be seeing a new tace in the classroom this year, as Justin Sawyer will be teaching .math at the high school. Justin accepted the teaching position in Ortonville after teaching math in Hinckley for part of last year. lie graduated from Northwestern in St. Paul with a Bachelor of Science degree in Math Education. Another change in staffing this year will be the absence of sixth grade teacher Joe Eustice, who was placed on active duty with the National Guard in August. According to Taylor, Kelly Vangsness, who was a half-time employee of the school as an ESL teacher, will be filling in as a long-term substitute teacher for Eustice, in addition to assuming her duties as an ESL teacher. (Continued on page 5) PREPARING THE SCHOOL for the start of the 2003-04 school year, Ortonville janitor Arlo Klapel is pictured above washing windows in one of the Elementary Classrooms. Ortonville School ianitors have been busily preparing the school building and grounds to be in top condition for the first day of school on September 2. CBSL officers step down after giving many years of service After a combined total of almost 30 years, long-time Citizens for Big Stone Lake President Wil Hansen and Treasurer Bud Knippen have stepped aside to allow new leadership into the organization. Wil Hansen moved to Ortonville in 1980. Shortly after the move, he attended a CBSL meeting to learn more about the organization. According to Wil, by the time he left the meeting, he had been voted President of the group. He has been serving as President ever since. During a recent CBSL meeting, Wil resigned from the position, and Ortonville resident Curt Bailey was voted into the office. "It seemed to be the right time to pass the position on to someone else," said Hansen, who intends to remain an active member of CBSL. According to Hansen, he will con- tinue to work closely with the group, as well as with the new President to keep CBSL up and running. "My interest has not changed, it's just time to move on," he said. have to do this." Bud Knippen also gave his resig- nation, after acting as the group's Treasurer for 11 years. He also plans to remain an active member of CBSL, and is looking forward to handing over the reigns as Treasurer. Ortonville resident Linda Bailey is the new Treasurer for Citizens for Big Stone Lake. "I know she will do a very good job, I am not worried about it," said Knippen. During Knippen's years as treasur- er, he has witnessed many generous donations to the group, for the pur- pose of maintaining Big Stone Lake. "The walleye tournaments have been very giving, and gener/dly donate anywhere from $2,000 to $5,000," he said. According to Knippen, in past years the organization has used their time and money to help develop Bonanza State Park and Education Center, and have worked closely with James Knoll Elementary lourth (Continued on page 5) Hansen's favorite part about acting as President of the organization has been the large changes he has wit- nessed throughout the years, especial- ly regarding the state of Big Stone Lake. "If you take a ride around the lake, you will be amazed, especially if you know what it used to be. When I was first acting as President, people turned away from the lake, now there is this amazing group of people fight- ing to save it," he said. Hansen also mentions that the lake was very dirty at the beginning of his role as President, primarily as a result of nutrients running into the lake. In the past years, CBSL has been suc- cessful in reducing the nutrients, and the overall state of the lake has improved. "We are way ahead of many areas with large bodies of water," he claims. According to Hansen, he has no plans to discontinue his involvement with CBSL. "I am sure I will do this until I can no longer actively partici- pate," he said. "It isn't an option, we \\; NORTHRIDGE CORNFEST ROYALTY for 2003 are Bob Peterson and Clara Hein. Hein is the great grand- mother of newly crowned Little Miss Ortonville Area Stephanie Arndt. Hein and Peterson are pictured above with Arndt.