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Ortonville, Minnesota
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August 26, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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Editorial comment GUEST EDITORIAL... Printed word most vital to society! (Edi. note: The following is authored by Bob Karolevitz, writer-at-large for the Grant County Review newspaper in Milbank, SD. We extend thanks to the Review for re-printing Bob's thoughts on how important newspapers are as a means of keeping society alive and informed.) More than a half century ago I got a Master's Degree in journalism from the University of Oregon and I've hardly ever used it. l'm not bragging about the educational achievement, however, because I doubt if more than four people, besides myself,ever read my thesis - and as far as I know, they are all dead. Since then, my brilliant bit of scholarship, entitled "The 1949 Portland Newspaper Strike: A Study of Its Effect on the Community," has grown yellow with age on the bookshelf. I stumbled across it by accident the other day and decided all that work deserved at least a small measure of exposure. As I reread it for the first time in more than five decades, I was surprised that some of the things I learned might still be valid today. I proved that newspapers have a role to play, besides wrapping fish. Here's what happened a long, long time ago (less the footnotes and all that other academic stuff): On Feb. 18, 1949, 93 members of the Web Pressmen's Union walked off their job with Oregon's two leading papers, The Oregonian and the Oregon Journal. They never returned to work and Portland - then a city of half a million people - was without either of its two dailies for almost a month. While the strike was in progress, I got into my post-war Kaiser automobile and drove from Eugene to Portland to see what happened when folks were cut off from the printed word. To start with, 2,000 other employees of the two papers were out of work and 4,500 newsboys didn't have anything to peddle. Nearby restaurants were without customers, so they suffered economic woes as well. The problem then spread throughout the city like tumbling dominoes. These are some of things which occurred: • Florists suffered serious loss of business because acquaintances of deceased people didn't learn of deaths until the funerals were over. • Attendance at movie theaters dropped off because nobody knew what was playing. • Furniture, clolhing and jewelry stores cancelled special sales because of the lack of print advertising. • Ministers reported a drop in church attendance - especially evening services - when there were no notices in the papers. • Kids (and adults, too, missed the funny papers; and crossword addicts could hardly wait for the strike to end. Television was not a factor in 1949 and radio tried to fill the gap. However, it was soon evident that the two mediums (media, for you Latin buffs) served different functions. For instance, radio could not replace classified advertising, legal notices, vital statistics, sports box scores, obituaries, wedding reports and birth announcements. "You can't past a radio blurb in a scrapbook," one observer said. One gal, who always sat down with a cup of java and the morning paper after she got the kids off to school, complained that she never had an enjoyable cup of coffee while the strike was on. So it went. The walkout demonstrated that newspapers played a unique role in the community and that they were sorely missed, even by those who bellyached about them. Finally the strikers returned, the presses rolled and I got to wear a cap and gown. I suppose I contributed a mite to the world's vast store of knowledge, but I'm afraid that only the four dead guys and ! knew what it was. sos GESSWEIN coo 432-550! MOTORS 442-5545 Dead bird reporting for West Nile Virus To date, the best way to detect West Nile Virus (WNV) in an area is to look for birds that have been bitten by infected mosquitoes, and killed by the virus. The Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) has been collecting reports of dead birds from around the state and then testing some of these birds for the virus (particularly crows and blue jays). Countryside Public Health has been notified by MDH that the coun- \\; ties of Big Stone, Chippewa, and Lac qui Parle have had birds test positive for the disease. There is one human case in Chippewa County. Because these counties already know they have birds with the disease, MDH has requested that no more dead birds be sent to them. Swift and Yellow Medicine County may continue to report dead birds as these counties do not have a positive one reported as of 8/20/03. Ths may be done by contact- Johnson son heads high profile murder investigation Former Ortonville resident, Dave Johnson, a Police Captain with the St. Cloud Police Department, is heading a high profile, first degree, murder investigation in St. Cloud that is head- ed for trial beginning Sept. 2, 2003, in Duluth. The case involves the death of Kenneth MacLennan,who is alleged to have been shot several times in his St. Cloud home by his son, Jason, who was 17 at the time of the crime on Jan. 14, 2003. Jason MacLennan and a co-defen- dant, Matt Moeller of Clearwater, were both indicted on first-degree murder charges by a Stearns County Grand Jury. Jason MacLennan's defense attor- neys in the case were unsuccessful in their attempt to use a "battered child defense" in a recent ruling by Steams county District Judge, Paul Widick. ' Additionally, Widick denied a request by COURT TV to televise the trial live on TV. Johnson, a 1971 graduate of Ortonville High School has been a police officer for over 29 years, and has been the Captain in charge of the Criminal Investigation Division for the last six years. He is a graduate of St. Cloud State University and holds a Masters Degree in Justice Administration from the University of Louisville. He is the son of Loyal and Gladys Johnson of Ortonville. i I iiiii ii N 6oth YOeddin00 Emil and LuVerne Swezey celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary on Aug. 22, 2003. Emil was in the army in 1943 and later a barber in Clinton for 43 years. He also prepared tax returns, did bookwork and does volunteer tax work for sen- iors in Ortonville. LuVeme had a beauty shop in Clinton and ended her working days as a bookkeeper at the Clinton Coop. She is a volunteer health insurance counselor for seniors. Their daughter Janice (and husband Glenn) lives in Plymouth. Their son James (andwife Ardell) lives in Peoria, III. They have three grandchildren, Chad and Ross Gauger and Jennifer Swezey. In their retirement years, they are involved at First English Lutheran Church and enjoy playing bridge, gardening, golfing and square dancing. They are# --  thankful for their years together; good, health, family and friends. / ing the Countryside Public Health Office in that county. Countryside Public Health will report this to MDH and MDH will determine if the bird is to be sent to them for testing. Prevention of WNV is very impor- tant being the virus has been detected in many of the counties in Minnesota. Ways to reduce your risks of getting West Nile encephalitis are the use of mosquito repellents, avoiding outdoor expo'Sures rdusk and dawn (peak feeding time for many mosquitoes), and wearing longsleeved shirts and long pants. Removal of water-holding containers (mosquito breeding sites) from residential areas will reduce the numbers of several mosquito species. For information regarding WNV, you may contact your Countryside Public Health Office at 839-6135. " Information is also available at the MDH website www.health.state.mn.us. A current map of the 2003 WNV confirmed cases in humans, horses and birds by county is available at this website. If Check out our web site at -'  www.orton viUei'ndepetent.com ) ii ii i ONCE AGAIN... MANY THANKS Recent new and renewal sub- scribers to The Independent which we gratefully acknowledge with thanks for your loyalty: Garnett Steiner Darin Stoddard DeWane Stoddard Jack Lyons Diana Shelstad Glenn Henningson . David Meyer John Athey Rev. Larry Kasten James Phalen Ora Brustuen Caroline Zahn Anita Zempei Ray Hamann Joe Karels Darrell Tober Paul C. Ell Joel Kuyper H.O. Price Myron Guse Pauline Karels Dale Von Eschen Darlene Grossman Ralph Loeschke Carol Nelson Richard Ehrenberg Todd Sandberg Irene Karels Tom Henrich Beth & Tim Swanson Dennis Rleppel James Hamann Carol Hyatt Paul DeBoer Robert Dunston Joann McMahon Tom Aafedt Harold Dittes Chris Peterson Paul Chlndvall Loretta Schmleg Floyd Kellen Rev. lhno Janssen Dean Van Hout Tuck Nolop Tom Cordle Helen Schake iii Grand Am GT1 i unr t 50tit YOeddi0000 7400nioe00aa00 v k. .uee ad 7.th c'Z3aielao Get High Speed Wireless Internet from NATE'S NET where your uploads are as fast as downloads. NO PHONE LINES TO SLOW YOU DOWN! You can be on line all the time and never get bumped off! No need for that second phone line for the lnternet, because it's wireless! Computer Sales & Service • Wireless Intemet 00/Nat Net / Your Internet Provider - email: lori@natesnet.com 325 S. Main * Milbank, SD • 605-432-1222 i f We'll go out on a and give you i limb for you best service! Dillan and lorden Roggenbuck • Largest windshield inventory in the area o • 100% customer satisfaction • We'll handle all the insurance work PROGRESSIVE COLLISION & GLASS CENTER, INC. Steve and Linda Roggenbuck 109 SE Second Street • Ortonville, Minnesota 56278 Phone (320) 839-2255 Toll Free 888-819-2255 , The (U.S.P.S. JAMES D. Publisher / SUZE'B'E Office I KATHIE Computer EMILEE ( Compositor BETH Reporter / BILL BOB TIM NANCY Tues., Au Continuint Ortomll#, Periodicals Postage $30.00 per year Parle, Traverse Minnesota, Grant in South counties in All others, $38.00 Postmaster: The Ortonville Ortonville, RATE A FEBRUARY Big Stone, Lac € Grant and Roberts Februaq/ ........... 30.00 March ............... 27 50 April .................. 25.00 May ................... 22.50 June ................ 20.00 July ................... 17.50 ALL OTHERS IN February ........... 34.00 March ................ 31.24 April .................. 28.40 ' May ................... 25.56 June .................. 22.72 July ................... 19.88 ALL AREA February ........... 38.00 March .............. 34 87 Apdl ............ i' .31 70 May ................... 28.53 June .................. 25.38 July ............... ,!; The Publisher's omissions in tisement is strictly the issue or the the Church notes - I Display Pictures - 5 News- Friday Classified ads (Any ad brought to classify.) A Monday: A Tuesday: A A Friday: Holidays Letters to the. munity writers i Independent and/or isaper also h letters that it might be Letters printed or address Addresses to one The is news is If an zation char for an sidered paper. cease to receives for paper sale,' increases. and a Advertising particula ness. We advertising our decision. A News: ourI fully and staff's op opinion page. Editorials:' ,late readers. of other i tion; own views, Phone 839-3761 sifted Ortonviile Page 4  INDEPENDENT Editorial comment GUEST EDITORIAL... Printed word most vital to society! (Edi. note: The following is authored by Bob Karolevitz, writer-at-large for the Grant County Review newspaper in Milbank, SD. We extend thanks to the Review for re-printing Bob's thoughts on how important newspapers are as a means of keeping society alive and informed.) More than a half century ago I got a Master's Degree in journalism from the University of Oregon and I've hardly ever used it. l'm not bragging about the educational achievement, however, because I doubt if more than four people, besides myself,ever read my thesis - and as far as I know, they are all dead. Since then, my brilliant bit of scholarship, entitled "The 1949 Portland Newspaper Strike: A Study of Its Effect on the Community," has grown yellow with age on the bookshelf. I stumbled across it by accident the other day and decided all that work deserved at least a small measure of exposure. As I reread it for the first time in more than five decades, I was surprised that some of the things I learned might still be valid today. I proved that newspapers have a role to play, besides wrapping fish. Here's what happened a long, long time ago (less the footnotes and all that other academic stuff): On Feb. 18, 1949, 93 members of the Web Pressmen's Union walked off their job with Oregon's two leading papers, The Oregonian and the Oregon Journal. They never returned to work and Portland - then a city of half a million people - was without either of its two dailies for almost a month. While the strike was in progress, I got into my post-war Kaiser automobile and drove from Eugene to Portland to see what happened when folks were cut off from the printed word. To start with, 2,000 other employees of the two papers were out of work and 4,500 newsboys didn't have anything to peddle. Nearby restaurants were without customers, so they suffered economic woes as well. The problem then spread throughout the city like tumbling dominoes. These are some of things which occurred: • Florists suffered serious loss of business because acquaintances of deceased people didn't learn of deaths until the funerals were over. • Attendance at movie theaters dropped off because nobody knew what was playing. • Furniture, clolhing and jewelry stores cancelled special sales because of the lack of print advertising. • Ministers reported a drop in church attendance - especially evening services - when there were no notices in the papers. • Kids (and adults, too, missed the funny papers; and crossword addicts could hardly wait for the strike to end. Television was not a factor in 1949 and radio tried to fill the gap. However, it was soon evident that the two mediums (media, for you Latin buffs) served different functions. For instance, radio could not replace classified advertising, legal notices, vital statistics, sports box scores, obituaries, wedding reports and birth announcements. "You can't past a radio blurb in a scrapbook," one observer said. One gal, who always sat down with a cup of java and the morning paper after she got the kids off to school, complained that she never had an enjoyable cup of coffee while the strike was on. So it went. The walkout demonstrated that newspapers played a unique role in the community and that they were sorely missed, even by those who bellyached about them. Finally the strikers returned, the presses rolled and I got to wear a cap and gown. I suppose I contributed a mite to the world's vast store of knowledge, but I'm afraid that only the four dead guys and ! knew what it was. sos GESSWEIN coo 432-550! MOTORS 442-5545 Dead bird reporting for West Nile Virus To date, the best way to detect West Nile Virus (WNV) in an area is to look for birds that have been bitten by infected mosquitoes, and killed by the virus. The Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) has been collecting reports of dead birds from around the state and then testing some of these birds for the virus (particularly crows and blue jays). Countryside Public Health has been notified by MDH that the coun- \\; ties of Big Stone, Chippewa, and Lac qui Parle have had birds test positive for the disease. There is one human case in Chippewa County. Because these counties already know they have birds with the disease, MDH has requested that no more dead birds be sent to them. Swift and Yellow Medicine County may continue to report dead birds as these counties do not have a positive one reported as of 8/20/03. Ths may be done by contact- Johnson son heads high profile murder investigation Former Ortonville resident, Dave Johnson, a Police Captain with the St. Cloud Police Department, is heading a high profile, first degree, murder investigation in St. Cloud that is head- ed for trial beginning Sept. 2, 2003, in Duluth. The case involves the death of Kenneth MacLennan,who is alleged to have been shot several times in his St. Cloud home by his son, Jason, who was 17 at the time of the crime on Jan. 14, 2003. Jason MacLennan and a co-defen- dant, Matt Moeller of Clearwater, were both indicted on first-degree murder charges by a Stearns County Grand Jury. Jason MacLennan's defense attor- neys in the case were unsuccessful in their attempt to use a "battered child defense" in a recent ruling by Steams county District Judge, Paul Widick. ' Additionally, Widick denied a request by COURT TV to televise the trial live on TV. Johnson, a 1971 graduate of Ortonville High School has been a police officer for over 29 years, and has been the Captain in charge of the Criminal Investigation Division for the last six years. He is a graduate of St. Cloud State University and holds a Masters Degree in Justice Administration from the University of Louisville. He is the son of Loyal and Gladys Johnson of Ortonville. i I iiiii ii N 6oth YOeddin00 Emil and LuVerne Swezey celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary on Aug. 22, 2003. Emil was in the army in 1943 and later a barber in Clinton for 43 years. He also prepared tax returns, did bookwork and does volunteer tax work for sen- iors in Ortonville. LuVeme had a beauty shop in Clinton and ended her working days as a bookkeeper at the Clinton Coop. She is a volunteer health insurance counselor for seniors. Their daughter Janice (and husband Glenn) lives in Plymouth. Their son James (andwife Ardell) lives in Peoria, III. They have three grandchildren, Chad and Ross Gauger and Jennifer Swezey. In their retirement years, they are involved at First English Lutheran Church and enjoy playing bridge, gardening, golfing and square dancing. They are# --  thankful for their years together; good, health, family and friends. / ing the Countryside Public Health Office in that county. Countryside Public Health will report this to MDH and MDH will determine if the bird is to be sent to them for testing. Prevention of WNV is very impor- tant being the virus has been detected in many of the counties in Minnesota. Ways to reduce your risks of getting West Nile encephalitis are the use of mosquito repellents, avoiding outdoor expo'Sures rdusk and dawn (peak feeding time for many mosquitoes), and wearing longsleeved shirts and long pants. Removal of water-holding containers (mosquito breeding sites) from residential areas will reduce the numbers of several mosquito species. For information regarding WNV, you may contact your Countryside Public Health Office at 839-6135. " Information is also available at the MDH website www.health.state.mn.us. A current map of the 2003 WNV confirmed cases in humans, horses and birds by county is available at this website. If Check out our web site at -'  www.orton viUei'ndepetent.com ) ii ii i ONCE AGAIN... MANY THANKS Recent new and renewal sub- scribers to The Independent which we gratefully acknowledge with thanks for your loyalty: Garnett Steiner Darin Stoddard DeWane Stoddard Jack Lyons Diana Shelstad Glenn Henningson . David Meyer John Athey Rev. Larry Kasten James Phalen Ora Brustuen Caroline Zahn Anita Zempei Ray Hamann Joe Karels Darrell Tober Paul C. Ell Joel Kuyper H.O. Price Myron Guse Pauline Karels Dale Von Eschen Darlene Grossman Ralph Loeschke Carol Nelson Richard Ehrenberg Todd Sandberg Irene Karels Tom Henrich Beth & Tim Swanson Dennis Rleppel James Hamann Carol Hyatt Paul DeBoer Robert Dunston Joann McMahon Tom Aafedt Harold Dittes Chris Peterson Paul Chlndvall Loretta Schmleg Floyd Kellen Rev. lhno Janssen Dean Van Hout Tuck Nolop Tom Cordle Helen Schake iii Grand Am GT1 i unr t 50tit YOeddi0000 7400nioe00aa00 v k. .uee ad 7.th c'Z3aielao Get High Speed Wireless Internet from NATE'S NET where your uploads are as fast as downloads. NO PHONE LINES TO SLOW YOU DOWN! You can be on line all the time and never get bumped off! No need for that second phone line for the lnternet, because it's wireless! Computer Sales & Service • Wireless Intemet 00/Nat Net / Your Internet Provider - email: lori@natesnet.com 325 S. Main * Milbank, SD • 605-432-1222 i f We'll go out on a and give you i limb for you best service! Dillan and lorden Roggenbuck • Largest windshield inventory in the area o • 100% customer satisfaction • We'll handle all the insurance work PROGRESSIVE COLLISION & GLASS CENTER, INC. Steve and Linda Roggenbuck 109 SE Second Street • Ortonville, Minnesota 56278 Phone (320) 839-2255 Toll Free 888-819-2255 , The (U.S.P.S. JAMES D. Publisher / SUZE'B'E Office I KATHIE Computer EMILEE ( Compositor BETH Reporter / BILL BOB TIM NANCY Tues., Au Continuint Ortomll#, Periodicals Postage $30.00 per year Parle, Traverse Minnesota, Grant in South counties in All others, $38.00 Postmaster: The Ortonville Ortonville, RATE A FEBRUARY Big Stone, Lac € Grant and Roberts Februaq/ ........... 30.00 March ............... 27 50 April .................. 25.00 May ................... 22.50 June ................ 20.00 July ................... 17.50 ALL OTHERS IN February ........... 34.00 March ................ 31.24 April .................. 28.40 ' May ................... 25.56 June .................. 22.72 July ................... 19.88 ALL AREA February ........... 38.00 March .............. 34 87 Apdl ............ i' .31 70 May ................... 28.53 June .................. 25.38 July ............... ,!; The Publisher's omissions in tisement is strictly the issue or the the Church notes - I Display Pictures - 5 News- Friday Classified ads (Any ad brought to classify.) A Monday: A Tuesday: A A Friday: Holidays Letters to the. munity writers i Independent and/or isaper also h letters that it might be Letters printed or address Addresses to one The is news is If an zation char for an sidered paper. cease to receives for paper sale,' increases. and a Advertising particula ness. We advertising our decision. A News: ourI fully and staff's op opinion page. Editorials:' ,late readers. of other i tion; own views, Phone 839-3761 sifted Ortonviile Page 4  INDEPENDENT