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August 26, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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August 26, 2003
 

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/ V Y mill I I ! I | • _o c;ii;! Έ i i  SAFETY AWARD WINNERS at the Ortonville Post Office are pictured above. In front: Brad Voorhees and Joann McMahon. In back (I-r): Dale Finke, Rod Grossman, Dallas Gleoge and Dick Stotesbery. Not pictured are Marie Bergwall, Rick Mosey, Scott Nelson, Jennifer Stotesbery and Kevin Gable. Commissioners hear Chamber's report, consider funding for 2004 Orlou Mittelstaedt and Mary Anne IJtrich of the Big Stone Lake Area Chamber of Commerce, and Tourism Committee attended the regular meet- mg of the Big Stone County Board of Commissioners last Tuesday to request funding for 2004. According to Ulrich, there has been 601 queries about the Big Stone Lake area to the Chamber office this year. This number is up from the 267 queries received in 2002. Members of the Chamber feel that the increase in interest comes as a result of a series of TV commercials that have been played throughout the United States. According to Ulrich, the commer- cials doubled the number of hits to the Chamber Office in eight months, and the organization feels that continuing the commercials throughout 2004 is a top priority for the Chamber. She also mentioned that if Big Stone County would be willing to assist in continuing the commercials, " th Cham U ince- ing about all of Big Stone County. Ulrich stated the cost of producing and broadcasting the commercials is $7,000 which includes 30 second advertisements and a three-minute advertisement. These commercials were broadcasted on the Midwest Outdoors Show. In order to facilitate the cost of producing these commercials, the Chamber of Commerce requested $5,000 in funding from the Commissioners, up from $4,000 in previous years. Commissioners advised Ulrich that they will consider the request when working on the budget. No decision was made regarding funding for the Chamber. Big Stone County's Environmental Officer, Darren Wilke, was also at the meeting to discuss a recommendation made by the County's Planning and Zoning Commission. Wilke presented a preliminary plat for Mallard's Nest, which is located on Highway 7 near Mallard Point. According to Wilke, the Planning and Zoning Commission recommend- ed the Commissioners approve the plat, once changes are made regarding a property line that currently does not meet regulations. Big Stone County Attorney Bill Watson recommended to Commissioners that they get the final plat, including changes, and then approve the plat. No action was taken during the meeting. Wilke also mentioned that one bid was received on a shed located in eevilte According "to W e, T(td Firchau submitted the only bid for $700. Commissioner Wade Athey made a motion to accept the bid. The motion was seconded and carried. Big Stone County Engineer opened bids at the meeting for a pro- ject at the Big Stone County Historical Society, which will add a lookout tower, a pedestrian path and make other improvements to the museum grounds. Two bids were received for the projecb from Dallas I. Hanson Construction of Ortonville and from Environmental Associates of Wilhnar. WASTE MANAGEMENT will not be working on Monday, Sept 1st. ALL ORTONVILLE COMMERCIAL AND RESIDENTIAL GARBAGE EVERYDAY LOW PRICE AND RECYCLING will be picked up Sept. 2nd These are Ortonville Monda00 Sept. 1st routes D&L Photo *',,.Z o,, " 1-Hour Photo Processing Lab 307 Main St., Milbank (Across from Pizza Ranch). 432-5222 Your photographs are priceless memories, so don't trust your film to just any photo processor. Bring them to D&L Photo where photos are our only business/ Hanson's bid came in at $149,049 for the project, and Environmental Associate's bid was $194,031. According to Anderson, there is currently $110,000 available in fund- ing for the project, which would leave an additional $39,000 needed for the project. Commissioners did not award a bid for the project last Tuesday, as they will wait to see what can be done about the shortage of funding. Anderson also advised the Commissioners about a project in Graccvillc for repairs on sewer lines and the road running in front of the hospital. According to Anderson, the project could cost the City of Graceville up to $120,000, an amount that is not feasible for the City. Nick stated that he mentioned to Graceville's City Council that Big Stone County could finance the pro- ject for a period of five years, and indicated it was possible for Graceville to get a five percent inter- est'-rate' if lhey financed the project that way. According to Anderson, the Graceville Council indicated interest in financing the project through Big Stone County for the entire amount of the project, as that is the only way the City will have the ability to move for- ward with the project. A motion was made by Commissioner Dick Lane to approve financing the City of Graceville for the project, up to $125,000 at a five percent interest rate over five years. The motion was seconded and carried. School expense reduced By Arnold Souba The Ortonvilte School Board at the regular Aug. 18 meeting called for 700,000 dollars in aid anticipation certificates. This down from 800 K last year and 1.2 million a few years ago. The result should be a reduction of interest expense for the school. Bellingham tuition was discussed. The sense of the meeting was that a mini-board meeting to discuss terms should occur. Disscussion was also held on the new graduation standards and the fact that the legislature repealed the profile of learning in favor of stiffer standards and more content. For 9th thru 12th grade it was suggested that profile math should continue, in order to dovetail with national standards. Tom and Darcy Roscoe requested that their second oldest daughter be allowed to attend Ortonville school. The board passed a motion approving this in principle. A number of school policies were amended and approved by the board. Student, teacher and athletic hand- books were also modified and approved. Actitvity ticket prices were discussed, a senior dicount approved. The request of John and Jean Trevett for their children to attend Milbank School was granted. August bills for 285.912.97 were paid. This included 57.089.02 for a new school bus. The next regular board meeting will be Sept. 15th at 7 p.m. in the school library. '01 Dodge Intrepid ES 24,000 Miles 4 disc Extension report Karl Beran Regional Extension Educator, Health & Nutrition Stevens County Extension Service 10 E Hwy 28, Suite 1 Morris;, MN 56267 320 589-7423 ENHANCING AND RENEWING YOUR LIFE Positive aging is experiencing the disease, cancer, diabetes and its consequences, pulmonary diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, arthritis, and dysfunction of aging like physical, mental, and social problems. We need to control our personal habits like smoking, drinking, substance abuse, and risky behaviors to help us out. It is found that 75 percent of health status and life expectancy after age 40 later years of ::: ::::::+,+:::::: : : : is based on modifiable factors like diet human life asii! and weight, exercise, stress increasingly s a t i s f y i n g, management and coping, and aspects enriching and of attitude and mood states. The productive. A major key is weight management and major issue exercise to be healthy. We also need included in the to look at how to cope with exposure understanding of the aging process is the physical : challenge of h e a I t h maintenance, which has major implications for individuals, families and communities in terms of impact on the workforce and the economy. The MacArthur Foundation study found the primary predictors of successful aging are to stay socially connected and active, to stay mentally and physically active, and to avoid disease. The major age-related chronic diseases are cardiovascular ........... to chronic stressors like personal, : : work, environmental, financial, relationships, and depression. How much of a sense of control you have in these situations will help. Some other ways we can make a positive difference in healthy aging are to have independence, understanding for our anger and hostility, spirituality to give us a sense of hope and faith, and a belief system to help you with your perceptions and emotions. Nutrition is also important. You need to have fruits and vegetables for your phytochemicals and phytonutrients to fight You need to get a your fruits and ve: greens, yellow/orange, and whites) for they all 1 factors to help you Overall, you need diet controlling your your whole grains getting the proteins as needed. Lastly, you need to your own needs in system by asking que informed, seeking an active part of your team. It is being much we can learn person care" the inte and wellness to make Karl Beran is a with the University.  Extension Service f Nutrition serving the District that include County. Our cafinot BE RESPON 60,000 Mile Limited Treadwear Warranty • S-Speed Rated • Steel Belted Construction • All Season Performance SUPREME Si S6 P205/70R15 WHITEWALL BLACK WALL PRICE WHITE STRIPE PRICE WHITE STRIPE PRICE P185GOR14 ........ $59.95 P195/70R14 ........... 61.95 P185/65R14 ........... 66.95 P195/65R14 ........... 68.95 0205/65R15 ........... 73.95 P215/60R16 ........... 81.95 P1650R13 ........ $51.95 P1750R13 ........... 52.95 P185/80R13 ........... 53.95 P185ffSR14 ........... 61.95 0185GOR14 ........... 61.95 P195GSR14 ........... 62.95 P205GOR14 ........ $63.95 P205/75R14 ........... 63.95 P205/75R15 ........... 66.95 P215G5R15 ........... 68.95 P225G5R15 ........... 70.95 P235/75R15 ........... 73.95 4-WHEEL COMPUTERIZED ALIGNMENT • Computer-optimized tread pitch sequencing for quiet ride. • Two steel belts and polyester cord body for strength and smooth, comfortable ride. • Full depth slpes for wet trectlon and less hydroplaning. • 45,000 mile limited Black Wall treadwear warranty. P 175/'70R 13 • White stripe sidewalland P185/70R14 black wall styling. P195/70R14 Price $ 53.95 54.95 Price White Stripe P 155/80R 13 P 165/80R 13 P 175/80R 13 P185/80R13 P 185/75R 14 P 195/75R 14 Price White Stripe $ 42.95 P205/701q14 46.95 P205/75R 14 48.95 P205/75R15 49.95 P215/75R15 51.95 P225/75R15 52.95 P235/75R15 $58.95 54.95 57.95 59.95 61.95 64.95 Limited Mlea • Warra ainst Tire Wear Out BridgestonelFirestone will rep ace your t res on a pro-rated basis if they do not achieve the guaranteed mileage, ACtual tread life may vary Certain exceptions and restrictions may apply. See us for a copy Of the warranty, speed rating and lire safety information. Page 10  INDEPENDENT TuesdaY' / V Y mill I I ! I | • _o c;ii;! Έ i i  SAFETY AWARD WINNERS at the Ortonville Post Office are pictured above. In front: Brad Voorhees and Joann McMahon. In back (I-r): Dale Finke, Rod Grossman, Dallas Gleoge and Dick Stotesbery. Not pictured are Marie Bergwall, Rick Mosey, Scott Nelson, Jennifer Stotesbery and Kevin Gable. Commissioners hear Chamber's report, consider funding for 2004 Orlou Mittelstaedt and Mary Anne IJtrich of the Big Stone Lake Area Chamber of Commerce, and Tourism Committee attended the regular meet- mg of the Big Stone County Board of Commissioners last Tuesday to request funding for 2004. According to Ulrich, there has been 601 queries about the Big Stone Lake area to the Chamber office this year. This number is up from the 267 queries received in 2002. Members of the Chamber feel that the increase in interest comes as a result of a series of TV commercials that have been played throughout the United States. According to Ulrich, the commer- cials doubled the number of hits to the Chamber Office in eight months, and the organization feels that continuing the commercials throughout 2004 is a top priority for the Chamber. She also mentioned that if Big Stone County would be willing to assist in continuing the commercials, " th Cham U ince- ing about all of Big Stone County. Ulrich stated the cost of producing and broadcasting the commercials is $7,000 which includes 30 second advertisements and a three-minute advertisement. These commercials were broadcasted on the Midwest Outdoors Show. In order to facilitate the cost of producing these commercials, the Chamber of Commerce requested $5,000 in funding from the Commissioners, up from $4,000 in previous years. Commissioners advised Ulrich that they will consider the request when working on the budget. No decision was made regarding funding for the Chamber. Big Stone County's Environmental Officer, Darren Wilke, was also at the meeting to discuss a recommendation made by the County's Planning and Zoning Commission. Wilke presented a preliminary plat for Mallard's Nest, which is located on Highway 7 near Mallard Point. According to Wilke, the Planning and Zoning Commission recommend- ed the Commissioners approve the plat, once changes are made regarding a property line that currently does not meet regulations. Big Stone County Attorney Bill Watson recommended to Commissioners that they get the final plat, including changes, and then approve the plat. No action was taken during the meeting. Wilke also mentioned that one bid was received on a shed located in eevilte According "to W e, T(td Firchau submitted the only bid for $700. Commissioner Wade Athey made a motion to accept the bid. The motion was seconded and carried. Big Stone County Engineer opened bids at the meeting for a pro- ject at the Big Stone County Historical Society, which will add a lookout tower, a pedestrian path and make other improvements to the museum grounds. Two bids were received for the projecb from Dallas I. Hanson Construction of Ortonville and from Environmental Associates of Wilhnar. WASTE MANAGEMENT will not be working on Monday, Sept 1st. ALL ORTONVILLE COMMERCIAL AND RESIDENTIAL GARBAGE EVERYDAY LOW PRICE AND RECYCLING will be picked up Sept. 2nd These are Ortonville Monda00 Sept. 1st routes D&L Photo *',,.Z o,, " 1-Hour Photo Processing Lab 307 Main St., Milbank (Across from Pizza Ranch). 432-5222 Your photographs are priceless memories, so don't trust your film to just any photo processor. Bring them to D&L Photo where photos are our only business/ Hanson's bid came in at $149,049 for the project, and Environmental Associate's bid was $194,031. According to Anderson, there is currently $110,000 available in fund- ing for the project, which would leave an additional $39,000 needed for the project. Commissioners did not award a bid for the project last Tuesday, as they will wait to see what can be done about the shortage of funding. Anderson also advised the Commissioners about a project in Graccvillc for repairs on sewer lines and the road running in front of the hospital. According to Anderson, the project could cost the City of Graceville up to $120,000, an amount that is not feasible for the City. Nick stated that he mentioned to Graceville's City Council that Big Stone County could finance the pro- ject for a period of five years, and indicated it was possible for Graceville to get a five percent inter- est'-rate' if lhey financed the project that way. According to Anderson, the Graceville Council indicated interest in financing the project through Big Stone County for the entire amount of the project, as that is the only way the City will have the ability to move for- ward with the project. A motion was made by Commissioner Dick Lane to approve financing the City of Graceville for the project, up to $125,000 at a five percent interest rate over five years. The motion was seconded and carried. School expense reduced By Arnold Souba The Ortonvilte School Board at the regular Aug. 18 meeting called for 700,000 dollars in aid anticipation certificates. This down from 800 K last year and 1.2 million a few years ago. The result should be a reduction of interest expense for the school. Bellingham tuition was discussed. The sense of the meeting was that a mini-board meeting to discuss terms should occur. Disscussion was also held on the new graduation standards and the fact that the legislature repealed the profile of learning in favor of stiffer standards and more content. For 9th thru 12th grade it was suggested that profile math should continue, in order to dovetail with national standards. Tom and Darcy Roscoe requested that their second oldest daughter be allowed to attend Ortonville school. The board passed a motion approving this in principle. A number of school policies were amended and approved by the board. Student, teacher and athletic hand- books were also modified and approved. Actitvity ticket prices were discussed, a senior dicount approved. The request of John and Jean Trevett for their children to attend Milbank School was granted. August bills for 285.912.97 were paid. This included 57.089.02 for a new school bus. The next regular board meeting will be Sept. 15th at 7 p.m. in the school library. '01 Dodge Intrepid ES 24,000 Miles 4 disc Extension report Karl Beran Regional Extension Educator, Health & Nutrition Stevens County Extension Service 10 E Hwy 28, Suite 1 Morris;, MN 56267 320 589-7423 ENHANCING AND RENEWING YOUR LIFE Positive aging is experiencing the disease, cancer, diabetes and its consequences, pulmonary diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, arthritis, and dysfunction of aging like physical, mental, and social problems. We need to control our personal habits like smoking, drinking, substance abuse, and risky behaviors to help us out. It is found that 75 percent of health status and life expectancy after age 40 later years of ::: ::::::+,+:::::: : : : is based on modifiable factors like diet human life asii! and weight, exercise, stress increasingly s a t i s f y i n g, management and coping, and aspects enriching and of attitude and mood states. The productive. A major key is weight management and major issue exercise to be healthy. We also need included in the to look at how to cope with exposure understanding of the aging process is the physical : challenge of h e a I t h maintenance, which has major implications for individuals, families and communities in terms of impact on the workforce and the economy. The MacArthur Foundation study found the primary predictors of successful aging are to stay socially connected and active, to stay mentally and physically active, and to avoid disease. The major age-related chronic diseases are cardiovascular ........... to chronic stressors like personal, : : work, environmental, financial, relationships, and depression. How much of a sense of control you have in these situations will help. Some other ways we can make a positive difference in healthy aging are to have independence, understanding for our anger and hostility, spirituality to give us a sense of hope and faith, and a belief system to help you with your perceptions and emotions. Nutrition is also important. You need to have fruits and vegetables for your phytochemicals and phytonutrients to fight You need to get a your fruits and ve: greens, yellow/orange, and whites) for they all 1 factors to help you Overall, you need diet controlling your your whole grains getting the proteins as needed. Lastly, you need to your own needs in system by asking que informed, seeking an active part of your team. It is being much we can learn person care" the inte and wellness to make Karl Beran is a with the University.  Extension Service f Nutrition serving the District that include County. Our cafinot BE RESPON 60,000 Mile Limited Treadwear Warranty • S-Speed Rated • Steel Belted Construction • All Season Performance SUPREME Si S6 P205/70R15 WHITEWALL BLACK WALL PRICE WHITE STRIPE PRICE WHITE STRIPE PRICE P185GOR14 ........ $59.95 P195/70R14 ........... 61.95 P185/65R14 ........... 66.95 P195/65R14 ........... 68.95 0205/65R15 ........... 73.95 P215/60R16 ........... 81.95 P1650R13 ........ $51.95 P1750R13 ........... 52.95 P185/80R13 ........... 53.95 P185ffSR14 ........... 61.95 0185GOR14 ........... 61.95 P195GSR14 ........... 62.95 P205GOR14 ........ $63.95 P205/75R14 ........... 63.95 P205/75R15 ........... 66.95 P215G5R15 ........... 68.95 P225G5R15 ........... 70.95 P235/75R15 ........... 73.95 4-WHEEL COMPUTERIZED ALIGNMENT • Computer-optimized tread pitch sequencing for quiet ride. • Two steel belts and polyester cord body for strength and smooth, comfortable ride. • Full depth slpes for wet trectlon and less hydroplaning. • 45,000 mile limited Black Wall treadwear warranty. P 175/'70R 13 • White stripe sidewalland P185/70R14 black wall styling. P195/70R14 Price $ 53.95 54.95 Price White Stripe P 155/80R 13 P 165/80R 13 P 175/80R 13 P185/80R13 P 185/75R 14 P 195/75R 14 Price White Stripe $ 42.95 P205/701q14 46.95 P205/75R 14 48.95 P205/75R15 49.95 P215/75R15 51.95 P225/75R15 52.95 P235/75R15 $58.95 54.95 57.95 59.95 61.95 64.95 Limited Mlea • Warra ainst Tire Wear Out BridgestonelFirestone will rep ace your t res on a pro-rated basis if they do not achieve the guaranteed mileage, ACtual tread life may vary Certain exceptions and restrictions may apply. See us for a copy Of the warranty, speed rating and lire safety information. Page 10  INDEPENDENT TuesdaY'