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August 26, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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Bellingham Boogie Woogie Day determine spring nitrogen needs. The '98 Jeep class.c car show to be Sept. 13 Grand Limited Bellingham Boogie Woogie Day is scheduled for Saturday, September 13, beginning with the Classic Car Show Registration at 11 a.m. Door prizes will be given away, and people will have the opportunity to register for prizes throughout the day. Fifites and 60's music will be played on main street, and the public will have the chance to vote for their favorite car. They will decide who wins the People's Choice Award, Ladies' Choice Award, and the Kid's Choice Award. Every year more tro- phies are added. This year, a category for Juniors to age 21 was added. The Kevin Ehrenberg Memorial Trophy will be awarded again this year. Last year's winner, Monte Kouf from Watertown, SD will be attending this year's show. A muffler rap, engine blow up and show and shine are all part of the day's activities. "]['he highlight of the day will be the burn out contest, in which participants will be vying for the $150 first place; $100 second place and $50 third place prizes. Last year's winners in the burn out were Rick Lindner from Watertown, SD; Cody Schuelke from Wyoming and George Kurkosky from Benson. A number of trophies are awarded anually at the car show, and include: Oldest Running Entry; Mayor's Choice; Best Paint Job; Furthest Traveled; Favorite Local Car (30 mile radius); Under Construction and many more. Anyone that is pre-registered will have a chance to wm a Dale Earnhardt, Jr. jacket. Pre-registration costs $15. The price of pre-registra- tion includes a T-shirt, lunch and dash plaque; while supplies last. Alter August 24 until the day of the event, the registration fee will increase to $20. For more information about Bellingham Boogie Woogie Day, call 1-320-568-2t20. Everyone is invited to attend and experience big time fun in a small town. carryover nitrate-N in the soil and are adjusted for previous crop and yield goal (this test is not recommended if the previous crop was alfalfa). This test can reduce the amount of nitrogen applied and will result in economic savings for the producer. 3.) Soil organic matter naturally stores and releases nitrogen throughout the growing season. The higher your organic matter percent, the more nitrogen is released.' Approximately 15-20 Ibs of N/acre are released per percent of organic matter. For example, if your field has 3% organic matter you can expect 45-60 Ibs/acre of nitrogen to be released to your crop each year. Therefore, adjust your N application to your organic matter content. This can reduce the Council reviews Ortonv,lle dance total Nfertilizerneededforcorn ordinance, parking lot problems Ortonville's Mayor David Dinnel presented the conclusion of the Council's performance review of the City Clerk/Administrator at last Monday's regular meeting of the Council. The August 4 meeting of Ortonville's Council went into closed session to review the performance of Char Grossman, City Clerk/Administrator, and according to Dinnel, produced favorable results. Dinnel noted that many areas of Grossman's job description, including budget preparation, were given an exceptional rating by councilmem- bers. Additionally, other areas were given a commendable rating. Dinnel mentioned that there were some areas of improvement brought to Grossman's attention, and coun- cilmembers offered suggestions on how to improve in those areas. Overall, Dinnel expressed feelings about a favorable performance review. Councilmembers also discussed the city's Dance Ordinance, 114.02. According to the ordinance, all public dances held in Ortonville require obtaining a permit prior to the date of the dance. An application for the per- mit must be submitted at least 10 days in advance, and a Police Officer must be present at every dance. Councilmembers discussed con- cerns about the ordinance, as there are establishments in Ortonville that hold dances on a weekly basis. The current ordinance would require these estab- of the Senior dances held every Sunday evening at the Matador, and mentioned that an Ortonville officer would have to be at those dances every Sunday evening, for the entire dance. Councilmember Artie Arndt posed the question "what do we stand to risk if we dissolve the ordinance?" He mentioned that it would be very diffi- cult for the City to regulate all public dances, and they would have a hard time enforcing the ordinance. Councilmember Lisa Berkner expressed concerns about completely dissolving the ordinance, because of insurance and notification reasons. Mayor Dinnel stated there may be some things present in the ordinance to keep. Councilmember Artie Arndt made a motion for a resolution to hold the first reading of the Ordinance, to dis- solve the dance ordinance. Councilmembers will further review the ordinance and have a second read- ing at a later date. Councilmembers also discussed gift certificates at the Ortonville Golf Course that were issued before the change in management at the Golf Course occurred. The Council received a letter from a customer whose gift certificate was not hon- ored. Councilmember Arndt suggested that gift certificates could be issued by the city of Ortonville, which would prevent further problems should another change in management ever councilmembers discussed what could be done to keep the lot open, clean and in good shape. Councilmembers asked Police Chief Hormann about whether or not a curfew is in place for the city of Ortonville. Hormann answered that there is a curfew, but the curfew only affects Ortonville kids under 17 years old. He indicated that most of the people who hang out in the lower parking lot are 17 years old or older. A suggestion was made to place "no loitering" signs at each end of the parking lot, to serve as a warning that loitering in the parking lot will not be tolerated. "I believe that kids need a place to hang out, but the traffic in the lower parking lot is beginning to be a prob- lem," said Mayor Dinnel. No action was taken regarding the parking lot, and councilmembers will consider various options to keep the parking lot open. Councilmember Arndt advised the Council that the Ortonville Jaycee's chapter is considering moving their Halloween Haunted House indoors this year, in case of bad weather. According to Arndt, they have held a "Haunted Park" in Neilson park the past few years, but would like to move it inside, as it will be less expen- sive and can withstand inclement weather. He advised councilmembers that an idea was brought up to hold the haunted house in the basement of the former Northside Medical Center lishments to apply for a permit I0 days prior to every dance. Ogonyill  ,Police Chie Curt Hormannl Who attended the meeting, mentioned additional concerns regarding having a Police Officer at every dance. Hormann mentioned that there may not be a sufficient number of officers available should there be more than one public dance in a night. He also gave an example following wheat or soybeans by 20-30 Ibs/acre. 4.) Consider the previous crop and any manure applied to the field. For example, if you are in a corn-soybean rotation you can take a 40 Ibs/ac N credit after the soybeans. This is due to the soybean residue and roots decaying and releasing that amount to the crop the following year. Manure credits are based on species, rates, and storage and handling of manure. Refer to U of M publications for these charts. As you are sitting in the combine thinking of the next field operation you need to make, remember the University of Minnesota's nitrogen recommendations to keep fertility high and costs low in your fields. If you need more information about fertilizer credits and application rates contact Jodi DeJong-Hughes at 320-589-1711 at the West Central Research and Outreach Center. Man appears in court on burglary charges Bryan Scott Kuefler requested a public defender in Big Stone County Court facing charges of burglary and theft. The court appearance takes place after alleged charges of burglarizing the Country Partner Coop in Beardsley. According to court documents, the total loss of property resulting from the burglary is approximately $1,343.01. Kuefler is facing one count of bur- glary in the second degree, one count of burglary in the third degree and one occur. Councilmembers discussed building's basement. Mayor Dinnel whether or not to regulate the gift cer- commented that there are still offices ,count o theft of property and ser- A m0iion was made and sec6nded (bai the" Dfillysis project will be dndeh ............... " " .... to honor previous gift certificates, and construction during Halloween. ':": i-  --- #, _ t.., ___,J_r the City will pay the difference for the After further discussion, a motion 00eNoy ocnroeue certificates. The motion carried, was made to send the idea to the In other business, Mayor Dinnel Healthcare board for recommenda- advised councilmembers that he has tion. The motion was seconded and been receiving many phone calls carried. regarding the lower parking lot, and NO oFle covers Minnesota better. It's comforting to know that Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota has been providing quality health care plans for nearly 70 years. With the variety of plans for individuals, groups and plans that work with Medicare, we've got you covered. Give me a call for more information. John Stolpman Ortonville Bellingham 320-839-6194 320-568-2101 BlueCross BlueShield of Minnesota .Wlhtig d indffndcnhlgenl fcc Bluc C$1a Blut Skidd afM illnlo  *,     l,.  lo,. v..,  WORK RELATED INJURIES Time loss from work is an immense problem in terms of human suffering and economic impact. The only disorder to cause more time loss from work than back pain is the common cold, Numerous studies show that chiropractic care is both a safe and effective way you deal with back pain, neck pain, headaches, tendonitis, carpal tunnel syndrome, muscular and joint injuries. Our office procedures include thorough examination, .promote fast relief and early return to work. Proper care of an acute injury is the best ' advice to prevent it from becoming a chronic ongoing disabling problem. 320-839-2323 Office Hours: M-W-F 8:30am - 5:00pm; Tues.-Thurs. 8:30am - 12noon; Sat. by appt. Extension l II Jody DeJong-Hughes Regional Extension Educator Ag Production Systems-Crops & Soils Fertility West Central Research and Outreach Center Morris, MN 320/589-1711 NITROGEN BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES Nitrogen (N) is an essential plant nutrient that 'V  ". c ontributesl greatly to the agricultural economy of MN crop producers. Unfortunately, the nitrate form of nitrogen can leach into ! surface and groundwater if nitrogen .............. management is not practiced carefully. In Western. Minnesota we have specific best management practices (BMP's) based on our climate and soil types to help keep our nutrients in the fields and out of our waterways. Below is a review of the nitrogen BMP's. 1.) Fall applied nitrogen, in heavier soils, is acceptable for our region of the state. When fall applying nitrogen use anhydrous ammonia or urea. UAN should not be fall-applied. Wait until the soil temperature at 6% is below 500. Research has shown that if N is applied at warmer temperatures, ammonia-N will quickly convert to nitrate-N which is susceptible to leaching with spring rains. Long-term averages indicate soil temperatures reach 500 on October 3rd at Morris and October 13th at Lamberton. .However, temperatures do not remain below 50 degrees until October 15th and 30th at the two locations. I have been asked if anhydrous is better than urea for keeping nitrogen as ammonium and not as nitrate. The reasoning behind this question is band applied anhydrous kills the soil bacteria slowing down the nitrogen conversion. However, bacteria are resilient and will start back up within a few days. Therefore, there is minimal advantage to using anhydrous benefit Sept. 10 at Trinity Church A barbecue supper benefit for LeRoy (Lee) Schroeder will be held Wednesday, Sept. 10th, with serving from 5-7 p.m. at the Trinity Lutheran Church, Ortonville. There will be a freewill offering. Funds raised will be used to help defray medical expenses. To assist with food donations and/or work at the benefit, please contact Janice Hinders at (605) 862- 8520. Or, after 5 p.m., you may contact Pat Janke at (320) 839-2930 or Pam Fryer at (605) 862-8999. Son born to Fenhauses Mary and Rod Fenhaus of Big Stone City, are happy to announce the birth of a son, Logan Daniel born Aug. 22, 2003 at the Ortonville Hospital, weighed 7 lbs, 11 ozs, 19 inches in length. Logan joins sister Rachel, 6 and Jessica 3. Proud grandparents are Lloyd and Betty Fenhaus of Corona, and Dan and Eunice Schmieg of Big Stone City. INDEPENDENT WANT ADS PAY s12,985 Campbell Williams American Legion will meet Sept. 2 Campbell Williams American Legion Post 258 of Clinton, will meet, Tuesday, Sept. 2, at 8 p.m. in the Legion room, located in the Memorial Building. It is the beginning of the new Legion year. Officers will be installed. New members welcome. Rcddcn on the lan- Cavil CLASSIFIED QUICK At Its Finest and At Lowest Prices NO JOB TOO The Ortonville I Ortonville, MN Letters Policy Letters to the editor discussing community issues are writers should be aware that The Independent reserves the and-or condense letters for print. The paper also reserves publish letters that are unsuitable or for which it mi liable. Letters should contain the writer's printed or typed name, s address and telephone number. Addresses and telephone be published. Letter writers are asked to limit themselves to one Please keep letter brief, preferably not over 350 ,70,000 Pay Only* Pay Only *123 =277 '431 Quality Collision Repair FREE LOANER VEHICLE *Body Work & Painting *Insurance Claims Glass InstallatiO Free Estimates Located one mile north of Ortonville on HwY. 7 Pavtllo to Sioux Historic GARY KNOLL '  Call Anytime | 1320) 839-2718 NOTICE OF FILl FOR THE NOV. 4, 2003, BIENNIAL ELEC THE CITY OF ORTONVILLE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that candidates for elected offices must file between Tuesday, August 26, 2003 p.m. on Tuesday, September 9, 2003, at the City Office Madison Avenue. Any qualified voter of the City of Ortonville may file for filing an affidavit of candidacy (available at City Hall) and fee of $2.00 to the City of Ortonville. COUNCIL SEAT "B" COUNCIL SEAT "D" COUNCIL SEAT "F" BY ORDER OF THE CITY COUNCIL Char Grossman, City Clerk, Administrator City of Ortonville, Minnesota Page 12 ......... " INDEPENDENT Bellingham Boogie Woogie Day determine spring nitrogen needs. The '98 Jeep class.c car show to be Sept. 13 Grand Limited Bellingham Boogie Woogie Day is scheduled for Saturday, September 13, beginning with the Classic Car Show Registration at 11 a.m. Door prizes will be given away, and people will have the opportunity to register for prizes throughout the day. Fifites and 60's music will be played on main street, and the public will have the chance to vote for their favorite car. They will decide who wins the People's Choice Award, Ladies' Choice Award, and the Kid's Choice Award. Every year more tro- phies are added. This year, a category for Juniors to age 21 was added. The Kevin Ehrenberg Memorial Trophy will be awarded again this year. Last year's winner, Monte Kouf from Watertown, SD will be attending this year's show. A muffler rap, engine blow up and show and shine are all part of the day's activities. "]['he highlight of the day will be the burn out contest, in which participants will be vying for the $150 first place; $100 second place and $50 third place prizes. Last year's winners in the burn out were Rick Lindner from Watertown, SD; Cody Schuelke from Wyoming and George Kurkosky from Benson. A number of trophies are awarded anually at the car show, and include: Oldest Running Entry; Mayor's Choice; Best Paint Job; Furthest Traveled; Favorite Local Car (30 mile radius); Under Construction and many more. Anyone that is pre-registered will have a chance to wm a Dale Earnhardt, Jr. jacket. Pre-registration costs $15. The price of pre-registra- tion includes a T-shirt, lunch and dash plaque; while supplies last. Alter August 24 until the day of the event, the registration fee will increase to $20. For more information about Bellingham Boogie Woogie Day, call 1-320-568-2t20. Everyone is invited to attend and experience big time fun in a small town. carryover nitrate-N in the soil and are adjusted for previous crop and yield goal (this test is not recommended if the previous crop was alfalfa). This test can reduce the amount of nitrogen applied and will result in economic savings for the producer. 3.) Soil organic matter naturally stores and releases nitrogen throughout the growing season. The higher your organic matter percent, the more nitrogen is released.' Approximately 15-20 Ibs of N/acre are released per percent of organic matter. For example, if your field has 3% organic matter you can expect 45-60 Ibs/acre of nitrogen to be released to your crop each year. Therefore, adjust your N application to your organic matter content. This can reduce the Council reviews Ortonv,lle dance total Nfertilizerneededforcorn ordinance, parking lot problems Ortonville's Mayor David Dinnel presented the conclusion of the Council's performance review of the City Clerk/Administrator at last Monday's regular meeting of the Council. The August 4 meeting of Ortonville's Council went into closed session to review the performance of Char Grossman, City Clerk/Administrator, and according to Dinnel, produced favorable results. Dinnel noted that many areas of Grossman's job description, including budget preparation, were given an exceptional rating by councilmem- bers. Additionally, other areas were given a commendable rating. Dinnel mentioned that there were some areas of improvement brought to Grossman's attention, and coun- cilmembers offered suggestions on how to improve in those areas. Overall, Dinnel expressed feelings about a favorable performance review. Councilmembers also discussed the city's Dance Ordinance, 114.02. According to the ordinance, all public dances held in Ortonville require obtaining a permit prior to the date of the dance. An application for the per- mit must be submitted at least 10 days in advance, and a Police Officer must be present at every dance. Councilmembers discussed con- cerns about the ordinance, as there are establishments in Ortonville that hold dances on a weekly basis. The current ordinance would require these estab- of the Senior dances held every Sunday evening at the Matador, and mentioned that an Ortonville officer would have to be at those dances every Sunday evening, for the entire dance. Councilmember Artie Arndt posed the question "what do we stand to risk if we dissolve the ordinance?" He mentioned that it would be very diffi- cult for the City to regulate all public dances, and they would have a hard time enforcing the ordinance. Councilmember Lisa Berkner expressed concerns about completely dissolving the ordinance, because of insurance and notification reasons. Mayor Dinnel stated there may be some things present in the ordinance to keep. Councilmember Artie Arndt made a motion for a resolution to hold the first reading of the Ordinance, to dis- solve the dance ordinance. Councilmembers will further review the ordinance and have a second read- ing at a later date. Councilmembers also discussed gift certificates at the Ortonville Golf Course that were issued before the change in management at the Golf Course occurred. The Council received a letter from a customer whose gift certificate was not hon- ored. Councilmember Arndt suggested that gift certificates could be issued by the city of Ortonville, which would prevent further problems should another change in management ever councilmembers discussed what could be done to keep the lot open, clean and in good shape. Councilmembers asked Police Chief Hormann about whether or not a curfew is in place for the city of Ortonville. Hormann answered that there is a curfew, but the curfew only affects Ortonville kids under 17 years old. He indicated that most of the people who hang out in the lower parking lot are 17 years old or older. A suggestion was made to place "no loitering" signs at each end of the parking lot, to serve as a warning that loitering in the parking lot will not be tolerated. "I believe that kids need a place to hang out, but the traffic in the lower parking lot is beginning to be a prob- lem," said Mayor Dinnel. No action was taken regarding the parking lot, and councilmembers will consider various options to keep the parking lot open. Councilmember Arndt advised the Council that the Ortonville Jaycee's chapter is considering moving their Halloween Haunted House indoors this year, in case of bad weather. According to Arndt, they have held a "Haunted Park" in Neilson park the past few years, but would like to move it inside, as it will be less expen- sive and can withstand inclement weather. He advised councilmembers that an idea was brought up to hold the haunted house in the basement of the former Northside Medical Center lishments to apply for a permit I0 days prior to every dance. Ogonyill  ,Police Chie Curt Hormannl Who attended the meeting, mentioned additional concerns regarding having a Police Officer at every dance. Hormann mentioned that there may not be a sufficient number of officers available should there be more than one public dance in a night. He also gave an example following wheat or soybeans by 20-30 Ibs/acre. 4.) Consider the previous crop and any manure applied to the field. For example, if you are in a corn-soybean rotation you can take a 40 Ibs/ac N credit after the soybeans. This is due to the soybean residue and roots decaying and releasing that amount to the crop the following year. Manure credits are based on species, rates, and storage and handling of manure. Refer to U of M publications for these charts. As you are sitting in the combine thinking of the next field operation you need to make, remember the University of Minnesota's nitrogen recommendations to keep fertility high and costs low in your fields. If you need more information about fertilizer credits and application rates contact Jodi DeJong-Hughes at 320-589-1711 at the West Central Research and Outreach Center. Man appears in court on burglary charges Bryan Scott Kuefler requested a public defender in Big Stone County Court facing charges of burglary and theft. The court appearance takes place after alleged charges of burglarizing the Country Partner Coop in Beardsley. According to court documents, the total loss of property resulting from the burglary is approximately $1,343.01. Kuefler is facing one count of bur- glary in the second degree, one count of burglary in the third degree and one occur. Councilmembers discussed building's basement. Mayor Dinnel whether or not to regulate the gift cer- commented that there are still offices ,count o theft of property and ser- A m0iion was made and sec6nded (bai the" Dfillysis project will be dndeh ............... " " .... to honor previous gift certificates, and construction during Halloween. ':": i-  --- #, _ t.., ___,J_r the City will pay the difference for the After further discussion, a motion 00eNoy ocnroeue certificates. The motion carried, was made to send the idea to the In other business, Mayor Dinnel Healthcare board for recommenda- advised councilmembers that he has tion. The motion was seconded and been receiving many phone calls carried. regarding the lower parking lot, and NO oFle covers Minnesota better. It's comforting to know that Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota has been providing quality health care plans for nearly 70 years. With the variety of plans for individuals, groups and plans that work with Medicare, we've got you covered. Give me a call for more information. John Stolpman Ortonville Bellingham 320-839-6194 320-568-2101 BlueCross BlueShield of Minnesota .Wlhtig d indffndcnhlgenl fcc Bluc C$1a Blut Skidd afM illnlo  *,     l,.  lo,. v..,  WORK RELATED INJURIES Time loss from work is an immense problem in terms of human suffering and economic impact. The only disorder to cause more time loss from work than back pain is the common cold, Numerous studies show that chiropractic care is both a safe and effective way you deal with back pain, neck pain, headaches, tendonitis, carpal tunnel syndrome, muscular and joint injuries. Our office procedures include thorough examination, .promote fast relief and early return to work. Proper care of an acute injury is the best ' advice to prevent it from becoming a chronic ongoing disabling problem. 320-839-2323 Office Hours: M-W-F 8:30am - 5:00pm; Tues.-Thurs. 8:30am - 12noon; Sat. by appt. Extension l II Jody DeJong-Hughes Regional Extension Educator Ag Production Systems-Crops & Soils Fertility West Central Research and Outreach Center Morris, MN 320/589-1711 NITROGEN BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES Nitrogen (N) is an essential plant nutrient that 'V  ". c ontributesl greatly to the agricultural economy of MN crop producers. Unfortunately, the nitrate form of nitrogen can leach into ! surface and groundwater if nitrogen .............. management is not practiced carefully. In Western. Minnesota we have specific best management practices (BMP's) based on our climate and soil types to help keep our nutrients in the fields and out of our waterways. Below is a review of the nitrogen BMP's. 1.) Fall applied nitrogen, in heavier soils, is acceptable for our region of the state. When fall applying nitrogen use anhydrous ammonia or urea. UAN should not be fall-applied. Wait until the soil temperature at 6% is below 500. Research has shown that if N is applied at warmer temperatures, ammonia-N will quickly convert to nitrate-N which is susceptible to leaching with spring rains. Long-term averages indicate soil temperatures reach 500 on October 3rd at Morris and October 13th at Lamberton. .However, temperatures do not remain below 50 degrees until October 15th and 30th at the two locations. I have been asked if anhydrous is better than urea for keeping nitrogen as ammonium and not as nitrate. The reasoning behind this question is band applied anhydrous kills the soil bacteria slowing down the nitrogen conversion. However, bacteria are resilient and will start back up within a few days. Therefore, there is minimal advantage to using anhydrous benefit Sept. 10 at Trinity Church A barbecue supper benefit for LeRoy (Lee) Schroeder will be held Wednesday, Sept. 10th, with serving from 5-7 p.m. at the Trinity Lutheran Church, Ortonville. There will be a freewill offering. Funds raised will be used to help defray medical expenses. To assist with food donations and/or work at the benefit, please contact Janice Hinders at (605) 862- 8520. Or, after 5 p.m., you may contact Pat Janke at (320) 839-2930 or Pam Fryer at (605) 862-8999. Son born to Fenhauses Mary and Rod Fenhaus of Big Stone City, are happy to announce the birth of a son, Logan Daniel born Aug. 22, 2003 at the Ortonville Hospital, weighed 7 lbs, 11 ozs, 19 inches in length. Logan joins sister Rachel, 6 and Jessica 3. Proud grandparents are Lloyd and Betty Fenhaus of Corona, and Dan and Eunice Schmieg of Big Stone City. INDEPENDENT WANT ADS PAY s12,985 Campbell Williams American Legion will meet Sept. 2 Campbell Williams American Legion Post 258 of Clinton, will meet, Tuesday, Sept. 2, at 8 p.m. in the Legion room, located in the Memorial Building. It is the beginning of the new Legion year. Officers will be installed. New members welcome. Rcddcn on the lan- Cavil CLASSIFIED QUICK At Its Finest and At Lowest Prices NO JOB TOO The Ortonville I Ortonville, MN Letters Policy Letters to the editor discussing community issues are writers should be aware that The Independent reserves the and-or condense letters for print. The paper also reserves publish letters that are unsuitable or for which it mi liable. Letters should contain the writer's printed or typed name, s address and telephone number. Addresses and telephone be published. Letter writers are asked to limit themselves to one Please keep letter brief, preferably not over 350 ,70,000 Pay Only* Pay Only *123 =277 '431 Quality Collision Repair FREE LOANER VEHICLE *Body Work & Painting *Insurance Claims Glass InstallatiO Free Estimates Located one mile north of Ortonville on HwY. 7 Pavtllo to Sioux Historic GARY KNOLL '  Call Anytime | 1320) 839-2718 NOTICE OF FILl FOR THE NOV. 4, 2003, BIENNIAL ELEC THE CITY OF ORTONVILLE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that candidates for elected offices must file between Tuesday, August 26, 2003 p.m. on Tuesday, September 9, 2003, at the City Office Madison Avenue. Any qualified voter of the City of Ortonville may file for filing an affidavit of candidacy (available at City Hall) and fee of $2.00 to the City of Ortonville. COUNCIL SEAT "B" COUNCIL SEAT "D" COUNCIL SEAT "F" BY ORDER OF THE CITY COUNCIL Char Grossman, City Clerk, Administrator City of Ortonville, Minnesota Page 12 ......... " INDEPENDENT