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August 26, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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Talking helps teens combat the OHS online Did you know you can access influence of clique culture tY°Urughiltdh'eSlntdirVdtu?lIItigtentchdat° student attendance and grades are Being a teenager has never been easy. Fitting in with peers and mak- ing the right kind of friends are prob- ably the hardest parts of growing up. Typically, young people break off into groups or cliques. There's an important difference between the two. A group of friends is comprised of individuals who have certain things in common -- for example, a favorite type of music or activity, like surfing. Groups often spend time together playing games, studying or working on school projects, or just hanging out at the local park. They tend to be open-minded about those who are different from themselves. This can make the awkward days of adoles- cence go by more smoothly. Cliques represent a darker side of this idea. A clique is a group of friends that defines itself by those it excludes. For example, a clique of "jocks" by definition would exclude students who are not athletic. Clique culture is rampant in high school communities around the world, and in recent years, some experts have come to believe that it is at least par- tially responsible for school shoot- ings, hazing, racial discrimination and rising rates of depression among teens. .... As a parent, you want your chil- dren to be successful in the classroom and on the playground. Parents have an even greater responsibility to understand their kids' lives and the social dynamics of America's schools. "When there is no family connec- tion, teens look outside for a group identity, support, esteem, validation and friendships," writes Jay McGraw, author of "Closing the Gap: A Strategy for Bringing Parents and Teens Together" (Fireside). "That makes them easy marks for gangs, cults, drug dealers and sexual preda- tors." Worried about the group dynamics at your child's school? Follow these tips to help your teens combat the potentially negative influence of cliques: • Talk about it. Make sure that your child knows that cliques are about gaining power and influence and not necessarily about developing genuine friendships. "Since all teenagers feel insecure,. they struggle with being accepted. Some try to forget their own negative self-image by controlling others," write Charlene Giannetti and Margaret Sagarese, coauthors of "Parenting 911: How to Safeguard and Rescue Your 10- to 15-Year-Old From Substance Abuse, Sexual Encounters ... and Other Risky Situations" (Broadway Books). • .', !ii ii" .. ;: ::@i ii ili i IT'S IMPORTANT THAT TEENS UNDERSTAND the difference between a group of friends that help the awkward days of adolescence go by a little easier and potentially dangerous cliques. • Share your stories. It's impor- tant for teens to realize that although the pressure to fit in can seem unbearable, it really is only tempo- rary. Tell them about your experi- ences in school. Be open about how the cliques in your school made you feel and how you might have done things differently if you knew then what you know now. • Ask for your kids' opinions. How does your son or daughter feel about the social hierarchy at school'? Who are your child's friends, and why did she choose them? Let your children know that you are not there just to do all the talking but that you also want to listen to what they have to say. Point out the importance of tolerance for others. HONOR ROLL SUPERIOR HONOR ROLL includes all students who have earned at least an "A-" in each academic class. "A" HONOR ROLL includes students who have a grade point average of 3.67 or above. "B" HONOR ROLL includes students who have a grade point average between 2.67 and 3.66. A student who receives a "D," "F," or 'T' in any subject does not qualify for any of the honor rolls. ""11 "" ' " ! I" ' I I II I I Report Cards Report card grades will be entered by computer network. All grades are to be in the office by the time requested. Enter your grades from the following scale. A =4.0 C+ = 2.33 A- =3.67 C =2.0 B+ = 3.33 C- = 1.67 B = 3.00 D+ = 1.33 B- =2.67 D =1.0 D- = .67 Letter grades will be given as final course grades. Teachers will assign grades based on the following percentages: 96-100 = A 80-82 = C 93-95 = A- 77-79 = C- 91-92 = B+ 75-76 = D+ 88-90 = B 72-74 = D 85-87 = B- 70-71 = D- 83-84 = C+ 69 and lower = F Students must not record or average marks under any circumstances. I I IIIII II I I i • "All the research shows that a one- on-one connection with an adult, a parent, a teacher, a coach, is 10 times more powerful an influence than peers," says William Pollack, a psy- chologist and author of "Real Boys' Voices" (Penguin USA). • Build self-esteem. If your child is constantly worrying about what others think of him or if he takes orders from his peers, he might be trying too hard to fit in with a particu- lar group. Encourage your children to partici- pate in activities -- anything from sports to religious studies -- that help them meet people outside of school and make them feel good about them- selves. Groups play an important role in forming identities and getting to know oneself. The goal is for kids to find the right group and tolerate oth- ers with different interests. means € Back-To-Music Get in tune for fall at Your musical headquarters for * New & Used Band Instruments (rentals & sales) Reeds, Oil and other Band Accessories Music (Popular, Sacred, Band & Piano Methods) Complete In-Store Band Instrument Repair Service DOWNTOWN MORRIS 1-800-626-3996 now posted on the internet. You can access this information through our school web page at www.ortonville.k 12.mn.us. Once you are at our home page, you need to select OHS Online. Look for the "Parents" section. After you select "access secondary student information," the system will ask for your user name and password. If you currently have a user name and password, you can enter them here to access your child's individual information. If you would like to obtain a user name and password, please the high school office Due to privacy issues, we can only assign passwords in person. This service is not currently available for elementary students. What's new at Ortonville School? Construction projects Ortonville is proud of our beautiful school facility, and we continue to make improvements, including tuckpointing and auditorium step replacement projects that are being implemented this summer. (( ))))1 Get a head sta00 to higher grades All good things must end, including summer vacation. The start of the new school year looms just over the horizon. However, it's not uncommon for students to forget just about everything they've learned during the previous term. Teachers from grade school to grad school often have to dew)te valuable class time to review what students have already learned. Standardized tests like the ACT and SAT examine juniors and seniors on material from their underclass years. Many coltege students may not even be fortunate enough to get such a refresher course. But that doesn't mean that children should hit the books all summer. Rather, a little study time each day can keep the mental cobwebs away, which equals saved time and better grades all year long. Cliffs Quick Reviews ® from Cliffs Notes provide students with efficient study guides to more than 40 topics, from global history to grammar to statistics. With tear-out pocket guides, quizzes, final exams, resource guides and glossaries, the guides allow students to quickly and easily review important class subjects with- out missing any. summer fun and games. The series is also valuable for par- ents. At a time when many parents are tightening the purse strings, they may no longer be able to afford tutors or test prep classes. Now they can study right along with their children and feel free to offer homework help without fear of running into an algo- rithm unaware. In today's competitive education climate, a little time spent reviewing the previous year's classwork can certainly go a long way toward help- ing your child improve his or her grades this year and beyond. What's new at Ortonville School? Trojan Tech "Trojan Tech," a program funded by a grant from the SouthweSt Foundation, will be available to all students beginning Oct. will provide student access to an open media center and school and will also provide homework assistance and dplay Join the winning tea00 with an ArtCarved Class Ring! www. ArtcarvedHigh JEW Odonville, MN 56278 • Phone Sc.oo, Ws00T.S. for Ortonville, Bellingham, Big Stone School Closings. Late Starts. Earl¢00 The following media will be used to public in the event of inclement RADIO KDIO 1350 AM - Ortonville KMSD 1510 AM/KPHP 106.3 FM - i KWAT 950 AM - Watertown KIXX 96.1 FM - Watertown KDLO 96.9 FM - Watertown WCCO 830 AM - Minneapolis TELEVISION WCCO Ch. 13 - Minneapolis KSAX Ch. 42 & 43 - Alexandria KELO Ch. 3 - Sioux Falls KARE Ch. 11 - Minneapolis KMSP Ch. 9 - Minneapolis ORTONVILLE SCHOOL WEB_ i www.ortonville.k12.mn.us ORTONVILLE PUBLIC SCHOOL CALENDAR 2003-2004 THIRD QUARTER - 42 Days FIRST QUARTER - 42 Days S M T W TH F SA SECOND QUARTER - 44 Days S M T W TH F SA Aug 29 , 5 8 9 10 11 12 14 15 16 17 18 19  Octi28 29 30 1 2 3 FC S M T ' 6 4 1 Aug. 26, 27 & 28-Faculty Workshop Sept 1 - Labor Day (No School) Sept 2 - First Day of School Oct. 16 & 17 - MEA (No School) Oct. 31 - End of 1st Quarter 10 11 12 13 14 8 24 25 26 l,lr41.,l;ll 6 7 . 8 9 10 L  .... : i2 13 14 15 i[,1 ==Ira ,.., 27 28 29 30 31 .,( ....... ..... 12 13 14 15 16 8,1 20 2.1 22 O MAKE UP DAYS AS FOLLOWS: Day 1: Dec. 22 Day 2: Feb. 13 Day 3: Apr. 8 Day 4: May 14 Nov. 3 - Faculty Workshop Nov. 4 - 2nd Quarter Begins Nov. 6 - Evening Conferences 4-8 PM Any other missed days will be , made up ,at the end of the ),,ear Nov. 7 - Conferences (No School) Nov. 26 - Early Out- 2:30 PM Nov 27 & 28-Thanksgiving (No School) Dec. 22 - Winter Break Begins Jan. 1 - New Year's Day (No School) Jan. 5 - School Resumes Jan. 19 - In-Service Day (No School) Jan. 22 - End of 2rid Quarter Jan. 23 - Faculty Workshop Ortonville Board of Education reserves the right to provide late starts/early dismissals for appropriate teacher inservice. 00INDEPENDENT Feb S M T W TH F SA l 2 3 4 5 6 Ma" 1 2 3 4 5 l[ 8 9 10 11 12 is .... ........ 0 Jan 26 - 3rd Quarter Begins Feb 13 - No School Feb 16 - President's Day (No School) Mar 25 - End of 3rd Quarter Mar 26 - Faculty Worksh.o p (No School) .5 Conference (1 1/2 days) 71 School Days Workshop/In-Service Days pal.5 TOTAL DAYS,  Workshop/In-service Days,(No E Vacation Days (No School) [ FirsULast Day of School [-'---'[Conferences 1 cc Mar. 29- 4th ouatt Apr. 8,9 & 12-SP dat May 14-In-Se vice,( May 30 - Graduati: May 31-Memorial l Jun, 2- Last DaY effl Jun. 3 - Fa Talking helps teens combat the OHS online Did you know you can access influence of clique culture tY°Urughiltdh'eSlntdirVdtu?lIItigtentchdat° student attendance and grades are Being a teenager has never been easy. Fitting in with peers and mak- ing the right kind of friends are prob- ably the hardest parts of growing up. Typically, young people break off into groups or cliques. There's an important difference between the two. A group of friends is comprised of individuals who have certain things in common -- for example, a favorite type of music or activity, like surfing. Groups often spend time together playing games, studying or working on school projects, or just hanging out at the local park. They tend to be open-minded about those who are different from themselves. This can make the awkward days of adoles- cence go by more smoothly. Cliques represent a darker side of this idea. A clique is a group of friends that defines itself by those it excludes. For example, a clique of "jocks" by definition would exclude students who are not athletic. Clique culture is rampant in high school communities around the world, and in recent years, some experts have come to believe that it is at least par- tially responsible for school shoot- ings, hazing, racial discrimination and rising rates of depression among teens. .... As a parent, you want your chil- dren to be successful in the classroom and on the playground. Parents have an even greater responsibility to understand their kids' lives and the social dynamics of America's schools. "When there is no family connec- tion, teens look outside for a group identity, support, esteem, validation and friendships," writes Jay McGraw, author of "Closing the Gap: A Strategy for Bringing Parents and Teens Together" (Fireside). "That makes them easy marks for gangs, cults, drug dealers and sexual preda- tors." Worried about the group dynamics at your child's school? Follow these tips to help your teens combat the potentially negative influence of cliques: • Talk about it. Make sure that your child knows that cliques are about gaining power and influence and not necessarily about developing genuine friendships. "Since all teenagers feel insecure,. they struggle with being accepted. Some try to forget their own negative self-image by controlling others," write Charlene Giannetti and Margaret Sagarese, coauthors of "Parenting 911: How to Safeguard and Rescue Your 10- to 15-Year-Old From Substance Abuse, Sexual Encounters ... and Other Risky Situations" (Broadway Books). • .', !ii ii" .. ;: ::@i ii ili i IT'S IMPORTANT THAT TEENS UNDERSTAND the difference between a group of friends that help the awkward days of adolescence go by a little easier and potentially dangerous cliques. • Share your stories. It's impor- tant for teens to realize that although the pressure to fit in can seem unbearable, it really is only tempo- rary. Tell them about your experi- ences in school. Be open about how the cliques in your school made you feel and how you might have done things differently if you knew then what you know now. • Ask for your kids' opinions. How does your son or daughter feel about the social hierarchy at school'? Who are your child's friends, and why did she choose them? Let your children know that you are not there just to do all the talking but that you also want to listen to what they have to say. Point out the importance of tolerance for others. HONOR ROLL SUPERIOR HONOR ROLL includes all students who have earned at least an "A-" in each academic class. "A" HONOR ROLL includes students who have a grade point average of 3.67 or above. "B" HONOR ROLL includes students who have a grade point average between 2.67 and 3.66. A student who receives a "D," "F," or 'T' in any subject does not qualify for any of the honor rolls. ""11 "" ' " ! I" ' I I II I I Report Cards Report card grades will be entered by computer network. All grades are to be in the office by the time requested. Enter your grades from the following scale. A =4.0 C+ = 2.33 A- =3.67 C =2.0 B+ = 3.33 C- = 1.67 B = 3.00 D+ = 1.33 B- =2.67 D =1.0 D- = .67 Letter grades will be given as final course grades. Teachers will assign grades based on the following percentages: 96-100 = A 80-82 = C 93-95 = A- 77-79 = C- 91-92 = B+ 75-76 = D+ 88-90 = B 72-74 = D 85-87 = B- 70-71 = D- 83-84 = C+ 69 and lower = F Students must not record or average marks under any circumstances. I I IIIII II I I i • "All the research shows that a one- on-one connection with an adult, a parent, a teacher, a coach, is 10 times more powerful an influence than peers," says William Pollack, a psy- chologist and author of "Real Boys' Voices" (Penguin USA). • Build self-esteem. If your child is constantly worrying about what others think of him or if he takes orders from his peers, he might be trying too hard to fit in with a particu- lar group. Encourage your children to partici- pate in activities -- anything from sports to religious studies -- that help them meet people outside of school and make them feel good about them- selves. Groups play an important role in forming identities and getting to know oneself. The goal is for kids to find the right group and tolerate oth- ers with different interests. means € Back-To-Music Get in tune for fall at Your musical headquarters for * New & Used Band Instruments (rentals & sales) Reeds, Oil and other Band Accessories Music (Popular, Sacred, Band & Piano Methods) Complete In-Store Band Instrument Repair Service DOWNTOWN MORRIS 1-800-626-3996 now posted on the internet. You can access this information through our school web page at www.ortonville.k 12.mn.us. Once you are at our home page, you need to select OHS Online. Look for the "Parents" section. After you select "access secondary student information," the system will ask for your user name and password. If you currently have a user name and password, you can enter them here to access your child's individual information. If you would like to obtain a user name and password, please the high school office Due to privacy issues, we can only assign passwords in person. This service is not currently available for elementary students. What's new at Ortonville School? Construction projects Ortonville is proud of our beautiful school facility, and we continue to make improvements, including tuckpointing and auditorium step replacement projects that are being implemented this summer. (( ))))1 Get a head sta00 to higher grades All good things must end, including summer vacation. The start of the new school year looms just over the horizon. However, it's not uncommon for students to forget just about everything they've learned during the previous term. Teachers from grade school to grad school often have to dew)te valuable class time to review what students have already learned. Standardized tests like the ACT and SAT examine juniors and seniors on material from their underclass years. Many coltege students may not even be fortunate enough to get such a refresher course. But that doesn't mean that children should hit the books all summer. Rather, a little study time each day can keep the mental cobwebs away, which equals saved time and better grades all year long. Cliffs Quick Reviews ® from Cliffs Notes provide students with efficient study guides to more than 40 topics, from global history to grammar to statistics. With tear-out pocket guides, quizzes, final exams, resource guides and glossaries, the guides allow students to quickly and easily review important class subjects with- out missing any. summer fun and games. The series is also valuable for par- ents. At a time when many parents are tightening the purse strings, they may no longer be able to afford tutors or test prep classes. Now they can study right along with their children and feel free to offer homework help without fear of running into an algo- rithm unaware. In today's competitive education climate, a little time spent reviewing the previous year's classwork can certainly go a long way toward help- ing your child improve his or her grades this year and beyond. What's new at Ortonville School? Trojan Tech "Trojan Tech," a program funded by a grant from the SouthweSt Foundation, will be available to all students beginning Oct. will provide student access to an open media center and school and will also provide homework assistance and dplay Join the winning tea00 with an ArtCarved Class Ring! www. ArtcarvedHigh JEW Odonville, MN 56278 • Phone Sc.oo, Ws00T.S. for Ortonville, Bellingham, Big Stone School Closings. Late Starts. Earl¢00 The following media will be used to public in the event of inclement RADIO KDIO 1350 AM - Ortonville KMSD 1510 AM/KPHP 106.3 FM - i KWAT 950 AM - Watertown KIXX 96.1 FM - Watertown KDLO 96.9 FM - Watertown WCCO 830 AM - Minneapolis TELEVISION WCCO Ch. 13 - Minneapolis KSAX Ch. 42 & 43 - Alexandria KELO Ch. 3 - Sioux Falls KARE Ch. 11 - Minneapolis KMSP Ch. 9 - Minneapolis ORTONVILLE SCHOOL WEB_ i www.ortonville.k12.mn.us ORTONVILLE PUBLIC SCHOOL CALENDAR 2003-2004 THIRD QUARTER - 42 Days FIRST QUARTER - 42 Days S M T W TH F SA SECOND QUARTER - 44 Days S M T W TH F SA Aug 29 , 5 8 9 10 11 12 14 15 16 17 18 19  Octi28 29 30 1 2 3 FC S M T ' 6 4 1 Aug. 26, 27 & 28-Faculty Workshop Sept 1 - Labor Day (No School) Sept 2 - First Day of School Oct. 16 & 17 - MEA (No School) Oct. 31 - End of 1st Quarter 10 11 12 13 14 8 24 25 26 l,lr41.,l;ll 6 7 . 8 9 10 L  .... : i2 13 14 15 i[,1 ==Ira ,.., 27 28 29 30 31 .,( ....... ..... 12 13 14 15 16 8,1 20 2.1 22 O MAKE UP DAYS AS FOLLOWS: Day 1: Dec. 22 Day 2: Feb. 13 Day 3: Apr. 8 Day 4: May 14 Nov. 3 - Faculty Workshop Nov. 4 - 2nd Quarter Begins Nov. 6 - Evening Conferences 4-8 PM Any other missed days will be , made up ,at the end of the ),,ear Nov. 7 - Conferences (No School) Nov. 26 - Early Out- 2:30 PM Nov 27 & 28-Thanksgiving (No School) Dec. 22 - Winter Break Begins Jan. 1 - New Year's Day (No School) Jan. 5 - School Resumes Jan. 19 - In-Service Day (No School) Jan. 22 - End of 2rid Quarter Jan. 23 - Faculty Workshop Ortonville Board of Education reserves the right to provide late starts/early dismissals for appropriate teacher inservice. 00INDEPENDENT Feb S M T W TH F SA l 2 3 4 5 6 Ma" 1 2 3 4 5 l[ 8 9 10 11 12 is .... ........ 0 Jan 26 - 3rd Quarter Begins Feb 13 - No School Feb 16 - President's Day (No School) Mar 25 - End of 3rd Quarter Mar 26 - Faculty Worksh.o p (No School) .5 Conference (1 1/2 days) 71 School Days Workshop/In-Service Days pal.5 TOTAL DAYS,  Workshop/In-service Days,(No E Vacation Days (No School) [ FirsULast Day of School [-'---'[Conferences 1 cc Mar. 29- 4th ouatt Apr. 8,9 & 12-SP dat May 14-In-Se vice,( May 30 - Graduati: May 31-Memorial l Jun, 2- Last DaY effl Jun. 3 - Fa