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The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
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September 1, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
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September 1, 1921
 

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SEPTEMBER 1, 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE f 0rtonville Independent EVERY THURSDAY by the & Merchants Printing Co. President Harris, Vice-president Lundgren, Secretary Walter Dinneil, Treasurer OF DIRECTORS John Kaercher Walter Dinnell 0lsoa L.E. Lundgren Grace F. Kaercher A. B. Kaercher Managing Editor - Associate Editor as second-class matter d920, at the post office at under the Act of $2.00 PER YEAR Rates m Application Advt. Representative. SELECT LIST. Bank, St. Paul St., - - Minneapolis Representative "7 ASSOCIATION . UEI"S HAVE FACTS. )out time that the Federal be put into hands cap- .Ullderstanding business and fi- and the needs of for which it was intended, of the law on which it it should serve. Whether is an 800,000,0C0 bushel grain in the ninth district, is certain and that is that in the grain growing dis- cannot pay any the proceeds of their year if they sell every at the head of an institution vho does not know that for a grain growing immediately secure all his farm will carry, to e.an feed 20 cent oats, 35 and 25 een{ corn, should from office immediately of broader calibre install- a.arae of common sense why restitution that is makipg on its capital not reduce rates, instead of advising to liquidate and thereby charges. How can a when it costs him raise his crop than it will has lost money for the and the banks or some have to carry him over Will be compelled to quit the farmers go out of busi- Wiseacres in charge of the Banks will be looking soft jobs. The whole put to farming and course be compelled to savaple of this institution s Propaganda--and by the for it ?--"Agriculture have absorbed and i too great a proportion of i credit of the Ninth Fed- District." Yes and it up unless the farmer oney at lower rates of is paid a higher price for of this institution seems the farmers are need- money and that they Well pay it back at once. Would take the pains to les from his office of lux- easily ascertain that far- either borrow money or of the matter is that the of the World War Upon the farmer and that freight rates and taxes in the price of farm caused him to borrow to meet his losses. proven by he by this institution twenty months, and business men of the ze this fact the better it all concerned in the na- because the business of prosper unless the Under present con- thing that can be to the farmer addi- until some other relief Reserve Bank de- all reason, first ex- currency and then con- money to specula- down the price of farm then demanded that the immediately, and Proper foundation over 1921 crop, all ,to the farmers and those Upon his success. seems to be against in favor of the specu- evident that either for the present man- else that its actions are interests. chairman bf the Reserve'bank, in in the Minne- of August 30, by his that his estimate as the present value is practically deuble worth on the mar- August 30, 1921, the of the statement. llgures: bushels, say 56- . . f pound. Prme at Ortonvflle, $1.16 and I this is a higher grade than wheat will, average, $169,835,600.00. Oats 228,010,000 bushels, No. 3, at 22c, $50,162,200.00. Rye, 23,714,000 bushels, at 79c, $18,- (;44,060.00. Barley, 62,666,000 bushels at 40c, $25,066,400.00. Potatoes, 35,880,000 bushels at $1, $35,880,000.00. Corn, 302,040,040 bushels at 25c $75,610,010.00. This gives a total of $375,198,270.00 From this deduct threshing at 7c for wheat and rye, 4c for oats, and 5c for husking corn and hauling to mar- ket at 21/ cents--S83,152,000.00. Leaving a net value of $292,046,270, instead of $600,000,000 for the 1921 crop in the Ninth District, according to the banks own estimate of the num- ber of bushels. The prices m)e the vee hi,.hest being paid at toeai Ce- vatm's it; the CC'lntry to the far,,.'er ad these W'xcs .are based upon grades much higher than the grain will average and the allowance for threshing grain, husking corn and hauling to market is much below the actual cost. We may just as well look the situation squarely in the face and all join hands to better conditions in the most practical and feasible man- ner. There is no use in trying to "kid" yourself into believing every thing is a|l right--when you know it is not. No allowance is made in the figures above .given for seed for next year which would reduce the net amount available about $32,000,000.00 any nothing about horse feed and living expenses. g BETTER GET ACQUAINTED. It is to be hoped that members of Congress during vacation, will get the real situation of their constitu- ents thoroly impressed upon them, so that when congress reconvenes, ac- tion may be taken that will bring im- mediate relief to the whole country. Perhaps it would be a good plan to remove the capitol of the nation fur- ther from Europe and closer to the people--into the heart of the nation-- where it would not be so difficult for members to get in touch with the common folks, and where the common folks could get at them. There surely must be something wrong with the atmosphere down a Washington, or freight and passenger rates would have been reduced months ago, and thereby the business of the nation set in motion. Everybody except congress and the Inter-State Com- merce Commission seem to know that high freight rates is one of the princi- pal causes of low prices of farm pro- ducts and business stagnation gener- ally. It begins to look as tho we will be compelled to do business )vithout rail- roads and without money. Both seem to be beyond the reach of the ordi- nary mortal, and completely in the hands and under the control of a favored few. In the meantime congress investi- gates. To  live in too dry an atmosphere is unhealthy nd adds to the doctor's bill. Statistics show that about one- third of all deaths in this country have been due to diseases of the throat and lungs. Fresh, clean, pure, humid air as found out of doors is the treatment generally prescribed for such ailments; and until people understand the need for the proper kind of air in the home, especially during the seasons when the doors find windows are kept closed, the re- currence of such discomforts are to be expected. "In some parts of Africa a man doesn't know his wife until after he has married her." said Mrs. Gabb, as she looked up from the newspaper she was reading. "Huh?" replied Gabb, "why men- tion Africa, especially ?" --;Ladies' Gowns, 89c and 98c each. Tylr's Variety Store. i i J i i rain a snug, tight contact against the cylinderwall. No oil or gas can leak through and cause trouble. We carry in stock sizes for all of Cars, Trucks and Tractors. THE PARK GARAGE How to Cook an Old Ham--f NOTICE. Vinegar, Sugar and Cloves I Parties holding stock in the Arti- i choke & Correll Telephone Company M ..... can now present or mail Certificate of any ial'mers an(/ Iarmers wives i ,, . . , ....... i nares o ne lmton State Bank of on tarms where hOgS are ouLcnered! -... .... .  .  . , ........ i Cllnl;on ivlmnesoa, Ior payment, nave l;nelr own z(leas now nares ShOUld I .. .  . . .... . ............ I wmcn paymen o z6 per cen Will De oe CooKed 0 bes pmase ne appetite ........... .. . .. . . . ,. .  .. mae upon tne surrenoer oi the orlgl- ere Is tne Des1: way spec]atlstS oI ne . _. ...... . ,.. ..  ..... na cercmcae properly m(mrseo oy umea aes ueparment oI Agrl- .. . . . .. . . .. " . . culture do it: These directions are ne no(ler nereoL In ne even o contained in Farmers' Bulletin 1186, "Pork on the Farm--Killing, Curing, and Canning," just published by the department. Soak several hours, remove all muld and loose pieces, and rinse well. Cover with cold water, add two tablespoonfulls of vinegar, one-half cup brown sugar, four cloves, and one bay leaf, and heat to boiling. The amont of cloves and bay leaf may be increased if desired, especially for larger hams. Reduce the heat to a constant sim- mer and allow to cook at this tem- perature at the rate of 20 minutes for each pound weight. Rmove from fire, but keep the ham in the liquor in which it was cooked until cold, then remove from the con- tainer and allow to drain. Take off the skin, score the fat in inch blocks, and cover with a coating of brown sugar and crumbs. Stick with" cloves 1 inch apart. Bake in a slow oven until nicely browned, basting at intervals with one-half cup water and one table- spoonful of vinegar. loss of such certificate, bond will have to be furnished by party and such bond to be approved by the board of Directors of said company. C. F. HANSON, Secretary. $1,800 in purses offered at the Big Traverse County Fair at Wheaton for fast, auto, chairot avd horse races. Enter your car and horses in some of these races and win some of this mon- ey. You can lead a horse to water but you cannot make him drink; likewise you can appoint a committee. FOR 00RENT After September 1 and 15, the two "Dix Wilbur" cottages on the Peninsula. All furnished (including hot blast heaters) ex- cept the bedding and linen. September and October are the most pleasant months for outing here. Good for fishing and hunting. A good dock with plenty of water up to it. For information as to where to find me call at Postoffice. DR. GEO. P. DIX llllllllilllllimlililllillltlllifllliillililllll HiflflHfliu$ii[ Horses are in good demand and business is gaining in the markets of Boston and New York, according to reliable reports received at University Farm. For the first five months this i year a New York horse dealing fian sold 14,239 horses as against 11,605 in the corresponding period of last year. Dealers in 11 northeastern states re- port greater sales than last year; many men who have not, bought: horses for six to eight years are buy- ing now. REDUCING FREIGHT RATES. HARRY N. OWEN, Publisher, Farm Stock & Home, Minneapolis, Minn., Farmers must have prompt relief l from present freight rates on agri- cultural product, irrespective of what is done on other classes of freight. At present price level these rates, in many cases, are confiscating our property. Please forward this pro- test to the Inter-State Commerce Commission, Washington, D. C. Name .......................................................... Post Office ................................................ R.F.D ............................... : ..................... State ......................................................... I am farming .......................... acres. This information is important. You cannot afford to miss the Big Fair at Wheaton, September 14, 15, 16, 17. A bigger and better pro- gram of races, attractions, shows for each and every day than ever before. Platt: "What is your baby going [o be when he grows upi" Fisher: ' blackmailer, I think." Platt: "A blackmailer." Fisher: "I'm afraid so. We have to give him something every little while to keep him quiet.", Every opportunity we are given to serve you and the community g o o d exalts that m uc h more the spirit and high purpose of this Bank as a H o m e Institution Bring y o u r prob- lems to qs. , Good Food Wins The large number of people who are steady patrons, together with new customers who are satisfied, is a sure indication that our foods are of the best. Our Bakery each day makes pastries un- equalled. They are al\\;vays newly-baked. Try some. The KORNER KAFE Potter & Gowan, Proprietors. Society, Brand Get that Fall Suit now V OU have a large selection of .It good sits and topcoats to choose from here. Prices are as attractive as the clothes themselves. Come in. We'll show you the clothes that have made this store the style center. cost less in the end. Good clothes always have and always will prove the most economical. *40 to *60 10% Off on Clothing during the Legion Carnival The ?'Jew Style Shop E. B. Persson, Prop. \\; Some Value at Twenty Five _--,ollars We are not only showing the right styles and the best quali- ties, but we are showing coats that cannot be beaten when you consider the knom'a quality of the garments. You do not guess when you buy a "Palmer Gar- ment." The quality is there, and hundreds of women in this neighborhood have proved it. Now for twenty-seven dollars we offer this coat in Hague Polo mixture---or in other plain and mixed polo cloths. Yoke and sleeves are lined with vene- tian and the collar is of kitP coney--a Shawl collar, too. Sleeves are set in, with button trimmed cuffs. Stitched pleats on back form a panel. Pockets are outlined with stitthing in patch effect. Whatever--or whenever if you want a coat or suit worth every penny you pay, let us show you--then you decide. Pi(00neer 5u re Co-operative Co. ]00[OW and then we feel as if we've got to talk about the quality of the lumber we sell. There is just as much difference in lum- ber as there is in leather or any other commodity. Well-season- ed lumber compares with well- tanned leather. If you want to be a,well pleased patron, visit US. Geier Lumber Co. THE WEST HOTEL Minneapolis, Minnesota. Following t h e downward trend in prices is now offer- ing rooms at $1.50 to $2.00---Without Bath $2.00 to $5.00--With Bath With Mederate Priced Cafe-- In Connection Want Ad publicity is valuable pub licity--and costs but a trifle. SEPTEMBER 1, 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE f 0rtonville Independent EVERY THURSDAY by the & Merchants Printing Co. President Harris, Vice-president Lundgren, Secretary Walter Dinneil, Treasurer OF DIRECTORS John Kaercher Walter Dinnell 0lsoa L.E. Lundgren Grace F. Kaercher A. B. Kaercher Managing Editor - Associate Editor as second-class matter d920, at the post office at under the Act of $2.00 PER YEAR Rates m Application Advt. Representative. SELECT LIST. Bank, St. Paul St., - - Minneapolis Representative "7 ASSOCIATION . UEI"S HAVE FACTS. )out time that the Federal be put into hands cap- .Ullderstanding business and fi- and the needs of for which it was intended, of the law on which it it should serve. Whether is an 800,000,0C0 bushel grain in the ninth district, is certain and that is that in the grain growing dis- cannot pay any the proceeds of their year if they sell every at the head of an institution vho does not know that for a grain growing immediately secure all his farm will carry, to e.an feed 20 cent oats, 35 and 25 een{ corn, should from office immediately of broader calibre install- a.arae of common sense why restitution that is makipg on its capital not reduce rates, instead of advising to liquidate and thereby charges. How can a when it costs him raise his crop than it will has lost money for the and the banks or some have to carry him over Will be compelled to quit the farmers go out of busi- Wiseacres in charge of the Banks will be looking soft jobs. The whole put to farming and course be compelled to savaple of this institution s Propaganda--and by the for it ?--"Agriculture have absorbed and i too great a proportion of i credit of the Ninth Fed- District." Yes and it up unless the farmer oney at lower rates of is paid a higher price for of this institution seems the farmers are need- money and that they Well pay it back at once. Would take the pains to les from his office of lux- easily ascertain that far- either borrow money or of the matter is that the of the World War Upon the farmer and that freight rates and taxes in the price of farm caused him to borrow to meet his losses. proven by he by this institution twenty months, and business men of the ze this fact the better it all concerned in the na- because the business of prosper unless the Under present con- thing that can be to the farmer addi- until some other relief Reserve Bank de- all reason, first ex- currency and then con- money to specula- down the price of farm then demanded that the immediately, and Proper foundation over 1921 crop, all ,to the farmers and those Upon his success. seems to be against in favor of the specu- evident that either for the present man- else that its actions are interests. chairman bf the Reserve'bank, in in the Minne- of August 30, by his that his estimate as the present value is practically deuble worth on the mar- August 30, 1921, the of the statement. llgures: bushels, say 56- . . f pound. Prme at Ortonvflle, $1.16 and I this is a higher grade than wheat will, average, $169,835,600.00. Oats 228,010,000 bushels, No. 3, at 22c, $50,162,200.00. Rye, 23,714,000 bushels, at 79c, $18,- (;44,060.00. Barley, 62,666,000 bushels at 40c, $25,066,400.00. Potatoes, 35,880,000 bushels at $1, $35,880,000.00. Corn, 302,040,040 bushels at 25c $75,610,010.00. This gives a total of $375,198,270.00 From this deduct threshing at 7c for wheat and rye, 4c for oats, and 5c for husking corn and hauling to mar- ket at 21/ cents--S83,152,000.00. Leaving a net value of $292,046,270, instead of $600,000,000 for the 1921 crop in the Ninth District, according to the banks own estimate of the num- ber of bushels. The prices m)e the vee hi,.hest being paid at toeai Ce- vatm's it; the CC'lntry to the far,,.'er ad these W'xcs .are based upon grades much higher than the grain will average and the allowance for threshing grain, husking corn and hauling to market is much below the actual cost. We may just as well look the situation squarely in the face and all join hands to better conditions in the most practical and feasible man- ner. There is no use in trying to "kid" yourself into believing every thing is a|l right--when you know it is not. No allowance is made in the figures above .given for seed for next year which would reduce the net amount available about $32,000,000.00 any nothing about horse feed and living expenses. g BETTER GET ACQUAINTED. It is to be hoped that members of Congress during vacation, will get the real situation of their constitu- ents thoroly impressed upon them, so that when congress reconvenes, ac- tion may be taken that will bring im- mediate relief to the whole country. Perhaps it would be a good plan to remove the capitol of the nation fur- ther from Europe and closer to the people--into the heart of the nation-- where it would not be so difficult for members to get in touch with the common folks, and where the common folks could get at them. There surely must be something wrong with the atmosphere down a Washington, or freight and passenger rates would have been reduced months ago, and thereby the business of the nation set in motion. Everybody except congress and the Inter-State Com- merce Commission seem to know that high freight rates is one of the princi- pal causes of low prices of farm pro- ducts and business stagnation gener- ally. It begins to look as tho we will be compelled to do business )vithout rail- roads and without money. Both seem to be beyond the reach of the ordi- nary mortal, and completely in the hands and under the control of a favored few. In the meantime congress investi- gates. To  live in too dry an atmosphere is unhealthy nd adds to the doctor's bill. Statistics show that about one- third of all deaths in this country have been due to diseases of the throat and lungs. Fresh, clean, pure, humid air as found out of doors is the treatment generally prescribed for such ailments; and until people understand the need for the proper kind of air in the home, especially during the seasons when the doors find windows are kept closed, the re- currence of such discomforts are to be expected. "In some parts of Africa a man doesn't know his wife until after he has married her." said Mrs. Gabb, as she looked up from the newspaper she was reading. "Huh?" replied Gabb, "why men- tion Africa, especially ?" --;Ladies' Gowns, 89c and 98c each. Tylr's Variety Store. i i J i i rain a snug, tight contact against the cylinderwall. No oil or gas can leak through and cause trouble. We carry in stock sizes for all of Cars, Trucks and Tractors. THE PARK GARAGE How to Cook an Old Ham--f NOTICE. Vinegar, Sugar and Cloves I Parties holding stock in the Arti- i choke & Correll Telephone Company M ..... can now present or mail Certificate of any ial'mers an(/ Iarmers wives i ,, . . , ....... i nares o ne lmton State Bank of on tarms where hOgS are ouLcnered! -... .... .  .  . , ........ i Cllnl;on ivlmnesoa, Ior payment, nave l;nelr own z(leas now nares ShOUld I .. .  . . .... . ............ I wmcn paymen o z6 per cen Will De oe CooKed 0 bes pmase ne appetite ........... .. . .. . . . ,. .  .. mae upon tne surrenoer oi the orlgl- ere Is tne Des1: way spec]atlstS oI ne . _. ...... . ,.. ..  ..... na cercmcae properly m(mrseo oy umea aes ueparment oI Agrl- .. . . . .. . . .. " . . culture do it: These directions are ne no(ler nereoL In ne even o contained in Farmers' Bulletin 1186, "Pork on the Farm--Killing, Curing, and Canning," just published by the department. Soak several hours, remove all muld and loose pieces, and rinse well. Cover with cold water, add two tablespoonfulls of vinegar, one-half cup brown sugar, four cloves, and one bay leaf, and heat to boiling. The amont of cloves and bay leaf may be increased if desired, especially for larger hams. Reduce the heat to a constant sim- mer and allow to cook at this tem- perature at the rate of 20 minutes for each pound weight. Rmove from fire, but keep the ham in the liquor in which it was cooked until cold, then remove from the con- tainer and allow to drain. Take off the skin, score the fat in inch blocks, and cover with a coating of brown sugar and crumbs. Stick with" cloves 1 inch apart. Bake in a slow oven until nicely browned, basting at intervals with one-half cup water and one table- spoonful of vinegar. loss of such certificate, bond will have to be furnished by party and such bond to be approved by the board of Directors of said company. C. F. HANSON, Secretary. $1,800 in purses offered at the Big Traverse County Fair at Wheaton for fast, auto, chairot avd horse races. Enter your car and horses in some of these races and win some of this mon- ey. You can lead a horse to water but you cannot make him drink; likewise you can appoint a committee. FOR 00RENT After September 1 and 15, the two "Dix Wilbur" cottages on the Peninsula. All furnished (including hot blast heaters) ex- cept the bedding and linen. September and October are the most pleasant months for outing here. Good for fishing and hunting. A good dock with plenty of water up to it. For information as to where to find me call at Postoffice. DR. GEO. P. DIX llllllllilllllimlililllillltlllifllliillililllll HiflflHfliu$ii[ Horses are in good demand and business is gaining in the markets of Boston and New York, according to reliable reports received at University Farm. For the first five months this i year a New York horse dealing fian sold 14,239 horses as against 11,605 in the corresponding period of last year. Dealers in 11 northeastern states re- port greater sales than last year; many men who have not, bought: horses for six to eight years are buy- ing now. REDUCING FREIGHT RATES. HARRY N. OWEN, Publisher, Farm Stock & Home, Minneapolis, Minn., Farmers must have prompt relief l from present freight rates on agri- cultural product, irrespective of what is done on other classes of freight. At present price level these rates, in many cases, are confiscating our property. Please forward this pro- test to the Inter-State Commerce Commission, Washington, D. C. Name .......................................................... Post Office ................................................ R.F.D ............................... : ..................... State ......................................................... I am farming .......................... acres. This information is important. You cannot afford to miss the Big Fair at Wheaton, September 14, 15, 16, 17. A bigger and better pro- gram of races, attractions, shows for each and every day than ever before. Platt: "What is your baby going [o be when he grows upi" Fisher: ' blackmailer, I think." Platt: "A blackmailer." Fisher: "I'm afraid so. We have to give him something every little while to keep him quiet.", Every opportunity we are given to serve you and the community g o o d exalts that m uc h more the spirit and high purpose of this Bank as a H o m e Institution Bring y o u r prob- lems to qs. , Good Food Wins The large number of people who are steady patrons, together with new customers who are satisfied, is a sure indication that our foods are of the best. Our Bakery each day makes pastries un- equalled. They are al\\;vays newly-baked. Try some. The KORNER KAFE Potter & Gowan, Proprietors. Society, Brand Get that Fall Suit now V OU have a large selection of .It good sits and topcoats to choose from here. Prices are as attractive as the clothes themselves. Come in. We'll show you the clothes that have made this store the style center. cost less in the end. Good clothes always have and always will prove the most economical. *40 to *60 10% Off on Clothing during the Legion Carnival The ?'Jew Style Shop E. B. Persson, Prop. \\; Some Value at Twenty Five _--,ollars We are not only showing the right styles and the best quali- ties, but we are showing coats that cannot be beaten when you consider the knom'a quality of the garments. You do not guess when you buy a "Palmer Gar- ment." The quality is there, and hundreds of women in this neighborhood have proved it. Now for twenty-seven dollars we offer this coat in Hague Polo mixture---or in other plain and mixed polo cloths. Yoke and sleeves are lined with vene- tian and the collar is of kitP coney--a Shawl collar, too. Sleeves are set in, with button trimmed cuffs. Stitched pleats on back form a panel. Pockets are outlined with stitthing in patch effect. Whatever--or whenever if you want a coat or suit worth every penny you pay, let us show you--then you decide. Pi(00neer 5u re Co-operative Co. ]00[OW and then we feel as if we've got to talk about the quality of the lumber we sell. There is just as much difference in lum- ber as there is in leather or any other commodity. Well-season- ed lumber compares with well- tanned leather. If you want to be a,well pleased patron, visit US. Geier Lumber Co. THE WEST HOTEL Minneapolis, Minnesota. Following t h e downward trend in prices is now offer- ing rooms at $1.50 to $2.00---Without Bath $2.00 to $5.00--With Bath With Mederate Priced Cafe-- In Connection Want Ad publicity is valuable pub licity--and costs but a trifle. , 1921 THE ORTOIZlLLE INDEPENDENT PAGB | 0rtonvifle Independent ] pound, Price at OstnnviIle, $I,I6 and=How to Cook an Old Ham--I OTICE = Yen en 'e a horse  war hut -- ! this is a higher roe than wheat will , ! .... r 'on cannot make h drink' likis EVgV "rggnAviaverae $16983 6O00O i Vlnega| Sugar and C ones Part, holding stk in the Arts-  . m , e b=tl ............. I Oas22,00,00buhes, Nol'0' " 3 atl -- Ichke & Correll Telephone Company. you can appon aeomm tee " , , ' I can now present or mall Certificate of an Priatin C 22c $50 162200.00. Man, falers and famlers wives g Shares to the Chntou State Bank n __ Rye, 23,7 4,0O0 bushels, at 79c,$18,- on farms where hng arc ,uteherc 'C nto M" e t f Pdent (44 O6O.OO have their nw ideas how hams should ; '. n, inn n a, or payment, ..................................... h ............... FOR RENT B' "62 666 . whic h payment of 23 per cent will be ( , . . ma upnn ne u n(ler of the oriel Igrezb Seer et ar $25 0 6 40000 Here is the heat way specialists of the . . ' ' " " . . na ce , ' z r, Di ............ $3P0t;;;,0 ............ h ..... St., Ugutm toat Dp2l,tctfonAgr,; th hofireetcPoz.Pe tlndt  twAof Sebu:r 1 a I ...... D RECTORS Corn, 302,040,040 bushe s a 2c cents n n Farm.s' Bu e n I 86 less. f such certificate, bond wall have the Peninsula All famished . , , to oe furnished bv par y and sueh d JohnKher $5,610,010.00. I Pork on the Farm--Kllhng, Cunng, b d t b " (me u mg hot b ast heaters) ex- Walter Diell Ths gives a total of $8 and Canning" just published b, he n o e app.ved by the board of eept the bedding and linen. Gr F. Khcr ye, 4c for Soak Vel.al hours, remove all muh[ - ' ON, the most pleasant months for Secretary. outing he. Good for fishing A. B. Kaereher . Mging Editor zond-eI the post emee at der the Act of PFA YEAR Apolition CITIZEN5 NATIONAL BANI Bank, . - S Paul - - - Minneapolis time the nto hands cap- business and fl- and the needs of as intended should sere. Is  800,000,000 bushel ninth district, that is that s i the grain growing dis-  Izthwest not the premeds year if they sell e head of  nsttution grain o'ng will c, to  feed 2O nt oats, 35 V, d 25 n cn, should 1 from ot immediately broader calibre install rates, itead of advising liquidate and theby How c a when y for the carry bm over Will be mpelled to quit farmers go out of busi- soft jobs. g and eour be compelled arap Prpqzaada--and by for it ?--"Agriltu c have Credlt of the Ninth Fed- e District." Yes and it this institution : money d that the pains tc early eer of the matter is that tht felght tes price of by t]s t twenty mons, and fact the better it Sl "oncee tless the present con- thing me other Bank de- reason, first ex. the most practical and feasible man- net. The is no use in trying to "kid" xnumelf into believing every -- thng is all right--wbe you know it s not. No allowce is made in the rigors above ,given for seed for next year reduce the et amount about $32,000,000.0 Sa nothing about hose fd and lidn  BE'IER Gwr ACQUAINTED. It is to be hopea that members e Cong during vtion, wilt get the al situation of their nstitu- eut thusly imprd upon them, so that when ngs conves, a tion may be taken that wi[[ bring - Perhaps t would be a ocd plan to remove the pitol el  the nation fu ther from EUml and clnr to the peoplinte the heet of the tionw where It ld not be so dcult for membem to get in touch with the common folks, d whe the nn folks could get at them. Them sely must be something wng with the atmohem down a Washington, or fight and penr rates would reduced months ago, and thereby the business of the nation t in mOAon. Everybody ezpt cnngeess and the lnter State Corn- seem to know that high freight rat is one of the pigel. pal cauls of ow prices of fa p- ducts and business stagnation gener- ally. It begins to look  the we will he mpelIe to do businsthout rail- roads and wttht mone' Both  nal mortaL, and completely in d under the contl of a few Tn the meantime congress investS* gates. To live in too dry an atmosphere is unhealthy 1 bill. Statistics third of all deaths in this country have bn due to dseases of the tat and lungs. Fresh, el ar as the treatment erally for such ailments; and until people for the of mr In the home, especially during the ns when the doon be exl:ecte& "In some parts of Arica dsn't know his wife until after he: h married her." id M. Gabb, as she Ikea up fm the newspa she was i'eng. "Huh?" plied Gabb, "why tion fri, ecJally?" --,adles' Gos, 89e nd 98e each. Tyler'a Valtety or for husking and loose pieces, and rinse well -- ket at 21:J r Cover ith cold water, add two Leavnganet value of $292O4627O I tablesponnfulls of vnegar, cue-hall instead of $600,000,000 for the 1921 cup brown sugar, our cloves, c crop in the Ninth Distrqct according one bay leaf, and heat to boiling. Th to the banks own estimate of the hum- amont nf elos and hay leaf may b her of bushels. The prices ,1 the increased if desired, pally fn e,' highest being pd at Ioe,iJ o!e larger hams. vat,,rs ie he e.atry to the a,,er Reduce the heat to a nstant sire- the e  are based u mer and allow to cook at ths tern 'dea :uch p it(gh;r than the g lt ............ . ........... es fo will average and the allowance for[ eh pound weight. thshing grain husking corn and l Rmovs from fit, but keep the ham t k t h th " the Yquor in which it wa ked hauling o mar e is mac below e m 1 s coo We may jt as well Ik until cold, then move fm the con luarely in the face and thiner and allow to drain. al[ join hands to better conditions in Take off the skin, score the fat iv inch blocks, and cover with a coating of brown sugar ate] crumbs Sek immediately, and proper foundatlon over 3 192 p, all ,to the the farmers ad gdnst GIn Rings main- rain a snug, fight cortt act against the cvllnd=rwal No oil or gu crux b.ak through and tmtum trottbte. with" cloves 1 inch aparL Bake in a slow oven until nicely browne, basting at intal wth one-half cup water and one tabl spoonful of vlneger, Ho az in good demand and business is gainlng in the markets o Boston and New York, cnring to reliable ports received at University Farm, For the first five months th yr a New York horse dling firm sold 14,289 hotes as against 11,605 in Deale in It norheatem states re- the corresponding period of last year. port gater sales than last year; many men who have not, bought hors forslx to eight years a buy- ing now. Minneapol REDUCING FREIGHT RATES. HARRY N. OWEN, Publisher, Farm Stock & Home, Fmers mt have prompt relief from pnt freight rates on ari*l cultural prduet, isctve of what,' is done on other cls of ight. At[ present pri levi these rates, n I' many eases, a confiscating our! property. Please foard this pro-: test to the Inter-State Commission, Whington, D. C. Pot om farming .... res. is important. --You cannot afford to miss the Big Fair at Whiten, Septemb 14, 15, 16, 17. A bigger d better p- gram of races, attractions, shows fo eh d erf day Platt: "What is your baby going t be when he rrows upi" Fisher: A blakller, 1 think. , P[att: "A blackaailr." Fisher: "I'm afraid . We ha to give him methlng every llttle while to keep him quiet."* and huntin. A good dock with $1#@) in purses offered at the Big plenty of water up to it. t rraver County Fair at Wheaten fur For infoaton as to where fast, auto, chairot and hsrse mees. to find me call at Postem. Enter ynur car and horses in some n DR. GEe. P. DIX these races and win ssme of this men ey. Every opportunity we are given to serve you and the community g o o d exalts that m uc h more the spirit and high purpose of this Bank as a H o m e Institution Bring your prob- lems to qs. Good Food Wins The large number of people who are steady patrons, together with new customers who are satisfied, is a sure indication that our foods are of the best. Our Bakery each day makes pastries un- eqtmlled. They are al\\;vays newly-baked. Try some. The KORNER KAFE Pdtter & Gowan, Proprietors. Get that Fall. Suit now' V OU have a large selection of a" good sdts and topcoats to choose from here. Pricts are as attractive as the clothes themselves. Come in. We'll show you the clothes that have made this store the style center. gloths cost less in the end. oad clothes always have and Mways will prove the most economical s40 to s60 9 bf the , in in the Mlane. that hi eatimabe is practically dobl August 30, 191, th+ We el*y ha stock aims f all makl of Cars. Tralm and qlSraeto ITHE PARK GARAGE 10% Off on Clothing during the Legion Carnival The New Style Shop E. B. Persson, prop. Some Value at Twenty Five Dollars We a not only showing the right styl and the bet q[i. ties, but we are showing coats that cnot be bten wh you consider he kno quality of the gaents. You do not gess when you buy a "Palm Gar- ment." The quality is the, and hundd of women in this neighborhood have pved it. Now for twentyeven dollars we offer this coat in Hagam Polo mixtur in other ptaln d mixed polo cloths. Yoke and slees are lined with vene-  and the collar is of ki coney -- a ahawl o11, too. Slves a set in, with button trimmed cuffs. Stitched plts on bak fo a p[, Pecket outlined wlth stitqe]dng in patch effe Whatever--r whenevex - if you want a coat or t worth every penny you pay, let us show you--then you decide. Pioneer Store Co-operative Co. NOW n i . the lumber we ll. There is Just a much differeno in lum- ber as there is ]n Ither or any other commodity. Wcdlseson- ed lumber mpas with well- tanned leather. If you want to be atwel] pleased patron, visit us. Geier Lumber Co. ----= THE WEST HOTEL Minneapoli Minnemt a FoUowlng t h e dotard trend m prlees is now offe ing rooms at--- $1.50 to |2.00Without Bath $2,0O to $5,0#---With Bath With Mederate Priced --Care-- ta Cmeethm wt Ad 'publicity is a/Oble 'lb ]tcity--and sts but a -Lq SEPTEMBER 1, 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE f 0rtonville Independent EVERY THURSDAY by the & Merchants Printing Co. President Harris, Vice-president Lundgren, Secretary Walter Dinneil, Treasurer OF DIRECTORS John Kaercher Walter Dinnell 0lsoa L.E. Lundgren Grace F. Kaercher A. B. Kaercher Managing Editor - Associate Editor as second-class matter d920, at the post office at under the Act of $2.00 PER YEAR Rates m Application Advt. Representative. SELECT LIST. Bank, St. Paul St., - - Minneapolis Representative "7 ASSOCIATION . UEI"S HAVE FACTS. )out time that the Federal be put into hands cap- .Ullderstanding business and fi- and the needs of for which it was intended, of the law on which it it should serve. Whether is an 800,000,0C0 bushel grain in the ninth district, is certain and that is that in the grain growing dis- cannot pay any the proceeds of their year if they sell every at the head of an institution vho does not know that for a grain growing immediately secure all his farm will carry, to e.an feed 20 cent oats, 35 and 25 een{ corn, should from office immediately of broader calibre install- a.arae of common sense why restitution that is makipg on its capital not reduce rates, instead of advising to liquidate and thereby charges. How can a when it costs him raise his crop than it will has lost money for the and the banks or some have to carry him over Will be compelled to quit the farmers go out of busi- Wiseacres in charge of the Banks will be looking soft jobs. The whole put to farming and course be compelled to savaple of this institution s Propaganda--and by the for it ?--"Agriculture have absorbed and i too great a proportion of i credit of the Ninth Fed- District." Yes and it up unless the farmer oney at lower rates of is paid a higher price for of this institution seems the farmers are need- money and that they Well pay it back at once. Would take the pains to les from his office of lux- easily ascertain that far- either borrow money or of the matter is that the of the World War Upon the farmer and that freight rates and taxes in the price of farm caused him to borrow to meet his losses. proven by he by this institution twenty months, and business men of the ze this fact the better it all concerned in the na- because the business of prosper unless the Under present con- thing that can be to the farmer addi- until some other relief Reserve Bank de- all reason, first ex- currency and then con- money to specula- down the price of farm then demanded that the immediately, and Proper foundation over 1921 crop, all ,to the farmers and those Upon his success. seems to be against in favor of the specu- evident that either for the present man- else that its actions are interests. chairman bf the Reserve'bank, in in the Minne- of August 30, by his that his estimate as the present value is practically deuble worth on the mar- August 30, 1921, the of the statement. llgures: bushels, say 56- . . f pound. Prme at Ortonvflle, $1.16 and I this is a higher grade than wheat will, average, $169,835,600.00. Oats 228,010,000 bushels, No. 3, at 22c, $50,162,200.00. Rye, 23,714,000 bushels, at 79c, $18,- (;44,060.00. Barley, 62,666,000 bushels at 40c, $25,066,400.00. Potatoes, 35,880,000 bushels at $1, $35,880,000.00. Corn, 302,040,040 bushels at 25c $75,610,010.00. This gives a total of $375,198,270.00 From this deduct threshing at 7c for wheat and rye, 4c for oats, and 5c for husking corn and hauling to mar- ket at 21/ cents--S83,152,000.00. Leaving a net value of $292,046,270, instead of $600,000,000 for the 1921 crop in the Ninth District, according to the banks own estimate of the num- ber of bushels. The prices m)e the vee hi,.hest being paid at toeai Ce- vatm's it; the CC'lntry to the far,,.'er ad these W'xcs .are based upon grades much higher than the grain will average and the allowance for threshing grain, husking corn and hauling to market is much below the actual cost. We may just as well look the situation squarely in the face and all join hands to better conditions in the most practical and feasible man- ner. There is no use in trying to "kid" yourself into believing every thing is a|l right--when you know it is not. No allowance is made in the figures above .given for seed for next year which would reduce the net amount available about $32,000,000.00 any nothing about horse feed and living expenses. g BETTER GET ACQUAINTED. It is to be hoped that members of Congress during vacation, will get the real situation of their constitu- ents thoroly impressed upon them, so that when congress reconvenes, ac- tion may be taken that will bring im- mediate relief to the whole country. Perhaps it would be a good plan to remove the capitol of the nation fur- ther from Europe and closer to the people--into the heart of the nation-- where it would not be so difficult for members to get in touch with the common folks, and where the common folks could get at them. There surely must be something wrong with the atmosphere down a Washington, or freight and passenger rates would have been reduced months ago, and thereby the business of the nation set in motion. Everybody except congress and the Inter-State Com- merce Commission seem to know that high freight rates is one of the princi- pal causes of low prices of farm pro- ducts and business stagnation gener- ally. It begins to look as tho we will be compelled to do business )vithout rail- roads and without money. Both seem to be beyond the reach of the ordi- nary mortal, and completely in the hands and under the control of a favored few. In the meantime congress investi- gates. To  live in too dry an atmosphere is unhealthy nd adds to the doctor's bill. Statistics show that about one- third of all deaths in this country have been due to diseases of the throat and lungs. Fresh, clean, pure, humid air as found out of doors is the treatment generally prescribed for such ailments; and until people understand the need for the proper kind of air in the home, especially during the seasons when the doors find windows are kept closed, the re- currence of such discomforts are to be expected. "In some parts of Africa a man doesn't know his wife until after he has married her." said Mrs. Gabb, as she looked up from the newspaper she was reading. "Huh?" replied Gabb, "why men- tion Africa, especially ?" --;Ladies' Gowns, 89c and 98c each. Tylr's Variety Store. i i J i i rain a snug, tight contact against the cylinderwall. No oil or gas can leak through and cause trouble. We carry in stock sizes for all of Cars, Trucks and Tractors. THE PARK GARAGE How to Cook an Old Ham--f NOTICE. Vinegar, Sugar and Cloves I Parties holding stock in the Arti- i choke & Correll Telephone Company M ..... can now present or mail Certificate of any ial'mers an(/ Iarmers wives i ,, . . , ....... i nares o ne lmton State Bank of on tarms where hOgS are ouLcnered! -... .... .  .  . , ........ i Cllnl;on ivlmnesoa, Ior payment, nave l;nelr own z(leas now nares ShOUld I .. .  . . .... . ............ I wmcn paymen o z6 per cen Will De oe CooKed 0 bes pmase ne appetite ........... .. . .. . . . ,. .  .. mae upon tne surrenoer oi the orlgl- ere Is tne Des1: way spec]atlstS oI ne . _. ...... . ,.. ..  ..... na cercmcae properly m(mrseo oy umea aes ueparment oI Agrl- .. . . . .. . . .. " . . culture do it: These directions are ne no(ler nereoL In ne even o contained in Farmers' Bulletin 1186, "Pork on the Farm--Killing, Curing, and Canning," just published by the department. Soak several hours, remove all muld and loose pieces, and rinse well. Cover with cold water, add two tablespoonfulls of vinegar, one-half cup brown sugar, four cloves, and one bay leaf, and heat to boiling. The amont of cloves and bay leaf may be increased if desired, especially for larger hams. Reduce the heat to a constant sim- mer and allow to cook at this tem- perature at the rate of 20 minutes for each pound weight. Rmove from fire, but keep the ham in the liquor in which it was cooked until cold, then remove from the con- tainer and allow to drain. Take off the skin, score the fat in inch blocks, and cover with a coating of brown sugar and crumbs. Stick with" cloves 1 inch apart. Bake in a slow oven until nicely browned, basting at intervals with one-half cup water and one table- spoonful of vinegar. loss of such certificate, bond will have to be furnished by party and such bond to be approved by the board of Directors of said company. C. F. HANSON, Secretary. $1,800 in purses offered at the Big Traverse County Fair at Wheaton for fast, auto, chairot avd horse races. Enter your car and horses in some of these races and win some of this mon- ey. You can lead a horse to water but you cannot make him drink; likewise you can appoint a committee. FOR 00RENT After September 1 and 15, the two "Dix Wilbur" cottages on the Peninsula. All furnished (including hot blast heaters) ex- cept the bedding and linen. September and October are the most pleasant months for outing here. Good for fishing and hunting. A good dock with plenty of water up to it. For information as to where to find me call at Postoffice. DR. GEO. P. DIX llllllllilllllimlililllillltlllifllliillililllll HiflflHfliu$ii[ Horses are in good demand and business is gaining in the markets of Boston and New York, according to reliable reports received at University Farm. For the first five months this i year a New York horse dealing fian sold 14,239 horses as against 11,605 in the corresponding period of last year. Dealers in 11 northeastern states re- port greater sales than last year; many men who have not, bought: horses for six to eight years are buy- ing now. REDUCING FREIGHT RATES. HARRY N. OWEN, Publisher, Farm Stock & Home, Minneapolis, Minn., Farmers must have prompt relief l from present freight rates on agri- cultural product, irrespective of what is done on other classes of freight. At present price level these rates, in many cases, are confiscating our property. Please forward this pro- test to the Inter-State Commerce Commission, Washington, D. C. Name .......................................................... Post Office ................................................ R.F.D ............................... : ..................... State ......................................................... I am farming .......................... acres. This information is important. You cannot afford to miss the Big Fair at Wheaton, September 14, 15, 16, 17. A bigger and better pro- gram of races, attractions, shows for each and every day than ever before. Platt: "What is your baby going [o be when he grows upi" Fisher: ' blackmailer, I think." Platt: "A blackmailer." Fisher: "I'm afraid so. We have to give him something every little while to keep him quiet.", Every opportunity we are given to serve you and the community g o o d exalts that m uc h more the spirit and high purpose of this Bank as a H o m e Institution Bring y o u r prob- lems to qs. , Good Food Wins The large number of people who are steady patrons, together with new customers who are satisfied, is a sure indication that our foods are of the best. Our Bakery each day makes pastries un- equalled. They are al\\;vays newly-baked. Try some. The KORNER KAFE Potter & Gowan, Proprietors. Society, Brand Get that Fall Suit now V OU have a large selection of .It good sits and topcoats to choose from here. Prices are as attractive as the clothes themselves. Come in. We'll show you the clothes that have made this store the style center. cost less in the end. Good clothes always have and always will prove the most economical. *40 to *60 10% Off on Clothing during the Legion Carnival The ?'Jew Style Shop E. B. Persson, Prop. \\; Some Value at Twenty Five _--,ollars We are not only showing the right styles and the best quali- ties, but we are showing coats that cannot be beaten when you consider the knom'a quality of the garments. You do not guess when you buy a "Palmer Gar- ment." The quality is there, and hundreds of women in this neighborhood have proved it. Now for twenty-seven dollars we offer this coat in Hague Polo mixture---or in other plain and mixed polo cloths. Yoke and sleeves are lined with vene- tian and the collar is of kitP coney--a Shawl collar, too. Sleeves are set in, with button trimmed cuffs. Stitched pleats on back form a panel. Pockets are outlined with stitthing in patch effect. Whatever--or whenever if you want a coat or suit worth every penny you pay, let us show you--then you decide. Pi(00neer 5u re Co-operative Co. ]00[OW and then we feel as if we've got to talk about the quality of the lumber we sell. There is just as much difference in lum- ber as there is in leather or any other commodity. Well-season- ed lumber compares with well- tanned leather. If you want to be a,well pleased patron, visit US. Geier Lumber Co. THE WEST HOTEL Minneapolis, Minnesota. Following t h e downward trend in prices is now offer- ing rooms at $1.50 to $2.00---Without Bath $2.00 to $5.00--With Bath With Mederate Priced Cafe-- In Connection Want Ad publicity is valuable pub licity--and costs but a trifle.