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September 9, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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September 9, 2003
 

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IND END ENT i "A Constructive Newspaper In A Live Community" Second Big Stone Power Plant still a possibility, says Rolfes "DOWN HIGHWAY 75 last Thursday, this home was moved to Ridge Creek, located 14 miles nville alone Big Stone Lake. Rev. Marlene and Bill Elmstrom movedthis home about one mile rmer Iocaon. This old farm house was originally owned by Kent and Karol Stotesbery, who ,.5-37 years, and most recently by Tim Giddings of the metro area. According to the EImstroms, ave in the First English C.hurch Parsonage, but have purchased the house for retirement. house next Tues. at Big Bellingham Schools -ity, SD students are s again after returning reek for the 2003-04 Superintendent Ellen for the school Students, including  eighth graders. ! has joined the ranks i: Michelle Zepeta, L from Odessa, will be role of Special ge for the school this the music program at the school. Band teacher, Mrs. Amy Adelman has been working to add a Junior High Jazz Band to the pro- gram. According to Helgeson, stu- dents will participate in the band on a volunteer basis, and most Big Stone City School band students have shown an interest in participating. "Mrs. Adelman has been busy rewriting music, so that every musi- cian can be included, such as flute and clarinet players, who are not usually included in jazz bands," said Helgeson. "This way everyone will have the opportunity to experience the ass to sponsor Punt, !+and Kick this Saturday I' and Kick foot- December 3 l, 2003. The top finishers Pass n will be held in from each of eight age groups at the Saturday, September local competition will advance to a t at 10 a.m. on the Sectional competition. ail Field. , , The winners at the Sectional com- tion is sponsoreo oy petition will have their scores com- b A_ -- tea Jaycees, and pared with other Sectional champions; Frs to showcase their the top five scorers from the pool of a[g, passmz and kick- Sectional champions will advance. UaSed on d-istance and "" For more information on the com- petition, contact Isaiah Longnecker at are classified as of 839-6228. big band type of ensemble." Open house at the school will be held on Tuesday, September 16 from 7-8 p.m. The basketball program for girls and boys grades four through six will begin this week. Other events sched- uled for September include a lyceum, which will feature Creatures of the Night. The lyceum is scheduled for Monday, September 29. School pic- ture day will be held on Monday, September 22. Helgeson also mentioned that the school's Senior Citizens Lunches will begin in September. According. to Helgeson, during Senior Citizen Lunches, local senior citizens are invited to the school to eat lunch with the students. Additionally, the differ- ent grades take turns spending time with the senior citizens and providing entertainment throughout the day. This program runs from September until May, and takes place on the third Thursday of every month. Big Stone City School has a web- site on the internet, and can be visited at http://www.bigstonecity.k 12.sd.us Students and staff at Big Stone City School are looking forward to a (Continued on page 10) summer drought wreaks !0c on Big Stone Co. crops gand exceptionally g will be sending COunty Farmers to !:/heans and corn early r, dry spell that has , rea during August r has caused this :t ature earlier than i the area are plan- Sting soybeans by ) of this week, which  earlier than nor- rig Stone County Orector John has seen various !t!n the crops of Big tt, ne northern parts of g received slightly ..SOUthem parts, and ,lngham, the slight llhll is evident. Some farmers who have crop insurance will be assisted, but the amount of coverage depends on the typs of insurance individual farmers have. According to Cunningham, the wheat harvest was actually better than normal this year. In fact, he has heard reports that this year's wheat harvest was the best in the past several years. "We have had some very good wheat harvests in the past few years, so for this year's to be better, it was an out- standing harvest," he said. Cunningham also mentioned that there is an expected 50 percent reduc- tion from the potential corn and bean harvest as predicted for this year. He also says that although rain is still much needed, it will more than likely not have any effect on the crops at this point. "We haven't seen a drought like this for a long time. I think the last one was back in 1976," said Cunningham. Governor Tim Pawlenty announced his plans recently to seek federal disaster aid for Minnesota farmers who's crops are suffering from the drought. Through the decla- ration, low-interest loans and other subsidies would become available to assist farmers and communities cop with losses from the drought. Grant County, SD Commissioners recently sent a resolution to SD Governor Mike Rounds last week, asking him to declare Grant County a disaster area. According to Big Stone County Sherriff Joe Berning, who is currently assisting with the Emergency Management position in the county, he is unaware of plans for the county to request declaration of a disaster area at this point, even though that may be a possibility in the near future. (Courtesy Grant County Review, Milbank, SD.) Big Stone II, a new power plant proposed by Otter Tail Power Company two years ago, is still a future possibility, according to Mark Rolfes, manager of new business development. "The pro- ject is alive," he said. "We are look- ing at a smaller size plant, but we are still trying to put together a project." Construction of any new plant would likely begin in 2006. According to Rolfes, Otter Tail Power Company is committod to building a new plant if energy cus- tomers can be found. Part of his work in the last two years has fo- cused on finding those buyers and putting together detailed sales proposals. Xce] corporation of Minnesota, formerly known as Northern States Power, considered buying electricity from Big Stone II , but in the end decided to purchase en- ergy from natural gas plants and wind farms. Xcel provides electri- cal service to the Twin Cities and other areas in Minnesota. Compa- ny executives made their decision on June 20 after considering the proposal for many months. When Xcel pulled out, Otter Tail decided to scale back the size of the proposed plant from a 600 megawatt plant to a 300 megawatt facility. The Big Stone plant generates 450 megawatts of electricity. "A 300 megawatt plant is still a large project," said Rolfes. "We would not have as many con- struction workers rleeded, but the operating staff would be nearly the same size as at a bigger plant." It is estimated that 20 to 25 em- ployees would be required to oper- ate the new plant. According to Rolfes, for the next nine months to a year he will be contacting private utilities and co- operatives to buy electricity. If buyers can be inked to a contract, engineering and the lengthy per- mitting process would begin. "The site is still an excellent lo- cation for development," said Rolfes. Advantages of the site in- dude existing rail lines, transmis- (Continued on page 10) Circulars inside I * Pro Auto Tire One * Carlson Thrifty White Drug I II GOLF CART WINNERS at this year's 12th annual Oak Tree Golf Classic, held last Saturday are this proud couple, Jack and Mary Weber of Hamel. Jack has been playing in all of the Classics since they started. He's a native of Ortonville, son of the late C. J. and Helen Weber. C.J. was an avid golfer. Hockey i an opportunity for g,rls, 00)oys of all ages Area youth have an opportunity to have lot's of fun this winter by joining one of the hockey teams in the Big Stone Lake Area Hockey Association. Boys and girls of all ages are encouraged to give hockey a try. Sign up is going on now. Hockey is often thought to be an expensive sport with all the equip- ment needed. The BSLA Hockey Association is fortunate to have a large supply of equipment on hand. Almost all the equipment is available with a check deposit. At the end of the season, return the equipment and your check will be returned to you. It's not an expensive sport either. The registration fee is $30 for younger players for the season and $75 for the junior varsity players. "One of the best things about play- ing hockey is that everyone gets to be out on the ice playing, with rotating lines throughout each game," said association board member Trish Kellen. "No one sits out of the game, as they often do in other school team sports. All the players get equal time to play." The kids have lots of fun and also learn how to become part of a team and work together, building leader- ship skills and confidence they will take with them throughout life, said Kellen. Children as young as four-years- old can play on the team. Even those who don't know how to skate, or those who haven't had a lot of prac- tice, are welcome at all age levels. The JV team travels quite a bit with their home ice being at Benson or Morris, but younger skaters will only have games at home or in Watertown, SD, Benson or Morris. More children are needed for the younger teams. Since Hockey isn't affiliated with the school, players can come from anywhere Clinton, Graceville, Ortonville, Bellingham, Madison and even from South Dakota in Big Stone City, Milbank, Revillo, Twin Brooks, Wilmot. There are no boundaries as to where participants may come from. "Hockey is a great sport for kids, said Kellen. ''They'll learn so much, build great self esteem and make a lot of new friends." Hockey registration is taking place now with practice expected to begin the first of November. Anyone interested in playing hock- ey should call Aaron Knutson in Ortonville 320-839-6288, Trish Kellen in Clinton, 320-325-9949 or Martin Kurtzahn in Milbank, 605- 432-4277. Bargains galore on Saturday during city-wide garage sale Bargain-hunters will be on the go Saturday morning. early this Saturday, September 13, as The sales are a great opportunity the Ortonville Independent-sponsored for one person to empty out their clos- City Wide Garage Sale will be in progress. Garage sales will be held at homes in Ortonville and Big Stone City, SD. Most of the sales will begin at 8 a.m. on Saturday and run throughout the morning, however some sales begin on Friday, and some may go beyond ets, while another person can spend the day finding everything they need- ed for a grea t price. Check out the map elsewhere in this issue, which pinpoints all of the homes participating in the city-wide sale. are a result of the hot, dry weather the area has month. Pictured above is an example of how a The top ear of corn illustrates how corn year. The bottom ear shows how much of the actually looks as a result of the drought. "l'h. ree have filed for council seats Chumh bells will sound Thum. As of press time on Monday, three in honorof9/11 anniversary men have filed for seats on Ortonville City Council, as seats B, D, and F are open for election this year. Accordiing to City Clerk Char Grossman, Mike Dorry has filed for Seat B. Dorry currently holds Seat B, and nobody else has filed for the posi- tion. Artie Arndt, who currently holds Council Seat D, has filed for re-elec- tion of his position on the Council. Amdt also is unopposed at this point., Dan Oakes has filed for Council Seat F, and is the only person who has filed to fill the position thus far. Oakes is also currently holding that position on the Council. The deadline to file for any of the open seats is tonight. American Gertje VanLith Legion Post 229 has requested that church bells ring five times this Thursday, September 11. The first ringing of church bells will be at 8:45 a.m., in honor of those who died when American Airlines flight 11 struck the North tower of the World Trade Center in New York City, NY. At 9:03 a.m., bells will ring in rememberance who died when United Airlines flight 175 struck the South tower of the World Trade Center. In rememberance of those who died when American Airlines flight 77 struck the Pentagon in Washington D.C., bells will again ring at 9:43 a.m. At 10 a.m., the bells will sound to remember those who died when United Airlines flight 93 crashed near Sharksville, PA. At noon, the bells will ring one final time in rememberance of all those men, women and children who died in the terrorist attacks. Dr. Ronn McDaniel, P.A. has also included a tribute elsewhere in this issue of The Ortonville Independent. The tribute honors not only those men and women who lost their lives as a result of Sept. 11, but also those men and women who are serving the United States today. United we stand. God Bless America. A NEW TEACHER at Ortonville High School, Justin + Sawyer is pictured above. Mr. Sawyer teaches in the Math Department at OHS. He came to Ortonville from Hinkley, where he taught math last year. He is a graduate of Northwestern in St. Paul, where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Math Education. IND END ENT i "A Constructive Newspaper In A Live Community" Second Big Stone Power Plant still a possibility, says Rolfes "DOWN HIGHWAY 75 last Thursday, this home was moved to Ridge Creek, located 14 miles nville alone Big Stone Lake. Rev. Marlene and Bill Elmstrom movedthis home about one mile rmer Iocaon. This old farm house was originally owned by Kent and Karol Stotesbery, who ,.5-37 years, and most recently by Tim Giddings of the metro area. According to the EImstroms, ave in the First English C.hurch Parsonage, but have purchased the house for retirement. house next Tues. at Big Bellingham Schools -ity, SD students are s again after returning reek for the 2003-04 Superintendent Ellen for the school Students, including  eighth graders. ! has joined the ranks i: Michelle Zepeta, L from Odessa, will be role of Special ge for the school this the music program at the school. Band teacher, Mrs. Amy Adelman has been working to add a Junior High Jazz Band to the pro- gram. According to Helgeson, stu- dents will participate in the band on a volunteer basis, and most Big Stone City School band students have shown an interest in participating. "Mrs. Adelman has been busy rewriting music, so that every musi- cian can be included, such as flute and clarinet players, who are not usually included in jazz bands," said Helgeson. "This way everyone will have the opportunity to experience the ass to sponsor Punt, !+and Kick this Saturday I' and Kick foot- December 3 l, 2003. The top finishers Pass n will be held in from each of eight age groups at the Saturday, September local competition will advance to a t at 10 a.m. on the Sectional competition. ail Field. , , The winners at the Sectional com- tion is sponsoreo oy petition will have their scores com- b A_ -- tea Jaycees, and pared with other Sectional champions; Frs to showcase their the top five scorers from the pool of a[g, passmz and kick- Sectional champions will advance. UaSed on d-istance and "" For more information on the com- petition, contact Isaiah Longnecker at are classified as of 839-6228. big band type of ensemble." Open house at the school will be held on Tuesday, September 16 from 7-8 p.m. The basketball program for girls and boys grades four through six will begin this week. Other events sched- uled for September include a lyceum, which will feature Creatures of the Night. The lyceum is scheduled for Monday, September 29. School pic- ture day will be held on Monday, September 22. Helgeson also mentioned that the school's Senior Citizens Lunches will begin in September. According. to Helgeson, during Senior Citizen Lunches, local senior citizens are invited to the school to eat lunch with the students. Additionally, the differ- ent grades take turns spending time with the senior citizens and providing entertainment throughout the day. This program runs from September until May, and takes place on the third Thursday of every month. Big Stone City School has a web- site on the internet, and can be visited at http://www.bigstonecity.k 12.sd.us Students and staff at Big Stone City School are looking forward to a (Continued on page 10) summer drought wreaks !0c on Big Stone Co. crops gand exceptionally g will be sending COunty Farmers to !:/heans and corn early r, dry spell that has , rea during August r has caused this :t ature earlier than i the area are plan- Sting soybeans by ) of this week, which  earlier than nor- rig Stone County Orector John has seen various !t!n the crops of Big tt, ne northern parts of g received slightly ..SOUthem parts, and ,lngham, the slight llhll is evident. Some farmers who have crop insurance will be assisted, but the amount of coverage depends on the typs of insurance individual farmers have. According to Cunningham, the wheat harvest was actually better than normal this year. In fact, he has heard reports that this year's wheat harvest was the best in the past several years. "We have had some very good wheat harvests in the past few years, so for this year's to be better, it was an out- standing harvest," he said. Cunningham also mentioned that there is an expected 50 percent reduc- tion from the potential corn and bean harvest as predicted for this year. He also says that although rain is still much needed, it will more than likely not have any effect on the crops at this point. "We haven't seen a drought like this for a long time. I think the last one was back in 1976," said Cunningham. Governor Tim Pawlenty announced his plans recently to seek federal disaster aid for Minnesota farmers who's crops are suffering from the drought. Through the decla- ration, low-interest loans and other subsidies would become available to assist farmers and communities cop with losses from the drought. Grant County, SD Commissioners recently sent a resolution to SD Governor Mike Rounds last week, asking him to declare Grant County a disaster area. According to Big Stone County Sherriff Joe Berning, who is currently assisting with the Emergency Management position in the county, he is unaware of plans for the county to request declaration of a disaster area at this point, even though that may be a possibility in the near future. (Courtesy Grant County Review, Milbank, SD.) Big Stone II, a new power plant proposed by Otter Tail Power Company two years ago, is still a future possibility, according to Mark Rolfes, manager of new business development. "The pro- ject is alive," he said. "We are look- ing at a smaller size plant, but we are still trying to put together a project." Construction of any new plant would likely begin in 2006. According to Rolfes, Otter Tail Power Company is committod to building a new plant if energy cus- tomers can be found. Part of his work in the last two years has fo- cused on finding those buyers and putting together detailed sales proposals. Xce] corporation of Minnesota, formerly known as Northern States Power, considered buying electricity from Big Stone II , but in the end decided to purchase en- ergy from natural gas plants and wind farms. Xcel provides electri- cal service to the Twin Cities and other areas in Minnesota. Compa- ny executives made their decision on June 20 after considering the proposal for many months. When Xcel pulled out, Otter Tail decided to scale back the size of the proposed plant from a 600 megawatt plant to a 300 megawatt facility. The Big Stone plant generates 450 megawatts of electricity. "A 300 megawatt plant is still a large project," said Rolfes. "We would not have as many con- struction workers rleeded, but the operating staff would be nearly the same size as at a bigger plant." It is estimated that 20 to 25 em- ployees would be required to oper- ate the new plant. According to Rolfes, for the next nine months to a year he will be contacting private utilities and co- operatives to buy electricity. If buyers can be inked to a contract, engineering and the lengthy per- mitting process would begin. "The site is still an excellent lo- cation for development," said Rolfes. Advantages of the site in- dude existing rail lines, transmis- (Continued on page 10) Circulars inside I * Pro Auto Tire One * Carlson Thrifty White Drug I II GOLF CART WINNERS at this year's 12th annual Oak Tree Golf Classic, held last Saturday are this proud couple, Jack and Mary Weber of Hamel. Jack has been playing in all of the Classics since they started. He's a native of Ortonville, son of the late C. J. and Helen Weber. C.J. was an avid golfer. Hockey i an opportunity for g,rls, 00)oys of all ages Area youth have an opportunity to have lot's of fun this winter by joining one of the hockey teams in the Big Stone Lake Area Hockey Association. Boys and girls of all ages are encouraged to give hockey a try. Sign up is going on now. Hockey is often thought to be an expensive sport with all the equip- ment needed. The BSLA Hockey Association is fortunate to have a large supply of equipment on hand. Almost all the equipment is available with a check deposit. At the end of the season, return the equipment and your check will be returned to you. It's not an expensive sport either. The registration fee is $30 for younger players for the season and $75 for the junior varsity players. "One of the best things about play- ing hockey is that everyone gets to be out on the ice playing, with rotating lines throughout each game," said association board member Trish Kellen. "No one sits out of the game, as they often do in other school team sports. All the players get equal time to play." The kids have lots of fun and also learn how to become part of a team and work together, building leader- ship skills and confidence they will take with them throughout life, said Kellen. Children as young as four-years- old can play on the team. Even those who don't know how to skate, or those who haven't had a lot of prac- tice, are welcome at all age levels. The JV team travels quite a bit with their home ice being at Benson or Morris, but younger skaters will only have games at home or in Watertown, SD, Benson or Morris. More children are needed for the younger teams. Since Hockey isn't affiliated with the school, players can come from anywhere Clinton, Graceville, Ortonville, Bellingham, Madison and even from South Dakota in Big Stone City, Milbank, Revillo, Twin Brooks, Wilmot. There are no boundaries as to where participants may come from. "Hockey is a great sport for kids, said Kellen. ''They'll learn so much, build great self esteem and make a lot of new friends." Hockey registration is taking place now with practice expected to begin the first of November. Anyone interested in playing hock- ey should call Aaron Knutson in Ortonville 320-839-6288, Trish Kellen in Clinton, 320-325-9949 or Martin Kurtzahn in Milbank, 605- 432-4277. Bargains galore on Saturday during city-wide garage sale Bargain-hunters will be on the go Saturday morning. early this Saturday, September 13, as The sales are a great opportunity the Ortonville Independent-sponsored for one person to empty out their clos- City Wide Garage Sale will be in progress. Garage sales will be held at homes in Ortonville and Big Stone City, SD. Most of the sales will begin at 8 a.m. on Saturday and run throughout the morning, however some sales begin on Friday, and some may go beyond ets, while another person can spend the day finding everything they need- ed for a grea t price. Check out the map elsewhere in this issue, which pinpoints all of the homes participating in the city-wide sale. are a result of the hot, dry weather the area has month. Pictured above is an example of how a The top ear of corn illustrates how corn year. The bottom ear shows how much of the actually looks as a result of the drought. "l'h. ree have filed for council seats Chumh bells will sound Thum. As of press time on Monday, three in honorof9/11 anniversary men have filed for seats on Ortonville City Council, as seats B, D, and F are open for election this year. Accordiing to City Clerk Char Grossman, Mike Dorry has filed for Seat B. Dorry currently holds Seat B, and nobody else has filed for the posi- tion. Artie Arndt, who currently holds Council Seat D, has filed for re-elec- tion of his position on the Council. Amdt also is unopposed at this point., Dan Oakes has filed for Council Seat F, and is the only person who has filed to fill the position thus far. Oakes is also currently holding that position on the Council. The deadline to file for any of the open seats is tonight. American Gertje VanLith Legion Post 229 has requested that church bells ring five times this Thursday, September 11. The first ringing of church bells will be at 8:45 a.m., in honor of those who died when American Airlines flight 11 struck the North tower of the World Trade Center in New York City, NY. At 9:03 a.m., bells will ring in rememberance who died when United Airlines flight 175 struck the South tower of the World Trade Center. In rememberance of those who died when American Airlines flight 77 struck the Pentagon in Washington D.C., bells will again ring at 9:43 a.m. At 10 a.m., the bells will sound to remember those who died when United Airlines flight 93 crashed near Sharksville, PA. At noon, the bells will ring one final time in rememberance of all those men, women and children who died in the terrorist attacks. Dr. Ronn McDaniel, P.A. has also included a tribute elsewhere in this issue of The Ortonville Independent. The tribute honors not only those men and women who lost their lives as a result of Sept. 11, but also those men and women who are serving the United States today. United we stand. God Bless America. A NEW TEACHER at Ortonville High School, Justin + Sawyer is pictured above. Mr. Sawyer teaches in the Math Department at OHS. He came to Ortonville from Hinkley, where he taught math last year. He is a graduate of Northwestern in St. Paul, where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Math Education.