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September 14, 1999     The Ortonville Independent
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On our front page this week, you'll note a photo of Ortonville attorney and native son Robert Pflueger, shown being honored by the Minnesota Bar Association for his 50 years of service. It's interest- ing to note a clipping in the Minneapolis Star-Journal of 1949 giving news of Bob's admittance by the Minnesota Supreme Court to begin his law practice. Administering the oath to Bob, along with 72 other young attorneys, was another Ortonville native, our late aunt, Grace Kaercher Davis, State Clerk of Court at that time. The story also stated that "in the group was William A. Bierman," oldest son of the late great U of M football coach, Bernie Bierman. As with Bob, you'll find on all attorneys admitted to practice in that era the name of Grace Kaercher Davis on their certificate, including another Ortonville attorney, R.D. Schreiner. Did you see the final Viking play of their game with Atlanta Sunday? Did you maybe wonder as we did why, as they were trying to kill the clock (on 4th down) they didn't just run back and forth, even a bit backwards, until the few seconds remain. ing were gone ... rather than driving straight ahead, thus giving Atlanta another shot at scoring, and even risking the chance of a fumble! The situation was kinda like in a basketball game, with but a few seconds left in the game, your team putting the ball into play under the oppo- nent's basket. The best tactic is to throw the ball the length of the court, so even if the opponent gets the bail, time is against them to score! Not long ago, an attorney friend of ours admitted that our nation's we judges throughout the country, we arc inclined to agree and wholeheartedly. Take the case of Donald Blom, who has confessed to the kidnapping, murder, and burning of young Katie Poirer of Moose Lake. According to news reports, it's a fact that Blom was a 6-time convicted offender ... yet the man was walking the streets! Absolutely disgusting that on six dif- ferent court appearances, a judge in each case set this man free. With such irresponsibility from our courts, we also agree wholeheartedly with Katie Poirer's grandfather, Lloyd Simick, that it should be possible to bring suit against judges. Certainly, such suits should be allowed when there is clear evidence of improper sentencing such as is clearly evident in the Blom-Poirer issue. And how many times have you read or heard about a driver still driving a vehicle after multiple DWI's!? On a more personal basis, we have experienced a gross injustice in the case of a judge allowing what common sense labels a most trivial suit to even be activated. It's not American, surely not right, not justifiable that anyone be allowed to sue anybody for rea- sons that are so trivial ... causing stress on defenders, and a loss of huge sums of money just to prove one's innocence! Makes you wonder if lawyers, even judges (who are nothing more than attorneys with a robe on) aren't all in cahoots! A license to steal? Not right!! And have you ever heard of a lawyer or judge admitting he was wrong?! In the case of Donald Blom, there certainly was a wrong 6 times previous, wouldn't you say?! Ortonvllle Kiwanis Club has a new song called "ASK". Lt. Gov. Brett Jacobsen and Kween Pam represented the local club as delegates at the District Convention in Bismarck, ND and brought back this recruiting song. Done to the tune of "Red River Valley", it is intended to be sung on a regular basis to remind members to ASK and keep on asking prospective mem- bers to visit, inquire and join the club. lpJ IIIII I Our Wildlife and Rsh" cannot survive unless our BE 00RESPONSIBLE!, Ag contract satellite broadcast scheduled A statewide satellite downlink broadcast on Agricultural Contracts has been scheduled for Tuesday, September 21st, from 7:00 - 9:00 PM. The program is titled: "Agricultural Contracts ..Decisions and Issues for Producers" During the first segment of the broadcast, Bob Koebler, University of Minnesota Swine Specialist, will dis- cuss opportunities and risks associat- ed with using contracts. Attorney Bruce Gerhardson will review the various types of contracts and con- tract language and definitions. Industry issues relative to increased use of contracts will be highlighted by Bill Lazarus, U of M Applied Economics Specialist. The second segment of the satellite broadcast will focus on legal consid- erations and issues. These include "red flag" issues when entering a con- tract, .properly documenting contract performance, and ways to exit a poor contract arrangement. Resources for the legal segment of the program are Julie Yuki Ralston Aoki, Assistant to the Minnesota Attorney General and Attorneys Bruce Kleven and Phil Kunkel. The final segment of the broadcast will feature Private Consultant Michelle Gullickson-Moore who will be discussing contract negotiating skills for producers. Perry Aasness from the Minnesota Department of Agriculture will discuss the new Contract Handbook for Producers and Jerry Shurson, U of M Swine Center Coordinator, will share other resources available to producers on agricultural contracts. The event is being co-sponsored by the University of Minnesota Extension Service, the Association of Minnesota Counties, the MNSCU Adult Farm Management Program, the Minnesota Department of Agriculture, the Minnesota Attorney General's Office, Farm Credit Services, and the Minnesota Research and Promotion Councils for Corn, Soybeans, Wheat, Pork, and Beef. For more information on the satellite broadcast on agricultural contracts contact Kent Thiesse, AMC Extension Fellow (651 224-3344; ext. #223). The satellite broadcast on agricul- ture contracts will be at numerous regional locations throughout the state, and at some county Extension Offices. This satellite broadcast can be viewed at the Big Stone County Ag/Family Service Center in Ortonville starting at 7:00 p.m. on September 21 st. Governors Ventura, Thompson intervene for dairy farmers Minnesota Governor Jesse Ventura and Wisconsin Governor Tommy Thompson today moved to uphold USDA's milk pricing reforms. The governors joined the Minnesota Milk Producers in filing an intervention in federal court on behalf of their states' dairy farmers. The lawsuit, filed by Hershey Food Corporation on Aug. 11 in Washington, D.C. federal district court, challenges a provision of USDA's proposed reform of the feder- al milk marketing order system. Midwestern dairy experts expect that the lawsuit will become the main legal vehicle for those challenging the newly reformed system. "This is a fight for a level playing field, so our farmers can compete, said Governor Ventura. "We must step forward in modernizing federal milk orders and not move backwards." While USDA's "reform rule" on dairy pricing goes a long way toward correcting the outdated milk pricing system, it by no means goes far enough. In June, Governor Ventura testified before a House Agriculture Subcommittee that over the long-term congress should work to eliminate this "depression-era dinosaur that subsidizes farmers based on how close they are to Eau Claire, WI." The current pricing system has been in effect since the 1930's, and was designed in an era when the fed- eral government wanted to encourage milk production outside of the Upper Midwest, where the majority of milk production took place. Modern tech- nological advancements in refrigera- tion and transportation make it no longer necessary to artificially set .prices to encourage milk production in other parts of the country. However, dairy producers in other regions of the country receive benefits from the present system and do not want to see it changed. "While this isn't a cure-all, it is certainly a good first-step toward reforming this archaic system," said Agriculture Commissioner Gene Hugoson. Recent USDA statistics indicate that 60 percent o the nation's dairy farmers will benefit from the reforms. In addition, dairy farmers recently voted overwhelmingly for the plan. American Legion works to improve fishing on Big Stone Legionnaires from Big Stone City, following improvements in order to SD, have worked to improve fishing continue to be productive: graded the in Big Stone Lake for the past 15 ponds' floors so they drain better, years, sprayed noxious weeds, rebuilt the Normally crappies are raised-pro- water pump that supplies the ponds, Gae,  :and refurbished the ponds' control ' :"liValso ...... works: ............................... ...... ? related work has been done to. make , . In addition more artificial reefs the three Rearing Ponds productive, were built: in January of 1999 one The ponds located three miles was constructed near Skeleton Island north of Big Stone City - have had the and in January of 2000 one will be built near Bay View. (Area fishermen reported nice catches of crappies this spring, partly due to stocking efforts and to artificial reefs that provide escapes for small fish from larger predatory fish.) The Christmas Tree artificial reef Project and the production of panfish are programs endorsed by the South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks Department. By Sonja Farmer Native Prairie: Our Natural Heritage Looking closer - Other Prairie Species It is easy to focus upon the buffalo, the prairie dog, and some of the other larger animals of the prairie. The little creatures that run the world such as bees, butterflies, bats and other insects often go unnoticed and unprotected until it is sometimes too late. If not for bees, many plants would be unable to produce fruits or seeds. Bees are responsible for pollinating more flowers than any other creatures on earth. Honeybees were imported from Europe in the 1600s and pollinate over 90 cultivated crops. But did you know there are an estimated 4,000 to 5,000 species of native bees in the continental United States? They include bumblebees, carpenter bees, sweat bees, leafcutter bees, alkali bees and mason bees and they also play an important role. Many of these native bee species specialize - they may pollinate a single plant species within a short distance from their nest. As a result, their work is fast and focused. For example, four blue orchard bees can pollinate one apple tree in the same time as hundreds of honeybees. In addition, many of these buzzing specialists "do the spring when very active Many I from human reasons for native plant development. a negative impact pollinators is the pesticides. These "nectar corridors" habitat fra corridors are to "island hop" contain dangers applications and food. Sometimes the t small, they provide the food apart, pollen possible. As a result, I survive without the the pollinators can't the plants. To help reduce pollinators, things. They can pesticide use. They filled gardens, sources and proteC. nesting sites. recommend wildflowers and climactic just a few thing: improve the lot - and perhaps important heritage. Library corner series of three earth books about parenthood with not falling into the game noatowner's Electrical Manual: Repair, and Impr Essential Chock full of instructions, and to help you boat. Antique TractOr Complete Guide to Bt Restoring Old Spencer Yost. The tl tells it all ... has lots helpful hints. Coming installment of Dave wrote A Child Boy), The Alibi by Walk to Remembt Sparks (who also and Message in a B, for the Holida M,a0000a Stewart. By Laurie Hammel, Librarian As the weather starts to get chillier and the days get shorter, it's time to start looking for things to do indoors. In no particular order, here are a few of the newer books at the Ortonville Library. Unless someone beats you to them, they're all currently available for check-out. Body Slam: The Jesse Ventura Story by Jake Tapper An unauthorized biography of the Gov. written by a D.C. journalist. Start Wars Episode 1: The Phantom Menace by Terry Brooks. The novelization of the most recent Star Wars movie High Five by Janet Evanovich. This is the fifth book in the Stephanie Plum series. It's my own personal new favorite. (I like this series better than Sue Grafton, if that's telling you anything.) We also have the previous four titles in paperback. The Girlfriends' Guide to Pregnancy/Surviving the First Year of Motherhood/Foddlers by Vicki Iovine. A mom of four kids, Iovine wrote this for one delicious duo! Third safety belt use survey The Ortonville Police Department in conjunction with the Minnesota Safe & Sober campaign conducted its third and final informal seat belt sur- vey for 1999. Once again by observ- ing the first 100 vehicles at an inter- section to see if the driver of the vehi- cle was using their safety belt was the method of the survey. The two places observed were the intersections of Hwy. 12 and Hwy. 7, and Hwy. 75 and Hwy. 12. The overall outcome was that 63.5% of vehicle drivers were observed using their safety belts. That's an increase of 2% in just over a month time, and a 6.5% increase of safety belt use since June of this year. Each year, at least 150 unbuckled people die in motor vehicle crashes in Minnesota alone. That is 150 people with unfinished plans, hopes and dreams. That's 150 people whose rel- atives are left feeling cheated and lonely. Safety belt use continues to be stagnant while motor vehicle deaths rise each year. The information is out there. There are billboards, bumper stickers, t-shirts and television adver- tisements encouraging adults and children to buckle up. There should be no excuse for neglecting to use safety belts. For more information regarding the Minnesota Safe & Sober cam- paign feel free to contact Officer Jason Mork at the Ortonville Police Department at 839-6161. Annual Classic Bellingham Boogie Woogie Day is scheduled for Sat. Sept. 18, 1999. The Classic Car Show will begin at 11 a.m. with registration. KQ will be here with music all afternoon for your enjoyment. "Burn outs" on main is a new attraction this year starting at 2 p.m. headed up by Ron Taylor, a Bellingham native. The public is invited to view the cars as they vote for people's choice awards and ladies can vote for ladies' choice awards. Price reductions mean income loss A fifty cent per bushel price reduction equals massive losses in income for Big Stone County farmers, nearly $8 million in lost revenue. Of the county's 213,100 acres, which consist of 72,800 corn, 106,200 soybeans and 34,100 of wheat, a total of 15,615,400 bushels of the three commodities were produced in 1998. Taking that total times $.50, farmers in the county would see a loss of $7,807,700, Memorial for Rice Hospice The followi, ng memorials were received by Rice Hospice Ortonville/Graceville - for the month of July, 1999: In memory of: Karin Bender from OAHS Home Health Agency of Ortonville, MN. A donation to the hospice program was given by Glenn Krier. Rice Hospice - Appleton, Benson, Dawson, Graceville, Granite Falls, Montevideo, Ortonville, Paynesville, Willmar - wishes to express their gratitude for these memorials. Car Show set for Bellingham Some of the vehicles that you will see are: Chevy Belair from Alberta; from Wyoming, MN a '64 Jaguar Roadster; Chevy Impala Convertible from Montevideo; from Watertown, SD a 56 Chevy Pick-up; '37 Ford Pick-up from Madison; '39 Ford 2 dr Delux Coupe from Watertown, SD; from Milbank, SD '66 Jaguar. A nice variety and some beautiful cars. Trophies being awarded are: Oldest Running Entry, People's Choice, Mayor's Choice, Street Machines, Stock Classes, Under Construction, Trucks, Car Club Most Entries and many more. Registration fee is $20 which includes T-shirt, lunch voucher, and dash plaque. For more information call 1-320-568-2125. photos do not represent MAXIPEDIC >Firm or Luxury Firm >312 Bonnell Coil Unit > 5/10 Year Warranty >13 gauge Coil Beautyrest ROOSEVELT >Firm or Luxury Firm >651 coils pcketed >10 yr. non-prorated >15 &-13-3/4 gauge coils Beautyrest Antiqua Wool Pillow Top >704 pocketed coils >10 yr. non-prorated warranty >15 gauge coils i | I a n m mm m a I I I I I nm I | i i | | ! n u ! n | i Dig into the Pecan Mud00lide" or Chocolate Rook" Treat. Oul  O! e Chdd.m't I/k.ll llldt 3han00 00onna ,gz00nao00 a00u/O00 Big Stone 750 Eastvold Ortonville, MN 56278 , :!i Page 2 INDEPENDENT On our front page this week, you'll note a photo of Ortonville attorney and native son Robert Pflueger, shown being honored by the Minnesota Bar Association for his 50 years of service. It's interest- ing to note a clipping in the Minneapolis Star-Journal of 1949 giving news of Bob's admittance by the Minnesota Supreme Court to begin his law practice. Administering the oath to Bob, along with 72 other young attorneys, was another Ortonville native, our late aunt, Grace Kaercher Davis, State Clerk of Court at that time. The story also stated that "in the group was William A. Bierman," oldest son of the late great U of M football coach, Bernie Bierman. As with Bob, you'll find on all attorneys admitted to practice in that era the name of Grace Kaercher Davis on their certificate, including another Ortonville attorney, R.D. Schreiner. Did you see the final Viking play of their game with Atlanta Sunday? Did you maybe wonder as we did why, as they were trying to kill the clock (on 4th down) they didn't just run back and forth, even a bit backwards, until the few seconds remain. ing were gone ... rather than driving straight ahead, thus giving Atlanta another shot at scoring, and even risking the chance of a fumble! The situation was kinda like in a basketball game, with but a few seconds left in the game, your team putting the ball into play under the oppo- nent's basket. The best tactic is to throw the ball the length of the court, so even if the opponent gets the bail, time is against them to score! Not long ago, an attorney friend of ours admitted that our nation's we judges throughout the country, we arc inclined to agree and wholeheartedly. Take the case of Donald Blom, who has confessed to the kidnapping, murder, and burning of young Katie Poirer of Moose Lake. According to news reports, it's a fact that Blom was a 6-time convicted offender ... yet the man was walking the streets! Absolutely disgusting that on six dif- ferent court appearances, a judge in each case set this man free. With such irresponsibility from our courts, we also agree wholeheartedly with Katie Poirer's grandfather, Lloyd Simick, that it should be possible to bring suit against judges. Certainly, such suits should be allowed when there is clear evidence of improper sentencing such as is clearly evident in the Blom-Poirer issue. And how many times have you read or heard about a driver still driving a vehicle after multiple DWI's!? On a more personal basis, we have experienced a gross injustice in the case of a judge allowing what common sense labels a most trivial suit to even be activated. It's not American, surely not right, not justifiable that anyone be allowed to sue anybody for rea- sons that are so trivial ... causing stress on defenders, and a loss of huge sums of money just to prove one's innocence! Makes you wonder if lawyers, even judges (who are nothing more than attorneys with a robe on) aren't all in cahoots! A license to steal? Not right!! And have you ever heard of a lawyer or judge admitting he was wrong?! In the case of Donald Blom, there certainly was a wrong 6 times previous, wouldn't you say?! Ortonvllle Kiwanis Club has a new song called "ASK". Lt. Gov. Brett Jacobsen and Kween Pam represented the local club as delegates at the District Convention in Bismarck, ND and brought back this recruiting song. Done to the tune of "Red River Valley", it is intended to be sung on a regular basis to remind members to ASK and keep on asking prospective mem- bers to visit, inquire and join the club. lpJ IIIII I Our Wildlife and Rsh" cannot survive unless our BE 00RESPONSIBLE!, Ag contract satellite broadcast scheduled A statewide satellite downlink broadcast on Agricultural Contracts has been scheduled for Tuesday, September 21st, from 7:00 - 9:00 PM. The program is titled: "Agricultural Contracts ..Decisions and Issues for Producers" During the first segment of the broadcast, Bob Koebler, University of Minnesota Swine Specialist, will dis- cuss opportunities and risks associat- ed with using contracts. Attorney Bruce Gerhardson will review the various types of contracts and con- tract language and definitions. Industry issues relative to increased use of contracts will be highlighted by Bill Lazarus, U of M Applied Economics Specialist. The second segment of the satellite broadcast will focus on legal consid- erations and issues. These include "red flag" issues when entering a con- tract, .properly documenting contract performance, and ways to exit a poor contract arrangement. Resources for the legal segment of the program are Julie Yuki Ralston Aoki, Assistant to the Minnesota Attorney General and Attorneys Bruce Kleven and Phil Kunkel. The final segment of the broadcast will feature Private Consultant Michelle Gullickson-Moore who will be discussing contract negotiating skills for producers. Perry Aasness from the Minnesota Department of Agriculture will discuss the new Contract Handbook for Producers and Jerry Shurson, U of M Swine Center Coordinator, will share other resources available to producers on agricultural contracts. The event is being co-sponsored by the University of Minnesota Extension Service, the Association of Minnesota Counties, the MNSCU Adult Farm Management Program, the Minnesota Department of Agriculture, the Minnesota Attorney General's Office, Farm Credit Services, and the Minnesota Research and Promotion Councils for Corn, Soybeans, Wheat, Pork, and Beef. For more information on the satellite broadcast on agricultural contracts contact Kent Thiesse, AMC Extension Fellow (651 224-3344; ext. #223). The satellite broadcast on agricul- ture contracts will be at numerous regional locations throughout the state, and at some county Extension Offices. This satellite broadcast can be viewed at the Big Stone County Ag/Family Service Center in Ortonville starting at 7:00 p.m. on September 21 st. Governors Ventura, Thompson intervene for dairy farmers Minnesota Governor Jesse Ventura and Wisconsin Governor Tommy Thompson today moved to uphold USDA's milk pricing reforms. The governors joined the Minnesota Milk Producers in filing an intervention in federal court on behalf of their states' dairy farmers. The lawsuit, filed by Hershey Food Corporation on Aug. 11 in Washington, D.C. federal district court, challenges a provision of USDA's proposed reform of the feder- al milk marketing order system. Midwestern dairy experts expect that the lawsuit will become the main legal vehicle for those challenging the newly reformed system. "This is a fight for a level playing field, so our farmers can compete, said Governor Ventura. "We must step forward in modernizing federal milk orders and not move backwards." While USDA's "reform rule" on dairy pricing goes a long way toward correcting the outdated milk pricing system, it by no means goes far enough. In June, Governor Ventura testified before a House Agriculture Subcommittee that over the long-term congress should work to eliminate this "depression-era dinosaur that subsidizes farmers based on how close they are to Eau Claire, WI." The current pricing system has been in effect since the 1930's, and was designed in an era when the fed- eral government wanted to encourage milk production outside of the Upper Midwest, where the majority of milk production took place. Modern tech- nological advancements in refrigera- tion and transportation make it no longer necessary to artificially set .prices to encourage milk production in other parts of the country. However, dairy producers in other regions of the country receive benefits from the present system and do not want to see it changed. "While this isn't a cure-all, it is certainly a good first-step toward reforming this archaic system," said Agriculture Commissioner Gene Hugoson. Recent USDA statistics indicate that 60 percent o the nation's dairy farmers will benefit from the reforms. In addition, dairy farmers recently voted overwhelmingly for the plan. American Legion works to improve fishing on Big Stone Legionnaires from Big Stone City, following improvements in order to SD, have worked to improve fishing continue to be productive: graded the in Big Stone Lake for the past 15 ponds' floors so they drain better, years, sprayed noxious weeds, rebuilt the Normally crappies are raised-pro- water pump that supplies the ponds, Gae,  :and refurbished the ponds' control ' :"liValso ...... works: ............................... ...... ? related work has been done to. make , . In addition more artificial reefs the three Rearing Ponds productive, were built: in January of 1999 one The ponds located three miles was constructed near Skeleton Island north of Big Stone City - have had the and in January of 2000 one will be built near Bay View. (Area fishermen reported nice catches of crappies this spring, partly due to stocking efforts and to artificial reefs that provide escapes for small fish from larger predatory fish.) The Christmas Tree artificial reef Project and the production of panfish are programs endorsed by the South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks Department. By Sonja Farmer Native Prairie: Our Natural Heritage Looking closer - Other Prairie Species It is easy to focus upon the buffalo, the prairie dog, and some of the other larger animals of the prairie. The little creatures that run the world such as bees, butterflies, bats and other insects often go unnoticed and unprotected until it is sometimes too late. If not for bees, many plants would be unable to produce fruits or seeds. Bees are responsible for pollinating more flowers than any other creatures on earth. Honeybees were imported from Europe in the 1600s and pollinate over 90 cultivated crops. But did you know there are an estimated 4,000 to 5,000 species of native bees in the continental United States? They include bumblebees, carpenter bees, sweat bees, leafcutter bees, alkali bees and mason bees and they also play an important role. Many of these native bee species specialize - they may pollinate a single plant species within a short distance from their nest. As a result, their work is fast and focused. For example, four blue orchard bees can pollinate one apple tree in the same time as hundreds of honeybees. In addition, many of these buzzing specialists "do the spring when very active Many I from human reasons for native plant development. a negative impact pollinators is the pesticides. These "nectar corridors" habitat fra corridors are to "island hop" contain dangers applications and food. Sometimes the t small, they provide the food apart, pollen possible. As a result, I survive without the the pollinators can't the plants. To help reduce pollinators, things. They can pesticide use. They filled gardens, sources and proteC. nesting sites. recommend wildflowers and climactic just a few thing: improve the lot - and perhaps important heritage. Library corner series of three earth books about parenthood with not falling into the game noatowner's Electrical Manual: Repair, and Impr Essential Chock full of instructions, and to help you boat. Antique TractOr Complete Guide to Bt Restoring Old Spencer Yost. The tl tells it all ... has lots helpful hints. Coming installment of Dave wrote A Child Boy), The Alibi by Walk to Remembt Sparks (who also and Message in a B, for the Holida M,a0000a Stewart. By Laurie Hammel, Librarian As the weather starts to get chillier and the days get shorter, it's time to start looking for things to do indoors. In no particular order, here are a few of the newer books at the Ortonville Library. Unless someone beats you to them, they're all currently available for check-out. Body Slam: The Jesse Ventura Story by Jake Tapper An unauthorized biography of the Gov. written by a D.C. journalist. Start Wars Episode 1: The Phantom Menace by Terry Brooks. The novelization of the most recent Star Wars movie High Five by Janet Evanovich. This is the fifth book in the Stephanie Plum series. It's my own personal new favorite. (I like this series better than Sue Grafton, if that's telling you anything.) We also have the previous four titles in paperback. The Girlfriends' Guide to Pregnancy/Surviving the First Year of Motherhood/Foddlers by Vicki Iovine. A mom of four kids, Iovine wrote this for one delicious duo! Third safety belt use survey The Ortonville Police Department in conjunction with the Minnesota Safe & Sober campaign conducted its third and final informal seat belt sur- vey for 1999. Once again by observ- ing the first 100 vehicles at an inter- section to see if the driver of the vehi- cle was using their safety belt was the method of the survey. The two places observed were the intersections of Hwy. 12 and Hwy. 7, and Hwy. 75 and Hwy. 12. The overall outcome was that 63.5% of vehicle drivers were observed using their safety belts. That's an increase of 2% in just over a month time, and a 6.5% increase of safety belt use since June of this year. Each year, at least 150 unbuckled people die in motor vehicle crashes in Minnesota alone. That is 150 people with unfinished plans, hopes and dreams. That's 150 people whose rel- atives are left feeling cheated and lonely. Safety belt use continues to be stagnant while motor vehicle deaths rise each year. The information is out there. There are billboards, bumper stickers, t-shirts and television adver- tisements encouraging adults and children to buckle up. There should be no excuse for neglecting to use safety belts. For more information regarding the Minnesota Safe & Sober cam- paign feel free to contact Officer Jason Mork at the Ortonville Police Department at 839-6161. Annual Classic Bellingham Boogie Woogie Day is scheduled for Sat. Sept. 18, 1999. The Classic Car Show will begin at 11 a.m. with registration. KQ will be here with music all afternoon for your enjoyment. "Burn outs" on main is a new attraction this year starting at 2 p.m. headed up by Ron Taylor, a Bellingham native. The public is invited to view the cars as they vote for people's choice awards and ladies can vote for ladies' choice awards. Price reductions mean income loss A fifty cent per bushel price reduction equals massive losses in income for Big Stone County farmers, nearly $8 million in lost revenue. Of the county's 213,100 acres, which consist of 72,800 corn, 106,200 soybeans and 34,100 of wheat, a total of 15,615,400 bushels of the three commodities were produced in 1998. Taking that total times $.50, farmers in the county would see a loss of $7,807,700, Memorial for Rice Hospice The followi, ng memorials were received by Rice Hospice Ortonville/Graceville - for the month of July, 1999: In memory of: Karin Bender from OAHS Home Health Agency of Ortonville, MN. A donation to the hospice program was given by Glenn Krier. Rice Hospice - Appleton, Benson, Dawson, Graceville, Granite Falls, Montevideo, Ortonville, Paynesville, Willmar - wishes to express their gratitude for these memorials. Car Show set for Bellingham Some of the vehicles that you will see are: Chevy Belair from Alberta; from Wyoming, MN a '64 Jaguar Roadster; Chevy Impala Convertible from Montevideo; from Watertown, SD a 56 Chevy Pick-up; '37 Ford Pick-up from Madison; '39 Ford 2 dr Delux Coupe from Watertown, SD; from Milbank, SD '66 Jaguar. A nice variety and some beautiful cars. Trophies being awarded are: Oldest Running Entry, People's Choice, Mayor's Choice, Street Machines, Stock Classes, Under Construction, Trucks, Car Club Most Entries and many more. Registration fee is $20 which includes T-shirt, lunch voucher, and dash plaque. For more information call 1-320-568-2125. photos do not represent MAXIPEDIC >Firm or Luxury Firm >312 Bonnell Coil Unit > 5/10 Year Warranty >13 gauge Coil Beautyrest ROOSEVELT >Firm or Luxury Firm >651 coils pcketed >10 yr. non-prorated >15 &-13-3/4 gauge coils Beautyrest Antiqua Wool Pillow Top >704 pocketed coils >10 yr. non-prorated warranty >15 gauge coils i | I a n m mm m a I I I I I nm I | i i | | ! n u ! n | i Dig into the Pecan Mud00lide" or Chocolate Rook" Treat. Oul  O! e Chdd.m't I/k.ll llldt 3han00 00onna ,gz00nao00 a00u/O00 Big Stone 750 Eastvold Ortonville, MN 56278 , :!i Page 2 INDEPENDENT