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September 14, 1999     The Ortonville Independent
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Editorial comment GUEST EDITORIAL... Do not give your credit card number over the phone by leanette Bohlman Report any phone call you receive to the Minnesota Attorney General s office in St. Paul when they want your credit card number over the phone. I have received several calls in which they wanted me to use their credit card protection insurance for a monthly fee charged to my credit card. Do not give out your credit card number over the phone. You are already protected up to $50,000 of charges when your credit card is stolen or lost and you have reported it to your credit card carrier. The Attorney General wants you to report anyone who wants you togive them your credit card number. They will oe gladto inform you regarding whether or not these are legal companies or not and what protections you already have under the law. Keep their numbers handy and call the Minnesota Attorney General's office at 1-800-657- 3787 or 1-651-296-6186. I called and I was glad I had. The state's turkey growers are talk- ing about producing energy from turkey litter. The British company Fibrowatt has been promoting the idea as a solution to the MPCA's new stan- dards relating to manure management. However, says the company, a new plant would require state funding on the order of a cent and a half per kilo- watt hour in order to be competitive. This is because the plant cannot be sized as large as the coal facilities it must compete with. Projections are that the plant would be weaned in about ten years from state help. The idea is backed by some heavy hitters in West Central Minnesota including, in addition to the turkey growers, a coalition of county com- missioners and development officials. Ag. Commissioner Gene Huguson is also on board. This public/private partnership approach to setting a direction for the state's ag economy is not new. It is particularly common in the energy business. We have the entire ethanol industry as an example. There, the t o ao...thi00; \\; .t  : . -_3  . i;? Ii 2. Strip 3. Cloudy 4. From pentane (Chemistry) 5. Endings 6. Disliked 7. Turkish leader title 8. Sift 9. Mental object 10. Sheepskin 11. Weapons system 12. Injure Clues ACROSS 1. Statute law 5. Ruboff 10. Female parent 14, Razor or jackknife 15. Sea wreckage 16. Asian nation 17. Weather report 20. Needles 21. Matters 22.  student, leams healing 23.  Alto, California 13. & & & cry 25. Performs a dance 29. System 33. Bitter chemical 34. Bank feature 35. A Dalton (Physics) 36. Limits 38. Cyclic 41. Mineral 42. Region 44. Attack (obsolete) 45. Curriculum 48. Feeling 49. Otherwise 50. Plump for 51. Capital of Guam 54. Weightlessness 59. In a gloomy manner 62. Wings 63. Contests 64. Invests in little enterprises 65. Pats 66. Nasty manner 67. Measuring instrument Clues DOWN 1. Adolph Simon , New York Times 18. Kind 19. Robust 23. Plate for Eucharist 24.  Mater, one's school 25. Gulf of, in the Aegean 26. Wing shaped 27. Alloy of nickel and copper 28. Braggart 29. Puzzles 56 i7 !, 30. Move 31. Domestic helps 32. Measuring rods 37. Compass pt. one point S. of S.E. 39. Motionless 40. Paddle 43. Fixed charge 46. Optical devices 47. Jai , sport 48. Purplish red 50. Exhibited 51. S. American armadillo 52. Sicilian city 53. As fast as can be done, abbr. 54. Anagram of iecs 55. Thomas ._.__, Amedcan cartoonist 56. Italian Island 57. Berth 58. Indian groom 60. Wife 61. 007's creator same arguments have been put for- ward about the need for state funding at the outset. This has been accom- plished through a straightforward sub- sidy (recently renewed) of so many cents per gallon as well as state garan- teed loans. MnVap (Minnesota Valley Alfalfa Producers) is another example. This group of farmers formed up their cooperative in response to legislative action a few years ago which required NSP to generate a certain portion of its power from biomass in exchange for permission to store its spent nuclear rods at Prairie Island. MnVap has received a number of large state and federal grants to pursue the research needed for plant development and for building the cooperative infrastructure needed to supply alfalfa stems for power generation on a sufficient scale. Certainly, a strong argument can be made in all three cases for the useful- ness of more local power generation. It is not good for a region to be in a deficit situation in something as important as energy. And that extends to the use of state financial stability to nurse along the infancy of well thought out new processes. The boost to rural economies gen- erated by the building and operations of these plants is no small matter. One of the largest problems in this state, indeed, in the entire midwest, is the way in which the rural areas have been drained, deserted, and left behind by the metropolitan hunger for more of everything. The concerns about the new indus- tries are less tangible and more philo- sophical. Is it possible to extract more energy from a bushel of corn than the energy invested in it, both in the pro- cessing and the production? And what about the increased emphasis on corn production? Does it increase biologi- cal diversity on the land? Ethanol has been touted as benefi- Cial to the environment. It iS a little hard to tell yet how the turkey manure to energy idea will be treated; It would be hard to argue to anyone who has had the stuff piled right next door that burning it would not improve the air quality, particularly if the plant is located somewhere else. But burning it impoverishes the land, which needs the manure returned as closely as possible to where the feed was produced in order to main- tain long term fertility. Already the turkey and hog industries are not doing this very well. While they waste manure by overapplication, Thanks a million Dear Mr. Ross: Problems in River City as my dear mother used to say. School is starting and I know of 4 children who won't have the proper clothing to attend. They're my husband's nieces and nephew came all the way from California to live with their dad. Poor little things-mother got into drugs and wild men and never paid no attention to them. Their room and dad divorced a couple of years ago and each summer they come, they have less and less. They usually only come for a month, but last week their mom called and told their dad to keep them-she was sick of raising them. Can you imagine? My brother-in-law makes minimum wage. He couldn't possibly begin to buy them the necessities. I don't mean to sound harsh. I'm just terribly concerned for them. Our church has made some donations, but for things like underwear and shoes you pretty much have to buy new. Pride goes before the fall, so I thought I'd write you. Please give this newly reunited family a boost. Mrs. S. O .... Trading Post, Rittman, OH Dear Mrs. O.: You say your nieces and nephew need the "necessities." It's 1999-how does one qualify what are the necessities? Maybe 50 years ago underwear and shoes constituted the necessities. Today it seems more like a lap top computer, cell phone and CD player. We've got a generation of tech heads coming up. I wonder if one day we can't just stay in bed and run our lives from a home based computer center. I guess I'm old-fashioned in that I still believe clean underwear is more important than a computer chip. It has everything to do with self esteem and modesty. Please see that your brother in-law's children receive as much with the $1,000 I'm sending. Dear Mr. Percy: Our mom promised us that we would get stuff Final weigh-ins in fishing contest corn farmers mine and transport com- mercial fertilizer. There is also the in this year's contest. question of who is being helped by this proposed state effort. It is wrong to accuse small farms of "inefficien- Memorials for cy" and then bend every effort to help heart research large farmers with the problems inher- ent in their systems. More thought needs to be given to where we want to be in twenty, fifty, or even one hun- dred years as a state and region. Patchwork fixes are not vision. Wei.ghdown wkshp. begins Monday As time ran out Friday in the final week of the Independent Fishing Contest, two anglers weighed in their final catches. Roni Miller of Lawton, IA reeled in a 1 pound perch, weighing in at BUd'S Bait of Oi, tonville. Brian Anderson of Ortonville had the winning walleye this week, at 4 pounds 10 ounces. He also weighed in at Bud's. Final jackpots stay the same in the perch category ($145) and walleye category ($235). The bullhead and northern categories increase for the drawing, at $160 and $190, respectively. Winners will be drawn today and notified later this week. Thanks go to the weigh-in stations, sponsoring businesses and to all who participated Can you stop in the middle of a candy bar and have no desire for the second half? The Weighdown Workshop is daily showing people how God can transform their hearts and minds so they can rise above the magnetic pull of the refrigerator. The Weighdown Workshop is in all 50 states and still spreading quickly by word of mouth. Through a series of videos, audiotapes, workbooks, and Bible lessons, you will learn how to be delivered from the slavery of food. A free orientation will be held on Monday, Sept. 20 at 7 p.m. at New Life Community Baptist Church. The orientation is open to the public. For more information you may call Mary at 839-2259. Marthaler twins Semifinalists in merit scholarship The names of approximately 16,000 scholastically talented high school seniors were announced today as Semifinalists in the 45th annual National Merit s Scholarship Program. These Semifinalists now have an opportunity to continue in the competition for some 7,600 Merit Scholarship awards, worth over $28 million, tlat will he offered next spring. Included on the list are two OHS students, namely twin brothers David and Jonathan Marthaldr. During the month of July and Aug., gifts were received by the American Heart Association, Minnesota Affiliate remembering: Jim Rabe, Emil Hillman, Robert Ronglien, Walt Rasmussen, Annie Hedge and Maurice Loft. This report comes from Dianne Cornelisen, "A Time To Remember"/Memorial Chairperson for Big Stone County. for school. I know she meant it but other things keep happening. Our car busted. And our phone got shut off. My mom has to have the phone because my little brother has asthma real bad. She has to call the ambulance sometimes because he can't breathe. He needs air conditioning too, so my mom works 2 jobs. We are lucky to have my grandma stay with us when she is working. She helped me with this letter. I get real scared when my brother can't breathe. What we need is pants, tops and shoes. My morn can buy it if you send the money. Please and thank you if you can or if you can't. Miss M. N .... Transcontinental Weeklies, Manitoba Dear Miss M.: It's nice to know I'm not judged by the measure of my wallet. I imagine it will seem a little like Christmas when the $500 I'm sending arrives. It is my hope that you and your little brother begin the school year with all that you need. Dear Readers: Across the nation, children are starting school. A year older and most likely in a higher grade than last, some of them will begin in rags for clothing. I'm not dramatizing the picture, just giving the facts. Please do what you can when you recognize need. Pass along your children's used garments and be willing to make cash donations for under garments and the like. Some parents fall on hard times, others make their own hard times. Regardless, children properly clothed and fed will learn in school. So you decide. What kind of generation do you want looking out for your needs when you're 75? Share the wealth now. www. thanksami llion, com Thanks A Million 7340 Ohms Lane, Minneapolis, MN 55439 Field day. set on community supported Ag. Sisters Annette and Kay Fernholz extend an open house invitation to their "Harvest Fast Thanks" field day at 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 25. This is the Fernholz sisters' fourth year of Community Supported Agriculture (CSA). The project started out with seven families and has grown to 45. They rent 2.5 acres of land on their parent's farm, where they have converted a hen house and a trailer to clean and store their garden produce. They are constructing a greenhouse for late summer plantings. The Fernholzes feel the success of the CSA has been due to community involvement. The day will consist of garden tours, exhibits and workshops by various local crafts persons and producers, and will end with a poduck picnic. Location of the field day is three miles east on Hwy. 40, a mile north and one fourth mile west of Madison. Everyone is welcome. For more information contact Annette and Kay Fernholz (320) 568- 2191 or LeeAnn VanDerPol, Western MN Sustainable Farming Association Coordinator (320)-847-3432. CLASSIFIED ADS BRING QUICK RESULTS EASTER LILLIES are bloomingat the Fran add Charles Trygestad home northeast of Belllngham.rheir son Nell gave them this plant last Easter. Fran repotted it this spring and kept it outside. To their surprise it is in full bloom again with four blosslms. The Indepe ooeOe Publisher JAMES Managing Editor & ROBERT Plant ARLENE Office IMIE RYAN Rel TONI Advertising & Printing BILL DWYER P ressme KR Camera Collater oeoee Ies., Sept. 14, 1999 SUBSCRIPI:ION $25.00per year in Pade, Traverse Minnesota, Grant and in South Dakota. counties In Dakota. All others Postmaster: The Ortonvllle Ortonvllle, NEW SUBSCRIPTION -ALL SUBSCRIPTIONS I A FEBRUARY 1ST BoStOne, Lac ( unties In Roberts in February .............. I$.00 March .................. 21.il April .................... lO,I1 May ..................... 18,13 June .................... 16.6S July ...................... 14.$7 ALL OTHERS IN MINN. February ............. 2g.00 March .................. 26.61 April .................... 24. lg May ...................... 21.77 June .................... 19.36 July ...................... 1.93 ALL AREA OUTSIDE OF February .............. 33.00 March .................. 30.26 April .................... 27.S0 May ..................... 24.7S June ................... 22.00 July ..................... 19.2S "PUBLISHER'S The Publisher advertisement. The for other errors or connection with an strictly limited to advertisement in any or the advertisement. Chumh News (Any ad brought In t classiC.) OFRCE A Thursday A Friday: 8 a.m.-12 A Holidays Letters to the community Letter writers independent and/or condense paper also reserves publish letters that s printed or typed address and to ( Addresses and not be published. Letter writers themselves to one Please keep letter over 350 words AD vs. The Ortonvllle determlnln is If an individual zatlon charges for event, for an item or t be considered newspaper. would cease to paper receives for single paper sales I ink and paper product. It no paper cost cost of ink and a paper used. Advertlstn and the Without any' gartlcular business uslness. ADS: We A News: Our goal as fully and staffs opinions )rag e , om other stim01ate our readers. editor are those of other expressed in tlons may be own views, general interest. Cell 320-839-3761 to classified Ortonvllle Page4 00INDEPENDENT Editorial comment GUEST EDITORIAL... Do not give your credit card number over the phone by leanette Bohlman Report any phone call you receive to the Minnesota Attorney General s office in St. Paul when they want your credit card number over the phone. I have received several calls in which they wanted me to use their credit card protection insurance for a monthly fee charged to my credit card. Do not give out your credit card number over the phone. You are already protected up to $50,000 of charges when your credit card is stolen or lost and you have reported it to your credit card carrier. The Attorney General wants you to report anyone who wants you togive them your credit card number. They will oe gladto inform you regarding whether or not these are legal companies or not and what protections you already have under the law. Keep their numbers handy and call the Minnesota Attorney General's office at 1-800-657- 3787 or 1-651-296-6186. I called and I was glad I had. The state's turkey growers are talk- ing about producing energy from turkey litter. The British company Fibrowatt has been promoting the idea as a solution to the MPCA's new stan- dards relating to manure management. However, says the company, a new plant would require state funding on the order of a cent and a half per kilo- watt hour in order to be competitive. This is because the plant cannot be sized as large as the coal facilities it must compete with. Projections are that the plant would be weaned in about ten years from state help. The idea is backed by some heavy hitters in West Central Minnesota including, in addition to the turkey growers, a coalition of county com- missioners and development officials. Ag. Commissioner Gene Huguson is also on board. This public/private partnership approach to setting a direction for the state's ag economy is not new. It is particularly common in the energy business. We have the entire ethanol industry as an example. There, the t o ao...thi00; \\; .t  : . -_3  . i;? Ii 2. Strip 3. Cloudy 4. From pentane (Chemistry) 5. Endings 6. Disliked 7. Turkish leader title 8. Sift 9. Mental object 10. Sheepskin 11. Weapons system 12. Injure Clues ACROSS 1. Statute law 5. Ruboff 10. Female parent 14, Razor or jackknife 15. Sea wreckage 16. Asian nation 17. Weather report 20. Needles 21. Matters 22.  student, leams healing 23.  Alto, California 13. & & & cry 25. Performs a dance 29. System 33. Bitter chemical 34. Bank feature 35. A Dalton (Physics) 36. Limits 38. Cyclic 41. Mineral 42. Region 44. Attack (obsolete) 45. Curriculum 48. Feeling 49. Otherwise 50. Plump for 51. Capital of Guam 54. Weightlessness 59. In a gloomy manner 62. Wings 63. Contests 64. Invests in little enterprises 65. Pats 66. Nasty manner 67. Measuring instrument Clues DOWN 1. Adolph Simon , New York Times 18. Kind 19. Robust 23. Plate for Eucharist 24.  Mater, one's school 25. Gulf of, in the Aegean 26. Wing shaped 27. Alloy of nickel and copper 28. Braggart 29. Puzzles 56 i7 !, 30. Move 31. Domestic helps 32. Measuring rods 37. Compass pt. one point S. of S.E. 39. Motionless 40. Paddle 43. Fixed charge 46. Optical devices 47. Jai , sport 48. Purplish red 50. Exhibited 51. S. American armadillo 52. Sicilian city 53. As fast as can be done, abbr. 54. Anagram of iecs 55. Thomas ._.__, Amedcan cartoonist 56. Italian Island 57. Berth 58. Indian groom 60. Wife 61. 007's creator same arguments have been put for- ward about the need for state funding at the outset. This has been accom- plished through a straightforward sub- sidy (recently renewed) of so many cents per gallon as well as state garan- teed loans. MnVap (Minnesota Valley Alfalfa Producers) is another example. This group of farmers formed up their cooperative in response to legislative action a few years ago which required NSP to generate a certain portion of its power from biomass in exchange for permission to store its spent nuclear rods at Prairie Island. MnVap has received a number of large state and federal grants to pursue the research needed for plant development and for building the cooperative infrastructure needed to supply alfalfa stems for power generation on a sufficient scale. Certainly, a strong argument can be made in all three cases for the useful- ness of more local power generation. It is not good for a region to be in a deficit situation in something as important as energy. And that extends to the use of state financial stability to nurse along the infancy of well thought out new processes. The boost to rural economies gen- erated by the building and operations of these plants is no small matter. One of the largest problems in this state, indeed, in the entire midwest, is the way in which the rural areas have been drained, deserted, and left behind by the metropolitan hunger for more of everything. The concerns about the new indus- tries are less tangible and more philo- sophical. Is it possible to extract more energy from a bushel of corn than the energy invested in it, both in the pro- cessing and the production? And what about the increased emphasis on corn production? Does it increase biologi- cal diversity on the land? Ethanol has been touted as benefi- Cial to the environment. It iS a little hard to tell yet how the turkey manure to energy idea will be treated; It would be hard to argue to anyone who has had the stuff piled right next door that burning it would not improve the air quality, particularly if the plant is located somewhere else. But burning it impoverishes the land, which needs the manure returned as closely as possible to where the feed was produced in order to main- tain long term fertility. Already the turkey and hog industries are not doing this very well. While they waste manure by overapplication, Thanks a million Dear Mr. Ross: Problems in River City as my dear mother used to say. School is starting and I know of 4 children who won't have the proper clothing to attend. They're my husband's nieces and nephew came all the way from California to live with their dad. Poor little things-mother got into drugs and wild men and never paid no attention to them. Their room and dad divorced a couple of years ago and each summer they come, they have less and less. They usually only come for a month, but last week their mom called and told their dad to keep them-she was sick of raising them. Can you imagine? My brother-in-law makes minimum wage. He couldn't possibly begin to buy them the necessities. I don't mean to sound harsh. I'm just terribly concerned for them. Our church has made some donations, but for things like underwear and shoes you pretty much have to buy new. Pride goes before the fall, so I thought I'd write you. Please give this newly reunited family a boost. Mrs. S. O .... Trading Post, Rittman, OH Dear Mrs. O.: You say your nieces and nephew need the "necessities." It's 1999-how does one qualify what are the necessities? Maybe 50 years ago underwear and shoes constituted the necessities. Today it seems more like a lap top computer, cell phone and CD player. We've got a generation of tech heads coming up. I wonder if one day we can't just stay in bed and run our lives from a home based computer center. I guess I'm old-fashioned in that I still believe clean underwear is more important than a computer chip. It has everything to do with self esteem and modesty. Please see that your brother in-law's children receive as much with the $1,000 I'm sending. Dear Mr. Percy: Our mom promised us that we would get stuff Final weigh-ins in fishing contest corn farmers mine and transport com- mercial fertilizer. There is also the in this year's contest. question of who is being helped by this proposed state effort. It is wrong to accuse small farms of "inefficien- Memorials for cy" and then bend every effort to help heart research large farmers with the problems inher- ent in their systems. More thought needs to be given to where we want to be in twenty, fifty, or even one hun- dred years as a state and region. Patchwork fixes are not vision. Wei.ghdown wkshp. begins Monday As time ran out Friday in the final week of the Independent Fishing Contest, two anglers weighed in their final catches. Roni Miller of Lawton, IA reeled in a 1 pound perch, weighing in at BUd'S Bait of Oi, tonville. Brian Anderson of Ortonville had the winning walleye this week, at 4 pounds 10 ounces. He also weighed in at Bud's. Final jackpots stay the same in the perch category ($145) and walleye category ($235). The bullhead and northern categories increase for the drawing, at $160 and $190, respectively. Winners will be drawn today and notified later this week. Thanks go to the weigh-in stations, sponsoring businesses and to all who participated Can you stop in the middle of a candy bar and have no desire for the second half? The Weighdown Workshop is daily showing people how God can transform their hearts and minds so they can rise above the magnetic pull of the refrigerator. The Weighdown Workshop is in all 50 states and still spreading quickly by word of mouth. Through a series of videos, audiotapes, workbooks, and Bible lessons, you will learn how to be delivered from the slavery of food. A free orientation will be held on Monday, Sept. 20 at 7 p.m. at New Life Community Baptist Church. The orientation is open to the public. For more information you may call Mary at 839-2259. Marthaler twins Semifinalists in merit scholarship The names of approximately 16,000 scholastically talented high school seniors were announced today as Semifinalists in the 45th annual National Merit s Scholarship Program. These Semifinalists now have an opportunity to continue in the competition for some 7,600 Merit Scholarship awards, worth over $28 million, tlat will he offered next spring. Included on the list are two OHS students, namely twin brothers David and Jonathan Marthaldr. During the month of July and Aug., gifts were received by the American Heart Association, Minnesota Affiliate remembering: Jim Rabe, Emil Hillman, Robert Ronglien, Walt Rasmussen, Annie Hedge and Maurice Loft. This report comes from Dianne Cornelisen, "A Time To Remember"/Memorial Chairperson for Big Stone County. for school. I know she meant it but other things keep happening. Our car busted. And our phone got shut off. My mom has to have the phone because my little brother has asthma real bad. She has to call the ambulance sometimes because he can't breathe. He needs air conditioning too, so my mom works 2 jobs. We are lucky to have my grandma stay with us when she is working. She helped me with this letter. I get real scared when my brother can't breathe. What we need is pants, tops and shoes. My morn can buy it if you send the money. Please and thank you if you can or if you can't. Miss M. N .... Transcontinental Weeklies, Manitoba Dear Miss M.: It's nice to know I'm not judged by the measure of my wallet. I imagine it will seem a little like Christmas when the $500 I'm sending arrives. It is my hope that you and your little brother begin the school year with all that you need. Dear Readers: Across the nation, children are starting school. A year older and most likely in a higher grade than last, some of them will begin in rags for clothing. I'm not dramatizing the picture, just giving the facts. Please do what you can when you recognize need. Pass along your children's used garments and be willing to make cash donations for under garments and the like. Some parents fall on hard times, others make their own hard times. Regardless, children properly clothed and fed will learn in school. So you decide. What kind of generation do you want looking out for your needs when you're 75? Share the wealth now. www. thanksami llion, com Thanks A Million 7340 Ohms Lane, Minneapolis, MN 55439 Field day. set on community supported Ag. Sisters Annette and Kay Fernholz extend an open house invitation to their "Harvest Fast Thanks" field day at 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 25. This is the Fernholz sisters' fourth year of Community Supported Agriculture (CSA). The project started out with seven families and has grown to 45. They rent 2.5 acres of land on their parent's farm, where they have converted a hen house and a trailer to clean and store their garden produce. They are constructing a greenhouse for late summer plantings. The Fernholzes feel the success of the CSA has been due to community involvement. The day will consist of garden tours, exhibits and workshops by various local crafts persons and producers, and will end with a poduck picnic. Location of the field day is three miles east on Hwy. 40, a mile north and one fourth mile west of Madison. Everyone is welcome. For more information contact Annette and Kay Fernholz (320) 568- 2191 or LeeAnn VanDerPol, Western MN Sustainable Farming Association Coordinator (320)-847-3432. CLASSIFIED ADS BRING QUICK RESULTS EASTER LILLIES are bloomingat the Fran add Charles Trygestad home northeast of Belllngham.rheir son Nell gave them this plant last Easter. Fran repotted it this spring and kept it outside. To their surprise it is in full bloom again with four blosslms. The Indepe ooeOe Publisher JAMES Managing Editor & ROBERT Plant ARLENE Office IMIE RYAN Rel TONI Advertising & Printing BILL DWYER P ressme KR Camera Collater oeoee Ies., Sept. 14, 1999 SUBSCRIPI:ION $25.00per year in Pade, Traverse Minnesota, Grant and in South Dakota. counties In Dakota. All others Postmaster: The Ortonvllle Ortonvllle, NEW SUBSCRIPTION -ALL SUBSCRIPTIONS I A FEBRUARY 1ST BoStOne, Lac ( unties In Roberts in February .............. I$.00 March .................. 21.il April .................... lO,I1 May ..................... 18,13 June .................... 16.6S July ...................... 14.$7 ALL OTHERS IN MINN. February ............. 2g.00 March .................. 26.61 April .................... 24. lg May ...................... 21.77 June .................... 19.36 July ...................... 1.93 ALL AREA OUTSIDE OF February .............. 33.00 March .................. 30.26 April .................... 27.S0 May ..................... 24.7S June ................... 22.00 July ..................... 19.2S "PUBLISHER'S The Publisher advertisement. The for other errors or connection with an strictly limited to advertisement in any or the advertisement. Chumh News (Any ad brought In t classiC.) OFRCE A Thursday A Friday: 8 a.m.-12 A Holidays Letters to the community Letter writers independent and/or condense paper also reserves publish letters that s printed or typed address and to ( Addresses and not be published. Letter writers themselves to one Please keep letter over 350 words AD vs. The Ortonvllle determlnln is If an individual zatlon charges for event, for an item or t be considered newspaper. would cease to paper receives for single paper sales I ink and paper product. It no paper cost cost of ink and a paper used. Advertlstn and the Without any' gartlcular business uslness. ADS: We A News: Our goal as fully and staffs opinions )rag e , om other stim01ate our readers. editor are those of other expressed in tlons may be own views, general interest. Cell 320-839-3761 to classified Ortonvllle Page4 00INDEPENDENT