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September 14, 1999     The Ortonville Independent
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ber goose season youth hunt begin soon 1999 waterfowl sea- Saturday, Sept. 4, as hunters took to the opening of the in the Northwest the first year that season will be :ording to Tim of the Minnesota of Natural Resources September Canada Minnesota was held area in 1987, and bag limits have since then." season contributes Canada :, helping to make of the top states in in recent years. goose hunters in 160,000 Canada other state * and geese were season," sea- Minnesota before the geese into the season runs from to Wednesday, Sept. the Northwest Goose will be Sept. 4 the entire season Zone and the last season elsewhere, the information to help evaluate the can help by contact- wildlife manager to get their to determine which sub species of geese are being shot. Call 1-888-MINNDNR to get the phone number for your local DNR Wildlife Section office. The September season daily bag limit will be five Canada geese, except in the Northwest Goose Zone and Southeastern Minnesota, where the limit will be two. Possession lim- its are double the daily bag limits. Hunters must be I00 yards from sur- face water, except that beginning the second Saturday of the season in the West Goose Zone, the water restric- tion is no longer in effect. "The West Goose Zone has a rela- tively restrictive regular goose season because of the migrant Eastern Prairie Population Canada geese that fre- quent this area later in the fall," Bremicker noted. "By providing the over-water hunting, we hope to increase the harvest of Minnesota breeding geese even more in this zone." Hunters should note that the restriction on hunting within 100 yards of surface water applies to per- manent wetlands, lakes and rivers and does not apply to sheet water or tem- porary water in fields. For answers to a specific question, call the local DNR conservation officer. The Youth Waterfowl Hunt will be held this year on Saturday, Sept. 18, which overlaps the September Canada goose season in most of Minnesota. Hunters will have to choose whether to participate in the Youth Hunt or the early Goose hunt on that day. Youth under age 15 accompanied by a non- hunting adult may participate in the hunt. The bag limit is six ducks, to include no more than four mallards (including two female mallards), three scaup, two wood ducks, two redheads, one blackduck, one pintail and one canvasback. In addition, one Canada goose may be taken, except in the West Goose Zone where five Canada geese can be shot. "The five-goose limit for the Youth Hunt in the West Goose Zone is con- sistent with the goose limit for early September goose hunters, since open water hunting for Canada geese will be open at that time in that zone," Bremicker said. "The overlap of the September goose season and Youth Waterfowl Hunt might create some confusion this first year, but we felt that it was important to keep the Youth Waterfowl Hunt two weeks before the Oct. 2 regular duck season opener to minimize the effect the hunt may have on distribution of ducks for the regular opener." Details on the September Canada goose season are described in the 1999 Minnesota Hunting and Trapping Regulations booklet, which is available from license agents and DNR offices. Hunters in the September goose hunt are reminded they need their small game hunting license, both the state and federal waterfowl stamps, and the $3 special goose hunt permit. In addition, migra- tory bird hunters must be HIP compli- ant, and have checked YES to the question "In Minnesota, will you hunt any of the migratory birds listed below this year?" If the answer to this question is NO on your hunting license, call 1-888-MINNDNR to reg- ister for HIP and legally hunt migrato- ry birds in Minnesota. Details on regular and December season waterfowl regulations will be available in mid September. Mrs. Tom Schwarz and Daniel at New UIm, Mrs. Lyle Fischer and sons of Sleepy Eye spent Labor Day weekend at the Lawrence Miilerbernd home. Mr. and Mrs. Roger Karels spent Labor Day weekend at the Rob Rodas home in Marshall and celebrated their son Anthony's second birthday. Mr. and Mrs. Tom Strei of Alexandria were Friday, Sept. 3 visitors at the home of his aunt Mrs. Rose Karels. Robert Vincent and sons David and Peter of White Bear Lake were Saturday visitors at the home of Mrs. Rose Karels. Mr. and Mrs. Tom Pillatzke and Michelle went to Stensonville, OH on Wednesday, Aug. 25, where Michelle will be attending the Francisan University. Mrs. Marcy Trombley was a Sunday, Sept. 5 afternoon visitor at the Ralph Karels home. Labor Day weekend guests at the Jim Croatt home were Mr. and Mrs. Tony Croatt and family of Rochester and Mr. and Mrs. Bob Croatt and family of Chaska. Mr. and Mrs. Mike Pavelko and family of Worthington, Mr. and Mrs. Brad Nelson and family of Pelican Rapids were Labor Day weekend guests at the Bernard Piilatzke home. Visitors during the weekend were Mr. and Mrs. Brandon Van Sambeek and Christopher of Milbank, Mr. and Mrs. Larry Montag and family of Big Stone, the Mark Richard and Tom Pillatzke families. Mrs. Joan Strei, Mr. and Mrs. Glen Abramowski and Joseph were Saturday, Sept. 4 overnight guests at the Jennifer Strei home in Sioux Falls, SD. Sunday, Sept 5 Jennifer Strei and Todd Fatland accompanied them to Sioux City, IA to attend the birthday party for Benjamin's third and Grace's first birthday, children of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Selzer. In the afternoon they attended the wedding of Dawn Dale __~ and Timothy Gillen at 4:30 p.m. in the Bellingham school news Hop on Board and Join BES "On The Road to Learning" Welcome to the 1999-2000 Bellingham Elementary School Year! The journey began on Wednesday, September 1, 1999. All classes gathered in the gym around 8:30. We started with the Pledge of Allegiance. Mr. Krogsrud went on to introduce new students Tiffanie and Joshua Hofman, Stephanie Reynolds and Ashley Louwagie. Our new staff members include Miss Karl Weness in Music, Sister Kay Fernholz in Science and Dennis Pearson as our new custodian. Welcome to BES! Tiffany Larson and Megan Croatt got everyone revved up with the school song and a spirit cheer, where each class yelled out a specific noise made by some form of transportation. We then hopped on board the BES imaginary bus with Mrs. Letrud at the wheel. We all sang "The Wheels On the Bus" and another bus song as we "drove" to each classroom to drop off students. The rest of the morning was spent doing bus safety activities in the classrooms. To go along with our theme "On The Road to Learning", we decided to hit the road. Our destination was the Lac qui Parle Historical Museum in Madison. We saw many interesting displays from each township, along with a salt & pepper collection, a doll collection, a country school house, and the Robert Bly house, to mention a few. A great beginning to the 1999- 2000 school year!! Please make sure your child has tennis shoes for P.E. class everyday. This will help reduce injuries and make the gym a safe place to play. Thank you, Mr. Orvik Calendar of Events Wednesday, 9-15: Environmental Fair in Marshall for 5th and 6th graders 9:30-3:00 Thursday, 9-16: Parade 5:00 p.m.; Playground dedication 5:30; Burger supper 5:45 Friday, 9-17 Heights & Weights (K-6) 8:00 a.m. MENU Breakfast Monday--Breakfast pizza, apple juice, milk. Tuesday--assorted cold cereals, white toast, grape juice, milk. Wednesday--Pancakes, syrup, apple-grape juice, milk. Thursday--Cinnamon rolls, orange juice, milk. Friday--Assorted cold cereals, white toast, apple juice, milk. Lunch Monday--Beef tacos, hard or soft shell, lettuce, cheese, chilled pears, pineapple tidbits, bread, chocolate or white milk. Tuesday--Beef stew with mixed vegetable, tangy sausage sandwiches, chilled fruit cup, milk. Wednesday---Sloppy joes on buns, oven fries, vegetable sticks w/dip, apple crisp, milk. Thursday--Oven baked chicken, mashed potatoes with gravy, corn, dressing, dinner rolls, milk. Friday--Cheese pizza, tossed salad, oranges slices, chocolate chips cookie, bread, milk Girls Basketball .... The girls basketball practices will begin Thursday, September 9. They plan to practice Tuesdays and Thursdays, provided there are no conflicting schedules or scheduled games. If you have any questions, please phone Cindy Henrich, the girls' coach this year. Chapel at Augustana College and 0w fe bei g reception at the Radisson Encore Inn Workshop on raising kids to succeed sn nces n in Sioux Falls, SD. Mr. and Mrs. Manfred Krakow The average young person has youth involvement. spent Labor Day weekend at the home fewer than half of the essential This workshop is designed for uraged for winter '99-'00 to feel and look like we know that winter We can still easily of 1996-97 and be a repeat. The gave us many that we can learn : is that many snow- same place year drifts year after year travel conditions, and huge snow might ask why is in this par- w.e,can Living Snow was organized fol- of 1996-97 to snowdrifting and about it. They con- snowplow opera- that many tope- cause snowdrift Upwind topography the road elevation will create problems 98% of the time. Snowpiles at intersections because the plow cannot wing the snow out far enough creates problems 95% of the time. Frozen lakes adjacent to and upwind of the roadway create drifting and visibility problems 89% of the time. Some other conditions include farmstead windbreaks and buildings located to close the roadway. Any thing permanent in nature can create problems with the snow and drifting. There are 4,000 sites in Minnesota equaling 1,000 miles of federal, state and county roads that create haz- ardous travel and costs millions of dollars' every yar to keep open for travel. There are new techniques for snow fences that are cost effective. The savings in one average winter are twice the cost of a fence. Living snow fences are specifically designed plantings of trees, shrubs and grasses strategically located short distances upwind of roads, ditches, farmsteads and communities. The key elements in there design are height, density, and length. Why a living snow fence versus a structural fence? Living snow fences are more cost effective, last longer and once established require very lit- tle maintenance. They also provide wildlife habitat, livestock protection, reduce soil erosion, and enhance the appearance of our roadsides and com- munities. They are a good investment of public funds. Lets do something now to prepare for our next winter. Minnesota does not have hurricanes or earthquakes; however winter weather concerns are the #I safety hazard. It causes more deaths and injuries than any other nat- ural hazard. Lets do something now to help prepare for our winter weather. A good place to contact if you would like more information on living snow fences is your local soil and water conservation district. news :' M.J. Kirchberg "" h Karels were guests at the and son Nathan of Mrs. Tom Strei of Day weekend home. Bud Radermacher the Henrich and get together and in Ortonville 1999. lests at the Lester rae were Marty brnaha, NE, Steve t. Cloud, Mr. and aes of Shoreview. afternoon visitors Tom Schwarz and Daniel, Mrs. Larry Weiderhoeft and family of New Ulm, Mrs. Lyle Fischer and sons of Sleepy Eye and Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Millerbernd. Mrs. Kay Stolpman of Cold Spring and Mrs. Myra Schmieg were Monday, Sept. 5 afternoon visitors at the M.J. Kirchberg home. Mrs. Myra Schmieg accompanied Mrs. Charlie Radermacher to St. Cloud on Friday, Sept. 3 and visited with their niece Lynn Spanier. Brian Schuelke of Lennox, SD and Alan Schuelke of Watertown, SD spent Labor Day weekend at the home of their parents Mr. and Mrs. Ray Schuelke. Mr. and Mrs. Dan Rademacher of Aberdeen, Mr. and Mrs. Jeff Rademacher of Brookings and Greg Rademacher of Watertown were weekend guests at the Kevin Rademacher home. Monday, Sept. 6 dinner and afternoon guests were Mr. and Mrs. Albert Folk and Scott Folk and family of Milbank. Mrs. Larry Weiderhoeft and family, in South Dakota 520 ACRE FARM AND RANCH Tillable in CRP, nice house, three to four bedrooms, two barns. Near Summit. INi:ORMA TION ON THESE AND OTHER PROPERTIES CONTACT FEHR LAND LTD. Box 156 Big Stone City, SD 57216 Phone 605-862-6 t 12 Agonts lb. FEHR >Arlen LaCombe >Carlton (320) of their daughter Mary in Minneapolis and visited with their children the Randy Eklunds, Mike Schmiegs and Rick Krakows. Mr. and Mrs. Paul Redepenning and family of Farmington, Ryan Bergeson of Madison and Sarah Anderson were weekend guests at the Dennis Rademacher home. Mr. and Mrs. Gary Karels, Blaine and Kayla of Breckenridge were Labor Day weekend guests at the Ray Karels home. Erin Bruns of Watertown spent several days at the home of her grandparents Mr. and Mrs. Edward Karels. Mrs. Gary Karels, Blaine and Kayla, Kay Karels, Rick and Michael, Mr. and Mrs. Andy. Legred+and Jonathan were among relatives,at the Stan Koeckeritz cabin on Lake Victoria on Sunday, Sept. 5 to celebrate Jonathan Legred's first birthday. Mrs. Marcy Trombley of Minnetonka was a Friday evening until Monday, Sept. 6 at the M.J. Kirchberg home. Additional Saturday dinner and afternoon guests were Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Kirchberg of Bloomington, Tom Kirchberg of New UIm and Mrs. Myra Schmieg. Sunday, Sept. 5 dinner guests were Mr. and Mrs. Randy Kirchberg and Caleb and Tom Kirchberg of New Ulm. Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Brehmer and Eric. Afternoon callers were Mr. and Mrs. Steve Barr and girls of Ortonville, Mr. and Mrs. Warren Kirchberg, Nicole and Jan and Mrs. Tom Kirchberg. INDEPENDENT WANT ADS PAY ingredients for healthy development, according to recent survey findings from Search Institute. The result is that too many young people are growing up ill-prepared to take their place in society. A workshop focused on raising kids to succeed will be held on Monday, Sept. 20 from 2-8 p.m. in the Central United Methodist Fellowship Hall in Milbank. The Grant County Healthy Communities * Healthy Youth will be hosting this Link 'n Learn workshop as an opportunity to network with other individuals who are seeking to incorporate the "40 Developmental Assets" for youth in their community. Keynote speaker, Gerry Likness from Watel-town, will,present an overview of the 40 as,s and their impact on adolescent at-risk behaviors. Elective topics will include parenting ideas, congregational applications, intergenerational approaches and IIIII I IIII .... HICKMAN'S Garage Door & More John Hickman Overhead Garage Door Sales & Service parents, youth workers, Sunday School teachers, school personnel, business representatives, service organizations, and youth. Any.one interested in building assets in young people is invited to attend. A $20 registration fee will include materials, an afternoon snack and dinner. Registration forms are available from Sandy Christensen (605-432-4538) or Janet Liebe (605- 432-5546). EMT COURSE Offered Oct. I, 1999 Ortonvllle Ambulance is offerin Emergency Medlco[;'iitchniclara course beginning Oct. 1 at 6:30 p.m. Classes will be held at the Ortonvllle Ambulance building on Tugsday and Thursday evenlngs, Successful complen wlll certify a person as an EMT with the National Registry of EMTs and the Minnesota EMS Regulatory Board. Applicants must pre-register with the Ortonvllle Ambulance director, Joan Julius at 839-4130 days, 18_39-2792 evenings. I ASSET # 9 SIAl] I(,L TO OTHi,;RS YOUNG Pt,:RSON ,q,:RVES IN THE (]I00MMUNrtrY ONE OR MORE HOI]RS PER WEEK Serving someone can change the situation of the person being served, but service can also profoundly change the life of the person who serves. Helping and serving give us a deep feeling of worth. Self-esteem does not just occur when someone is told that they have value. One can feel a deep sense of worth when they know that they have given and shared in a way that has meaning in another person's life. Deepen our youth's self-esteem. opportunities to serve. Give them 14, 1999  INDEPENDENT Page 5 ber goose season youth hunt begin soon 1999 waterfowl sea- Saturday, Sept. 4, as hunters took to the opening of the in the Northwest the first year that season will be :ording to Tim of the Minnesota of Natural Resources September Canada Minnesota was held area in 1987, and bag limits have since then." season contributes Canada :, helping to make of the top states in in recent years. goose hunters in 160,000 Canada other state * and geese were season," sea- Minnesota before the geese into the season runs from to Wednesday, Sept. the Northwest Goose will be Sept. 4 the entire season Zone and the last season elsewhere, the information to help evaluate the can help by contact- wildlife manager to get their to determine which sub species of geese are being shot. Call 1-888-MINNDNR to get the phone number for your local DNR Wildlife Section office. The September season daily bag limit will be five Canada geese, except in the Northwest Goose Zone and Southeastern Minnesota, where the limit will be two. Possession lim- its are double the daily bag limits. Hunters must be I00 yards from sur- face water, except that beginning the second Saturday of the season in the West Goose Zone, the water restric- tion is no longer in effect. "The West Goose Zone has a rela- tively restrictive regular goose season because of the migrant Eastern Prairie Population Canada geese that fre- quent this area later in the fall," Bremicker noted. "By providing the over-water hunting, we hope to increase the harvest of Minnesota breeding geese even more in this zone." Hunters should note that the restriction on hunting within 100 yards of surface water applies to per- manent wetlands, lakes and rivers and does not apply to sheet water or tem- porary water in fields. For answers to a specific question, call the local DNR conservation officer. The Youth Waterfowl Hunt will be held this year on Saturday, Sept. 18, which overlaps the September Canada goose season in most of Minnesota. Hunters will have to choose whether to participate in the Youth Hunt or the early Goose hunt on that day. Youth under age 15 accompanied by a non- hunting adult may participate in the hunt. The bag limit is six ducks, to include no more than four mallards (including two female mallards), three scaup, two wood ducks, two redheads, one blackduck, one pintail and one canvasback. In addition, one Canada goose may be taken, except in the West Goose Zone where five Canada geese can be shot. "The five-goose limit for the Youth Hunt in the West Goose Zone is con- sistent with the goose limit for early September goose hunters, since open water hunting for Canada geese will be open at that time in that zone," Bremicker said. "The overlap of the September goose season and Youth Waterfowl Hunt might create some confusion this first year, but we felt that it was important to keep the Youth Waterfowl Hunt two weeks before the Oct. 2 regular duck season opener to minimize the effect the hunt may have on distribution of ducks for the regular opener." Details on the September Canada goose season are described in the 1999 Minnesota Hunting and Trapping Regulations booklet, which is available from license agents and DNR offices. Hunters in the September goose hunt are reminded they need their small game hunting license, both the state and federal waterfowl stamps, and the $3 special goose hunt permit. In addition, migra- tory bird hunters must be HIP compli- ant, and have checked YES to the question "In Minnesota, will you hunt any of the migratory birds listed below this year?" If the answer to this question is NO on your hunting license, call 1-888-MINNDNR to reg- ister for HIP and legally hunt migrato- ry birds in Minnesota. Details on regular and December season waterfowl regulations will be available in mid September. Mrs. Tom Schwarz and Daniel at New UIm, Mrs. Lyle Fischer and sons of Sleepy Eye spent Labor Day weekend at the Lawrence Miilerbernd home. Mr. and Mrs. Roger Karels spent Labor Day weekend at the Rob Rodas home in Marshall and celebrated their son Anthony's second birthday. Mr. and Mrs. Tom Strei of Alexandria were Friday, Sept. 3 visitors at the home of his aunt Mrs. Rose Karels. Robert Vincent and sons David and Peter of White Bear Lake were Saturday visitors at the home of Mrs. Rose Karels. Mr. and Mrs. Tom Pillatzke and Michelle went to Stensonville, OH on Wednesday, Aug. 25, where Michelle will be attending the Francisan University. Mrs. Marcy Trombley was a Sunday, Sept. 5 afternoon visitor at the Ralph Karels home. Labor Day weekend guests at the Jim Croatt home were Mr. and Mrs. Tony Croatt and family of Rochester and Mr. and Mrs. Bob Croatt and family of Chaska. Mr. and Mrs. Mike Pavelko and family of Worthington, Mr. and Mrs. Brad Nelson and family of Pelican Rapids were Labor Day weekend guests at the Bernard Piilatzke home. Visitors during the weekend were Mr. and Mrs. Brandon Van Sambeek and Christopher of Milbank, Mr. and Mrs. Larry Montag and family of Big Stone, the Mark Richard and Tom Pillatzke families. Mrs. Joan Strei, Mr. and Mrs. Glen Abramowski and Joseph were Saturday, Sept. 4 overnight guests at the Jennifer Strei home in Sioux Falls, SD. Sunday, Sept 5 Jennifer Strei and Todd Fatland accompanied them to Sioux City, IA to attend the birthday party for Benjamin's third and Grace's first birthday, children of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Selzer. In the afternoon they attended the wedding of Dawn Dale __~ and Timothy Gillen at 4:30 p.m. in the Bellingham school news Hop on Board and Join BES "On The Road to Learning" Welcome to the 1999-2000 Bellingham Elementary School Year! The journey began on Wednesday, September 1, 1999. All classes gathered in the gym around 8:30. We started with the Pledge of Allegiance. Mr. Krogsrud went on to introduce new students Tiffanie and Joshua Hofman, Stephanie Reynolds and Ashley Louwagie. Our new staff members include Miss Karl Weness in Music, Sister Kay Fernholz in Science and Dennis Pearson as our new custodian. Welcome to BES! Tiffany Larson and Megan Croatt got everyone revved up with the school song and a spirit cheer, where each class yelled out a specific noise made by some form of transportation. We then hopped on board the BES imaginary bus with Mrs. Letrud at the wheel. We all sang "The Wheels On the Bus" and another bus song as we "drove" to each classroom to drop off students. The rest of the morning was spent doing bus safety activities in the classrooms. To go along with our theme "On The Road to Learning", we decided to hit the road. Our destination was the Lac qui Parle Historical Museum in Madison. We saw many interesting displays from each township, along with a salt & pepper collection, a doll collection, a country school house, and the Robert Bly house, to mention a few. A great beginning to the 1999- 2000 school year!! Please make sure your child has tennis shoes for P.E. class everyday. This will help reduce injuries and make the gym a safe place to play. Thank you, Mr. Orvik Calendar of Events Wednesday, 9-15: Environmental Fair in Marshall for 5th and 6th graders 9:30-3:00 Thursday, 9-16: Parade 5:00 p.m.; Playground dedication 5:30; Burger supper 5:45 Friday, 9-17 Heights & Weights (K-6) 8:00 a.m. MENU Breakfast Monday--Breakfast pizza, apple juice, milk. Tuesday--assorted cold cereals, white toast, grape juice, milk. Wednesday--Pancakes, syrup, apple-grape juice, milk. Thursday--Cinnamon rolls, orange juice, milk. Friday--Assorted cold cereals, white toast, apple juice, milk. Lunch Monday--Beef tacos, hard or soft shell, lettuce, cheese, chilled pears, pineapple tidbits, bread, chocolate or white milk. Tuesday--Beef stew with mixed vegetable, tangy sausage sandwiches, chilled fruit cup, milk. Wednesday---Sloppy joes on buns, oven fries, vegetable sticks w/dip, apple crisp, milk. Thursday--Oven baked chicken, mashed potatoes with gravy, corn, dressing, dinner rolls, milk. Friday--Cheese pizza, tossed salad, oranges slices, chocolate chips cookie, bread, milk Girls Basketball .... The girls basketball practices will begin Thursday, September 9. They plan to practice Tuesdays and Thursdays, provided there are no conflicting schedules or scheduled games. If you have any questions, please phone Cindy Henrich, the girls' coach this year. Chapel at Augustana College and 0w fe bei g reception at the Radisson Encore Inn Workshop on raising kids to succeed sn nces n in Sioux Falls, SD. Mr. and Mrs. Manfred Krakow The average young person has youth involvement. spent Labor Day weekend at the home fewer than half of the essential This workshop is designed for uraged for winter '99-'00 to feel and look like we know that winter We can still easily of 1996-97 and be a repeat. The gave us many that we can learn : is that many snow- same place year drifts year after year travel conditions, and huge snow might ask why is in this par- w.e,can Living Snow was organized fol- of 1996-97 to snowdrifting and about it. They con- snowplow opera- that many tope- cause snowdrift Upwind topography the road elevation will create problems 98% of the time. Snowpiles at intersections because the plow cannot wing the snow out far enough creates problems 95% of the time. Frozen lakes adjacent to and upwind of the roadway create drifting and visibility problems 89% of the time. Some other conditions include farmstead windbreaks and buildings located to close the roadway. Any thing permanent in nature can create problems with the snow and drifting. There are 4,000 sites in Minnesota equaling 1,000 miles of federal, state and county roads that create haz- ardous travel and costs millions of dollars' every yar to keep open for travel. There are new techniques for snow fences that are cost effective. The savings in one average winter are twice the cost of a fence. Living snow fences are specifically designed plantings of trees, shrubs and grasses strategically located short distances upwind of roads, ditches, farmsteads and communities. The key elements in there design are height, density, and length. Why a living snow fence versus a structural fence? Living snow fences are more cost effective, last longer and once established require very lit- tle maintenance. They also provide wildlife habitat, livestock protection, reduce soil erosion, and enhance the appearance of our roadsides and com- munities. They are a good investment of public funds. Lets do something now to prepare for our next winter. Minnesota does not have hurricanes or earthquakes; however winter weather concerns are the #I safety hazard. It causes more deaths and injuries than any other nat- ural hazard. Lets do something now to help prepare for our winter weather. A good place to contact if you would like more information on living snow fences is your local soil and water conservation district. news :' M.J. Kirchberg "" h Karels were guests at the and son Nathan of Mrs. Tom Strei of Day weekend home. Bud Radermacher the Henrich and get together and in Ortonville 1999. lests at the Lester rae were Marty brnaha, NE, Steve t. Cloud, Mr. and aes of Shoreview. afternoon visitors Tom Schwarz and Daniel, Mrs. Larry Weiderhoeft and family of New Ulm, Mrs. Lyle Fischer and sons of Sleepy Eye and Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Millerbernd. Mrs. Kay Stolpman of Cold Spring and Mrs. Myra Schmieg were Monday, Sept. 5 afternoon visitors at the M.J. Kirchberg home. Mrs. Myra Schmieg accompanied Mrs. Charlie Radermacher to St. Cloud on Friday, Sept. 3 and visited with their niece Lynn Spanier. Brian Schuelke of Lennox, SD and Alan Schuelke of Watertown, SD spent Labor Day weekend at the home of their parents Mr. and Mrs. Ray Schuelke. Mr. and Mrs. Dan Rademacher of Aberdeen, Mr. and Mrs. Jeff Rademacher of Brookings and Greg Rademacher of Watertown were weekend guests at the Kevin Rademacher home. Monday, Sept. 6 dinner and afternoon guests were Mr. and Mrs. Albert Folk and Scott Folk and family of Milbank. Mrs. Larry Weiderhoeft and family, in South Dakota 520 ACRE FARM AND RANCH Tillable in CRP, nice house, three to four bedrooms, two barns. Near Summit. INi:ORMA TION ON THESE AND OTHER PROPERTIES CONTACT FEHR LAND LTD. Box 156 Big Stone City, SD 57216 Phone 605-862-6 t 12 Agonts lb. FEHR >Arlen LaCombe >Carlton (320) of their daughter Mary in Minneapolis and visited with their children the Randy Eklunds, Mike Schmiegs and Rick Krakows. Mr. and Mrs. Paul Redepenning and family of Farmington, Ryan Bergeson of Madison and Sarah Anderson were weekend guests at the Dennis Rademacher home. Mr. and Mrs. Gary Karels, Blaine and Kayla of Breckenridge were Labor Day weekend guests at the Ray Karels home. Erin Bruns of Watertown spent several days at the home of her grandparents Mr. and Mrs. Edward Karels. Mrs. Gary Karels, Blaine and Kayla, Kay Karels, Rick and Michael, Mr. and Mrs. Andy. Legred+and Jonathan were among relatives,at the Stan Koeckeritz cabin on Lake Victoria on Sunday, Sept. 5 to celebrate Jonathan Legred's first birthday. Mrs. Marcy Trombley of Minnetonka was a Friday evening until Monday, Sept. 6 at the M.J. Kirchberg home. Additional Saturday dinner and afternoon guests were Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Kirchberg of Bloomington, Tom Kirchberg of New UIm and Mrs. Myra Schmieg. Sunday, Sept. 5 dinner guests were Mr. and Mrs. Randy Kirchberg and Caleb and Tom Kirchberg of New Ulm. Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Brehmer and Eric. Afternoon callers were Mr. and Mrs. Steve Barr and girls of Ortonville, Mr. and Mrs. Warren Kirchberg, Nicole and Jan and Mrs. Tom Kirchberg. INDEPENDENT WANT ADS PAY ingredients for healthy development, according to recent survey findings from Search Institute. The result is that too many young people are growing up ill-prepared to take their place in society. A workshop focused on raising kids to succeed will be held on Monday, Sept. 20 from 2-8 p.m. in the Central United Methodist Fellowship Hall in Milbank. The Grant County Healthy Communities * Healthy Youth will be hosting this Link 'n Learn workshop as an opportunity to network with other individuals who are seeking to incorporate the "40 Developmental Assets" for youth in their community. Keynote speaker, Gerry Likness from Watel-town, will,present an overview of the 40 as,s and their impact on adolescent at-risk behaviors. Elective topics will include parenting ideas, congregational applications, intergenerational approaches and IIIII I IIII .... HICKMAN'S Garage Door & More John Hickman Overhead Garage Door Sales & Service parents, youth workers, Sunday School teachers, school personnel, business representatives, service organizations, and youth. Any.one interested in building assets in young people is invited to attend. A $20 registration fee will include materials, an afternoon snack and dinner. Registration forms are available from Sandy Christensen (605-432-4538) or Janet Liebe (605- 432-5546). EMT COURSE Offered Oct. I, 1999 Ortonvllle Ambulance is offerin Emergency Medlco[;'iitchniclara course beginning Oct. 1 at 6:30 p.m. Classes will be held at the Ortonvllle Ambulance building on Tugsday and Thursday evenlngs, Successful complen wlll certify a person as an EMT with the National Registry of EMTs and the Minnesota EMS Regulatory Board. Applicants must pre-register with the Ortonvllle Ambulance director, Joan Julius at 839-4130 days, 18_39-2792 evenings. I ASSET # 9 SIAl] I(,L TO OTHi,;RS YOUNG Pt,:RSON ,q,:RVES IN THE (]I00MMUNrtrY ONE OR MORE HOI]RS PER WEEK Serving someone can change the situation of the person being served, but service can also profoundly change the life of the person who serves. Helping and serving give us a deep feeling of worth. Self-esteem does not just occur when someone is told that they have value. One can feel a deep sense of worth when they know that they have given and shared in a way that has meaning in another person's life. Deepen our youth's self-esteem. opportunities to serve. Give them 14, 1999  INDEPENDENT Page 5