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The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
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September 15, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
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September 15, 1921
 

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THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1921 NUMBER 19 BUSY MINNESOTA PROJECT and Soundings For I Sites--Assessing and of Damage Be- On Job. Viewers acting under the di- State Drainage Engineer, are at work along the River bottoms assessing and awarding damages plans perfected for the Whetstone River into Lake and for the dyking of a dam at the out- qui Parle Lake and anoth- Falls. for a preliminary fund the expense in connection Pubi:zation of notices and was secured by Sen- Cliff, acting attorney for the tiver Drainage and Con- when he appeared Olson of New Ulm last of a petition is under river bottom for the It will soon be filed covering the probable f final hearing with the confidence is expressed by 4tare suffered losses from in seeing ahead the relief as proposed, and it the work of construc- yke at the foot of Big will commence early in of $35,000 was legislature at the last surveys and plans thfft made. as outlined has had the of both state and federal and is deemed feasible and 0nly measure that will the bottom lands from floods that have ruined of dollars worth of crops. who are in charge of the this end are S. L. Moyer, M. Green, Lake Crys- New Ulm. P. X. St. Paul, is assistant and p. G. Kief of Monte- the chauffeur. engineers consisting of who is in charge of the H. Willsusan and A. are at work near Monte- dam sites and making soundings. They expect Ortonville today to carry in this vicinity. To Local Man. sold his eighty acre north of town Saturday of Granite View Builds To Its Plant thousand pounds of poul- taken care of now at the Produce Company's without being wholly de- railroad accommoda- erection of a new struc- is an exact duplicate of chicken cars, the local a to adequately care in busin%ss, while mieh difficulty and delay on account of having cars. busy season the local a handicap because almost solely upon the railroad company to ears for the ship- produce at a time when weather conditions were le. With the new ar- business of the be retarded as was By the steady is possible now with farmers are assur- Prices for their" produce for most company's oit By Fast Mail. his motorcycle when was hit by the fast going east at 8:30 o'clock George Dripps did as one might ex- to his feet and began the fast mail which had motorcycle on the fen- crossing the tracks at the accident occur- the train when it was and attempted to turn Parallel to it but skid- track in front of the The fender caught When it was in the ten- Young Dripl was to the side rather ahead. His face was when he hit the escaped serious in- nil slowed down as saw he had hit was =hie to re- at the Sixth St,. Tribune. Hunters Make Rush For Licenses; 500 Are Issued Applications for hunting licenses this year already total in the neigh- borhood of five hundred with a large number yet to apply. County Audi- tor A. V. Randall and his deputy, Miss Dens Hudson, have been rushed the past two days attending to all details, connected with the work. Up to the present time the number of applicants that have appeared at the auditor's office is about the same as that of last year, Mr. Randall sta- ted, but in all probability before the week is over the number will have passed the figures of last year because of the open season for chickens which is attracting ,many outside hunters. The fever in fact has become so prevalent that for awhile the school board here had under advisement the question of whether or not classes should be discontinued tomorrow to allow the young nimrods to give vent to their desires. Rather than close school, however, it was deemed best to give permis- sion only to those of the high school boys who wish t be excused for hunt- ing. Parent-Teacher Meeting .. Set For September 26 A meeting of the Parent-Teacher Association will be held Monday eve- ning, September 26, at the high school assembly room. This will be the first meeting of the school year and a large number are expected to attend. Prof. g. M, Snesrud will give a talk on "The Junior High School," which is a subject that promises to be of much interest to all parents. Election of officers will also take place at this meeting. Announce- ment of tl meeting was made by R. F. Walker, president of the associa- tion. The meeting was originally planned for Monday, September 12 but was postponed to the date above mention- ed on account of the opening of the Orpheum Treatre on Septamber 19. Fourth Prize Awarded Babbitt At State Fair Fourth prize in the aged sow class of the Duroc Jersey section of entries made at the State Fair was awarded to Bert Babbitt of this county, who had on exhibit three animals. Considering the fact that breeders from the states of North and South Dakota, Wisconsin, Iowa and Illinois were in competition in the various divisions and classes the winning of the prize by Mr. Babbitt is an honor that he might well be proud of. This is the first time Babbitt has shown in the state exhibit in the swine section but It is not the first prize of impor- tance that he has won. In 1915 he was awarded first prize for the best exhibit of White Dent corn at the show conducted by the First National Dank of St. Paul. While at the fair Mr. Babbitt pur- chased a herd boar, sired by the 1921 fit prize senior boar. m To Attend Ames College. Mr. and Mrs. Fred Pflueger and son Harvey expect to leave by auto next Tuesday for Ames, Iowa, where Har- vey will take a four year course at Ames College, which is one of the best agricultural colleges in the U. S. Mrs. Pflueger will visit in the cities and at her old home at Mayer, about thirty miles from St. Paul, on her return home. Robbers Gag Wheaton Garage Man; Escape After overpowering the night man in Lynch's .Garage at Wheaton early Monday morning, three strangers leis- urely took a buick roadster, filled it up with gas and oil and proceeded on their way. Being bound and gagged, it was about 20 minutes before the night man could summon help. A search of the surrounding country was made and about two and one-half miles out of town an overturned car was found. Later word was received at Wheaton that the bank at Nassau had been robbed of $2,000 in cash and COUNTY RANKS . NEXT TO LAST IN DAIRYING Figures Compiled By State Dairy & Food Department Shows Big Stone County Weak In Dairying. Big Stone County farmers received but $34,247.53 last year for the pro- duction of creamery butter, placing this county next to the lowest among the counties of the state, according to figures recently made public by the Minnesota Dairy and Food Depart- ment. Only 62,887 pounds of butter were produced in the county, while McLeod county, about the same in size, produced 399,714 pounds, net- ting the farms of that county the sum of $2,474,886.00. A study of the figures made public shows conclusively that the farmers of this county are not getting their full share of the cream checks being handled out by.the creameries of the state. Had the farmers of this coun- ty received the sum of $2,474,886.00 for cream instead of only $34,247.53 there would not be so much talk of hard times, observes a leading au- thority, who notes that after a survey of the counties of the state reports from business men living in the dairy sections are full of optimism for the coming season while those received from the business men doing business in the grain growing sections are pes- simistic in most cases. The bulletin, prepared by The Far- mer, shows Minnesota in the lead of other states with a production of 143,- Haul Made In Otrey Lake; Water Lowest In 21 Years In pursuance of the orders issued recently by the State Game Commis- sioner, Randall Brothers made their first haul of game fish. The haul was made at Otrey Lake in which there is only about twelve inches of water, re- ported by'neighbors to be the lowest stage in twenty-one years. Bullheads were the only kind of game fish found in the lake. Three thousand pounds of these were trans- ferred to Larson Lake, in accordance with the special orders. No pike, bass or other game fish were included in the haul, which net- ted the fishermen only a thousan pounds of rough fish, all of which were buffalo and carp. Drawing of the n was very diffi- cult because of the shallowness of the lake. Rebekahs To Hold Anniversary. Aniversary meeting of the Rebakah lodge will be held on Wednesday eve- ning, September 21, at the Odd FeN lows Hall. An offering will be taken WHETSTONE FAIR OFFERS $2000.00 IN PRIZE MONEY Lively Interest Being Shown In Exhibits Of All Kinds --Best Ten Ears of Corn To Pull Down $50.00. Two thousand dollars in prizes, the largest amount ever offered by the association, will be distributed among the exhibitors and attendants at the Whetstone Valley Fair at Big Stone City, which opens its gates for a three day showing on Wednesday, September 21. "This, the fifth annual fair of the association," says James Black, secre- tary, "will without question be the most successful of any since the or- igination of our association.. Exhi- bits this year will not only be more varied, but there will be more of them at that time for the benefit of the and with the splendid prizes offered Rebekah home. by )ur board we can see no reason Trains No. 1 and No. 4 Will Be Discontinued Trains No. 1 and No. 4, locals run- ninE between St. Paul and Aberdeen, will be discontinued commencing Sun- day, September 18, according to an announcement made by R. F. Walker, local agent. Falling off in travel to a point where further operations of these trains would mean a heavy los, has been given as the reason for the pres- ent action of the Milwaukee Road. The discontinuance of these trains whatever, unless it be inclement weathex, why the attendance to this year's fair should not be larger than ever before." "The fifty dollar prize which is be- ing offered for the best ten ears of either white or yellow dent corn is ttracting wide interest and the dis- play of that product promises to be enormous." Mr. Black said. Not only are there handsome prizes offerod to exhibitors but the associa- tion has purchased some of the best pure-bred stock in this section of the country which it is holding up as "attendance prizes." The valuation of these animals is conservatively Orpheum Theatre Will Open Monday Evening "Everything new but the location,  is a brief summing up of the present condition of the Orpheum Theatre which will open its doors to the pub- lic on Monday evening, September 19, with vaudeville performance from the Junior Orpheum circuit. Motion pictures will also be shown each night at the theatre, with a gen- eral news film included in the Mon- day andr Friday night shows. Tickets will be on sale at the box office a reasonable time before the vaudeville performance, the McCarthy brothers announced. The next meeting of the Kolah Club will be held at the home of Mrs. Geo. Holm, on September 22, with Mrs. Holm and Mrs. Ken Welch as hastesses. Mrs. U. J. Stotesbery and Mrs. P. E. VanHorn have been given the subject: "Brushing, Hanging and Storing Clothing." The Subject "Canning and Preserving," has been assigned to Mrs. Seaton an4 Mrs. Sut- ton. Mrs. P. Lannon will give sme interesting pointers on the subject, "Amusement for Children." Garage Window Broken And Supplies Taken Gaining entrance to the garage of Mueller & Schwandt of Odessa by breaking a large plate glass window, robbers succeeded in lugging away a number of tires, tubes and. supplies, on Wednesday night. The theft was not discovered until the following morning. It is thought to have been committed some time after midnight and appears to be the work of ama- teurs. No trace of the burglm have been found. 176,204 pounds of creamery butter,  so far as Mr. Walker knows will be for which farmers were paid the total i in effect for some time to come. sum of $73,390,825.73. Big Stone l county has only two creameries whie On Way Home From East. Freeborn county has twenty-six, be-I Mrs. C. T. Lange and Miss Hayes ing the largest number of creameries l are visiting friends at Hastings, on in any county in the state. Eight to ] their way home from New Hampshire. ten seem to be an average. They formerly lived at Hastings. Only one county in the state falls f below Big Stone, and that is Traverse,t Exceptionally Large prize" | which carries off the "booby 28,942[ Crowd At Auction Sale with a total production of only pounds for which the farmers were Seventy-five loaves of bread, a large paid $14,046.20. Dairy cows in this county number 7,002; hogs 20,841; silos 113; cream separators 826; electric light an power plants 19. While figures for the production of butter falls short as compared with the counties of the state. Big Stone county produced more small grain than many other counties. The number of bushels of corn raised is given as 1,171,500; spring wheat 810,000 bushels; oats 1,191,400 bushels; hay 64,600 tons; potatoes 63,000 bushels; and barley 326,400 bushels. Dairying, however, is encouraged because of the steady income which is derived, and because it is more profitable. Road Razer To Operate On City Streets Sept. 20 A special invation is given to the] different members of the township] boards of the county and to the coun- ty commissioners, by A. C. Anderson, to witness the operation of a "Road Razer," which is claimed to be an entirely new device in road machin- ely. This machine, which will be demon- strated on September 20 and 21. on the principal streets here is heralded as the very late, and its adoption is said to be working almost a complete change from the old method of road maintenanee. Mrs. Fred Pflueger received word this morning that the remains of her nephew, Clarence A. Buehlcr, vho was killed in action in the Argonne Forest had arrived at Hoboken, and would be shipped from there to the home of his parents at Fairfax, where inter- ment would be made early next week. box of sliced ham, a few pounds of coffee with a plentiful supply of doughnuts were used at the auction sale held at the Fred Wiley farm northeast of Ortonville recently, prov- ing beyond a shade of doubt that there was no small crowd in attendance. "They came from the east, west, north and south, besides from cross-lots," said one who attended, "and I never saw so many at an auction before in this county, unless it was at the Jack- son Zummach sale held last year." Not only were they hungry but they were real buyers. Everything sold exceptionally well. Cattle, hogs, ma- chinery and all went for a good price, the total of the sale being $4.500. Sixty-two dollars was the top paid for milk cows. Col. Wm. Wellendorf was the auctioneer. Former Resident Likes California. Mrs. Mattie E. Conley writes from Napa, California, that she and her sister, Mrs. J, W. Fix, and daughter Iona are highly pleased with that state and that the climate is fine dur- ing the whole year. She says that Napa is the county seat and a town of about eight thousand. She is one of the new subscribers to The Inde- pendent. Robert Schoen drove a new Paige 6-44 out from the cities Sunday. Ad- justment on the car which was stolen from his garage a short time ago will be made in the near future. Mrs. A. C. Anderson has been ap- pointed Deputy Grand Worthy Ma- tron of the Eastern Star lodge. She will hold a school of instruction some time in November of the lodges in this district. Rain Puts Damper On Clinton Fair Activities placed at close to one thousand dol- Shannon Hotel Sold. Iars, according to fair officials. The Shannon Hotel, the principal Every ticket purchased for admit- hostelry at this place, chaTlged hands tance to the fair will bear a number I on Friday of last week, Mr. Chas. which will be good for the drawing I that will be held on the day it is used. [ Wuiling, the former proprietor, dis- posing of the furnishings and the On the first day a Holstein Bull[business to Mrs. M. K. Lanson, of calf, from the Hof Brothers herd and I Minneapolis, who took inmediate pos- a Chester White Gilt, from the herd I sessiomGraceville Enterprise. of C. C. Ulrich & Son, are offered for] the attendance prizes. A Guernsey City Streets Get Gravel Heifer (yearling) from the W.D. The state has commenced the gray- Hall her4 and a Poland China Boar elling of the King of Trails fr the Pig, fl'om the herd of Ray Thyne depot to the corner by John Stutler's make up the prize list for the second residence and the work will continue day. On the third day the prizes for attendance are a Holstein Heifer, alo from Hof Brothers' herd and a Big Type Poland China Gilt from J. W. Darrington's herd. Horseshoe pitching contests, with no limit to the number of teams that ,might enter, are a part of the enter- tainment offered. Several from the Minresota side, it is said, have signi- fied their intention of participating nd lively interest is expected. Entries of all kinds of exhibits must be made not later than Wednesday noon, September 21. Evangelical Ass'n. Will Hold Joint Meeting Soon A joint convention of the Aberdea District of the South Dakota confer- ence of the Evangelical association and the Minnesota and North Dako- ta district of the Northwestern con- ference of the United Evangelical Church will be held at Big Stone Cit. S. D., September 21-26. The daily sessions will be held in the U." E. church and the evening until this section is completed. The work is under the supervision of N. J. Wilkins, street commissioner. P. E. VanHorn is assisting. Odessa Farmers' Store ' In Hands of Crediters = Abuse of credit by the patrons of the Farmers' Mercantile Company of Odessa, caused the closing of tlfeir store this week, according to the re- port given out by the directors of that company. Organization of that company took place several years ago and the con- cern enjoyed a splendid business dur- ing the first few years of i opera- tions, but thru lack of patro'age and abuse of credit by many of the custo- mers the business gradually dwindled until the figures became on the oppo- site side of the ledger and disposi- tion of the place was deemed advis- able. E. B. Campbell, presentmanager, will remain in charge until other ar- rangements are made. No fault is placed upon Mr. Campbell's shouklers services in the Evangelical associa- ;or the closing of the store. Instead tion church. Sunday services wilt be much favorable comment has been conducted in the Fair Grounds paoli- paid him for his efficiency and for his ion. strenuous effoms :n attempting to put Bishop L. H. Seager, D. D., of Na- perville, Illinois, and Presiding Elder Rev. C. W. Zeck of Aberdeen, S. D.. of the Evangelical association, and Bishop M. T. Maze, D. D., of Harris- burg, Penn., and Presiding Elder Rev. E. Meller of St. Paul of the United Evangelical church will be present the store on a paying basis. The stock was assigned over to the creditors by the stockholders at a recent meeting. Stevens County Fair A Success. The Forty-eighth annual Stevens county fair which came to an end last during the conference. Rev. J. H. Mayne and Rev. G. E. week, proved to be the biggest fair Zeck, pastors of Big Stone City, S. I the county has ever held, not only in D., have charge of the conference. [ the quantity of and quality of the ex- hibits, but in the number of people An interesting program has been] who attended. Over $3,000 was taken arranged, in at the gate on Tuesday and Wed- nesday.--Morris Tribune. Faculty Given Reception. several thousand dollars worth of lib- -- 4 erty bonds. A kit of yeoman's tools Rain which began falling early in racers, who arrived here today fr(m found in the overturned car gave evi- the week and which has continued up I Sioux City, Iowa, after being forced dence that the bank robbers were the to the present time kept several lto abandon one ofheir cars shortly same trio that made their get-away in thousand people from attending the t out of Sioux City, said that incessant Big Stone County Fair at Clinton, t rains had affected many of the coun- the car stolen from the garage at which closed today, i ty fairs in northern Iowa and southern Wheaton. Minnesota. The drivers arrived here County and city authorities in all "About one thousand people atten-I with the intention of racing at Clin- the surrounding towns were notified ded," said H. B. Adams, secretary, in ton but their trip was a financial loss. but up to the present time no further trace of the robbers has been uncov- ered. Will Assist Bellingham Lodge. About thirty members of Golden Rebekah lodge including the degree staff are planning to go to Belling- ham Friday evening of this week to initiate several members into that or- ganization. The Odd Fellows and Re- bekahs organized lodges at Belling- ha this spring and this will be the first initiation since the Organization of the Rebekahs. A luncheon will be served after the meeting. Owing to the rain last evening Un- cle Tom's Cabin, billed to be shown in their tent near the depot, was aban- doned. an interview over the telephone today. The attendance figures for last year was around seven thousand, five hun- dred. While the fair association had no insurance coveriflg weather condi- tions, Mr. Adams said that the af- fairs had been so arranged that only a minimum loss would result. "The fair association members while somewhat disappointed are not in the least discouraged, said Mr. Adams, adding "that our fair is not the only one that has suffered from bad weather. The Wheaton Fair which commenced today is running into like conditions, and the Swift County Fair at Appleton has a dark future before it alo." Nick Rich and Claud Pldllip, auto Two cars from Mankato also made their appearance but later in the day the drivers left for their homes. Other auto racers who arrived to take part in the races were Guy Gin- ter of Lemon, S. D., and Jack McCoy of Cedar Rapids, Iova. Considering everything it cannot be said that the fair was a failure even tho the gate receipts were far below the average . Exhibits of every kind were very good and the interest taken in the swine exhibits was remarkable. More than 250 hogs were brot in. Strong competition was noted be- tween the etries made by R. W. Keeler, living east of Glinton, and those made by Ralph Hippie and Bert Babbitt. A large display was made by the Boys' and Girls' Pi!r Club, also. Members of the faculty of the Or- tonville public school were tendered a reception by members of the Metho- dist church in the church parlors on Friday evening, September 9. A large number were in attendance, not- withstanding unsettled weather condi- tions. A delightful evening was spent in becoming acquainted and the pr- gram which was given proved very interesting. Two selections were given by the Men's Octette, a reading by Engineer Dies In His Cab. Ed. Foster, an engineer on the Soo line, who has been making the run between Glenwood and the cities, died in his engine at the Soo Hill this week He had arrived at Glenwoed which was the end of his run. As he was leaving the engine he remarked that he felt queer and collapsed. Death followed before any doctor could be called. Mr. Faster's home is in the Selon Sails, sleight of hand perform- cities.--Pope County Tribune. ance by Alvah Matthews and two readings by Mrs. D. M. Warlord. 1 Dan Eyre returned Monday night Wafers and frappe were served. Mrs. I from a five weeks visit at Hastingm John Michell and Mrs. John Kaereherl He expects to return there in about were on the reception committee and thee weeks to spend the winter. Mrs. Alvah Matthews and Miss Myr- While there he attended the celebra- tie Ljungdahl on the refreshment tion of the one hundredth birthday of Mrs. D. W. Truax of that place. committee, Cards are out announcing the mar- riage of Otto A. M. Monson and Sarah A. Stewart of Redfield, S.D. Orton- ville folks well remember the Ste- wart Orchestra that gave concerts and dances here several years ago. Mrs. Stewart and Mr. Monsn were both members of the orchestra. Mrs. Truax is the mother of Dr. Geo. Countryman of Aberdeen, S. D. Mr. the reunion the members of the family of which there were about a hundred, a like number of old set- tlere and town foM were invited to join them and that they ]kid a de- lightful time goes without saying. THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1921 NUMBER 19 BUSY MINNESOTA PROJECT and Soundings For I Sites--Assessing and of Damage Be- On Job. Viewers acting under the di- State Drainage Engineer, are at work along the River bottoms assessing and awarding damages plans perfected for the Whetstone River into Lake and for the dyking of a dam at the out- qui Parle Lake and anoth- Falls. for a preliminary fund the expense in connection Pubi:zation of notices and was secured by Sen- Cliff, acting attorney for the tiver Drainage and Con- when he appeared Olson of New Ulm last of a petition is under river bottom for the It will soon be filed covering the probable f final hearing with the confidence is expressed by 4tare suffered losses from in seeing ahead the relief as proposed, and it the work of construc- yke at the foot of Big will commence early in of $35,000 was legislature at the last surveys and plans thfft made. as outlined has had the of both state and federal and is deemed feasible and 0nly measure that will the bottom lands from floods that have ruined of dollars worth of crops. who are in charge of the this end are S. L. Moyer, M. Green, Lake Crys- New Ulm. P. X. St. Paul, is assistant and p. G. Kief of Monte- the chauffeur. engineers consisting of who is in charge of the H. Willsusan and A. are at work near Monte- dam sites and making soundings. They expect Ortonville today to carry in this vicinity. To Local Man. sold his eighty acre north of town Saturday of Granite View Builds To Its Plant thousand pounds of poul- taken care of now at the Produce Company's without being wholly de- railroad accommoda- erection of a new struc- is an exact duplicate of chicken cars, the local a to adequately care in busin%ss, while mieh difficulty and delay on account of having cars. busy season the local a handicap because almost solely upon the railroad company to ears for the ship- produce at a time when weather conditions were le. With the new ar- business of the be retarded as was By the steady is possible now with farmers are assur- Prices for their" produce for most company's oit By Fast Mail. his motorcycle when was hit by the fast going east at 8:30 o'clock George Dripps did as one might ex- to his feet and began the fast mail which had motorcycle on the fen- crossing the tracks at the accident occur- the train when it was and attempted to turn Parallel to it but skid- track in front of the The fender caught When it was in the ten- Young Dripl was to the side rather ahead. His face was when he hit the escaped serious in- nil slowed down as saw he had hit was =hie to re- at the Sixth St,. Tribune. Hunters Make Rush For Licenses; 500 Are Issued Applications for hunting licenses this year already total in the neigh- borhood of five hundred with a large number yet to apply. County Audi- tor A. V. Randall and his deputy, Miss Dens Hudson, have been rushed the past two days attending to all details, connected with the work. Up to the present time the number of applicants that have appeared at the auditor's office is about the same as that of last year, Mr. Randall sta- ted, but in all probability before the week is over the number will have passed the figures of last year because of the open season for chickens which is attracting ,many outside hunters. The fever in fact has become so prevalent that for awhile the school board here had under advisement the question of whether or not classes should be discontinued tomorrow to allow the young nimrods to give vent to their desires. Rather than close school, however, it was deemed best to give permis- sion only to those of the high school boys who wish t be excused for hunt- ing. Parent-Teacher Meeting .. Set For September 26 A meeting of the Parent-Teacher Association will be held Monday eve- ning, September 26, at the high school assembly room. This will be the first meeting of the school year and a large number are expected to attend. Prof. g. M, Snesrud will give a talk on "The Junior High School," which is a subject that promises to be of much interest to all parents. Election of officers will also take place at this meeting. Announce- ment of tl meeting was made by R. F. Walker, president of the associa- tion. The meeting was originally planned for Monday, September 12 but was postponed to the date above mention- ed on account of the opening of the Orpheum Treatre on Septamber 19. Fourth Prize Awarded Babbitt At State Fair Fourth prize in the aged sow class of the Duroc Jersey section of entries made at the State Fair was awarded to Bert Babbitt of this county, who had on exhibit three animals. Considering the fact that breeders from the states of North and South Dakota, Wisconsin, Iowa and Illinois were in competition in the various divisions and classes the winning of the prize by Mr. Babbitt is an honor that he might well be proud of. This is the first time Babbitt has shown in the state exhibit in the swine section but It is not the first prize of impor- tance that he has won. In 1915 he was awarded first prize for the best exhibit of White Dent corn at the show conducted by the First National Dank of St. Paul. While at the fair Mr. Babbitt pur- chased a herd boar, sired by the 1921 fit prize senior boar. m To Attend Ames College. Mr. and Mrs. Fred Pflueger and son Harvey expect to leave by auto next Tuesday for Ames, Iowa, where Har- vey will take a four year course at Ames College, which is one of the best agricultural colleges in the U. S. Mrs. Pflueger will visit in the cities and at her old home at Mayer, about thirty miles from St. Paul, on her return home. Robbers Gag Wheaton Garage Man; Escape After overpowering the night man in Lynch's .Garage at Wheaton early Monday morning, three strangers leis- urely took a buick roadster, filled it up with gas and oil and proceeded on their way. Being bound and gagged, it was about 20 minutes before the night man could summon help. A search of the surrounding country was made and about two and one-half miles out of town an overturned car was found. Later word was received at Wheaton that the bank at Nassau had been robbed of $2,000 in cash and COUNTY RANKS . NEXT TO LAST IN DAIRYING Figures Compiled By State Dairy & Food Department Shows Big Stone County Weak In Dairying. Big Stone County farmers received but $34,247.53 last year for the pro- duction of creamery butter, placing this county next to the lowest among the counties of the state, according to figures recently made public by the Minnesota Dairy and Food Depart- ment. Only 62,887 pounds of butter were produced in the county, while McLeod county, about the same in size, produced 399,714 pounds, net- ting the farms of that county the sum of $2,474,886.00. A study of the figures made public shows conclusively that the farmers of this county are not getting their full share of the cream checks being handled out by.the creameries of the state. Had the farmers of this coun- ty received the sum of $2,474,886.00 for cream instead of only $34,247.53 there would not be so much talk of hard times, observes a leading au- thority, who notes that after a survey of the counties of the state reports from business men living in the dairy sections are full of optimism for the coming season while those received from the business men doing business in the grain growing sections are pes- simistic in most cases. The bulletin, prepared by The Far- mer, shows Minnesota in the lead of other states with a production of 143,- Haul Made In Otrey Lake; Water Lowest In 21 Years In pursuance of the orders issued recently by the State Game Commis- sioner, Randall Brothers made their first haul of game fish. The haul was made at Otrey Lake in which there is only about twelve inches of water, re- ported by'neighbors to be the lowest stage in twenty-one years. Bullheads were the only kind of game fish found in the lake. Three thousand pounds of these were trans- ferred to Larson Lake, in accordance with the special orders. No pike, bass or other game fish were included in the haul, which net- ted the fishermen only a thousan pounds of rough fish, all of which were buffalo and carp. Drawing of the n was very diffi- cult because of the shallowness of the lake. Rebekahs To Hold Anniversary. Aniversary meeting of the Rebakah lodge will be held on Wednesday eve- ning, September 21, at the Odd FeN lows Hall. An offering will be taken WHETSTONE FAIR OFFERS $2000.00 IN PRIZE MONEY Lively Interest Being Shown In Exhibits Of All Kinds --Best Ten Ears of Corn To Pull Down $50.00. Two thousand dollars in prizes, the largest amount ever offered by the association, will be distributed among the exhibitors and attendants at the Whetstone Valley Fair at Big Stone City, which opens its gates for a three day showing on Wednesday, September 21. "This, the fifth annual fair of the association," says James Black, secre- tary, "will without question be the most successful of any since the or- igination of our association.. Exhi- bits this year will not only be more varied, but there will be more of them at that time for the benefit of the and with the splendid prizes offered Rebekah home. by )ur board we can see no reason Trains No. 1 and No. 4 Will Be Discontinued Trains No. 1 and No. 4, locals run- ninE between St. Paul and Aberdeen, will be discontinued commencing Sun- day, September 18, according to an announcement made by R. F. Walker, local agent. Falling off in travel to a point where further operations of these trains would mean a heavy los, has been given as the reason for the pres- ent action of the Milwaukee Road. The discontinuance of these trains whatever, unless it be inclement weathex, why the attendance to this year's fair should not be larger than ever before." "The fifty dollar prize which is be- ing offered for the best ten ears of either white or yellow dent corn is ttracting wide interest and the dis- play of that product promises to be enormous." Mr. Black said. Not only are there handsome prizes offerod to exhibitors but the associa- tion has purchased some of the best pure-bred stock in this section of the country which it is holding up as "attendance prizes." The valuation of these animals is conservatively Orpheum Theatre Will Open Monday Evening "Everything new but the location,  is a brief summing up of the present condition of the Orpheum Theatre which will open its doors to the pub- lic on Monday evening, September 19, with vaudeville performance from the Junior Orpheum circuit. Motion pictures will also be shown each night at the theatre, with a gen- eral news film included in the Mon- day andr Friday night shows. Tickets will be on sale at the box office a reasonable time before the vaudeville performance, the McCarthy brothers announced. The next meeting of the Kolah Club will be held at the home of Mrs. Geo. Holm, on September 22, with Mrs. Holm and Mrs. Ken Welch as hastesses. Mrs. U. J. Stotesbery and Mrs. P. E. VanHorn have been given the subject: "Brushing, Hanging and Storing Clothing." The Subject "Canning and Preserving," has been assigned to Mrs. Seaton an4 Mrs. Sut- ton. Mrs. P. Lannon will give sme interesting pointers on the subject, "Amusement for Children." Garage Window Broken And Supplies Taken Gaining entrance to the garage of Mueller & Schwandt of Odessa by breaking a large plate glass window, robbers succeeded in lugging away a number of tires, tubes and. supplies, on Wednesday night. The theft was not discovered until the following morning. It is thought to have been committed some time after midnight and appears to be the work of ama- teurs. No trace of the burglm have been found. 176,204 pounds of creamery butter,  so far as Mr. Walker knows will be for which farmers were paid the total i in effect for some time to come. sum of $73,390,825.73. Big Stone l county has only two creameries whie On Way Home From East. Freeborn county has twenty-six, be-I Mrs. C. T. Lange and Miss Hayes ing the largest number of creameries l are visiting friends at Hastings, on in any county in the state. Eight to ] their way home from New Hampshire. ten seem to be an average. They formerly lived at Hastings. Only one county in the state falls f below Big Stone, and that is Traverse,t Exceptionally Large prize" | which carries off the "booby 28,942[ Crowd At Auction Sale with a total production of only pounds for which the farmers were Seventy-five loaves of bread, a large paid $14,046.20. Dairy cows in this county number 7,002; hogs 20,841; silos 113; cream separators 826; electric light an power plants 19. While figures for the production of butter falls short as compared with the counties of the state. Big Stone county produced more small grain than many other counties. The number of bushels of corn raised is given as 1,171,500; spring wheat 810,000 bushels; oats 1,191,400 bushels; hay 64,600 tons; potatoes 63,000 bushels; and barley 326,400 bushels. Dairying, however, is encouraged because of the steady income which is derived, and because it is more profitable. Road Razer To Operate On City Streets Sept. 20 A special invation is given to the] different members of the township] boards of the county and to the coun- ty commissioners, by A. C. Anderson, to witness the operation of a "Road Razer," which is claimed to be an entirely new device in road machin- ely. This machine, which will be demon- strated on September 20 and 21. on the principal streets here is heralded as the very late, and its adoption is said to be working almost a complete change from the old method of road maintenanee. Mrs. Fred Pflueger received word this morning that the remains of her nephew, Clarence A. Buehlcr, vho was killed in action in the Argonne Forest had arrived at Hoboken, and would be shipped from there to the home of his parents at Fairfax, where inter- ment would be made early next week. box of sliced ham, a few pounds of coffee with a plentiful supply of doughnuts were used at the auction sale held at the Fred Wiley farm northeast of Ortonville recently, prov- ing beyond a shade of doubt that there was no small crowd in attendance. "They came from the east, west, north and south, besides from cross-lots," said one who attended, "and I never saw so many at an auction before in this county, unless it was at the Jack- son Zummach sale held last year." Not only were they hungry but they were real buyers. Everything sold exceptionally well. Cattle, hogs, ma- chinery and all went for a good price, the total of the sale being $4.500. Sixty-two dollars was the top paid for milk cows. Col. Wm. Wellendorf was the auctioneer. Former Resident Likes California. Mrs. Mattie E. Conley writes from Napa, California, that she and her sister, Mrs. J, W. Fix, and daughter Iona are highly pleased with that state and that the climate is fine dur- ing the whole year. She says that Napa is the county seat and a town of about eight thousand. She is one of the new subscribers to The Inde- pendent. Robert Schoen drove a new Paige 6-44 out from the cities Sunday. Ad- justment on the car which was stolen from his garage a short time ago will be made in the near future. Mrs. A. C. Anderson has been ap- pointed Deputy Grand Worthy Ma- tron of the Eastern Star lodge. She will hold a school of instruction some time in November of the lodges in this district. Rain Puts Damper On Clinton Fair Activities placed at close to one thousand dol- Shannon Hotel Sold. Iars, according to fair officials. The Shannon Hotel, the principal Every ticket purchased for admit- hostelry at this place, chaTlged hands tance to the fair will bear a number I on Friday of last week, Mr. Chas. which will be good for the drawing I that will be held on the day it is used. [ Wuiling, the former proprietor, dis- posing of the furnishings and the On the first day a Holstein Bull[business to Mrs. M. K. Lanson, of calf, from the Hof Brothers herd and I Minneapolis, who took inmediate pos- a Chester White Gilt, from the herd I sessiomGraceville Enterprise. of C. C. Ulrich & Son, are offered for] the attendance prizes. A Guernsey City Streets Get Gravel Heifer (yearling) from the W.D. The state has commenced the gray- Hall her4 and a Poland China Boar elling of the King of Trails fr the Pig, fl'om the herd of Ray Thyne depot to the corner by John Stutler's make up the prize list for the second residence and the work will continue day. On the third day the prizes for attendance are a Holstein Heifer, alo from Hof Brothers' herd and a Big Type Poland China Gilt from J. W. Darrington's herd. Horseshoe pitching contests, with no limit to the number of teams that ,might enter, are a part of the enter- tainment offered. Several from the Minresota side, it is said, have signi- fied their intention of participating nd lively interest is expected. Entries of all kinds of exhibits must be made not later than Wednesday noon, September 21. Evangelical Ass'n. Will Hold Joint Meeting Soon A joint convention of the Aberdea District of the South Dakota confer- ence of the Evangelical association and the Minnesota and North Dako- ta district of the Northwestern con- ference of the United Evangelical Church will be held at Big Stone Cit. S. D., September 21-26. The daily sessions will be held in the U." E. church and the evening until this section is completed. The work is under the supervision of N. J. Wilkins, street commissioner. P. E. VanHorn is assisting. Odessa Farmers' Store ' In Hands of Crediters = Abuse of credit by the patrons of the Farmers' Mercantile Company of Odessa, caused the closing of tlfeir store this week, according to the re- port given out by the directors of that company. Organization of that company took place several years ago and the con- cern enjoyed a splendid business dur- ing the first few years of i opera- tions, but thru lack of patro'age and abuse of credit by many of the custo- mers the business gradually dwindled until the figures became on the oppo- site side of the ledger and disposi- tion of the place was deemed advis- able. E. B. Campbell, presentmanager, will remain in charge until other ar- rangements are made. No fault is placed upon Mr. Campbell's shouklers services in the Evangelical associa- ;or the closing of the store. Instead tion church. Sunday services wilt be much favorable comment has been conducted in the Fair Grounds paoli- paid him for his efficiency and for his ion. strenuous effoms :n attempting to put Bishop L. H. Seager, D. D., of Na- perville, Illinois, and Presiding Elder Rev. C. W. Zeck of Aberdeen, S. D.. of the Evangelical association, and Bishop M. T. Maze, D. D., of Harris- burg, Penn., and Presiding Elder Rev. E. Meller of St. Paul of the United Evangelical church will be present the store on a paying basis. The stock was assigned over to the creditors by the stockholders at a recent meeting. Stevens County Fair A Success. The Forty-eighth annual Stevens county fair which came to an end last during the conference. Rev. J. H. Mayne and Rev. G. E. week, proved to be the biggest fair Zeck, pastors of Big Stone City, S. I the county has ever held, not only in D., have charge of the conference. [ the quantity of and quality of the ex- hibits, but in the number of people An interesting program has been] who attended. Over $3,000 was taken arranged, in at the gate on Tuesday and Wed- nesday.--Morris Tribune. Faculty Given Reception. several thousand dollars worth of lib- -- 4 erty bonds. A kit of yeoman's tools Rain which began falling early in racers, who arrived here today fr(m found in the overturned car gave evi- the week and which has continued up I Sioux City, Iowa, after being forced dence that the bank robbers were the to the present time kept several lto abandon one ofheir cars shortly same trio that made their get-away in thousand people from attending the t out of Sioux City, said that incessant Big Stone County Fair at Clinton, t rains had affected many of the coun- the car stolen from the garage at which closed today, i ty fairs in northern Iowa and southern Wheaton. Minnesota. The drivers arrived here County and city authorities in all "About one thousand people atten-I with the intention of racing at Clin- the surrounding towns were notified ded," said H. B. Adams, secretary, in ton but their trip was a financial loss. but up to the present time no further trace of the robbers has been uncov- ered. Will Assist Bellingham Lodge. About thirty members of Golden Rebekah lodge including the degree staff are planning to go to Belling- ham Friday evening of this week to initiate several members into that or- ganization. The Odd Fellows and Re- bekahs organized lodges at Belling- ha this spring and this will be the first initiation since the Organization of the Rebekahs. A luncheon will be served after the meeting. Owing to the rain last evening Un- cle Tom's Cabin, billed to be shown in their tent near the depot, was aban- doned. an interview over the telephone today. The attendance figures for last year was around seven thousand, five hun- dred. While the fair association had no insurance coveriflg weather condi- tions, Mr. Adams said that the af- fairs had been so arranged that only a minimum loss would result. "The fair association members while somewhat disappointed are not in the least discouraged, said Mr. Adams, adding "that our fair is not the only one that has suffered from bad weather. The Wheaton Fair which commenced today is running into like conditions, and the Swift County Fair at Appleton has a dark future before it alo." Nick Rich and Claud Pldllip, auto Two cars from Mankato also made their appearance but later in the day the drivers left for their homes. Other auto racers who arrived to take part in the races were Guy Gin- ter of Lemon, S. D., and Jack McCoy of Cedar Rapids, Iova. Considering everything it cannot be said that the fair was a failure even tho the gate receipts were far below the average . Exhibits of every kind were very good and the interest taken in the swine exhibits was remarkable. More than 250 hogs were brot in. Strong competition was noted be- tween the etries made by R. W. Keeler, living east of Glinton, and those made by Ralph Hippie and Bert Babbitt. A large display was made by the Boys' and Girls' Pi!r Club, also. Members of the faculty of the Or- tonville public school were tendered a reception by members of the Metho- dist church in the church parlors on Friday evening, September 9. A large number were in attendance, not- withstanding unsettled weather condi- tions. A delightful evening was spent in becoming acquainted and the pr- gram which was given proved very interesting. Two selections were given by the Men's Octette, a reading by Engineer Dies In His Cab. Ed. Foster, an engineer on the Soo line, who has been making the run between Glenwood and the cities, died in his engine at the Soo Hill this week He had arrived at Glenwoed which was the end of his run. As he was leaving the engine he remarked that he felt queer and collapsed. Death followed before any doctor could be called. Mr. Faster's home is in the Selon Sails, sleight of hand perform- cities.--Pope County Tribune. ance by Alvah Matthews and two readings by Mrs. D. M. Warlord. 1 Dan Eyre returned Monday night Wafers and frappe were served. Mrs. I from a five weeks visit at Hastingm John Michell and Mrs. John Kaereherl He expects to return there in about were on the reception committee and thee weeks to spend the winter. Mrs. Alvah Matthews and Miss Myr- While there he attended the celebra- tie Ljungdahl on the refreshment tion of the one hundredth birthday of Mrs. D. W. Truax of that place. committee, Cards are out announcing the mar- riage of Otto A. M. Monson and Sarah A. Stewart of Redfield, S.D. Orton- ville folks well remember the Ste- wart Orchestra that gave concerts and dances here several years ago. Mrs. Stewart and Mr. Monsn were both members of the orchestra. Mrs. Truax is the mother of Dr. Geo. Countryman of Aberdeen, S. D. Mr. the reunion the members of the family of which there were about a hundred, a like number of old set- tlere and town foM were invited to join them and that they ]kid a de- lightful time goes without saying. THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT ORTONVILLE, MINN. THURSDAY, SEPteMBER 15,1921 NUMUER 19 BUSY MINNESOTA PROJECT ! Sit ca--Assessing and On Job. Enginr, at work along the Rive- bottoms 8seeing damages Lake and for the dyking preliminary fund in pbt: aqon of ppeared of a petition d covering the pmbable a final hearing with the confidence is expased by suffered loss fm sing at the ft of Big eommen early in of $35,000 Hunters Make Rush For Licenses; 500 Are Issued COUNTY RANKS ...............  ...... NEXT TO LAST this year aiady total in the neigh- of five hundred with a LarJg ........................... IN DAIRYING tar A. V, Randall and his deputy, Miss Dens Hudn, have been rushed the past two days attending to Figures Compiled By State detall connected with the work. Up to the of applints that bare appeared al the audftor's om tl, but in all probability wk is nver the number will hew pad the figure of lt year beeaus is attracting many outside hunte. qutlon of whether or not should be allow the yoa.g nimrods to Rather than dose hl, however dmed best to give penis. high boys who wish t ins.. Parent-Teacher Meeting A mting sing, September 26, at the hi assembly roo This will be the fl1 mting of the year and large Prof. J. M. Snesmd will give a tal igh Schl," whd Election of omeers will also tak nly measu that will to the bottom Fourth Prize Awarded dollars worth of crops ho  n charge o he Babbit At State Fair bhts end are S. L. Mayer, Fourth prizelntheagedsowelqsof H. M, Green, Lake Crys- Jersey section m. P. X. made at the Stae Fair Paul, is aistart to Bert Babbitt ef this county, b i the ebuffe. Considering the fact that g of Dakota, Winsin, Willsus and A. we  iu competition in the at work nr Monte- divisione and classes the nning of tng the pri by soundings. They expect that he mlght well he pId of. Th i OrtonviHe today to carry Babbitt h sh iu this vicinity, but ]t is not the first prize of impo he has won, eighty acre was awarded first prize for the n Saturday exhibit of White Dent corn at the of Gnite View y the First National St. Paal. While at the fair Mr. Babbitt pur- hoar, sired by the 192i filt prize senior bo. onsand pounds of pot- To Attend Am College. . Mr. arid M Fd Pueger anti son Hae expect t leave by ante next Tuesday for Ames, Iowa, whe Har vey will take a four year course at Ames College, which is one of the is  ex dup ca e o best agricultural lleges in the U. I Chicken espy, the Iota S+ Mrs. Pflueger will visit in the le to teqtely ca cities and at her old home at Mayer, se in buin*es, while about thirty miles fm St. Paul, h diffilty and delay J on lira. Robbers Gag Wheaton bY Garage p bause almt le[y upon the After overpowering the night mat railroad mpany to salt  for the ship- iu at a time when ther conditions were With the new at- ever. busine o the oct be retarded as was By the study prode t By his motoycle was hit by the fast George Drlpps did ne might ex- the fast mal which had but ur trace ef the bbers ha been ered. the tin when it was ' ad attempted to turn Will Assist Bellinghem Lee. parallel to it but skid- About thirty mbers of GI track in front ef th Rebekah ledge including the degree I. The fender caught staff are plvlng to go to BelLig- hen it was in the n- ham Friday evening of this week to el Young Dripp w iidtlate ral membe into that e wn to the side he ganizatlo The Odd Fellows and Re- ,head. His f w ! bekahs orgafilzed lodges at Belting  at when he Mt th ham this aping 6 this will be the aeaped rnus in. first initiation since the 0rgarzat slowed do asl of the Rebekah A luncheon will be w he had hit' ed after the mting. w ble to - at the Sixth S. Owing to the raln lot eveMng Us. ele Tom's Cbln, billed to be show in their nt near the depot, was &m. Dairy & Food Department Shows Big Stone County Weak In Dairying. Big Stone County farmers ived ut $34,247.53 last year for the p,- bntter, pling ths county next to the Lowest or e, according to figures recently made public by the D&ily aad Food Dep- Only 62#87 pounds of batter were produced in the count, wble McLeod county, about the same in size, pdueed 399,714 pounds, net- ting the farms of that count), the sum of $2,474$g6.00. A study of the flgus made pubilc conclusively that the farme enunty a not getting their , cam et, nemg handled out by he cameres of the Had the fem of this eo- ty received the sum of $2,474,886.00 for crem instead of oniy $34,247,58 of hard glint, oboes a leaing au- thority, who notes that after a svey of the state reports fm buatn men living in the dairy mct!ons are full of optimism for the eived from the business men doing business in the grain growing seetis a pea bulletin, ppared by The F Minnesota in the lead of Haul Made In Otrey Lake; Water Lowest In 21 Years In pursuance of the orde issued rently by the State Ge Commi sinner, Randall Bthers made their fit haut of game fisb The haul w made at Oty Lake in which the is only about twelve inches of water, - ported by'neighbors to be the lowest stage in twenty-one yea. Bullheads we the only kind of game fish found in the lake. Th thousand po of thee we tras- fer.t to Laon Lake, in aordance with the special order, No pike, bass or other ge fi were included in the haul, which net- ted the fishermen only a thousana ponnds of ro0gh fish, all of which were huffalo and carp. Dxawing of the no I was very dig1 cult because of the shallowness of the lake. Rebtahs To Hold Anniverr7, Aniversm'y mting of the Rebakah lodge will be held on Wednesday eve- Ulna, September 21, at the Odd Fel- Iovs Hall. An offering will be taken at that time for the benefit of the Rebekah home. Trains No. l and No. 4 Will Be Discontinued Trains No. i d No. 4, Locals run- ning between St. Paul d Ardn, will be discontinued commencing Sun- day, September 18, according to an noment made by R. F. Walker, }oral agent. Falling off in tvel to a point whe further operations of thee trains would me a heavy loss, h he given as the rean for the pres- ent tion of the Milwak Road. place at this mting. Announc& other states with a product on of 143: The discontinuance of the trains merit of thmtng was made by R. i 176,204 pounds of camery butter,i so far  M r. Walker knows will be F. Walker, president of the assoeia- tar which farmers wet paid the totali in effect for me time to cem tim,. sum of $73390825.73. Big Stone -- The meeting was originally planned county has only twn creameries whie On Way Home Fm East. for Menda ,. September 12 but F eebnrn eouny has twentyix be- M:.:C T. Large. and M s. Ha.es postponed in the Largest number of cameries a via*ring fl,e s at Hastings, on ed on aceount of the opening of the in any county in the state. Eight to thmr way home from New Hampchire. Orpheum Treatre on September 19. to be an average. Only one county in the state fall below Big Stone, and that is Traversq which carries off the "bby prlze with a total predUon of only 28,942 pounds for which the faers were paid $14,046.20. Dairy cows ia this county number 7,OO2; hogs 20,841; silos n3; ee 826; eltlie light and power pIants 19. While flgr f the production of butter falls sher as compared with the counties nf the state. Big Stone enunty pdueed mo small grain than ,ny othe eounti. The number ef bushels ot ce Ised is given as 1,17100; opting wheat 810,000 bushels; oatt 1,191,400 buhel; hay 4,6OO tons; potato ,000 bhels; d barle .2,400 bushels. Dalrying, however is once.aged hause of the stead) inCOme which is derived, and beeau it is more pfitable. Road Razer To Operate They fomerly lived at Hastings. Exceptionally Large Crowd At Auction Sale Seventy-five loaves of bread, a large box of sliced ham, a few pounds of eoff with a plentiful supply of doughnuts we used at the act%n ale held at he Fred Wiley frm nortl east of Ortoniile ltly, prov- inf beyol a shade of doebt that the no amall wd in attendance. "They e fm the east, west, north and th, be$1d fm css-lots," said one who attended, "and I n.er w so my at  auction befo in this catty, unless it w at the Jack- son Zummach sale held lt year." Not only we they hungry but they we real bue. Ery%hing sold ! exceptionally well. Cattle, hogs, ma cMnery and all went for a good pti, the total of the sale being $4500. Sixty-two doila was the top paid for milk cows Col. Win. WeIlendorf WHITTftTqI ItlD ] Orpheum Theatre Will IAIIOIVI.II l'k.llt Olin Monday Evening  vv.vv [Is a brief summing up of the present IN PRIZE MONEYI ...............  Th ...... ' whlnh will opeat it d to the pub- ...... lie on Monday evening, September 19, -- . with vaudelle perforate fm the Lively Interest Being Shown Juror orhe ei In Exhibits Of All Kinds Motion pletu will a] be shewtt --Best Ten Ear of Cftltn eh night at the theat, with a geu- ........ eral news film ituded in the Man- TO Pull Dolt 50.00. day att Friday night ow -- Ticket s will be on sale at the bo Two thoamd doll in prizes, the largest mnount ever offered by the aiaton, will be distributed amens the exhibitors and attendants at th Whetstone Valley Fair at Big Ston Cit, which npens its gates for thr 'day showing nn Wednesday, September 21. "This, the fifth annual fair of the assnciation," says fames Blk, s- tary, "will withnut quesUon be the most suefu of any since the or- igtnation of our sation. Exhi- bits this ye will not only be mor vaned, hut the will be m of them and vth the splendid pris offered by ur board we can see no o whatever, unle it be inclement weather, why the attendan to thi year' fair should not be larger tha ever before." "The fifty dollar prize wdch is be- ing offed for the best ten e nI either white or yellow dent corn is ettracting wide intelst and the dis- play of that product premiss to h enoo," Mr. Black acid. Not only are the hdso pfize offex to exhibitor but the Mig. Lion has puhased some of the bes pu-bred stock in this flon of th cot,T which it  holding up "attendn prizes." The valtio of these animals is eonseativel placed at close to one thousand dol lars, according to fmr omcials. Every ticket puhased for admit. tahoe to the fair will bear a numbel whkh will be good for the drawin that will be held en the day it is ud office a onable time before the vaudeville performan, the Mccarthy bthe anuound. The next meetlng of the Kolah Club will he held at the hnme of M Creo. Holm, on September 22, with Mre. Hnlm d M. Ren Welch he'tests. M U. J. Stotesbery and M. P. E. VanHora have been given the subjt: "Brushing, Hanging d Storing Clothing." The Subieet "Canning and Prvlng," h bees aiged to Mrs. Seaten 4 Mr Sut- ton. Mrs. P. Lnon Will gve s intesting pointers on the subjt, "Amusement for Children." Garage Window Broken And Supplies Taken Gaining ente to the garage of Muelier & Sehwandt of Odessa by bking a lars plate gIs window, bbe succeeded in lugghg away a nber of ti. tbes d supplies, on Wednday night TI theft w not discovered til the following meming. It is thought to ha be csmrmtted me time after midnight d appears to be the work of ama- teur, No trace of the burgi have been inured.  . Sheon Hotel Sold. The Shaon Hotel, the prineipal hostelry at this places eed htht vn Friday of last week, Mr. Chas, Wuliing, the fe*er pprietor, diS- posing of the fundsMns d the On the flt day a Holstein Bull hiness to Mrs. M. K. Lon, of If, from the Hal Brothers herd an Minneapolis, who took iraediate po a Cheste Whte Git fm the he dl e o--G vl r 1 , r s i r "lle Enterpn. ef C. C. Ulrich & Son, a offered for I --- the attendan pzes. A Guerny City Streeti Get Gravel Heifer (yrllng) from the W. D.: The state has corniced the gray- Hall her6 and a Pold China Born oiling of the lng of Tra from the Ig, from the herd of Ray hym depot to the er by John Stutl's ke up the p lst for the n reaid d the work will contn day. On the third day the pe for unit this section is cmpleted. The attenda a a Holstein Hfer,  w,,rk m uader the sulrvlslon of N. from Hof Brothe' herd and a Big Type Polatd Cldna Gilt fm J, W. Drngton's herd. Horsesh pitching contests, with no Imit to the nber of terns that ,might enter, are a part of the enter- tegument offered. Several fm the Minsota side, t is said, have signi- fied their intention of partlepatir nd lively inte,t ie expeete& Entrs of all Inds of exhibit s must he made not later th Wednesday noon, September 21. Evangelical Asa's. Will J. WiIMns, att eommiior, p. g. VaaHo is assistlm. Odessa Farmers' Store In Mands of Creditors Abu of eredlt by the patens of the Fae' Me--tile Cempmy of edema, caused the ling of tFreir store this week, according to the port given out by the dieters of that company. Organization of that company tk pla eelal yes ago arm the on- rn enjoyed a splendid ba.ine dur- On City Streets SepL 21 was the auctioneer. Hold Joint__Meeting Soon tions,lng thebatfirStthrufeWlackYeSof pat roagef " opeC-and A special inviatnp is gven to the Former Resider Likes California. A jolnt conventinn of the Aberdem able of credit by many of the custc- dlent members of the teship M Mattie E Con ev wri es f'om District of the South Dakota confer- me the bus ne gradn y dw n ed boards of the county and to the court- Napa Califoli thai'she and her ence of ,the Evangelical assoeiatlon until the figures bec,e on the oppo- y commissioners,  A C An erson, ster' Mr J  Fix and daugh e and the Minneta and Nm'th Dako- site side ef the ledger and disposl- to witness he operation of a "Read' Ions 'a highly peed w h h ta district of the Northweste enn- tinn ef the ple was deemed advis- Raer," which is clelmed to be an state md that the climate is fine da-' re' once of the United Evangelical able, I E.B. Campbell, psent magor, entily n devi in road mhln- ins the whole year. She says that Church will be held at Big StoL,e Cty, wll remmn In charge until other ar- cry Naps be county seat and a town S. n.. September.21-26. ' The mhlne, which will be demon-, of abou e ght thou d. She is one The daffy s,ons wl he held in ,angements n nade. No fault s stated on Sop ember g0and21 o. the I of the new sub era to The nde I the U. E. church and the evening ped upon Mr. Campbell's shoulde pr ne pa streets he is heralded as I pendenU ' ses in the Evangelieal sia- for the closing of the tore. lnstevd the very late and its adoption i ------ tioa church. Sunday services will he much favorabl mment has been aid to be worki most a eompletel Robert Schn drove a new Paise co,,ducted ia the Fair Gunds pavih paid m for hs emeleney ard fro" 16s s . riga ' * ad 644 utfmmthe "to Su ay Ad o strenuseffoamattemptingtopu cnge im the old methoa at re - o c, [i . - J n maitenan justment on the r which w stolen Bishop L7 H. Sger, D. D., nf Na. the sto on a ying asis. -" from his garage a short time age peillo, Illinois, and Presiding EIde, The stk  igned or to the Mrs. Fred pfiueger ee!ved word will be made in the near futu. Roy. C. W. Seek of Aberdeen, S D. creditors by the stkhoMers at a this mong that the mams of her -- of the Evangelil oiatlon an rent meeting. nephew, Clnrence A. Buehler, Who was M A C Andelon has bn ap* Bishop" M T Ma D D of Harms' pointed Deputy Grand Worthy Ms- " .... ' urely took a buick roadster, filled il had ived at Hnboken and the Eastern Star lodge. She burg, Penn, and Psiding Elder Re. Stevens County Fair A Suse. np with g and oil and preceded or be shlpped fm there to' he home nf I will hold n ache1 of instrutinn some E. Melter of St, Paul nf the United The Fortyighth annq Stevens their way. Being bound and gassed his paints at Fairfax where inter- I tme in November of the lodges in Evangelcnl church witl be present county fair wch eanle to  end last , during the confound, wk, provtd to be the biggest fair it w ab It 2O mlnutee beto th ment would b made curly next wek. this dstrict. Roy. J. H. Mayne and Roy. G. E. the uaty has ever held, not only in night man could mmon help, A ....  7 Zeek, ptors of Big Stone City,  the qnUty ef and qlity of the ex- of th ................... Rain Puts Damper On e and about two and one-half D,, have charge of the eonfen, hibits ' but in the nber of ople An inteeting program hms been wh o atttnded. Over $8,0OO was taken Later wanrd w eived aanged, in at the gate on Taesday and Wed. ............... Clinton Fair Activities -- n.,. ........... had been bbe of $2,0OO in eh and Faalty Giv Receptio -- 4t Members of the faculty of the Or- Engineer I)i In Hl Cab. erty hands. A kit of yeSlmn's tools Rain which began falling early ir who arrived he lay frees public school were tendered found in the overruled ear gave evi- ioux City, Iowa, after being forced membe of the Metlt Ed, Foster, an engineer on the S to the present time kept one of'teir cs shortly parlor s 0n line, who has been making the between Glenwead and the cities, died gfaway in thousand people fm attending th sa id that sant Friday evening, September 9. A in his engine at the Sou Hill this vcek large number w* in attendance, not- fm the gage at Big Stone County Fair ieb cl i today, tY fairs in t withstanding unsettled ather edl- He had arrived at Gtwood which was the d of hs run. AS he County and city authorities in a11 "About one thousand people alton Miet The drivers at Clil A de ghtfuI evening w paz, . he en iue . leavln*  g he ark that in becoming cqlfld fld th p h felt ueer d celia Death ded," id H, B. Adams, secltary, in gra m which w given proved y fol owedqbef  [ T o 1 ct'o em en ore any decto ud be ikons for last year t mteetmg" w se e l ns w . g tee I called. Mr. Fter's h is in the h, the Men's Octette, a reading oy, .. clti Pope Catty Tlbune , five h- ]eft for their hs. Selon Sails, sletghf of hand erfo- .-- . Oth auto racers who aived  att by AIvah Malthus and two] died. While the fmr soe at o t take in e GU Gin . . i i i part - the races w y . M Warlord. I  E . returned Monday night . , weather ad ngs bv Mrs. D ..... lnsuran ovelg ter of Lemon S.D. and Jack MeCo wafer  fran we ed M I from a fle ks mt at Htmg Lions,. Mr. Adams said thatththe M-I of Cedar. Rapids,. Iowa. John M'--e andMrs. John rch . He expels to tur the in about, fa  had been  aged at on y Considering everything it enotb c t I h week to spend the winter. " su[ . , we on the rephen ol  and a m lntmum loss would sa d that the fa r  a fmlu e: v =thew  M  M Wh e the he attended the ee eh .... in Mt' A ah M d yz- , ...... The fair ascxatlen members the the gate receipts we f be w fie Idungdahl" on the rfreshrdent tmn of the one hundredth birthday while somewhat dppomted are not the average. Exinblts of ery kind etMtt of M. D. W. Trllax of that plae the only e that h suffered from Mo than 250 hog wext brat h riageofOttoA. M, MosenadSarah Eyre m 'hat after the reuniea in the let dioagsd, sid Mr. were very good and the interest taken  Mrs. Tru is the mother of Dr. Gee. Adams, adding "that our fair is ot in the swine exhibits w rkable. Cards a out announng the ma Cotmtryman of Aherdeen, S. D. Mr. bad ather. The Weaton Fair[ Strong competition wu ld b]A. SttwarefRedfleld, S.D. Otton-!andplcnidinnbymmabersof which menl today Is nig tweeu the entries made by I W. ville folka well member the Sty- the fily of which ther were .to Ik ndlti nd he lt[K.ler, llvln t of G'liton d[wltrt Ohestra t.lt ga ..... rt 1 . undred * like .b. Of .d - County Fair at Appleton h & drk thrum made by Rlph Hlppl and BCXI ard dm be aveal ea ago. thrs d town fell.    " utart before it al"  B*bMtt. A large dJsphy w model Mrs* stewart ad Mr. Mcnn w[   d that  u a d- Nick Rich and Cloud Phi lips, to by the Boys sad G rls P C3ttb, al. 'oth memhe of the olhestr hghtful time If9 wltholtt tylng. THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1921 NUMBER 19 BUSY MINNESOTA PROJECT and Soundings For I Sites--Assessing and of Damage Be- On Job. Viewers acting under the di- State Drainage Engineer, are at work along the River bottoms assessing and awarding damages plans perfected for the Whetstone River into Lake and for the dyking of a dam at the out- qui Parle Lake and anoth- Falls. for a preliminary fund the expense in connection Pubi:zation of notices and was secured by Sen- Cliff, acting attorney for the tiver Drainage and Con- when he appeared Olson of New Ulm last of a petition is under river bottom for the It will soon be filed covering the probable f final hearing with the confidence is expressed by 4tare suffered losses from in seeing ahead the relief as proposed, and it the work of construc- yke at the foot of Big will commence early in of $35,000 was legislature at the last surveys and plans thfft made. as outlined has had the of both state and federal and is deemed feasible and 0nly measure that will the bottom lands from floods that have ruined of dollars worth of crops. who are in charge of the this end are S. L. Moyer, M. Green, Lake Crys- New Ulm. P. X. St. Paul, is assistant and p. G. Kief of Monte- the chauffeur. engineers consisting of who is in charge of the H. Willsusan and A. are at work near Monte- dam sites and making soundings. They expect Ortonville today to carry in this vicinity. To Local Man. sold his eighty acre north of town Saturday of Granite View Builds To Its Plant thousand pounds of poul- taken care of now at the Produce Company's without being wholly de- railroad accommoda- erection of a new struc- is an exact duplicate of chicken cars, the local a to adequately care in busin%ss, while mieh difficulty and delay on account of having cars. busy season the local a handicap because almost solely upon the railroad company to ears for the ship- produce at a time when weather conditions were le. With the new ar- business of the be retarded as was By the steady is possible now with farmers are assur- Prices for their" produce for most company's oit By Fast Mail. his motorcycle when was hit by the fast going east at 8:30 o'clock George Dripps did as one might ex- to his feet and began the fast mail which had motorcycle on the fen- crossing the tracks at the accident occur- the train when it was and attempted to turn Parallel to it but skid- track in front of the The fender caught When it was in the ten- Young Dripl was to the side rather ahead. His face was when he hit the escaped serious in- nil slowed down as saw he had hit was =hie to re- at the Sixth St,. Tribune. Hunters Make Rush For Licenses; 500 Are Issued Applications for hunting licenses this year already total in the neigh- borhood of five hundred with a large number yet to apply. County Audi- tor A. V. Randall and his deputy, Miss Dens Hudson, have been rushed the past two days attending to all details, connected with the work. Up to the present time the number of applicants that have appeared at the auditor's office is about the same as that of last year, Mr. Randall sta- ted, but in all probability before the week is over the number will have passed the figures of last year because of the open season for chickens which is attracting ,many outside hunters. The fever in fact has become so prevalent that for awhile the school board here had under advisement the question of whether or not classes should be discontinued tomorrow to allow the young nimrods to give vent to their desires. Rather than close school, however, it was deemed best to give permis- sion only to those of the high school boys who wish t be excused for hunt- ing. Parent-Teacher Meeting .. Set For September 26 A meeting of the Parent-Teacher Association will be held Monday eve- ning, September 26, at the high school assembly room. This will be the first meeting of the school year and a large number are expected to attend. Prof. g. M, Snesrud will give a talk on "The Junior High School," which is a subject that promises to be of much interest to all parents. Election of officers will also take place at this meeting. Announce- ment of tl meeting was made by R. F. Walker, president of the associa- tion. The meeting was originally planned for Monday, September 12 but was postponed to the date above mention- ed on account of the opening of the Orpheum Treatre on Septamber 19. Fourth Prize Awarded Babbitt At State Fair Fourth prize in the aged sow class of the Duroc Jersey section of entries made at the State Fair was awarded to Bert Babbitt of this county, who had on exhibit three animals. Considering the fact that breeders from the states of North and South Dakota, Wisconsin, Iowa and Illinois were in competition in the various divisions and classes the winning of the prize by Mr. Babbitt is an honor that he might well be proud of. This is the first time Babbitt has shown in the state exhibit in the swine section but It is not the first prize of impor- tance that he has won. In 1915 he was awarded first prize for the best exhibit of White Dent corn at the show conducted by the First National Dank of St. Paul. While at the fair Mr. Babbitt pur- chased a herd boar, sired by the 1921 fit prize senior boar. m To Attend Ames College. Mr. and Mrs. Fred Pflueger and son Harvey expect to leave by auto next Tuesday for Ames, Iowa, where Har- vey will take a four year course at Ames College, which is one of the best agricultural colleges in the U. S. Mrs. Pflueger will visit in the cities and at her old home at Mayer, about thirty miles from St. Paul, on her return home. Robbers Gag Wheaton Garage Man; Escape After overpowering the night man in Lynch's .Garage at Wheaton early Monday morning, three strangers leis- urely took a buick roadster, filled it up with gas and oil and proceeded on their way. Being bound and gagged, it was about 20 minutes before the night man could summon help. A search of the surrounding country was made and about two and one-half miles out of town an overturned car was found. Later word was received at Wheaton that the bank at Nassau had been robbed of $2,000 in cash and COUNTY RANKS . NEXT TO LAST IN DAIRYING Figures Compiled By State Dairy & Food Department Shows Big Stone County Weak In Dairying. Big Stone County farmers received but $34,247.53 last year for the pro- duction of creamery butter, placing this county next to the lowest among the counties of the state, according to figures recently made public by the Minnesota Dairy and Food Depart- ment. Only 62,887 pounds of butter were produced in the county, while McLeod county, about the same in size, produced 399,714 pounds, net- ting the farms of that county the sum of $2,474,886.00. A study of the figures made public shows conclusively that the farmers of this county are not getting their full share of the cream checks being handled out by.the creameries of the state. Had the farmers of this coun- ty received the sum of $2,474,886.00 for cream instead of only $34,247.53 there would not be so much talk of hard times, observes a leading au- thority, who notes that after a survey of the counties of the state reports from business men living in the dairy sections are full of optimism for the coming season while those received from the business men doing business in the grain growing sections are pes- simistic in most cases. The bulletin, prepared by The Far- mer, shows Minnesota in the lead of other states with a production of 143,- Haul Made In Otrey Lake; Water Lowest In 21 Years In pursuance of the orders issued recently by the State Game Commis- sioner, Randall Brothers made their first haul of game fish. The haul was made at Otrey Lake in which there is only about twelve inches of water, re- ported by'neighbors to be the lowest stage in twenty-one years. Bullheads were the only kind of game fish found in the lake. Three thousand pounds of these were trans- ferred to Larson Lake, in accordance with the special orders. No pike, bass or other game fish were included in the haul, which net- ted the fishermen only a thousan pounds of rough fish, all of which were buffalo and carp. Drawing of the n was very diffi- cult because of the shallowness of the lake. Rebekahs To Hold Anniversary. Aniversary meeting of the Rebakah lodge will be held on Wednesday eve- ning, September 21, at the Odd FeN lows Hall. An offering will be taken WHETSTONE FAIR OFFERS $2000.00 IN PRIZE MONEY Lively Interest Being Shown In Exhibits Of All Kinds --Best Ten Ears of Corn To Pull Down $50.00. Two thousand dollars in prizes, the largest amount ever offered by the association, will be distributed among the exhibitors and attendants at the Whetstone Valley Fair at Big Stone City, which opens its gates for a three day showing on Wednesday, September 21. "This, the fifth annual fair of the association," says James Black, secre- tary, "will without question be the most successful of any since the or- igination of our association.. Exhi- bits this year will not only be more varied, but there will be more of them at that time for the benefit of the and with the splendid prizes offered Rebekah home. by )ur board we can see no reason Trains No. 1 and No. 4 Will Be Discontinued Trains No. 1 and No. 4, locals run- ninE between St. Paul and Aberdeen, will be discontinued commencing Sun- day, September 18, according to an announcement made by R. F. Walker, local agent. Falling off in travel to a point where further operations of these trains would mean a heavy los, has been given as the reason for the pres- ent action of the Milwaukee Road. The discontinuance of these trains whatever, unless it be inclement weathex, why the attendance to this year's fair should not be larger than ever before." "The fifty dollar prize which is be- ing offered for the best ten ears of either white or yellow dent corn is ttracting wide interest and the dis- play of that product promises to be enormous." Mr. Black said. Not only are there handsome prizes offerod to exhibitors but the associa- tion has purchased some of the best pure-bred stock in this section of the country which it is holding up as "attendance prizes." The valuation of these animals is conservatively Orpheum Theatre Will Open Monday Evening "Everything new but the location,  is a brief summing up of the present condition of the Orpheum Theatre which will open its doors to the pub- lic on Monday evening, September 19, with vaudeville performance from the Junior Orpheum circuit. Motion pictures will also be shown each night at the theatre, with a gen- eral news film included in the Mon- day andr Friday night shows. Tickets will be on sale at the box office a reasonable time before the vaudeville performance, the McCarthy brothers announced. The next meeting of the Kolah Club will be held at the home of Mrs. Geo. Holm, on September 22, with Mrs. Holm and Mrs. Ken Welch as hastesses. Mrs. U. J. Stotesbery and Mrs. P. E. VanHorn have been given the subject: "Brushing, Hanging and Storing Clothing." The Subject "Canning and Preserving," has been assigned to Mrs. Seaton an4 Mrs. Sut- ton. Mrs. P. Lannon will give sme interesting pointers on the subject, "Amusement for Children." Garage Window Broken And Supplies Taken Gaining entrance to the garage of Mueller & Schwandt of Odessa by breaking a large plate glass window, robbers succeeded in lugging away a number of tires, tubes and. supplies, on Wednesday night. The theft was not discovered until the following morning. It is thought to have been committed some time after midnight and appears to be the work of ama- teurs. No trace of the burglm have been found. 176,204 pounds of creamery butter,  so far as Mr. Walker knows will be for which farmers were paid the total i in effect for some time to come. sum of $73,390,825.73. Big Stone l county has only two creameries whie On Way Home From East. Freeborn county has twenty-six, be-I Mrs. C. T. Lange and Miss Hayes ing the largest number of creameries l are visiting friends at Hastings, on in any county in the state. Eight to ] their way home from New Hampshire. ten seem to be an average. They formerly lived at Hastings. Only one county in the state falls f below Big Stone, and that is Traverse,t Exceptionally Large prize" | which carries off the "booby 28,942[ Crowd At Auction Sale with a total production of only pounds for which the farmers were Seventy-five loaves of bread, a large paid $14,046.20. Dairy cows in this county number 7,002; hogs 20,841; silos 113; cream separators 826; electric light an power plants 19. While figures for the production of butter falls short as compared with the counties of the state. Big Stone county produced more small grain than many other counties. The number of bushels of corn raised is given as 1,171,500; spring wheat 810,000 bushels; oats 1,191,400 bushels; hay 64,600 tons; potatoes 63,000 bushels; and barley 326,400 bushels. Dairying, however, is encouraged because of the steady income which is derived, and because it is more profitable. Road Razer To Operate On City Streets Sept. 20 A special invation is given to the] different members of the township] boards of the county and to the coun- ty commissioners, by A. C. Anderson, to witness the operation of a "Road Razer," which is claimed to be an entirely new device in road machin- ely. This machine, which will be demon- strated on September 20 and 21. on the principal streets here is heralded as the very late, and its adoption is said to be working almost a complete change from the old method of road maintenanee. Mrs. Fred Pflueger received word this morning that the remains of her nephew, Clarence A. Buehlcr, vho was killed in action in the Argonne Forest had arrived at Hoboken, and would be shipped from there to the home of his parents at Fairfax, where inter- ment would be made early next week. box of sliced ham, a few pounds of coffee with a plentiful supply of doughnuts were used at the auction sale held at the Fred Wiley farm northeast of Ortonville recently, prov- ing beyond a shade of doubt that there was no small crowd in attendance. "They came from the east, west, north and south, besides from cross-lots," said one who attended, "and I never saw so many at an auction before in this county, unless it was at the Jack- son Zummach sale held last year." Not only were they hungry but they were real buyers. Everything sold exceptionally well. Cattle, hogs, ma- chinery and all went for a good price, the total of the sale being $4.500. Sixty-two dollars was the top paid for milk cows. Col. Wm. Wellendorf was the auctioneer. Former Resident Likes California. Mrs. Mattie E. Conley writes from Napa, California, that she and her sister, Mrs. J, W. Fix, and daughter Iona are highly pleased with that state and that the climate is fine dur- ing the whole year. She says that Napa is the county seat and a town of about eight thousand. She is one of the new subscribers to The Inde- pendent. Robert Schoen drove a new Paige 6-44 out from the cities Sunday. Ad- justment on the car which was stolen from his garage a short time ago will be made in the near future. Mrs. A. C. Anderson has been ap- pointed Deputy Grand Worthy Ma- tron of the Eastern Star lodge. She will hold a school of instruction some time in November of the lodges in this district. Rain Puts Damper On Clinton Fair Activities placed at close to one thousand dol- Shannon Hotel Sold. Iars, according to fair officials. The Shannon Hotel, the principal Every ticket purchased for admit- hostelry at this place, chaTlged hands tance to the fair will bear a number I on Friday of last week, Mr. Chas. which will be good for the drawing I that will be held on the day it is used. [ Wuiling, the former proprietor, dis- posing of the furnishings and the On the first day a Holstein Bull[business to Mrs. M. K. Lanson, of calf, from the Hof Brothers herd and I Minneapolis, who took inmediate pos- a Chester White Gilt, from the herd I sessiomGraceville Enterprise. of C. C. Ulrich & Son, are offered for] the attendance prizes. A Guernsey City Streets Get Gravel Heifer (yearling) from the W.D. The state has commenced the gray- Hall her4 and a Poland China Boar elling of the King of Trails fr the Pig, fl'om the herd of Ray Thyne depot to the corner by John Stutler's make up the prize list for the second residence and the work will continue day. On the third day the prizes for attendance are a Holstein Heifer, alo from Hof Brothers' herd and a Big Type Poland China Gilt from J. W. Darrington's herd. Horseshoe pitching contests, with no limit to the number of teams that ,might enter, are a part of the enter- tainment offered. Several from the Minresota side, it is said, have signi- fied their intention of participating nd lively interest is expected. Entries of all kinds of exhibits must be made not later than Wednesday noon, September 21. Evangelical Ass'n. Will Hold Joint Meeting Soon A joint convention of the Aberdea District of the South Dakota confer- ence of the Evangelical association and the Minnesota and North Dako- ta district of the Northwestern con- ference of the United Evangelical Church will be held at Big Stone Cit. S. D., September 21-26. The daily sessions will be held in the U." E. church and the evening until this section is completed. The work is under the supervision of N. J. Wilkins, street commissioner. P. E. VanHorn is assisting. Odessa Farmers' Store ' In Hands of Crediters = Abuse of credit by the patrons of the Farmers' Mercantile Company of Odessa, caused the closing of tlfeir store this week, according to the re- port given out by the directors of that company. Organization of that company took place several years ago and the con- cern enjoyed a splendid business dur- ing the first few years of i opera- tions, but thru lack of patro'age and abuse of credit by many of the custo- mers the business gradually dwindled until the figures became on the oppo- site side of the ledger and disposi- tion of the place was deemed advis- able. E. B. Campbell, presentmanager, will remain in charge until other ar- rangements are made. No fault is placed upon Mr. Campbell's shouklers services in the Evangelical associa- ;or the closing of the store. Instead tion church. Sunday services wilt be much favorable comment has been conducted in the Fair Grounds paoli- paid him for his efficiency and for his ion. strenuous effoms :n attempting to put Bishop L. H. Seager, D. D., of Na- perville, Illinois, and Presiding Elder Rev. C. W. Zeck of Aberdeen, S. D.. of the Evangelical association, and Bishop M. T. Maze, D. D., of Harris- burg, Penn., and Presiding Elder Rev. E. Meller of St. Paul of the United Evangelical church will be present the store on a paying basis. The stock was assigned over to the creditors by the stockholders at a recent meeting. Stevens County Fair A Success. The Forty-eighth annual Stevens county fair which came to an end last during the conference. Rev. J. H. Mayne and Rev. G. E. week, proved to be the biggest fair Zeck, pastors of Big Stone City, S. I the county has ever held, not only in D., have charge of the conference. [ the quantity of and quality of the ex- hibits, but in the number of people An interesting program has been] who attended. Over $3,000 was taken arranged, in at the gate on Tuesday and Wed- nesday.--Morris Tribune. Faculty Given Reception. several thousand dollars worth of lib- -- 4 erty bonds. A kit of yeoman's tools Rain which began falling early in racers, who arrived here today fr(m found in the overturned car gave evi- the week and which has continued up I Sioux City, Iowa, after being forced dence that the bank robbers were the to the present time kept several lto abandon one ofheir cars shortly same trio that made their get-away in thousand people from attending the t out of Sioux City, said that incessant Big Stone County Fair at Clinton, t rains had affected many of the coun- the car stolen from the garage at which closed today, i ty fairs in northern Iowa and southern Wheaton. Minnesota. The drivers arrived here County and city authorities in all "About one thousand people atten-I with the intention of racing at Clin- the surrounding towns were notified ded," said H. B. Adams, secretary, in ton but their trip was a financial loss. but up to the present time no further trace of the robbers has been uncov- ered. Will Assist Bellingham Lodge. About thirty members of Golden Rebekah lodge including the degree staff are planning to go to Belling- ham Friday evening of this week to initiate several members into that or- ganization. The Odd Fellows and Re- bekahs organized lodges at Belling- ha this spring and this will be the first initiation since the Organization of the Rebekahs. A luncheon will be served after the meeting. Owing to the rain last evening Un- cle Tom's Cabin, billed to be shown in their tent near the depot, was aban- doned. an interview over the telephone today. The attendance figures for last year was around seven thousand, five hun- dred. While the fair association had no insurance coveriflg weather condi- tions, Mr. Adams said that the af- fairs had been so arranged that only a minimum loss would result. "The fair association members while somewhat disappointed are not in the least discouraged, said Mr. Adams, adding "that our fair is not the only one that has suffered from bad weather. The Wheaton Fair which commenced today is running into like conditions, and the Swift County Fair at Appleton has a dark future before it alo." Nick Rich and Claud Pldllip, auto Two cars from Mankato also made their appearance but later in the day the drivers left for their homes. Other auto racers who arrived to take part in the races were Guy Gin- ter of Lemon, S. D., and Jack McCoy of Cedar Rapids, Iova. Considering everything it cannot be said that the fair was a failure even tho the gate receipts were far below the average . Exhibits of every kind were very good and the interest taken in the swine exhibits was remarkable. More than 250 hogs were brot in. Strong competition was noted be- tween the etries made by R. W. Keeler, living east of Glinton, and those made by Ralph Hippie and Bert Babbitt. A large display was made by the Boys' and Girls' Pi!r Club, also. Members of the faculty of the Or- tonville public school were tendered a reception by members of the Metho- dist church in the church parlors on Friday evening, September 9. A large number were in attendance, not- withstanding unsettled weather condi- tions. A delightful evening was spent in becoming acquainted and the pr- gram which was given proved very interesting. Two selections were given by the Men's Octette, a reading by Engineer Dies In His Cab. Ed. Foster, an engineer on the Soo line, who has been making the run between Glenwood and the cities, died in his engine at the Soo Hill this week He had arrived at Glenwoed which was the end of his run. As he was leaving the engine he remarked that he felt queer and collapsed. Death followed before any doctor could be called. Mr. Faster's home is in the Selon Sails, sleight of hand perform- cities.--Pope County Tribune. ance by Alvah Matthews and two readings by Mrs. D. M. Warlord. 1 Dan Eyre returned Monday night Wafers and frappe were served. Mrs. I from a five weeks visit at Hastingm John Michell and Mrs. John Kaereherl He expects to return there in about were on the reception committee and thee weeks to spend the winter. Mrs. Alvah Matthews and Miss Myr- While there he attended the celebra- tie Ljungdahl on the refreshment tion of the one hundredth birthday of Mrs. D. W. Truax of that place. committee, Cards are out announcing the mar- riage of Otto A. M. Monson and Sarah A. Stewart of Redfield, S.D. Orton- ville folks well remember the Ste- wart Orchestra that gave concerts and dances here several years ago. Mrs. Stewart and Mr. Monsn were both members of the orchestra. Mrs. Truax is the mother of Dr. Geo. Countryman of Aberdeen, S. D. Mr. the reunion the members of the family of which there were about a hundred, a like number of old set- tlere and town foM were invited to join them and that they ]kid a de- lightful time goes without saying.