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September 15, 1921     The Ortonville Independent
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September 15, 1921
 

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SEPTEMBER 15, 192t Independent EVERY THURSDAY by the &amp; Merchants Printing Co. President Vir.e-president Ltmdgren, Secretary Walter DinnetL, Treasurer OF DIRECTORS John Kaercher Walter Dimaell Olson L.E. Lundgren Grace F. Kaercher A. B. Kaercher - Managing Editor as second-class matter 1920, at the post odBee at imder the Act of $2.00 PER YEAR Rates ant pplication Advt. Representative. SELECT LIST. Bank, - - St. Paul St., - - Mimeapolis ,rese.ntstte "7 CREDIT. very much disappointed in loan agency" Eugene Meyer, managing ' the War Finance Corpora- has complete control and the $1,000,000,000 fund so to have been ap- congress for the special farmers. aPPears that this appropria- nade in fact for the special of the big bankers, unless tro other committees to be of agricultural men and real yet to be appointed about has thus far been said. agricultural loan agency" for of Minnesota is comprised named bankers: vice-president of National Bank; L) C. T. Jaffray, president rat National Bank; J. R. ;t. Paul; S. L. Prentiss, Wi- A. A. Bennett, Renville. aaounced that this cmmit- is to pass, on wmt, loans? No--upon applica- loans from banks, bankers COmpanies, and make recom- to the cooration. says, "the corporation ha to make loans for a year extend them. The corpora- advance funds to any bank, or trust company in the which may have made for agricultural purposes, the breeding, raising and of livestock, or may have or rediscounted notes bills of exchange for such Congress has been fine in its attitude toward the Mr. Meyer said. It appear, but how about the bankers have , we believe control of the Fed- Banks and are now, and for months, making the local banks dance to their in the name of corn- and decency should they the $1,000,000,000 fund to the people of the as a whole ? National re money direct from the at 4 per cent per annum ll additional charge in the and why should the men the bankers and all hu- bs entitled to receive aim[- the government direct compelled to pay tri- be dominated over by, Whose sole aim and ambi- profits thru interest charges ? Land Banks are just to handle this money and more so, and already in working are controlled and by actual farmers ' not fieed the aistance of the big banks whose are directed towarl rate possible out instead of helling him rates of interest. the mortgage loan fited States fought the i :,tl 4} THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE t Federal and Joint Stock Land banks. Why? Because these banks were loaning money to farmers on tong time at 6 per cent, and the moment the Federal Land bank was tied up in litigation, rates of interest on farm loans went up to seven and eight per cent per annum and the amounts were cut down to such an extent that in many instances farmers were com- pelled to pay as high as ten per cent for ,money on both long and short time loans. This law should be amended so that Federal Land banks thru the local as- sociati can loan to farmers on chat- tle security at 6 per cent for terms of from 3 to 5 years, and then this coun- try would prosper as it never has e- fore, and the local banks would have ample fields for business in various other developments and enterprises that would naturally result from the prosperity ,of the farmer. If the administration desires to do the fair thing by the farmer it should furnish the Federal Land Bank with all the funds it needs to  supply the legitimate and pressing needs of the farmers without delay. Helping the big banks to unlimited funds may, to such extent as they, the big banks, feel disposed, help the lo- cal banks and thru them the farmer, but it is not the kind of rural credit the people understood the administra- tion to promise nor the kind they are entitled to. If the big banks deserve help as agencies and instrumentali- ties in the line of public service and public good give it to them, but do it honestly, openly and above-board-- not under the false pretense of cred- it, to farmers. Det the farmers for once have an opportunity to work out their own salvation. EDUCATION. School ha begun. Some of our young people have commenced their college course, but the larger part are at home in the local schools under the direct guidance of their parents and friends, but all are in the hands of their tutors, on whom rests a great responsibility. Only by all combined, working in harmony and unison can the greatest success be achieved. If the young people cmprising the pupils of our great educational insti- tutions, could only look into the fu- ture as their parents can look back- ward over the past, they would ar- dently afd vigorously grasp this the greatest opportunity of their life and avoid many of the pit-falls and temp- tations that will be placed before them, and make the very best of their golden opportunity. After all suc- cess or failure depends almost entire- ly upon the pupil. There must on her or his part be a will, a determination, motive or goal, a high and noble purpose and aim to the achievement of which sacrifices nmst be made and self-denial practiced. A strong and vigorous body is es- sent[aLto a strong and vigorous mind, so the propeP mixture of athletics with the mental activities is as in- dispensible as good wholesome food and abstinence fhm the use of nar- cotics, and alcoholic beverages, and anything elsethat impairs the health. V DIVERSIFIED FARMING. "Too much stress cannot be placed upon the importance and necessity of dairying and diversified farming. Just why Traverse, Big Stone and Lac qui Parle counties are at the bottom of the list of counties of the state, respectively in the order named, in the production of butter, except Lake county, which is between Tra- verse and Big Stone in this scale, is unaccountable. Perhaps it is because these counties have held up better in production of small grain on account of the fertility of the soil. Whatever the cause may be a care- ful study of the figures compiled by the State Dairy and Food Commis- sion in its last report, convinces one that lack of co-operation is one of the causes and that these counties must at once get to work and organize co- operative creameries, buy dairy cows and engage in diversified falning generally, to get in the procession of up-to-date farming cmmunities, and i fact to succeed at all. It is noticeable from this report that the counties leading in the pro- duction of butter also lead in the number of co-operative creameries. The little county of Steele, smaller than Big Stine. has 23 co-operative creameries and no ethel,, and pro- Make - Arrangements Now for Your Requirements [or HEATING and PLUMBING According to the news articles we read in the daily papers, the muskrats are building their houses early--and larger. Pretty good indica- tion, for nature's intimate friends usually get "tipped off." Don't wait until we are rushed with "hur- ried orders," see us NOW. It costs no more. , AUGUST LINDERT ORTONVILLE 00HIIIIHIIIIIMIlmlIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIlIlIIIIlillIIIIMIilHIIMIIilIlHI00 - g ." m --- .. /dr-."-II'g  __. _, E ...,.,. [] ---- E 1 i00he gurtin 00otel , | _ IOth STREET AT FOURTH ,IVgNUB MINNEAPOLIS l ffi= The Northwest' s Largest and Most BeautifulHostely All Rooms are Outsie and Each Room hu Private ltk  TARIFF: =.= 75 Rooms (Private Baths) Single at $2.00--Double $3.00 325 Rooms (Private Bathe) Single at $2.,r-Double $3.$0 I 200 Rooms (Private Baths) Single at $3 00--Doable $4.m i Others from $4.00 to St.00 i00iiHIIHHflHIHMflMIHIllmHIIIflmlIHIHmlflllflHHIHIIHmH00 duced in a single year $2,214,892 worth @ @ of butter. More than the counties of Clay, Wilkin, Traverse, Big Stone, Subscribers Recently Added To Stevens, Lee qui Parle, Chippewa, 'lhe Automobile Swift, Grant and Pope combined. Stevens county with its agricultural G.B. Campbell college, produced but $124,118 worth ha L. onnson of butter. Swift county leads in this Robert . .gOver00au.:n00 immediate section with a production Jxon,'ad .merberg of $766,563. ax Wmter The banner counties of the state J.A. bdeike in butter production are Ottertail, l]ss lviaage Kelly At prices that Stearns, Wright, McLeod, Carver, "ioa Farrell Steel and Freeborn, with a produc- J.P. Rohn are right. tion of over $2,000,000 each annually. F.B. Jest Twenty counties range from $1,000,-  G.H. ]nglund 000 to $2,000,000 and twenty from Julius Seeleld All work $500,000 to $1,000,000. hi. J. MciMroy guaranteed. Kittson county, away up in the Lloyd Gerhardt northwest corner of the state pro- H.B. Adams duced $265,947 worth of butter last Myrtle Larson I am located year and Marshall $425,739, and the Mrs. Win. O'Neill in the base- little county of Pennington $509,944, JOhn Crippen and the still smaller t%unty of Red F.L. Tooer ment of Lake $308,892, and Polk county, $1,- elen Hubbart Alvah Matthews 627,365. Fred Jaeger NOTICE TO HUNTERS.  N.G. Lindgren rage. Hunters are strictly forbidden to 'Kitty Clover Masse trespass or hunt on the following, des- Fred Kriesel Give me cribed premises: The east half of C.B. Oswood the southeast quarter, and north half Rev. J. C. Siegler A Trial. of southwest quarter and southwest Fred Bohmert quarter of southwest quarter of see- Anderson Brothers tion No. 1 and the northwest quarter Mrs. Fey Leigh of the northeast quarter of section " 0 B Jacobso[ No. 11, and the northeast quarter of section 12---all in the township of --Coverall Aprons, 98c, $1.19 and Odessa, Big Stone county, Minnesota, $1.48. Tyler's Variety Store. --SWAN NELSON, Owner. A splendid employment for idle funds until you have other use for them is one of our certificates of deposit payable in six nmnths or longer, bear- interest at Safe--Conservative NOW and then we feel as if we've got to talk about the quality of the lumber we sell. There is just as much difference in lum- ber as there is in leather or any other eomm,di.y. Well-season- ed lumber compares with well- tam.rod leather. If you want to be a well pleased patron, visit US, Geier Lumber Co. S00]]AN The Sedan enjoys, everywhe, a distinctly high social status, and yet its economy is one of the outstanding reasons for its strong hold on American appreciation. ge cov.sumtion is unttlold)y lows The tire mileage is unumally hh ALVAH 1. MATTHEWS Ortonville Minn. .; I SEPTEMBER 15, 192t Independent EVERY THURSDAY by the & Merchants Printing Co. President Vir.e-president Ltmdgren, Secretary Walter DinnetL, Treasurer OF DIRECTORS John Kaercher Walter Dimaell Olson L.E. Lundgren Grace F. Kaercher A. B. Kaercher - Managing Editor as second-class matter 1920, at the post odBee at imder the Act of $2.00 PER YEAR Rates ant pplication Advt. Representative. SELECT LIST. Bank, - - St. Paul St., - - Mimeapolis ,rese.ntstte "7 CREDIT. very much disappointed in loan agency" Eugene Meyer, managing ' the War Finance Corpora- has complete control and the $1,000,000,000 fund so to have been ap- congress for the special farmers. aPPears that this appropria- nade in fact for the special of the big bankers, unless tro other committees to be of agricultural men and real yet to be appointed about has thus far been said. agricultural loan agency" for of Minnesota is comprised named bankers: vice-president of National Bank; L) C. T. Jaffray, president rat National Bank; J. R. ;t. Paul; S. L. Prentiss, Wi- A. A. Bennett, Renville. aaounced that this cmmit- is to pass, on wmt, loans? No--upon applica- loans from banks, bankers COmpanies, and make recom- to the cooration. says, "the corporation ha to make loans for a year extend them. The corpora- advance funds to any bank, or trust company in the which may have made for agricultural purposes, the breeding, raising and of livestock, or may have or rediscounted notes bills of exchange for such Congress has been fine in its attitude toward the Mr. Meyer said. It appear, but how about the bankers have , we believe control of the Fed- Banks and are now, and for months, making the local banks dance to their in the name of corn- and decency should they the $1,000,000,000 fund to the people of the as a whole ? National re money direct from the at 4 per cent per annum ll additional charge in the and why should the men the bankers and all hu- bs entitled to receive aim[- the government direct compelled to pay tri- be dominated over by, Whose sole aim and ambi- profits thru interest charges ? Land Banks are just to handle this money and more so, and already in working are controlled and by actual farmers ' not fieed the aistance of the big banks whose are directed towarl rate possible out instead of helling him rates of interest. the mortgage loan fited States fought the i :,tl 4} THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE t Federal and Joint Stock Land banks. Why? Because these banks were loaning money to farmers on tong time at 6 per cent, and the moment the Federal Land bank was tied up in litigation, rates of interest on farm loans went up to seven and eight per cent per annum and the amounts were cut down to such an extent that in many instances farmers were com- pelled to pay as high as ten per cent for ,money on both long and short time loans. This law should be amended so that Federal Land banks thru the local as- sociati can loan to farmers on chat- tle security at 6 per cent for terms of from 3 to 5 years, and then this coun- try would prosper as it never has e- fore, and the local banks would have ample fields for business in various other developments and enterprises that would naturally result from the prosperity ,of the farmer. If the administration desires to do the fair thing by the farmer it should furnish the Federal Land Bank with all the funds it needs to  supply the legitimate and pressing needs of the farmers without delay. Helping the big banks to unlimited funds may, to such extent as they, the big banks, feel disposed, help the lo- cal banks and thru them the farmer, but it is not the kind of rural credit the people understood the administra- tion to promise nor the kind they are entitled to. If the big banks deserve help as agencies and instrumentali- ties in the line of public service and public good give it to them, but do it honestly, openly and above-board-- not under the false pretense of cred- it, to farmers. Det the farmers for once have an opportunity to work out their own salvation. EDUCATION. School ha begun. Some of our young people have commenced their college course, but the larger part are at home in the local schools under the direct guidance of their parents and friends, but all are in the hands of their tutors, on whom rests a great responsibility. Only by all combined, working in harmony and unison can the greatest success be achieved. If the young people cmprising the pupils of our great educational insti- tutions, could only look into the fu- ture as their parents can look back- ward over the past, they would ar- dently afd vigorously grasp this the greatest opportunity of their life and avoid many of the pit-falls and temp- tations that will be placed before them, and make the very best of their golden opportunity. After all suc- cess or failure depends almost entire- ly upon the pupil. There must on her or his part be a will, a determination, motive or goal, a high and noble purpose and aim to the achievement of which sacrifices nmst be made and self-denial practiced. A strong and vigorous body is es- sent[aLto a strong and vigorous mind, so the propeP mixture of athletics with the mental activities is as in- dispensible as good wholesome food and abstinence fhm the use of nar- cotics, and alcoholic beverages, and anything elsethat impairs the health. V DIVERSIFIED FARMING. "Too much stress cannot be placed upon the importance and necessity of dairying and diversified farming. Just why Traverse, Big Stone and Lac qui Parle counties are at the bottom of the list of counties of the state, respectively in the order named, in the production of butter, except Lake county, which is between Tra- verse and Big Stone in this scale, is unaccountable. Perhaps it is because these counties have held up better in production of small grain on account of the fertility of the soil. Whatever the cause may be a care- ful study of the figures compiled by the State Dairy and Food Commis- sion in its last report, convinces one that lack of co-operation is one of the causes and that these counties must at once get to work and organize co- operative creameries, buy dairy cows and engage in diversified falning generally, to get in the procession of up-to-date farming cmmunities, and i fact to succeed at all. It is noticeable from this report that the counties leading in the pro- duction of butter also lead in the number of co-operative creameries. The little county of Steele, smaller than Big Stine. has 23 co-operative creameries and no ethel,, and pro- Make - Arrangements Now for Your Requirements [or HEATING and PLUMBING According to the news articles we read in the daily papers, the muskrats are building their houses early--and larger. Pretty good indica- tion, for nature's intimate friends usually get "tipped off." Don't wait until we are rushed with "hur- ried orders," see us NOW. It costs no more. , AUGUST LINDERT ORTONVILLE 00HIIIIHIIIIIMIlmlIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIlIlIIIIlillIIIIMIilHIIMIIilIlHI00 - g ." m --- .. /dr-."-II'g  __. _, E ...,.,. [] ---- E 1 i00he gurtin 00otel , | _ IOth STREET AT FOURTH ,IVgNUB MINNEAPOLIS l ffi= The Northwest' s Largest and Most BeautifulHostely All Rooms are Outsie and Each Room hu Private ltk  TARIFF: =.= 75 Rooms (Private Baths) Single at $2.00--Double $3.00 325 Rooms (Private Bathe) Single at $2.,r-Double $3.$0 I 200 Rooms (Private Baths) Single at $3 00--Doable $4.m i Others from $4.00 to St.00 i00iiHIIHHflHIHMflMIHIllmHIIIflmlIHIHmlflllflHHIHIIHmH00 duced in a single year $2,214,892 worth @ @ of butter. More than the counties of Clay, Wilkin, Traverse, Big Stone, Subscribers Recently Added To Stevens, Lee qui Parle, Chippewa, 'lhe Automobile Swift, Grant and Pope combined. Stevens county with its agricultural G.B. Campbell college, produced but $124,118 worth ha L. onnson of butter. Swift county leads in this Robert . .gOver00au.:n00 immediate section with a production Jxon,'ad .merberg of $766,563. ax Wmter The banner counties of the state J.A. bdeike in butter production are Ottertail, l]ss lviaage Kelly At prices that Stearns, Wright, McLeod, Carver, "ioa Farrell Steel and Freeborn, with a produc- J.P. Rohn are right. tion of over $2,000,000 each annually. F.B. Jest Twenty counties range from $1,000,-  G.H. ]nglund 000 to $2,000,000 and twenty from Julius Seeleld All work $500,000 to $1,000,000. hi. J. MciMroy guaranteed. Kittson county, away up in the Lloyd Gerhardt northwest corner of the state pro- H.B. Adams duced $265,947 worth of butter last Myrtle Larson I am located year and Marshall $425,739, and the Mrs. Win. O'Neill in the base- little county of Pennington $509,944, JOhn Crippen and the still smaller t%unty of Red F.L. Tooer ment of Lake $308,892, and Polk county, $1,- elen Hubbart Alvah Matthews 627,365. Fred Jaeger NOTICE TO HUNTERS.  N.G. Lindgren rage. Hunters are strictly forbidden to 'Kitty Clover Masse trespass or hunt on the following, des- Fred Kriesel Give me cribed premises: The east half of C.B. Oswood the southeast quarter, and north half Rev. J. C. Siegler A Trial. of southwest quarter and southwest Fred Bohmert quarter of southwest quarter of see- Anderson Brothers tion No. 1 and the northwest quarter Mrs. Fey Leigh of the northeast quarter of section " 0 B Jacobso[ No. 11, and the northeast quarter of section 12---all in the township of --Coverall Aprons, 98c, $1.19 and Odessa, Big Stone county, Minnesota, $1.48. Tyler's Variety Store. --SWAN NELSON, Owner. A splendid employment for idle funds until you have other use for them is one of our certificates of deposit payable in six nmnths or longer, bear- interest at Safe--Conservative NOW and then we feel as if we've got to talk about the quality of the lumber we sell. There is just as much difference in lum- ber as there is in leather or any other eomm,di.y. Well-season- ed lumber compares with well- tam.rod leather. If you want to be a well pleased patron, visit US, Geier Lumber Co. S00]]AN The Sedan enjoys, everywhe, a distinctly high social status, and yet its economy is one of the outstanding reasons for its strong hold on American appreciation. ge cov.sumtion is unttlold)y lows The tire mileage is unumally hh ALVAH 1. MATTHEWS Ortonville Minn. .; I 1921 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE "lelnddent, . - ns.l ui ,oo " o  . ViI I Federa I and Joint Stock Ld ba k t t ons uld only look mt th fu ] ' Why? Bu th banks wei tun as their prents ca Ik back El) EVERy THJRSDAY IoaRing money to fae on long ] ward over the pt, they would ar- by tit. I me at 6 per ce.t and the torment l dently ah'I V gorous y grasp this the & Mtmata Priatkl I Co. i one cerm tana v w Lieu up [ gtest opportunity of their life and n t ga on, rates of intest on fa o d man of h h pnmidmt [ loans nt up to sen and eight p-[ v Y t e pit-fails and temp- IIT Vize met cent per annum and the amen t alns tnt will be placed before L ............................. that tghodenanod t ?u e he veAftebr t of their period to pay as high  ten per cent s or fHure depends almost entlre- tax Dlal. in y instances famers were corn- g pp m y. er all suc- for +money on beth long and shertj lY uP n the pupil. The t on her time loans, or his part be a will a determination, JhnwalterlDiell Thi law should be ended so that i moti oardgoal, a h gh att<l noble L. E. Ltwiffz1 nu vxs  ne lo - Gce F. r sociatis c.]oan to faers on chat- A. B, Kaereher tle ulity at 6 praeced. mvber . Managing FAllt at the pest e41ee , under ee Act pER YEAR - - - Mhmeapelts Meyer, mging le W Finan Corpo- m SL000,O0000 fund r eongss for th : appears that thls appmpa- lpccial the big bankers, yet to be appoJeted about gency" for Mnnesot is comprised bke: Ntional Bank; Jaffray, psident Natlunal Bak; J. R+ Prentss, Wi- A. A+ Bennett, pas, on at, baoks, bankers ompanies, the corporation. Says, +'the oorporatlo, ha : to make extend them. The dvace funds to any bank, company in the which may bve agriltural breeding, ralsing and livestock, or y have . or redlscounted bt/ of exehge for such Congress hLe bn fine s ia its attitude toward the Mr. Meyer d. [t , but how about the we belleve, r and ,r months, making why in the name of era- decency should they $1,000.000,000 fund the people o a whole ? t per nt per annum, bke d the gevemeut diet t compelled to pay t- be dmited over by, whose le sire and arab; meummulate pfl d interest charges ? 1 Laud Bank  just to hd)e this mk, and no  ad s already in working controlled and actual faers CITIZEN5 NATIONAL BAN! polble rates of interes + the mortgage loan ] States fought the tiff* delidom ' when you r S from 3 to 5 y A stng d vigous body try wouM psper  it Lg d vigoro mind, the proper mhme in th the other developments d cnterpres spenslble as good wholesome food that would prosperity f the fa. ' absne from the me of r- Tf the dnnistmt des to do beveeag, and the fair thing by the faer it should fumh the Feder Land Bank vthl all the fund it needs to. supply the  DIVERSIFIED FARMING+ legimate and pressing needs of the  Too mh stress cannot be pl farme without delay, hpon the importan d neity of Helping the blg banks to unlimited d'ing and diversified farming. funds y. to such extent  they, th i Yust why Traverse, Bg Stone and big bk, feel disposed, help the 1o Lae qal Ple count.s  at the of the list of eunes of the but it is not the kind of state. pecHvy in the ord ned, the peop in the production of butter, ept Lake county, which is betwn T- If the big banks deme verse d Big Stone [n this eJe, is help  agenes Perhaps it ties (n the line up better ia pub]le g+od gve it to them, but do i pductlon of small I honestly, openly and aboveboard-- of the fertility of the sol. areal. Whatever the cause may be s r it, to fe. It the faers fo ful study of the flsrares compiled by on have an opportunity to work oul and Food atvation. port, convinces EDUCATION. Seht ha begun+ Some of at once get to work and orgi co- young people have commeed +, buy dairy cows college course, but the larger part  nd engage in dhetfied fain genelly, to get in the pcession of direct guidan of their paints farming emunlties, and at all friends, hut It is noticeable fm th port their tutors, on whom in tc p. responsibility. Ot,ly by all comhh,ed butter al+o lead n eamerles, i the greatest suss be achieved. The llttle county of Steele smalleri If the youn people eprls.gth Big stile, ha 23 co operative no ethel., and Make Arrangements Now (0r Your Requirements [or HEATING and PLUMBING - According to the news articles we read in the daily papers, the muskrats are building their houses early--add larger. Pretty good indica- tion, for nature's intimate friends usually get "tipped off." Don't wait until we are rushed with "hur- ried orders," see us NOW. It costs no more. , AUGUST LINDERT ORTONVILLE flHmmflflflflfli ..+. o'+o L, S "" ED E I N i he (urtt. oteI  rh NortAt '* Lgre#f and MostlamttfaIHll  75 Rm* Private BathsAsI/FF:e at $2.00--Doubl +00 s Room. Ipri...+,+ atb*{ ..... *2..--Dovb S.SO H summalIlmllamlmmHlml r duced in a single year $2214J92 worth @ Clay, Wflkn, Tve, Big Stone, Subribeta Rently Added TO Stevens, L qui Parle, CTppewa, 'the Independent Ltd. wift, Grmtt d Pope mbned. Stevens county with its aricuttural G. B Campbelt college produced but $124,118 worth #vm. C. ooann of butter. Swift unty ]es in this lober l ve immediate ston with a production omd tsterhe of $76,563. ax W,nLer The bner counties of J.A. hieke in batter pductJon a ,ss Uge Kelly Stear, Wright, McLeod,  Fxneli Steel nd Fbom, with a J.P. Rohn tion of over $2,00O,000 F.a. Jt G. H. Englund 000 to $2000,000 and twenty Julius SeeeJd $500,00O to $1,000,000+ L J. biety Kitten county, av up in the Lloyd Cermet state pro- H. B. Adds dueed $265.4 Myrtle Larson year d MarshaLl $425,739 ad the Mr Win. O'Neit Little county of Pen'ton $6O9.944, JOhn Cppen and the still smaller unty of Red F. U Tller Lake $092, and PoLk nnty, $1.- t%]en Hubba 627,36. Fred Jaeger NOTICE TO N.G. LJudcen Hunters are stly dtty Clever Ms4ee Fr.d Kriel pmi: The east half of C.B. Owood luarter, d norththalf Roy. J. C. $iegler Fred Bohme rquarter of outhwest quarter of s Andeon Brothe Mrs. Fey Leigh nut,he*st No. 11, and the northst quart of ll in the sMp of ---Coverall Apto, 9e, $1.19 Odessa. Big Stone unty, Minnesot $1.48. Tler's variety Sto. ---WAN NELSON, Ow.. Automobile Overhauling At prices that are right. All work guaranteed. I am located in the base. ment of Alvah Matthews grage. Give me A Trial. O.B. Jacobsen A splendid employment for idle funds until you have other use for them is one of our certificates of deposit payable in six nmnths or longer, bear- interest at 5N Safe--Conservative NOW and then e feet as if we've ot to talk ab the quaTity of the lunflr we sell There is just  much difference in lum- ber. as thee is in leather or any othc comnmdi[. Well-seasm- ed lumbex mparcs with well* tmni leather. If you want to be a nell pleasl patron, visit us. Gcier Lumber Co. The Sedan enjoys, everywhe, a distinctly high social status, and yet its economy is one of the outet reasons for its strong hold on American appreciation. ALVAH 1. MATTHEWS Or tonville Minn. SEPTEMBER 15, 192t Independent EVERY THURSDAY by the & Merchants Printing Co. President Vir.e-president Ltmdgren, Secretary Walter DinnetL, Treasurer OF DIRECTORS John Kaercher Walter Dimaell Olson L.E. Lundgren Grace F. Kaercher A. B. Kaercher - Managing Editor as second-class matter 1920, at the post odBee at imder the Act of $2.00 PER YEAR Rates ant pplication Advt. Representative. SELECT LIST. Bank, - - St. Paul St., - - Mimeapolis ,rese.ntstte "7 CREDIT. very much disappointed in loan agency" Eugene Meyer, managing ' the War Finance Corpora- has complete control and the $1,000,000,000 fund so to have been ap- congress for the special farmers. aPPears that this appropria- nade in fact for the special of the big bankers, unless tro other committees to be of agricultural men and real yet to be appointed about has thus far been said. agricultural loan agency" for of Minnesota is comprised named bankers: vice-president of National Bank; L) C. T. Jaffray, president rat National Bank; J. R. ;t. Paul; S. L. Prentiss, Wi- A. A. Bennett, Renville. aaounced that this cmmit- is to pass, on wmt, loans? No--upon applica- loans from banks, bankers COmpanies, and make recom- to the cooration. says, "the corporation ha to make loans for a year extend them. The corpora- advance funds to any bank, or trust company in the which may have made for agricultural purposes, the breeding, raising and of livestock, or may have or rediscounted notes bills of exchange for such Congress has been fine in its attitude toward the Mr. Meyer said. It appear, but how about the bankers have , we believe control of the Fed- Banks and are now, and for months, making the local banks dance to their in the name of corn- and decency should they the $1,000,000,000 fund to the people of the as a whole ? National re money direct from the at 4 per cent per annum ll additional charge in the and why should the men the bankers and all hu- bs entitled to receive aim[- the government direct compelled to pay tri- be dominated over by, Whose sole aim and ambi- profits thru interest charges ? Land Banks are just to handle this money and more so, and already in working are controlled and by actual farmers ' not fieed the aistance of the big banks whose are directed towarl rate possible out instead of helling him rates of interest. the mortgage loan fited States fought the i :,tl 4} THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE t Federal and Joint Stock Land banks. Why? Because these banks were loaning money to farmers on tong time at 6 per cent, and the moment the Federal Land bank was tied up in litigation, rates of interest on farm loans went up to seven and eight per cent per annum and the amounts were cut down to such an extent that in many instances farmers were com- pelled to pay as high as ten per cent for ,money on both long and short time loans. This law should be amended so that Federal Land banks thru the local as- sociati can loan to farmers on chat- tle security at 6 per cent for terms of from 3 to 5 years, and then this coun- try would prosper as it never has e- fore, and the local banks would have ample fields for business in various other developments and enterprises that would naturally result from the prosperity ,of the farmer. If the administration desires to do the fair thing by the farmer it should furnish the Federal Land Bank with all the funds it needs to  supply the legitimate and pressing needs of the farmers without delay. Helping the big banks to unlimited funds may, to such extent as they, the big banks, feel disposed, help the lo- cal banks and thru them the farmer, but it is not the kind of rural credit the people understood the administra- tion to promise nor the kind they are entitled to. If the big banks deserve help as agencies and instrumentali- ties in the line of public service and public good give it to them, but do it honestly, openly and above-board-- not under the false pretense of cred- it, to farmers. Det the farmers for once have an opportunity to work out their own salvation. EDUCATION. School ha begun. Some of our young people have commenced their college course, but the larger part are at home in the local schools under the direct guidance of their parents and friends, but all are in the hands of their tutors, on whom rests a great responsibility. Only by all combined, working in harmony and unison can the greatest success be achieved. If the young people cmprising the pupils of our great educational insti- tutions, could only look into the fu- ture as their parents can look back- ward over the past, they would ar- dently afd vigorously grasp this the greatest opportunity of their life and avoid many of the pit-falls and temp- tations that will be placed before them, and make the very best of their golden opportunity. After all suc- cess or failure depends almost entire- ly upon the pupil. There must on her or his part be a will, a determination, motive or goal, a high and noble purpose and aim to the achievement of which sacrifices nmst be made and self-denial practiced. A strong and vigorous body is es- sent[aLto a strong and vigorous mind, so the propeP mixture of athletics with the mental activities is as in- dispensible as good wholesome food and abstinence fhm the use of nar- cotics, and alcoholic beverages, and anything elsethat impairs the health. V DIVERSIFIED FARMING. "Too much stress cannot be placed upon the importance and necessity of dairying and diversified farming. Just why Traverse, Big Stone and Lac qui Parle counties are at the bottom of the list of counties of the state, respectively in the order named, in the production of butter, except Lake county, which is between Tra- verse and Big Stone in this scale, is unaccountable. Perhaps it is because these counties have held up better in production of small grain on account of the fertility of the soil. Whatever the cause may be a care- ful study of the figures compiled by the State Dairy and Food Commis- sion in its last report, convinces one that lack of co-operation is one of the causes and that these counties must at once get to work and organize co- operative creameries, buy dairy cows and engage in diversified falning generally, to get in the procession of up-to-date farming cmmunities, and i fact to succeed at all. It is noticeable from this report that the counties leading in the pro- duction of butter also lead in the number of co-operative creameries. The little county of Steele, smaller than Big Stine. has 23 co-operative creameries and no ethel,, and pro- Make - Arrangements Now for Your Requirements [or HEATING and PLUMBING According to the news articles we read in the daily papers, the muskrats are building their houses early--and larger. Pretty good indica- tion, for nature's intimate friends usually get "tipped off." Don't wait until we are rushed with "hur- ried orders," see us NOW. It costs no more. , AUGUST LINDERT ORTONVILLE 00HIIIIHIIIIIMIlmlIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIlIlIIIIlillIIIIMIilHIIMIIilIlHI00 - g ." m --- .. /dr-."-II'g  __. _, E ...,.,. [] ---- E 1 i00he gurtin 00otel , | _ IOth STREET AT FOURTH ,IVgNUB MINNEAPOLIS l ffi= The Northwest' s Largest and Most BeautifulHostely All Rooms are Outsie and Each Room hu Private ltk  TARIFF: =.= 75 Rooms (Private Baths) Single at $2.00--Double $3.00 325 Rooms (Private Bathe) Single at $2.,r-Double $3.$0 I 200 Rooms (Private Baths) Single at $3 00--Doable $4.m i Others from $4.00 to St.00 i00iiHIIHHflHIHMflMIHIllmHIIIflmlIHIHmlflllflHHIHIIHmH00 duced in a single year $2,214,892 worth @ @ of butter. More than the counties of Clay, Wilkin, Traverse, Big Stone, Subscribers Recently Added To Stevens, Lee qui Parle, Chippewa, 'lhe Automobile Swift, Grant and Pope combined. Stevens county with its agricultural G.B. Campbell college, produced but $124,118 worth ha L. onnson of butter. Swift county leads in this Robert . .gOver00au.:n00 immediate section with a production Jxon,'ad .merberg of $766,563. ax Wmter The banner counties of the state J.A. bdeike in butter production are Ottertail, l]ss lviaage Kelly At prices that Stearns, Wright, McLeod, Carver, "ioa Farrell Steel and Freeborn, with a produc- J.P. Rohn are right. tion of over $2,000,000 each annually. F.B. Jest Twenty counties range from $1,000,-  G.H. ]nglund 000 to $2,000,000 and twenty from Julius Seeleld All work $500,000 to $1,000,000. hi. J. MciMroy guaranteed. Kittson county, away up in the Lloyd Gerhardt northwest corner of the state pro- H.B. Adams duced $265,947 worth of butter last Myrtle Larson I am located year and Marshall $425,739, and the Mrs. Win. O'Neill in the base- little county of Pennington $509,944, JOhn Crippen and the still smaller t%unty of Red F.L. Tooer ment of Lake $308,892, and Polk county, $1,- elen Hubbart Alvah Matthews 627,365. Fred Jaeger NOTICE TO HUNTERS.  N.G. Lindgren rage. Hunters are strictly forbidden to 'Kitty Clover Masse trespass or hunt on the following, des- Fred Kriesel Give me cribed premises: The east half of C.B. Oswood the southeast quarter, and north half Rev. J. C. Siegler A Trial. of southwest quarter and southwest Fred Bohmert quarter of southwest quarter of see- Anderson Brothers tion No. 1 and the northwest quarter Mrs. Fey Leigh of the northeast quarter of section " 0 B Jacobso[ No. 11, and the northeast quarter of section 12---all in the township of --Coverall Aprons, 98c, $1.19 and Odessa, Big Stone county, Minnesota, $1.48. Tyler's Variety Store. --SWAN NELSON, Owner. A splendid employment for idle funds until you have other use for them is one of our certificates of deposit payable in six nmnths or longer, bear- interest at Safe--Conservative NOW and then we feel as if we've got to talk about the quality of the lumber we sell. There is just as much difference in lum- ber as there is in leather or any other eomm,di.y. Well-season- ed lumber compares with well- tam.rod leather. If you want to be a well pleased patron, visit US, Geier Lumber Co. S00]]AN The Sedan enjoys, everywhe, a distinctly high social status, and yet its economy is one of the outstanding reasons for its strong hold on American appreciation. ge cov.sumtion is unttlold)y lows The tire mileage is unumally hh ALVAH 1. MATTHEWS Ortonville Minn. .; I