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The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
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September 21, 1922     The Ortonville Independent
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September 21, 1922
 

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PAGE 8 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER O | WANT ADS ; RATES---Gr.e cent per line per in- ertiom Minimum charge 25 cents. Payment for want-ads in advanc,, mill be appreciated; the book.keep- er will thus be relieved of the work of keeping raany small accounts. mlLs. LOST--Small black water spaniel. Notify I. E. Kahler, Columbian Hotel, Ortonville, for reward. 20-2 LOST--Brown Spaniel puppy. Re- turn to R. C. Kaercher. Ortonviile. WANTED--Six young women to take training for professional nurses at Ortonvide r:vangeiica Hospital. This Training Sc!loo . for nurses is recognized and accve,!ited by the Minnesota State Boa:(i of Ex- amir, ers for Nurses and twa years of training will be given here and the third or final year require[ for registration as an R. N. wiI! be given at some Hospital in Mira:ca- polls or St. Paul. Clara Kruegc:. P_ N. Supt. Ortmwille Evangelical Hospila]. HEMSTYFCHING--Will do hemstitch- ing at 10c t': yard. Mrs. A. L. Waddams. tf. gANTED--?,  with trucks to work on road ' xelling job. Steady work assu:'red during all of fail season. C :: in touch with the Inde- pendent office at once. 20-1 WANTID--A competent girl. Apply at Ciumbian Hotel. "20-1 FOR RENT--Barn for the winter, r for about 4 head of stock. E. J. S:evens, pnone 103-J3. *tf FOR ,\\;LE--In Malta township, sev- erfl tons cf good slough hay, also rny ,-.cru in the field. Write or phone Mrs. P. Clarke, Ortonville. , *20-2 ]FOR SALE--Two pure-bred Duroc I Jersey boars. W.D. Heathman, Or- ,_ tony/lie, Route 1. 19-2 R SALE--An Avery Tractor 8x16 with three plows, price $275.00. i John H. Martin, Clinton. "20-1 i'OR sALE--Remington typewrite', I fe and range. Inquire of Martin i Schoen. "20-1 Cites F00ctsToSet Road Critics Right Ofl'fi:ial Bulletin Offers Information to Up Misunderstandings About ] State Good Roads Plan Govd Roads Amendment No. 1, lussed in 1920 by a big majority to adopt the Babcock Plan, will be suc- ended on the November state election ballots by Rural Credits Amendment No. 1. Although in operation about 16 months and already spreading trunk mmite betterments to all sections of the state, the Babcock plan is not yet universally understood in all its fea- tures, according to a bulletin this week from the state highway depart- ment. The bulletin adds six facts in an effort to correct most of the mis- understandings: 1--Babcock plan improvements on trunk highways are paid for entirely with motor vehicle tax funds and federal highway aid, totaling about $7,500,000 average for the first two years. 2--Counties are relieved of the big pense of improving and keeping up the heavy-traveled highways, but with the townships are left all state aid and local road tax funds-about $20,000,000 a year--to use on the lo- cal or feeder roads. ! 3--Counties issuing reimbursement i bonds to finance trunk highway ira- I provements will be repaid, interest in-I eluded on all except one Hennepin county issue, from the state trunki highway funds, i 4--County and township tax levies i for road and bridge purposes last l year, for the first time in the his-[ tory of the state, were reduced alloui $1,500,000 and Other cuts will follow I since the state has taken over the most expensive roads. 5--Motor vehicle owners iil general are finding that better roads make! saving on car upkeep, tires and gas-i olhe which more than off-set higher Wm. G. McADOO William G. McAdoo, captaining one of the tug of wax teams at the An- nual indian Field Day celebration, held in Yosemite National Park, Cal. The tugging was lively at all times, but more especially after two Indians, near each other on the opposing sides CATTLE STEADY, HOGS DECLINE Healthy Demand Features Cattle Trade Degree Of Strength Noted Since Close 0fWeek--Hogs Lower Tuesday's Closing Cattle 2,500. Killing classes of cat- tie steady. Calves 1,500 Unevenly r ' highe , bulk light calves to packers[ $10.75 to $11.00, extreme top to ship-] pers $11.75. Hogs 4,500, 10 to 25ci lower, top $9.50, bulk $7.50 to $9.40. l sheep 1,800. Lambs closing about 50c 1 higher top $13.25, sheep steady. I South St. Paul, Minn., September] 19, 1922. Aggregate receipts of cat-I tle locally for first two days this i week 12,700,a slight falling off from i the 13,715 the same days last week.  Market on killing classes has car- ried a good strong undertone and while today's trade was quoted as steady, the strength noted-te open- ing day of the week was retained and in a general way outlet for beef steers and she stock is quoted as strong to 25c higher than at the close of the week. Limit on fed steers $9.00, but there! has been nothing of outstanding qual-i ity and finish included and this class t of cattle are nominally quoted from I $8.50 to $10.50. Bulk grass fat steers $5.00 to $7.00 with well conditioned range steers up to $7.50 with indi- I vidual steers up to $8.00. I A spread of $3.25 to $5.00 is taking I in the bulk of grass fat cows and i heifers now coming, with best range cows included upward to $5.25, with l straight lots of range heifers upward jJ to $6.50, this price list showing an t upturn of 15 to 25c from late last1 week. Canners and cutters strong, t bulk canners around $2.50, with $2.75 to $3.00 popular for cutters. Bulls mostly 25c higher than late last week, bolognas mostly $3.50 to $4.25. Veal calves ,unevenly higher today, bulk light veals to Daeleers $10.75 to $11.00 extreme top to shippers $11.75. Market for Stackers and feeders has shown a good strong tone both yesterday and today and the better grades are quotable strong with the close of the week. Good and choice stackers and feeders are now clear- ing at a spread of $6.00 to $7.50, me- dium and common, the kinds that predominate, $4.50 to $6.00, common light steers down to $3.50. Hogs sold 10 to 25c or more low- er range $7 to $9.50, bulk $7.50 to $9.40 pigs $9.35 to $9.40, Bulk of fat lambs at the close today $13.25, seconds mostly $7.00 ,fat ewes largely $3.50 to $5.75. Western feeding lambs around $11.50 to $13.00 natives $8.00 to $9.25, feedin ewes $4.00 to $4.50. CHAS. BRUCE. IN TUG OF WAR extended the argument to include their feet. A few seconds after this picture was taken the rope broke and the forner Secretary of the Treasurer went down, head over heels, only to come up smiling as he did in the troublous days of the war. CENSUS SHOWS 7. S. LEADS IN CARS More Autos Bought By Americans During Past Year Than Rest of World Owns Pessimists and knockers and mem- bers of the Ancient Order of Gloom got a jolt when the 1922 automobile registration figures for United States came out. Despite generally adverse business conditions and the fact that thousands of cars went out of service, the peo- ple of this country own 1,428,773 more automobiles and trucks now than they did a year ago, an increase of 15 percent; As a matter of fact Americans bought within the past twelve months nearly as many cars as-the rest of the world owns altogether. Statisti- cians figure that fhe];e are about 12 800,000 cars running in the world, all of which but about 2,000,000 are owned in this country. Great Britain has about 497,000 cars, Canada 463,000, France 236o000, Germany 91,000 and the next one down the list is Argentine with 75,- 000. There are only 12 states out of the 45 in this country which do not own more cars than Argentine. This state alone with a registration of 343,000 owns more cars than any foreign country in the world, except Great Britain and Canada. That means 343,000 cars and trucks carrying .merchandise, supplementing the railroad service, carrying men back and forth to work, bringing the falTner and his produce into town from where he carries back the manu- factured goods that he needs in his home or oh the farm, enabling the working man to live out beyond the congested areas and own a little tract of land and still keep up his work in the city, performing in one hun- dred ad one ways various useful functions in the dvelopment and operation of a great 'industrial na- tion. "New York leads the country in the number of cars, then comes Ohio with its rich industrial and agricultural wealth, then comes California the r--ground of the nation, then busy i .asylvania and then the rich state o Illinois Any one of these five American states own more cars than any foreign country on the globe. Canad has only a few 'hundred more ca,s than Michigan, the state where so many aotomobiles are manu- factured. Then comes Texas, Indiana, Iowa, Massachusetts, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Missouri, Kansas, and New Jersey, all of whom have more cars than France, the third largest car owning foreign taxes on their carsthat automobile and truck and tire makers and oil re-; liners are indirectly paying for the good roads. 6--Altho Hennepin, Ramsey and St. Louis counties are paying more than $2 000,000 annuaiiy or about 40 per cent of the auto taxes, not one dollar of trunk highway money is or can be used in St. Paul, Minneapolis or Du- luth, in spite of their big contribu- tions to the fund. Foregoing statements of fact an- swers the most common objections to the Mghway development plan, near- iy all of which are due to misinforma- tion, the bulletin continues, and others on minor features will be answered when sent to the St. Paul offices of the state highway department. WHEN WE ALL PUL/L TOGETHER What wonderful relults have been obtaine(r by concerted efforts in the recent war c.cth-ities. Without this unity of pro.pose on the part of the people o comnmnities the mammoth Liberty Loans could not have been possible, the Red Cross campaigns would have failed, and, in fact, none of the great things that we have ac- mplished could have been possible with the people of the country pulling iu opposite directions. This is true just as large a sense in eonlmun- ittg  work of the Buy, at-Home Move- I imet. With each and every resident I of a ceanmunity pulling for the home I town, a force ispresented that can'[ not be defeated. That town will thrive--there i no such word as failq I RED CROSS NOTES nation. 0 . Nebraska, Florida, Oklahoma, Wash a --oska c,,,,,,, xT ..... ington, Colorado, North Carolina, Vir- a 34 all last wek nosi&: i,o glnla, Maryland, Kentucky, ' Georgia, _, .... ___ .... __, ,,._ ,   to ectlcut, tenne see, outn uaKota, Sile WaS In aLLUIIURIIC a% Lne bounI:v--re "" ":' " " wt,...ll n,.. as,r- wh,r* =ha nnn,,.+" I  gon all run aneaa ot tiermany, , the fourth owmng foreign country ed a health booth with instructive ........ honlth --hih;e ] .a_laoama, ArKansas, laOUlSlana, .................... ain Y a In a few da s Miss Ro oshas- I M e, North D kota, South Carohna, ,.., ' .Y -. g.. .zalutah, West Virginia are all ahead of u m commence ner lnspeclon ox scnom I Ar'entine children throughout the county It is! : -'- - - - ei1 to i " " at thes r"" " " rive states snowe an increase o "em.emoer m e p enmm- " a e  .... ar- examinations made b th nurs 100,000 carsln y ar nth Ilhnmslust ) , ...... Y . ..e under the mark. "In other words. Cali- suliiae :n:ILeen  se y stnal:nml!Y fornia, Florida, Illinois, New York and p ":'" , p to co{r-  ....... il ..... Pennwlvanla added more cars math- ec oeleczs, wn e on me suoject in" toe--" las" " year than any of the other of medical examinations, we would countrie except Great'Britain, Can- like to make a plea for semi-yearly ada andirance examinations for every person every- where. You do not wait for your auto to fall to pieces before you be- gin to repair it; why do less for the human "machine? How can we pre- vent what we do not know exists? How are we going to find out the be ginning of disease unless we have an overhauling once in a while? Think it over. isn't it cheaper to avoid illness than to try to cure it? Statis- tics show that 75 percent of the po- verty existing is caused through poor health. Isn't it time to try to lower this percentage, as an economic fac- tor, if not from a health standpoint? Requiescat "MAD" had a little lamb": R almost makes me cry, The way the jokesmiths keep this up And won't let Mary die. Stuffed Olives in Aspic Stone Svanish green olives and fill eavitles with, green butter Place small molds in van of ice water and hour in aspic jelly mixture one-fourth inch deep. When firm rut an olive in each mold (keepin olives in place width small wooden skewers) and add asvic by soonfuls until molds are filled. Chill thoroughly. When re- moved to serve, garnish with hrd- boiled egg. strips of red pevper, et For reen butter mix yolk of one hard boiled eg, two tablespoonfuls butter, one spri paslev, one svri tarragon, one small shallot, one-half teaspoon- ful anchovy, paste, one teaspoonful cavers, one teaspoonful chop:l gher- kins. Pound in mortar then rub through a very fine sieve. Season with salt and pepper and add a few drops of vinegar. NEIGHBORING COUNTY RALLIES that Minnesota-made farm tractors i O SUPPORT OF NEAR EAST. operated oy U. W. Harthill, (iicecor i of agriculture for the Near Eas Re- Ye (. Medicine county has adopt-i lief, imd begun work pulling up barb- ed 1C orphans of the Bible Lands of ied wire entanglements from the bat- the Near East. to l! tlefields of Transcaucasia. The sal- vaged wire is being used for fences. The announcement was made day by Dr..George E. White, state! Mr. Harthill is authority for the statement that American farm ma-I Director of he Near East Relief, on' receiving word from Judge Charles F i chinerv is rapidly forcing back the  tdes of famine that have swept over i Hall who is head of the organization th e Bible countries, i in Yellow Medicine count), for the:, "Acres of land, unseeded during[ gathering of a "gift of wieat" to i tide over the Near East refugees un-!War"invasin and consequent periods i of famine," he says, "have been sown i til the next harvest, to wheat, barley and flax. Ground According to Judge Hall the Yel- about American orphanages has been low Medicine County Near East Re-! carefully cultivated in order that an lief Association has been formed and l adequate supply of food will be on 6C0 shares will be sold at $10 since it i hand for the children despite an), turn is estimated that $60 will take care l of events and in addition, food sup-! of an armenian child in one of the!plies have been furnished to framers many orphan asylums of the country if n many districts upon the condition for a year. I that seed sunplies on hand be sown Dr. White was recently informed i instead of hoarded for food." hsrter 6459 Reserve District No. 9 Report 01 tha Condition of the First National Bank, at Ortonville. in the State of Minnesota, at the close of business September 15, 1922. RESOURCES. 1. a. Loans an=l discounts, libelling rediounts, acceptances of other hsnks, and foreign bills 9f exchange or drafts sold with indorse- ment of this bank (except those shown in b and c) ...................... $293,026.27 2. Overdrafts, secured, none; unsecured, $249.53 ................................ 249.53 4. U. S. Government SecuriHes Owned: a Deposited to secure circulation U. S. bonds par value) ............... 25,000 00 b. All other U. S. Govt. securities (including premiums, if any) ....... 53,150.00 Total ................................................................................................ 7.150.00 5 Other bonds, stocks, securities, etc.: .......................................... 48,050.00 8 Banking house, $,000.00 : furniture and fixture, $4000.00 ....... 10,000.00 7. Real estate owned other than banking house ........................ 4,000.0 8. Lawful reserve witb Federal Reserve Bank ............................................ 23,0oo.0a 10. Cash in vaui and amount due from national banks .......................... 86,609.62 11. Amount due from state banks, bankers, and trust companies in the U. S. (other than included in items 8 and 10) .................................. 13. Checks on other banks in ".he came city or town as reporting hank other than item 12) ................................................................. 85.10 Total of items8, 10, 11, and 13 .................................................. 86,694.72 14. L Cheeks and drafts on banks (including Federal Re-'ve Bank) located outside of city or town of reporting bank ................... 171.25 b. Miscel|aneous cash items ....................................................................... 171.25 15. Redemption "fund with U. S. treasurer and due from U. S. trsrer 1,250.00 16. Otter Assets, if any: Interest earned but not collected .................... 9,315.49 Total 553,907.26 17. Capital soek paid in ' 25,000.00 I 18. Surplus fund 10,000.00 19. Undivided profits. $13,372.86 c. Less current expenses, inteeest, and taxes paid ........................... 4,109.68 9.63.18 20. Circulating notes outtsmdlng .......................................... 25,00.08 3. ount due to State banks, bankers, and trot eomanit in the U. S. and foreign countries .............................................................. 1,920.68 Total of item 23 1,920.68 Demand deposits (other than .................................................................. bank deposits) sub.t to Reserve (deposits payable within $0 days): #6. Individual deposits subject to check .................................................. 129,158.61 7 Certificates of deposit due in. less than 30 days (other than for money borrowed) ............... : .............................................................. 78,529.07 Total of demand devosit (other than bank deposit) ubjeet to reserve, it.ms 26 and 27 .............................................. 207,687.68 $2. Certificates of deposit (other than for money borrowed} ............. 265,1S1.82 ]4. Other time deposits ....................................................................................... 9,853.90 Total of time deposits subject to reserve items 32 and 34 ..... 275,035.72 Total .......................................................... 553,907.26 State of Minnesota, Count of Big Stone--ss I, John Michell, presidett of the above-naed bank. do olemnly swmr tat the abov atement ts true to the best of my knowledge and elief. JOHN MICHELL. Preet. Subscribed and worn to before me this 20th day of September. 1922 RAYMOND B: CHRISMAN. Notary Public. Correct Attest: O. I. Chambsrlin. John E. Palmer, Charles Bolsta, Directors Cheese With Olives Put one-quarter pound cheese, and one-quarter fort cheese, in bowl, !itb -ap,",re,i mi:> together. Chop small bottle ed Spanish green olives, a salt and white pepper, drops of onion juice if d i makes delightful filling ! wiches, also may be for, e tie round balls'for salad glass jar and keep on ice. Navajo Blankets and from the Oregon woolen Grosenick's. Let The Independent [ HONOR W[ WON-- I=INEST PRt;g! THE SUN ! Like Any Mortal We are mightily because the public well of us. Well, it seems to turn out that if you give out, with you do business, the sort of a deaL They ing to boost your only smooth thing the perfect manner we plane our lumber. 6clef tum00er One MamSaemmd by The Drunswick-Balke- Collender 84% Against Friction What 84% Friction- Proofed Means FHction is the enemy of tire life. The trc of 95 blow-outs in 100. ]By special ,process Brunswick Tires are now 84% Friction, Proofed. A new con- ception of tire ice  is thus effecte& Endur- ance is multiplied. Troubles are redceto an amazing minimum. Owners of Brunswick Tires are gaining an en- tirely new conception of tire service. Made by a new, scientific process, thes ::res are revealing amazing endurance to road wear. Friction is the enemy of tire life, for friction de- velops heat, and heat destroys the vitality of rub- ber. 95 blowouts in 100 are charged to friction, to road burn. By this new process of compounding rubber Brunswick Tires are made 84% Friction-Proof, the ultimate in road resistance yet attained. Note, too, the 84% Friction-Proofed Brunswick conforms to the d HsL It costs no more than standard tires. See this new Brunswick. Then enjoy multiplied service, a mi-;mum of tro ORTONVILLE TIRE-SHO GLEN HARRIS, Proprietor