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The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
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September 23, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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September 23, 2003
 

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IND ENDENT heart" "A Constructive Newspaper In A Live Community" ;: !+ q 4 IZE WINNERS OF THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT FISHING CONTEST received their week. The scrip they won will be spent at local businesses who sponsored the contest all are Carol Dragt of Lakeshore RV Park, presenting Ortonville's Jodi Steilow with $190 td category. Albert Lotthammer of Ortonville received $100 scrip for the walleye Rasset of Bud's Bait, and in front, Stacy Homan of Ortonville received $190 from Bait. Katie Duros of Omaha, NE is shown in the inset photo. She won $205 for the n, Hardware Store red Watertown PO Ortonville's " his new ven- busi- last Friday staff writer in the Opinion. It entirely.) *tsts from Jim Larson's laYing out plans for a new business to devel =+ opment. Take one of his latest ventures: hardware. From the outside, the True Value Store on Ortonville's Main Street looks like any other hardware store-- mowers, barbecue' grills, yard and garden items and wheelbarrows line the sidewalk out front. But step inside, meet the new owner and you soon get the picture this isn't meant to be just any old hardware store. For years, the native of Britton, S.D., had driven through Ortonville going to and from his business in Minneapolis. Larson said he was always amazed by the attraction of Big Stone Lake and what he saw as the potential for developing this town on the Minnesota-South Dakota bor- der from its resources. The True Value Store is one of the first steps toward making that vision a reality. (Continued on page 4) turnout expected for duck opener at noon this Sat. be flocking to as duck hunt- this Saturday, Nelsen, Big "W -. arden, tons of m the area for a that there are a at Sept. 24 n will be held from l I a.m. Charles Hall in is $4. Open to fair number of ducks in the area, which should make for good hunting. Although some of the county's small- er sloughs are dried up as a result of previous drought conditions, the larg- er ones still have quite a bit of water, and will be sufficient for hunting. Duck hunting is a 60-day season, however there are shorter duck sea- sons within that time frame. Pintail season, for example, is only a 30-day season, and runs through the first half of regular duck season. Canvasback season, also a 30-day season, is set to begin on October 11. Nelsen reminds hunters to look at their hunting supplements, so they are familiar with the rules and regulations of this hunting season. "Spinning- wing motor decoys are illegal on pub- lic waters for the first couple of weeks in the season," said Nelsen. Nelsen also mentioned that hunters should pay attention to limits. Although this year's limit remians six ducks per day, there are some restric- tions on those limits. Scaups are lim- ited to three per day, Mallards have a limit of four per day, with only two Mallard hens per day, and Redheads have a limit of two per day. Pintai] and Canvasbacks are both limited to one duck per day within their respec- tive seasons. For the first couple of weeks in the (Continued on page 3) m H| : 'Kid Co. Board will hold public hearing before adopting feedlot ordinance Big Stone County Environmental Officer Darren Wilke met with Big Stone County Commissioners at their regular meeting last Tuesday to dis- cuss the adoption of a revised Feediot Ordinance. The Planning and Zoning Commission of Big Stone County has been working on revising the ordi- nance for quite some time, and after several meetings and a public hearing, Planning and Zoning has created a draft, and made a recommendation that the Board of Commissioners adopts the revised ordinance. Wilke discussed some of the revi- sions with Commissioners, including a two-mile setback from the bluff of Big Stone Lake, an animal unit cap of 3,000 units, minimum acreage requirements and a requirement to inject or incorporate manure, taking into account sensitive areas. 'I think we have a very good docu- ment here for you," said Wilke. He also mentioned he felt the revised ordinance was progressive when com- pared with other counties in the area. Commissioners set Tuesday, Novermber 4 at 10 a.m. for a public hearing to be held in the Big Stone County Courtroom, before the County Board will make a decision to accept or not accept the recommendation from Planning and Zoning. No fur- ther action was taken regarding the ordinance. Big Stone County Attorney Bill Watson advised Commissioners on the Deputy Registrar appointment. According to Watson, the State Department of Public Safety grants permission to County Auditors to accept the deputy registrar position or can appoint a deputy registrar. Big Stone County Auditor Michelle Knutson has expressed dis- comfort in doing this, as she would then be responsible to oversee the actions of the deputy registrar. According to Knutson, she does not feel she has sufficient knowledge of the deputy registrar position to be comfortable in doing this. Watson informed Commissioners that the Department of Public Safety is currently looking into this issue, to (Continued on page 3) AVID HUNTER Roger Hynnek and his dog Rusty brought home three geese one day last week during early goose season Many wildlife lovers expected at Ducks Unlimited Banquet Friday Big Stone Lake Area Ducks Unlimited will be holding their annu- al banquet this Friday, September 26 at the Matador in Ortonville. Social hour begins at 5:30, supper will be served around 7 p.m. Cost to attend the event will be $40 for a sin- gle person, $50 for couples, and $25 for anyone 17 and under. Purchasing a ticket also includes membership to Ducks Unlimited. WELCA of Eidskog Fall dinner Oct. 12th The WELCA of EIDSKOG LUTHERAN CHURCH of rural ORTONVILLE will be having a FALL FUNDRAISER DINNER serving TURKEY, DRESSING and all the trimmings and HOMEMADE PIE on SUNDAY OCT. 12TH, 2003 from 1 I am to I pm PLEASE JOIN US FOR GOOD FOOD AND GREAT FELLOWSHIP-HUNTERS WELCOME. Co hosted with supplemental funds by Thrivent Financial for Lutherans Branch #31319. (Adv) :ill: iiiiiii: ii  " +',iii Many prizes will be given away in this year's raffles, including guns, wildlife prints and more. Additionally, an additional prize will be given away this year. For the Jacob Riley Memorial Raffle, kids that have participated in gun safety training, and have received their permits, will be eligible for the drawing. Ducks Unlimited spends much of their money on habitat conservation. This year, many funds from the local Ducks Unlimited chapter were used to restore wetlands in Big Stone County. Tickets for the event may be pur- chased from any Ducks Unlimited Committee member. Tickets may also be purchased at Hasslen Construction in Ortonvill. Everyone is encouraged to attend this year's Ducks Unlimited event. [ INDEPENDENT WANT ADS BRING QUICK RESULTS! } Student Concepts inside this issue Included in local issues of The Ortonville Independent js a spe- cial section entitled "Student Concepts", highlighting college choices and other issues facing high school students. Student Concepts offers tips and advice to students, and par- ents of students who are begin- ning to think about their future, whether it is continuing their edu- cation or beginning their careers. I i III   i i'i i ii' i  Picture day set at Ortonville School Individual Student pictures are scheduled to be taken at Ortonville School by Sherman Studio for the 2003-2004 yearbook and for package orders. Elementary, early childhood, and special education students will be photographed Tuesday, Oct. 1. Headstart and students in grades seven through 11 will be photographed Thursday, Oct. 2th. Envelopes with instructions and pricing will be sent home with students this week. (Adv.) IJJ lal' :NIl || i: :/   :;i : +: i%+ :,::i i: +:::I:I':: : ' ........  .... SENIOR LIVING CENTER will soon be a reality, and construction on theproject is set to ptem)er 29. According to Marketing Director Joan Hasslen, a ground-breaking cere- later date, after construction has begun. Hasslen also mentioned that 12 peopFe have the housing, and there are over 100 potential residents of the complex. Hasslen has been impressed by the community involvement during this l)roject, and is excited to see it all coming togeth- er. Pictured above, an architectual image of how the buildlng is expected to look after construction is com- pleted. Hasslen said the general contractor of the project estimated the building would be up in approxi. mately six weeks. IND ENDENT heart" "A Constructive Newspaper In A Live Community" ;: !+ q 4 IZE WINNERS OF THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT FISHING CONTEST received their week. The scrip they won will be spent at local businesses who sponsored the contest all are Carol Dragt of Lakeshore RV Park, presenting Ortonville's Jodi Steilow with $190 td category. Albert Lotthammer of Ortonville received $100 scrip for the walleye Rasset of Bud's Bait, and in front, Stacy Homan of Ortonville received $190 from Bait. Katie Duros of Omaha, NE is shown in the inset photo. She won $205 for the n, Hardware Store red Watertown PO Ortonville's " his new ven- busi- last Friday staff writer in the Opinion. It entirely.) *tsts from Jim Larson's laYing out plans for a new business to devel =+ opment. Take one of his latest ventures: hardware. From the outside, the True Value Store on Ortonville's Main Street looks like any other hardware store-- mowers, barbecue' grills, yard and garden items and wheelbarrows line the sidewalk out front. But step inside, meet the new owner and you soon get the picture this isn't meant to be just any old hardware store. For years, the native of Britton, S.D., had driven through Ortonville going to and from his business in Minneapolis. Larson said he was always amazed by the attraction of Big Stone Lake and what he saw as the potential for developing this town on the Minnesota-South Dakota bor- der from its resources. The True Value Store is one of the first steps toward making that vision a reality. (Continued on page 4) turnout expected for duck opener at noon this Sat. be flocking to as duck hunt- this Saturday, Nelsen, Big "W -. arden, tons of m the area for a that there are a at Sept. 24 n will be held from l I a.m. Charles Hall in is $4. Open to fair number of ducks in the area, which should make for good hunting. Although some of the county's small- er sloughs are dried up as a result of previous drought conditions, the larg- er ones still have quite a bit of water, and will be sufficient for hunting. Duck hunting is a 60-day season, however there are shorter duck sea- sons within that time frame. Pintail season, for example, is only a 30-day season, and runs through the first half of regular duck season. Canvasback season, also a 30-day season, is set to begin on October 11. Nelsen reminds hunters to look at their hunting supplements, so they are familiar with the rules and regulations of this hunting season. "Spinning- wing motor decoys are illegal on pub- lic waters for the first couple of weeks in the season," said Nelsen. Nelsen also mentioned that hunters should pay attention to limits. Although this year's limit remians six ducks per day, there are some restric- tions on those limits. Scaups are lim- ited to three per day, Mallards have a limit of four per day, with only two Mallard hens per day, and Redheads have a limit of two per day. Pintai] and Canvasbacks are both limited to one duck per day within their respec- tive seasons. For the first couple of weeks in the (Continued on page 3) m H| : 'Kid Co. Board will hold public hearing before adopting feedlot ordinance Big Stone County Environmental Officer Darren Wilke met with Big Stone County Commissioners at their regular meeting last Tuesday to dis- cuss the adoption of a revised Feediot Ordinance. The Planning and Zoning Commission of Big Stone County has been working on revising the ordi- nance for quite some time, and after several meetings and a public hearing, Planning and Zoning has created a draft, and made a recommendation that the Board of Commissioners adopts the revised ordinance. Wilke discussed some of the revi- sions with Commissioners, including a two-mile setback from the bluff of Big Stone Lake, an animal unit cap of 3,000 units, minimum acreage requirements and a requirement to inject or incorporate manure, taking into account sensitive areas. 'I think we have a very good docu- ment here for you," said Wilke. He also mentioned he felt the revised ordinance was progressive when com- pared with other counties in the area. Commissioners set Tuesday, Novermber 4 at 10 a.m. for a public hearing to be held in the Big Stone County Courtroom, before the County Board will make a decision to accept or not accept the recommendation from Planning and Zoning. No fur- ther action was taken regarding the ordinance. Big Stone County Attorney Bill Watson advised Commissioners on the Deputy Registrar appointment. According to Watson, the State Department of Public Safety grants permission to County Auditors to accept the deputy registrar position or can appoint a deputy registrar. Big Stone County Auditor Michelle Knutson has expressed dis- comfort in doing this, as she would then be responsible to oversee the actions of the deputy registrar. According to Knutson, she does not feel she has sufficient knowledge of the deputy registrar position to be comfortable in doing this. Watson informed Commissioners that the Department of Public Safety is currently looking into this issue, to (Continued on page 3) AVID HUNTER Roger Hynnek and his dog Rusty brought home three geese one day last week during early goose season Many wildlife lovers expected at Ducks Unlimited Banquet Friday Big Stone Lake Area Ducks Unlimited will be holding their annu- al banquet this Friday, September 26 at the Matador in Ortonville. Social hour begins at 5:30, supper will be served around 7 p.m. Cost to attend the event will be $40 for a sin- gle person, $50 for couples, and $25 for anyone 17 and under. Purchasing a ticket also includes membership to Ducks Unlimited. WELCA of Eidskog Fall dinner Oct. 12th The WELCA of EIDSKOG LUTHERAN CHURCH of rural ORTONVILLE will be having a FALL FUNDRAISER DINNER serving TURKEY, DRESSING and all the trimmings and HOMEMADE PIE on SUNDAY OCT. 12TH, 2003 from 1 I am to I pm PLEASE JOIN US FOR GOOD FOOD AND GREAT FELLOWSHIP-HUNTERS WELCOME. Co hosted with supplemental funds by Thrivent Financial for Lutherans Branch #31319. (Adv) :ill: iiiiiii: ii  " +',iii Many prizes will be given away in this year's raffles, including guns, wildlife prints and more. Additionally, an additional prize will be given away this year. For the Jacob Riley Memorial Raffle, kids that have participated in gun safety training, and have received their permits, will be eligible for the drawing. Ducks Unlimited spends much of their money on habitat conservation. This year, many funds from the local Ducks Unlimited chapter were used to restore wetlands in Big Stone County. Tickets for the event may be pur- chased from any Ducks Unlimited Committee member. Tickets may also be purchased at Hasslen Construction in Ortonvill. Everyone is encouraged to attend this year's Ducks Unlimited event. [ INDEPENDENT WANT ADS BRING QUICK RESULTS! } Student Concepts inside this issue Included in local issues of The Ortonville Independent js a spe- cial section entitled "Student Concepts", highlighting college choices and other issues facing high school students. Student Concepts offers tips and advice to students, and par- ents of students who are begin- ning to think about their future, whether it is continuing their edu- cation or beginning their careers. I i III   i i'i i ii' i  Picture day set at Ortonville School Individual Student pictures are scheduled to be taken at Ortonville School by Sherman Studio for the 2003-2004 yearbook and for package orders. Elementary, early childhood, and special education students will be photographed Tuesday, Oct. 1. Headstart and students in grades seven through 11 will be photographed Thursday, Oct. 2th. Envelopes with instructions and pricing will be sent home with students this week. (Adv.) IJJ lal' :NIl || i: :/   :;i : +: i%+ :,::i i: +:::I:I':: : ' ........  .... SENIOR LIVING CENTER will soon be a reality, and construction on theproject is set to ptem)er 29. According to Marketing Director Joan Hasslen, a ground-breaking cere- later date, after construction has begun. Hasslen also mentioned that 12 peopFe have the housing, and there are over 100 potential residents of the complex. Hasslen has been impressed by the community involvement during this l)roject, and is excited to see it all coming togeth- er. Pictured above, an architectual image of how the buildlng is expected to look after construction is com- pleted. Hasslen said the general contractor of the project estimated the building would be up in approxi. mately six weeks.