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September 23, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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Editorial comment RACING TO SUCCESS at Bellingham Elementary School was the slogan for the Kindergarten and Preschool Class during the Bellingham Schoo| Parade. The class is pictured above with their teacher, Miss Pearson, who is located at the far right side of the picture. Larson (Continued from page 1) After more than 40 years as a suc- cessful real estate developer in Minneapolis Larson decided it was time to slow down and made the move to Ortonville and semi-retirement. Instead, he finds himself working as much as ever on a number of pro- jects, often referring to the excitement he sees in them. When he took over the hardware" store a couple months ago, he had already formulated a plan that would transform the store from its traditional role into something beyond. "You can't make it here on $10 or $11 tickets and that's the average for a hardware store," Larson said. "You would need 200 or 300 people a day and we're just not going to get that. ' "We get maybe 60 to 100 people a day. Looking at those numbers it becomes clear you have to look at other things." Larson's vision includes being joined by skilled trades people anx- ious to start their own business, but struggling to come up with the neces- sary capital to get started. Through Larson's approach to the hardware store as a home service center, spe- cializing in providing not only materi- als but also talent and expertise, they join a partnership that sends them on that path to independence. "If they have the talent and the energy, I will provide, the tqols and " " i" r materials, Larsot tells a Y stto on busy Monday morning.-ide'ally, we will have about 15 people working out of the store." Larson sees his crews being made up of carpenters, interior design spe- cialists, painters, plumbers and more, all taking part in a project that will make them money on their own through a partnership. "They will get a stipend and then a percentage of the profits after expens- es," Larson said. "The more they put in, the more they can get back." In a nutshell, Larson is proposing to find the jobs, sometimes through his own properties, provide the neces- sary tools and materials and sending his troops out to work on their own every day. At the center of it all will be the hardware store, used to order and provide materials and tools as well as book work for the crews. Talking with some of the people already getting on board with Larson, it becomes easy to see his enthusiasm is contagious. Terri Mielitz of nearby Big Stone City S.D., now works for an interior design store in Ortonville as well as doing her own contract painting and offering design consultation services. She will take over Larson's paint and design department in a couple of weeks and already has picked up the bug. "I will consult with customers on design ideas and colors using a com- puter program to help them visualize their plans," she said. "I think we can make this go. "I think the computer will go well there. There's a going to be an empha- sis on services people need and that will help keep people in town." Mielitz described the computer program that will be used as some- thing not available from even the largest hardware and lumber compa- nies in the area, something that goes beyond what people are used to in design ideas and assistance. Lars0n has bought a number of residential properties in Ortonviile over the last few months, many of which were in sad need of repair and renovation. For now, when the car- penters he has with him aren't busy on an outside job, they are spending their time refurbishing those homes. Izzy Maus of Montevideo, is one of the young carpenters who caught Larson's eye. "He's not afraid to work, is good at what he does and knows the meaning of 'early to bed, early to rise'," Larson said. To that end, Larson arranged to get Maus better tools, keep him in steady work and even help arrange the pur- chase of a better, more reliable vehi- cle. As Maus gives a tour of the nearly- completed home he has been working on, his satisfaction with the job and the ortunity is clear. 'i  has n great;" he :said: "I like "'Orkid b)" ye/f,  I 'ltlce he work and I like the variety. "I looked at buying a cabinet shop, but when we went to the bank, they took a look at the tax returns and wouldn't make the loan. I could never afford to get started on my own like that." Larson now has a total staff of about seven or eight people, including a store manager. The goal, he says, is to provide an opportunity for those willing to work for themselves and the benefit of the others. "These people will have the oppor- tunity to earn between $30,000 and $50,000 a year," he said. "That's pret- ty good money for a small communi- ty" And, if that does turn out to be the case, those who benefit can look back and remember the whole thing when it was just an idea---even if it is just one of many to come from a very fertile imagination. Markets I No. I Wheat ...................... 3.29 Soybeans ............................ 6.00 Corn ................................... 1.98 Sept. 24, 2002 No. 1 Wheat ...................... 4.73 Soybeans ........................... 5.23 Corn ................................... 2.27 Customer Service Representative AgCountry Farm Credit Services is seeking a Customer ,%rvice Representative for the Graceville (MN) office. Position will support in delivering customer-focused financial solutions tailored to specific cus- tomer needs; develop and maintain positive customer relationships by providing quality, front-line service. Associate Degree or equivalent from a two- year college or technical school is preferred; 1 to 2 years of secretarial or administrative experience in a lending environment or equivalent; proven customer service skills, ability to communicate effectively with customers and co-workers; and ability to utilize office machines, computer technology and a wide variety of software, including word processing, spreadsheet, and database applications. Benefits include medical, dental, vision, flexible spending accounts, life insurance short & long term disability, 401k plan, annual leave, sick leave, holidays, tuition reimbursement, and a competitive com- pensation package. Deadline for applications is Oct. 3, 2003. Send resume and cover letter to: AgCountry Farm Credit Services ATTN: Chuck Troftgruben P Box 6020 Fargo, ND 58108-6020 Email: ctroftg @agcountry.com EOE ( Check out our web site at www.ortonvilleindependent.com ) Council approves 2004 budget, utility rates will increase Jan. 1 Ortonville's City Council passed a resolution increasing the city's utility rates during last Monday's regular meeting. The rate increase will take effect on January 1, 2004, and includes a five percent electrical rate increase. The resolution was passed based on a recommendation from the city's Utility Committee. According to Councilmember Dan Oakes, who also serves on the Utility Committee, the rate increase was nec- essary to keep the city's light fund sol- vent. "We all have to pay utility bills, and nobody likes the increase," said Oakes, "but this increase will generate an additional $65,000 a year for the city." Oakes also mentioned that with the increase, utility bills" are only expected to go up by approximately $2.50 per month on average. The resolution to increase the City of Ortonville's Utility rates passed unanimously. In other business, councilmembers discussed the City's Budget Committee's recommendation to approve the 2004 budget. During dis- cussion, it was mentioned that the general levy increase was held to 1.1 percent. Additionally, $90,000 was transferred from the Sanitary System to the General Fund. Councilmember Mel Reinke offered the resolution to approve the recommended budget. The resolution was seconded and carried unanimous- ly. Ortonville Fire Chief Ron Athey also attended the meetings to discuss the Ortonville Fire Department's plans to purchase a new wildland fire- fighting vehicle. According to Athey; the fire department was given a $15,000 grant from U.S. Fish and Wildlife, to be used toward the purchase of a wild- land firefighting vehicle. Athey men- tioned that the fire department is cur- rently looking at purchasing a one- ton, four wheel drive with duallies. Athey also informed councilmem- bers that estimated total cost of pur- chasing and equipping this sort of vehicle is $30,000. The remaining $15,000 needed for the purchase would come from the fire depart- menrs capital equipment fund. Councilmember Mel Reinke offered a resolution to approve the purchase of a wildland firefighting vehicle, with the stipulation that the fire department comes up with some criteria about what they want and do not want with the vehicle. The reso- lution was seconded and carried unan- imously. Bellingham news By Margret Strueckrath Phone 568-2430 Lawrence Rakow was not present !i/iM was called for $60  tlrn' rnmuntty Drawing on Sept. 17. Sept. 24 the drawing will be for $80. Lucille Nelson, Doris Johnson and Vivian Janssen of Ortonville, Mary Anderson of Clinton, Delaine Magadanz of Milbank and Annette Moon had lunch at The Steak House at Appleton on Friday and then were afternoon guests of Annette Moon at I Schake, Joyce Norby, Margaret Klefsaas, Marge Schake, Carol Mangel, Sandy Hanson and Marlys Kunde. * ..... ,,, up, gusts aLthe hoofPtgx anl Vicky Hall at Madison on Sunday evening were Danny, JoDeU, Michael, Gregory and Danielle Larson and Wally and Lois Larson. The Danny Larson family and the Halls had taken part in the Crop Walk on Sunday afternoon. Joleen, Lucas and Chandler Van Hoorn spent Thursday afternoon to Ed and Marilyn Goetsch, LeRoy and Bonnie Goetsch and Mildred Roth enjoyed Sunday dinner at Trevetts in MilbanL E,d ,ad Marilyn celebrated their 49th' wng anniversary. LOUISEVOG  ' ......... Charles and Ihla Thomson and Lea Wagner of Minnetonka were Sunday visitors of Rick and Rachael Galarneau of Chanhassen. Tuesday evening supper guests of Charles and Ihla Thomson were Philip and Harriet Nygard, Lucille Nelson, Herb and Marilyn Streich of Ortonville and Doris Johnson of her home in Appleton. Monday at their home at Aberdeen. Odessa. Wally and Lois Larson, Joleen, Wally and'Lois Larson and Lou Lucas and Chandler Van Hoorn Jean Schake attended the prayer attended the parade and burger feed at Bellingham on Tuesday. Lucas rode in the parade with the Preppie class and Miss Pearson. Visitors at Ron Nelson's Saturday were Mel Omen and Frank Bergerson. Late afternoon visitors were John Rogers from Louisburg, Tom Peters from Nassau and John D. Johnson. They all attended the car show in the MANY THANKS afternoon. Jan Pohlen of Coon Rapids spent Recent new and renewal sub- the weekend at the home of Harvey and Lila Plathe and took in the car show Saturday afternoon in Beilingham. Saturday, Sept. 13 at 4 p.m. Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Goctsch and Mildred Roth attended the wedding of Michelle Bear and Garrett Hennings at Trinity Lutheran Church, Revillo, SD. Mildred Roth was a Saturday overnight guest at the Ed and Marilyn Goetsch home. service for Shorty Jorgenson on Wednesday evening, Sept. 10. The Ruth Circle of St. Paul's Church met on Thursday evening at the church with Karen Schake as hostess. Attending were Carol Olson, Dianne Dybevik, Lois Larson, Karen ONCE AGAIN . . . scribers to The Independent which we gratefully acknowledge with thanks for your loyalty: Gloria Sorenson Joseph Seoblic Jenny Maisom Dnald Ross Harvey Kunkel John Plathe Mike Dunnihoo Rodeli Rudolph Lyndon Johnson EIIoid Lobbins R.J.B. of Big Stone, Inc. M/Mrs, R. Papasso Dorothy Johnson Vince Stegner Carlton Anderson Timothy Henrich Dorothy Krogsrud Harry Russman Mrs. Carl Halvorson Ron Beling Eldred Soenson Klein NatiOnal Bank Linda Roggenbuck Fay Webster Robert Wiese Steve Stern Rev. Karl Watkins Joanne Carlson Dorismae Meers Melvin Maatz Brenda Powers Joe Van Lith Arlen Giese Agnes Pillatzke Tami Gangelhoff Gary Knoll Glenn Erickson Orlend Foikens Randy Baerwaldt Marlys Longhenry Tom Kramer James Carlson Marlyn Vangsne Wendell Paulsen it'sallinside'. catalog [.com It's Here! The JCPenney Christmas 2003 Catalog Catalogs are available at Liebo Drug/Variety in Browrm Valley, Clinton, Gracevliie. Ortonvilie, Miank or Wi#not. Our gift collection has something for everyone on your list. Purchase the NEW Christmas Catalog for just $4 and receive a $5 catalog savings certificate. Plus...save on shipping when you select delivery to your local JCPenney Catalog Desk compared to Home Delivery.* Pick up a copy today or call 1-800-222-6161 and ask for TA 005-0062A. Also available online at JCPenney.com *Some items can only be shipped Home Delivery. JCPenney Catalog Located in Llebe Drug/Variety * 146 NW 2nd St. * Ortonville, MN t=.ll 320-839-6191 The Inde (u.s.P.S. e  JAMES D. Publisher / SUZETrE Office Computer EMILEE Compositor BETH Reporter I BOB Camera Col PHIL oooO Tues., Sqt. 23, 2003 Continuing Published Every TuesdaY. Otonville, MN Periodicals Postage Paid lit, $30.O0per year in Parle, Traverse Minnesota, Grant in South counties in Minnesota  All others, Postmaster: Send The Ortonvilte Ortonvitle, RATE A FEBRUARY Big Stone, Lac qul Swift Counties In Grant and Roberts February ........... 30.00 March ................ 27.50 horn .................. 25.00 May ................... 22.50 June .................. 20.00 July ................... 17.50 ALL OTHERS IN February ........... 34.00 March ................ 31.24 April .................. 28.40 May ................... 25.56 June ............ _...22.72 July ................... 19.88 ALL AREA February ........... 38.00 March ................ 34.87 April .................. 31.70 May ................... 28.53 June .................. 25.36 July ................... 22.19 "PUBLISHER'S The Publisher shall changes or The Publisher's omissions in the issue or the the advertisement. Church notes - SatUr , ads - Pictures 5 Classified ads - (Any ad brought in to classify.) A Monday: A A Wednesday: A i Friday: Holidays r Letters to the munity issues writers should Independent and/or condenSe ishPer also reserves letters that ore Letters printed or address Addresses and not be published. Letter wdters selves to one keep letter bdof, words, and The Ortonvtllo is news is If an sidered paper. cease to exist. receives for paper used in no longer d increases. and a small Advertising to and underwear noss. We reserve e, advertising without our decision. A News: Our fully and staff's opinions late readers. ,or are her own of other expressed in tions own views, oral Interest. Phone 839-3761 to sifted Ortonville Page 4  INDEPENDENT Editorial comment RACING TO SUCCESS at Bellingham Elementary School was the slogan for the Kindergarten and Preschool Class during the Bellingham Schoo| Parade. The class is pictured above with their teacher, Miss Pearson, who is located at the far right side of the picture. Larson (Continued from page 1) After more than 40 years as a suc- cessful real estate developer in Minneapolis Larson decided it was time to slow down and made the move to Ortonville and semi-retirement. Instead, he finds himself working as much as ever on a number of pro- jects, often referring to the excitement he sees in them. When he took over the hardware" store a couple months ago, he had already formulated a plan that would transform the store from its traditional role into something beyond. "You can't make it here on $10 or $11 tickets and that's the average for a hardware store," Larson said. "You would need 200 or 300 people a day and we're just not going to get that. ' "We get maybe 60 to 100 people a day. Looking at those numbers it becomes clear you have to look at other things." Larson's vision includes being joined by skilled trades people anx- ious to start their own business, but struggling to come up with the neces- sary capital to get started. Through Larson's approach to the hardware store as a home service center, spe- cializing in providing not only materi- als but also talent and expertise, they join a partnership that sends them on that path to independence. "If they have the talent and the energy, I will provide, the tqols and " " i" r materials, Larsot tells a Y stto on busy Monday morning.-ide'ally, we will have about 15 people working out of the store." Larson sees his crews being made up of carpenters, interior design spe- cialists, painters, plumbers and more, all taking part in a project that will make them money on their own through a partnership. "They will get a stipend and then a percentage of the profits after expens- es," Larson said. "The more they put in, the more they can get back." In a nutshell, Larson is proposing to find the jobs, sometimes through his own properties, provide the neces- sary tools and materials and sending his troops out to work on their own every day. At the center of it all will be the hardware store, used to order and provide materials and tools as well as book work for the crews. Talking with some of the people already getting on board with Larson, it becomes easy to see his enthusiasm is contagious. Terri Mielitz of nearby Big Stone City S.D., now works for an interior design store in Ortonville as well as doing her own contract painting and offering design consultation services. She will take over Larson's paint and design department in a couple of weeks and already has picked up the bug. "I will consult with customers on design ideas and colors using a com- puter program to help them visualize their plans," she said. "I think we can make this go. "I think the computer will go well there. There's a going to be an empha- sis on services people need and that will help keep people in town." Mielitz described the computer program that will be used as some- thing not available from even the largest hardware and lumber compa- nies in the area, something that goes beyond what people are used to in design ideas and assistance. Lars0n has bought a number of residential properties in Ortonviile over the last few months, many of which were in sad need of repair and renovation. For now, when the car- penters he has with him aren't busy on an outside job, they are spending their time refurbishing those homes. Izzy Maus of Montevideo, is one of the young carpenters who caught Larson's eye. "He's not afraid to work, is good at what he does and knows the meaning of 'early to bed, early to rise'," Larson said. To that end, Larson arranged to get Maus better tools, keep him in steady work and even help arrange the pur- chase of a better, more reliable vehi- cle. As Maus gives a tour of the nearly- completed home he has been working on, his satisfaction with the job and the ortunity is clear. 'i  has n great;" he :said: "I like "'Orkid b)" ye/f,  I 'ltlce he work and I like the variety. "I looked at buying a cabinet shop, but when we went to the bank, they took a look at the tax returns and wouldn't make the loan. I could never afford to get started on my own like that." Larson now has a total staff of about seven or eight people, including a store manager. The goal, he says, is to provide an opportunity for those willing to work for themselves and the benefit of the others. "These people will have the oppor- tunity to earn between $30,000 and $50,000 a year," he said. "That's pret- ty good money for a small communi- ty" And, if that does turn out to be the case, those who benefit can look back and remember the whole thing when it was just an idea---even if it is just one of many to come from a very fertile imagination. Markets I No. I Wheat ...................... 3.29 Soybeans ............................ 6.00 Corn ................................... 1.98 Sept. 24, 2002 No. 1 Wheat ...................... 4.73 Soybeans ........................... 5.23 Corn ................................... 2.27 Customer Service Representative AgCountry Farm Credit Services is seeking a Customer ,%rvice Representative for the Graceville (MN) office. Position will support in delivering customer-focused financial solutions tailored to specific cus- tomer needs; develop and maintain positive customer relationships by providing quality, front-line service. Associate Degree or equivalent from a two- year college or technical school is preferred; 1 to 2 years of secretarial or administrative experience in a lending environment or equivalent; proven customer service skills, ability to communicate effectively with customers and co-workers; and ability to utilize office machines, computer technology and a wide variety of software, including word processing, spreadsheet, and database applications. Benefits include medical, dental, vision, flexible spending accounts, life insurance short & long term disability, 401k plan, annual leave, sick leave, holidays, tuition reimbursement, and a competitive com- pensation package. Deadline for applications is Oct. 3, 2003. Send resume and cover letter to: AgCountry Farm Credit Services ATTN: Chuck Troftgruben P Box 6020 Fargo, ND 58108-6020 Email: ctroftg @agcountry.com EOE ( Check out our web site at www.ortonvilleindependent.com ) Council approves 2004 budget, utility rates will increase Jan. 1 Ortonville's City Council passed a resolution increasing the city's utility rates during last Monday's regular meeting. The rate increase will take effect on January 1, 2004, and includes a five percent electrical rate increase. The resolution was passed based on a recommendation from the city's Utility Committee. According to Councilmember Dan Oakes, who also serves on the Utility Committee, the rate increase was nec- essary to keep the city's light fund sol- vent. "We all have to pay utility bills, and nobody likes the increase," said Oakes, "but this increase will generate an additional $65,000 a year for the city." Oakes also mentioned that with the increase, utility bills" are only expected to go up by approximately $2.50 per month on average. The resolution to increase the City of Ortonville's Utility rates passed unanimously. In other business, councilmembers discussed the City's Budget Committee's recommendation to approve the 2004 budget. During dis- cussion, it was mentioned that the general levy increase was held to 1.1 percent. Additionally, $90,000 was transferred from the Sanitary System to the General Fund. Councilmember Mel Reinke offered the resolution to approve the recommended budget. The resolution was seconded and carried unanimous- ly. Ortonville Fire Chief Ron Athey also attended the meetings to discuss the Ortonville Fire Department's plans to purchase a new wildland fire- fighting vehicle. According to Athey; the fire department was given a $15,000 grant from U.S. Fish and Wildlife, to be used toward the purchase of a wild- land firefighting vehicle. Athey men- tioned that the fire department is cur- rently looking at purchasing a one- ton, four wheel drive with duallies. Athey also informed councilmem- bers that estimated total cost of pur- chasing and equipping this sort of vehicle is $30,000. The remaining $15,000 needed for the purchase would come from the fire depart- menrs capital equipment fund. Councilmember Mel Reinke offered a resolution to approve the purchase of a wildland firefighting vehicle, with the stipulation that the fire department comes up with some criteria about what they want and do not want with the vehicle. The reso- lution was seconded and carried unan- imously. Bellingham news By Margret Strueckrath Phone 568-2430 Lawrence Rakow was not present !i/iM was called for $60  tlrn' rnmuntty Drawing on Sept. 17. Sept. 24 the drawing will be for $80. Lucille Nelson, Doris Johnson and Vivian Janssen of Ortonville, Mary Anderson of Clinton, Delaine Magadanz of Milbank and Annette Moon had lunch at The Steak House at Appleton on Friday and then were afternoon guests of Annette Moon at I Schake, Joyce Norby, Margaret Klefsaas, Marge Schake, Carol Mangel, Sandy Hanson and Marlys Kunde. * ..... ,,, up, gusts aLthe hoofPtgx anl Vicky Hall at Madison on Sunday evening were Danny, JoDeU, Michael, Gregory and Danielle Larson and Wally and Lois Larson. The Danny Larson family and the Halls had taken part in the Crop Walk on Sunday afternoon. Joleen, Lucas and Chandler Van Hoorn spent Thursday afternoon to Ed and Marilyn Goetsch, LeRoy and Bonnie Goetsch and Mildred Roth enjoyed Sunday dinner at Trevetts in MilbanL E,d ,ad Marilyn celebrated their 49th' wng anniversary. LOUISEVOG  ' ......... Charles and Ihla Thomson and Lea Wagner of Minnetonka were Sunday visitors of Rick and Rachael Galarneau of Chanhassen. Tuesday evening supper guests of Charles and Ihla Thomson were Philip and Harriet Nygard, Lucille Nelson, Herb and Marilyn Streich of Ortonville and Doris Johnson of her home in Appleton. Monday at their home at Aberdeen. Odessa. Wally and Lois Larson, Joleen, Wally and'Lois Larson and Lou Lucas and Chandler Van Hoorn Jean Schake attended the prayer attended the parade and burger feed at Bellingham on Tuesday. Lucas rode in the parade with the Preppie class and Miss Pearson. Visitors at Ron Nelson's Saturday were Mel Omen and Frank Bergerson. Late afternoon visitors were John Rogers from Louisburg, Tom Peters from Nassau and John D. Johnson. They all attended the car show in the MANY THANKS afternoon. Jan Pohlen of Coon Rapids spent Recent new and renewal sub- the weekend at the home of Harvey and Lila Plathe and took in the car show Saturday afternoon in Beilingham. Saturday, Sept. 13 at 4 p.m. Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Goctsch and Mildred Roth attended the wedding of Michelle Bear and Garrett Hennings at Trinity Lutheran Church, Revillo, SD. Mildred Roth was a Saturday overnight guest at the Ed and Marilyn Goetsch home. service for Shorty Jorgenson on Wednesday evening, Sept. 10. The Ruth Circle of St. Paul's Church met on Thursday evening at the church with Karen Schake as hostess. Attending were Carol Olson, Dianne Dybevik, Lois Larson, Karen ONCE AGAIN . . . scribers to The Independent which we gratefully acknowledge with thanks for your loyalty: Gloria Sorenson Joseph Seoblic Jenny Maisom Dnald Ross Harvey Kunkel John Plathe Mike Dunnihoo Rodeli Rudolph Lyndon Johnson EIIoid Lobbins R.J.B. of Big Stone, Inc. M/Mrs, R. Papasso Dorothy Johnson Vince Stegner Carlton Anderson Timothy Henrich Dorothy Krogsrud Harry Russman Mrs. Carl Halvorson Ron Beling Eldred Soenson Klein NatiOnal Bank Linda Roggenbuck Fay Webster Robert Wiese Steve Stern Rev. Karl Watkins Joanne Carlson Dorismae Meers Melvin Maatz Brenda Powers Joe Van Lith Arlen Giese Agnes Pillatzke Tami Gangelhoff Gary Knoll Glenn Erickson Orlend Foikens Randy Baerwaldt Marlys Longhenry Tom Kramer James Carlson Marlyn Vangsne Wendell Paulsen it'sallinside'. catalog [.com It's Here! The JCPenney Christmas 2003 Catalog Catalogs are available at Liebo Drug/Variety in Browrm Valley, Clinton, Gracevliie. Ortonvilie, Miank or Wi#not. Our gift collection has something for everyone on your list. Purchase the NEW Christmas Catalog for just $4 and receive a $5 catalog savings certificate. Plus...save on shipping when you select delivery to your local JCPenney Catalog Desk compared to Home Delivery.* Pick up a copy today or call 1-800-222-6161 and ask for TA 005-0062A. Also available online at JCPenney.com *Some items can only be shipped Home Delivery. JCPenney Catalog Located in Llebe Drug/Variety * 146 NW 2nd St. * Ortonville, MN t=.ll 320-839-6191 The Inde (u.s.P.S. e  JAMES D. Publisher / SUZETrE Office Computer EMILEE Compositor BETH Reporter I BOB Camera Col PHIL oooO Tues., Sqt. 23, 2003 Continuing Published Every TuesdaY. Otonville, MN Periodicals Postage Paid lit, $30.O0per year in Parle, Traverse Minnesota, Grant in South counties in Minnesota  All others, Postmaster: Send The Ortonvilte Ortonvitle, RATE A FEBRUARY Big Stone, Lac qul Swift Counties In Grant and Roberts February ........... 30.00 March ................ 27.50 horn .................. 25.00 May ................... 22.50 June .................. 20.00 July ................... 17.50 ALL OTHERS IN February ........... 34.00 March ................ 31.24 April .................. 28.40 May ................... 25.56 June ............ _...22.72 July ................... 19.88 ALL AREA February ........... 38.00 March ................ 34.87 April .................. 31.70 May ................... 28.53 June .................. 25.36 July ................... 22.19 "PUBLISHER'S The Publisher shall changes or The Publisher's omissions in the issue or the the advertisement. Church notes - SatUr , ads - Pictures 5 Classified ads - (Any ad brought in to classify.) A Monday: A A Wednesday: A i Friday: Holidays r Letters to the munity issues writers should Independent and/or condenSe ishPer also reserves letters that ore Letters printed or address Addresses and not be published. Letter wdters selves to one keep letter bdof, words, and The Ortonvtllo is news is If an sidered paper. cease to exist. receives for paper used in no longer d increases. and a small Advertising to and underwear noss. We reserve e, advertising without our decision. A News: Our fully and staff's opinions late readers. ,or are her own of other expressed in tions own views, oral Interest. Phone 839-3761 to sifted Ortonville Page 4  INDEPENDENT