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The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
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October 12, 1999     The Ortonville Independent
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October 12, 1999
 

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Editorial comment GUEST EDITORIAL... What readers want from their newspaper Newspapers, newspapers, newspapers...giving you all the news that fits. A popular saying but, what does the average reader want? An editorial, 'Gimme a paper,' which first appeared in the Wetaskiwin Times in Alberta, Canada, in 1974, seems to highlight some of the demands the paper faces each day. It has been expanded upon and localized to make it more inclusive in today's market. From the reader ... l'm going to give 50 cents to the newspaper staff. Divide it up any way you wish. Now for that 50 cents I am giving you tonight, I want you to deliver tomorrow morning to my house a newspaper that will contain more reading matter than the current best-selling novel. I want all the news. And, I want every bit of it to be fresh. I want pictures of all local accidents, fires, meetings and events that l'm interested in; and I don't want to see any that offend me, either. I expect you to tell me who dies, who was born, who was divorced and who was married in the last week, includingthe last 24 hours. I want to know what those guys in government are doing with my tax money. I want to understand all of the important events, plans and results, but I don't want to have to waste more than a couple of minutes on your story. I want to read just as much about the Republicans as the Democrats or Reform Party. I want to read all the sports, national and local. I want to see sports photos. Don't tell me you can't do it. That's what I invested my 50 cents for. I want all the supermarket prices, a list of people with used cars for sale, the movie and TV times and the closing stock market prices. I want to know who breaks the law and what the sentence is but ... if I break the law, I don't want you to print my name in the paper, and I have a friend who is in trouble too; so leave that out. Another 'ring', I'm sick and tired of misspelled words in your paper. For 50 cents, you ought to do better. By the way, I have breakfast at 7 a.m., so my paper had better be in my front door before that. Not on the steps, not in the rain, not in the front yard, but either in my Tribune box or in my door. When I meet you on the street, I expect you to tell me all the inside dope. I expect you to serve as publicity chairman for every committee in town, too. If I call the paper and ask how many kids AI Capone had or what round Dempsey knocked out Tunny (or was it the other way?), I expect you to know and tell me. Right then! Next week, rm going to start a business, and I want a news item about it. A picture too would be nice. Advertising? No, if you run the story and picture, I won't need any advertising. But ... if you straighten up, I will give you another 50 cents for the day after tomorrow. Our goal is to give our readers all the news ... good and bad. Our staff works diligently to cover government, the schools, law enforcement, sports, events, the community. We're just ordinary citizens who do the best with the information available. If we make a mistake, please let us know immediately. We, too, want correct information in the paper. Our staff members are part of the community, and besides working a full day pounding out stories, selling advertising, designing ads, printing the paper, promoting, meeting the needs of subscribers, many also volunteer in the community. But, our overall goal is still to provide a good community paper that keeps our readers informed and works for our advertisers to promote their stores, products or services. This is National Newspaper Week and we're proud to be a part of the information superhighway. West Central Tribune, Willmar BSC Historical Society annual meeting set for Oct. 19 Mallard Point Supper Club will be the site of this year's annual meeting of the Big Stone County Historical Society, set for Tuesday, Oct. 19 at 6 p.m. Serving chicken and roast beef family style will start at 6:30. While some business must be conducted, it is a night meant for members throughout the county to come together for an evening of fun and entertainment. This year, a French Canadian fur trader who worked the St. Pierre's River (Minnesota River) in 6 early 1800's will be in attendance to visit with the group. His name is Babou and he looks a lot like Historical Society Vice President Don Felton. Please make reservations by Oct. 15 by calling the museum at 839- 3359. Those attending can meet at the museum at 5:30 to pool rides. (price $10). Prints of the prairie chickens will be available to purchase at the meeting, and the group also needs to update its list of volunteers, so please sign up if you could give some time on the weekends at the museum. "Post" drops F-- F-'7  14 , J .0 !5 26 !7 33 36 tl t5 51 52 53 59 82 65 Clues ACROSS 1. Fix 5, Conk 10. Czech river 14. About aviation 15. Marxist 16. Hungarian violinist 17. Bing Crosby song 20. Prominence 21. Portable stands for coffins 22. Born of 23. Cruciferous vegetable 25. Boxes 29, Most hard 33. Cargo vessel 34. Writing paper 35. Volt-ampere 36. Greet in a friendly way 38. Dover is the capital 41. The 7th letter of the Greek alphabet 42. Whale ship captain 44. Pains 45. Saloons 48, Bryophytes 49. Enough (archaic) 50. Pain unit 51. Carl , astronomer 54. Squiggle 59. Tense situations 62. Wager 63, Musical endings 64. Cookie 65. Made of fermented honey and water 66. White aspen 67. Tide Clues DOWN I. Impertinence 2. Pueblo people of New Mexico, 3. Plant part 4. Hindu symbol of a goddess 5. Prominences 6. Walk daintily 7. German woman's name 8. Referee declares 9. Supernatural being 10. More simplified 11. Sealing material 12. Take home 13. Strays 18. Classes or species 19. Competent 23. Slang for famous person 24. Rounded 25. Reciprocal of the sine (Math) 26. Long noosed rope 27.  Alda, actor 28. Shrub 29. Pops 30. Linda __, actress 31. Slang for sergeant 32. Hairdo 37. Hand (Spanish) 39. Son of Zeus 40. No longer is 43. The nictitating membrane of a horse 46. Combed out 47. Hostelries 48. Dour 50. Of a dukedom 51. Canned meat 52. Thomas , British composer, 1700 53. Clog 54. Give over 55. Representation 56. Wrap up 57. Fertilizer 58. Stock purchase plan 60. Arthropod genus 61. Pluck /ill onversations WITH TIlE " Van Der Pol  Copy this week from former OAHS Administrator Art Quance, now of Gettysburg, SD. We read the recent Odds and Ends Column decrying the farm article of another paper, which we did not see. We have been doing some work with the Census Bureau and are acquainted with the increasing number of farm auctions and farm abandonments. It is unfortunate that the greed of man has come to where corporate America now dictates the policies of Government - particularly in the Today's column is a little different. Because I think farmers often do not hear non- farmers, and because I hope that a few farmers do read this col- umn, I am offering this as an example of another point of view, one not heard often in the overheated hype sur- rounding our so- called "mission to feed the starving." I don't know Peter Rosset and I am not familiar with the Institute for Food and Development Policy. But this is interesting to me because I think we would be well advised to think long and carefully before we go full speed ahead into the biotech paradise planned for us by Monsanto and oth- ers to their own great profit. Read it and judge for yourself. AKLAND, Calif. -- In the debate over genetically altered foods, propo- nents like Senator Richard Luger, the Indiana Republican, argue that such products will be essential if we are to feed the world. But this claim rests on two persistent misconceptions about hunger: first, that people are hungry because of high population density, and second, that genetic engineering is the best or only way to meet our future needs. In fact, there is no relationship between the prevalence of hunger in a given country and its population. For every densely populated and hungry nation like Bangladesh, there is a sparsely populated and hungry nation like Brazil. The world today produces more food per inhabitant than ever before. Enough is available to provide 4.3 pounds to every person every day: two and a half pounds of grain, beans and nuts, about a pound of meat, milk and eggs, and another of fruits and veg- etables -- more than anyone could ever eat. The real problems are poverty and inequality. Too many people are too poor to buy the food that is available or lack land on which to grow it them- selves. The second misconception is that genetic engineering is the best way to boost food production. There are two principal technologies on the market. herbicide widely. Monsanto and several other com- panies also produce "Bt" seeds -- usu- ally corn, potatoes and cotton -- which are engineered so that each plant produces its own insecticide. Some researchers have shown that none of the genetically engineered seeds significantly increase the yield of crops. Indeed, in more than 8,200 field trials, the Roundup Ready seeds produced fewer bushels of soybeans than similar natural varieties, accord- ing to a study by Dr. Charles Benbrook, the former director of the Board on Agriculture at the National Academy of Sciences. Far from being a solution to the world's hunger problem, the rapid introduction of genetically engineered crops may actually threaten agricul- ture and food security. First, widespread adoption of her- bicide-resistant seeds may lead to greater use of chemicals that kill weeds. Yet, many noncrop plants are used by small farmers in the third world as supplemental food sources and as animal feed. In the United States, the Fish and Wildlife Service has found that Roundup already threatens 74 endangered plant species. Biological pollution from geneti- cally engineered organisms may be another problem. Monsanto is poised to acquire the rights to a genetic engi- neering technique that renders a crop's seeds sterile, insuring that farm- ers are dependent on Monsanto for new seed every year. Farming in the third world could be crippled if these genes contaminate other local crops that the poor depend on. And such genes could unintentionally sterilize other plants, according to a study by Martha Crouch, an associate professor of biology at Indiana University. Half the world's farmers rely on their own saved seed for each year's harvest. A true solution to the problem of hunger depends on attacking poverty and inequality among both producers and consumers of food. A food system increasingly dependent on genetically altered seeds takes us in the wrong direction. and Agriculture .... Defense Departments. Monsanto makes "Roundup Ready" Peter Rosset is director of the The small.farmer is (and has been) seeds, which are engineered to with- Institute for Food and Development stand its herbicide, Roundup. These Policy and , of "World the recipient of the governmental co-author policies which are being dictated by seeds -- usually soybeans, canola or Hunger: Twelve Myths.' the "big" boys through their hired cotton -- allow farmers to apply the "guns" of government. These Policy formulators are more often recent , w'4 "retirees" from the corporate world ovei" which they now dictate new policy. The politicians make the "show" of sympathy while they readily accept the gratuitous handouts from the corporations. In democracy dead in America? I fear it has died some many years ago, and we will soon see the results of what our "great" uncle has in mind for the mass of us "common" people. And it needs no reiteration that "as the small farm goes, so goes rural America." Keep your eyes open for further developments in this drama. There is a book which speaks of I , ) ]_  America dictating to the entire world through a new world organization. Are 1999 IIc,-eler pOll-Ilu41m,n C I.LC we already policemen of the world?  I *'"'d ,;"  ' " Keep fighting for rural America -- you can make a difference.  ?"" :" VanHout undergoes " Stroke of treatment in OK Markets 'tlae Brush Teresa VanHout of Big Stone City, SD, wife of Richard VanHout is now No. 1 Wheat ...................... 2.75 Big Stone Arts Council (BSAC) undergoing treatment for lung cancer Soybeans ........................... 4.19 would like to extend an open inTulsa, OK. Corn ................................... 1.30 invitation & welcome you along with Cards and letters may be sent to: Oct. 12, 1998 the public to join us at the B SAC Cancer Treatment Center of America, No. 1 Wheat ...................... 3.23 Annual Meeting being held Tuesday, 2408 E. 81st St. Suite 100, Tulsa, OK Soybeans ........................... 4.89 October 19th, 6:30 p.m. at the former 74137-4210. Corn ................................... 1.52 Masonic Hall Main Street in  : .-. , Ortonville. Join us as we celebrate Ortonviile's 125th Birthday with storytelling by area residents as we reminisce through the past. Bring a guest! Maybe you have or know of someone with area history to share with all that evening. Let us not forget the history of the Masonic Hall and other historic q buildings in the area. So bring a friend  as we stroll down memory lane bringing back memories of walks through the parks, catching that big fish off that special dock, smelling " , .... Grandma's homemade bread and  :' passing down the family's secret . recipe, sharing experiences of your : : childhood and your unique family traditions. : Help us blow out the candles on Ortonville's Birthday Cake at this special occasion. Support the area by becoming a member or renewing .... membership in the Big Stone Arts : Council. You may join or renew at this ::   celebration.  ........ da Amer!con Heort 00Associotion TABOR UNITED METHODIST CHURCH confirmed three students Sept. 12. Left to right are Vince Kellen, Rev. Karl Watkins, WE'RE FIC_.q-NG FORYOUR UFE Tina Athey and Heidi Hansen. Page 4 00INDEPENDENT 1 llll llll/ll II 1 I1 The Independent (U.S.P.S. 412-480) JEANETTE Publisher JAMES D. Managing EditOr SUZETTE Plant Manager Office Manager KATHIE Computer and Com TAMMIE Com RYAN Reporter/Ad BILL DWYER & Pressmen Camera NANCY ColIater Tues.,Oct. 12,1;;;a Vol, I Continuing Pubshed Evm PerW)dlcal Pom SUBSCRIP'I:ION I $25.00por year in Parle, Traverse and Minnesota, Grant and in South Dakota. counties in Minnesota Dakota. All others, $33.00 Postmaster: Send The Ortonville Ortonviile, -ALL SUBSCRIPTIONS A B,oStone, Lac qul Pade,' unties Roberts in South Fehruery .............. 25.00 March .................. 22.119 April .................... 20.111 May ..................... 18.73 June .................... 19.6S July ...................... 14.S7 February ............. 29.00 March .................. 26.61 Aprll .................... 24.19 May ...................... 21.77 June .................... 19.35 July ...................... 16.93 ALL AREA OUTSIDE OF MINN. February .............. 33.00 March .................. 30.2S April .................... 27.50 May ..................... 24.75 June ................... 22.00 July ..................... 19.2 "PUBLISHER'S LIABILITY | The Publisher shall not advertisement. The for other errors or connection with an strictly limited to advertisement in any or the refund of any advertisement. Church Display ads - Correspondenc Pictures - S p.m. Friday News - Fdday afternoon Classified ads (Any at classify OFFICE A Monday: 8 a.m.-5 p.m, 8 a.m.-12:301 8 a.m.-12 Letters to the community issues Letter writers should Independent reserves and/or condense paper also reserves publish letters that are which it might be held Letters should printed or address Addresses and not be published. Letter writers ere themselves to one Please keep letter over 350 words AD vs. The Ortonville is If an individual zation charges for event, for an item be considered words, newspaper. would cease to paper receives for paper used product. It no Ionq paper cost increases. cost of ink and a paper used. AdverUsin crops and products to the and any garticular usiness. ADS: We any advertising wH justify our decision. A News: Our as fully and staff's opinions opinion page. A Editorials: fpage, rom other source our readers. editor are her own those of other staff expressed In Items lions may own views, but are general Interest. Call 320-839-3761 to classified Ortonville Tuesday, Editorial comment GUEST EDITORIAL... What readers want from their newspaper Newspapers, newspapers, newspapers...giving you all the news that fits. A popular saying but, what does the average reader want? An editorial, 'Gimme a paper,' which first appeared in the Wetaskiwin Times in Alberta, Canada, in 1974, seems to highlight some of the demands the paper faces each day. It has been expanded upon and localized to make it more inclusive in today's market. From the reader ... l'm going to give 50 cents to the newspaper staff. Divide it up any way you wish. Now for that 50 cents I am giving you tonight, I want you to deliver tomorrow morning to my house a newspaper that will contain more reading matter than the current best-selling novel. I want all the news. And, I want every bit of it to be fresh. I want pictures of all local accidents, fires, meetings and events that l'm interested in; and I don't want to see any that offend me, either. I expect you to tell me who dies, who was born, who was divorced and who was married in the last week, includingthe last 24 hours. I want to know what those guys in government are doing with my tax money. I want to understand all of the important events, plans and results, but I don't want to have to waste more than a couple of minutes on your story. I want to read just as much about the Republicans as the Democrats or Reform Party. I want to read all the sports, national and local. I want to see sports photos. Don't tell me you can't do it. That's what I invested my 50 cents for. I want all the supermarket prices, a list of people with used cars for sale, the movie and TV times and the closing stock market prices. I want to know who breaks the law and what the sentence is but ... if I break the law, I don't want you to print my name in the paper, and I have a friend who is in trouble too; so leave that out. Another 'ring', I'm sick and tired of misspelled words in your paper. For 50 cents, you ought to do better. By the way, I have breakfast at 7 a.m., so my paper had better be in my front door before that. Not on the steps, not in the rain, not in the front yard, but either in my Tribune box or in my door. When I meet you on the street, I expect you to tell me all the inside dope. I expect you to serve as publicity chairman for every committee in town, too. If I call the paper and ask how many kids AI Capone had or what round Dempsey knocked out Tunny (or was it the other way?), I expect you to know and tell me. Right then! Next week, rm going to start a business, and I want a news item about it. A picture too would be nice. Advertising? No, if you run the story and picture, I won't need any advertising. But ... if you straighten up, I will give you another 50 cents for the day after tomorrow. Our goal is to give our readers all the news ... good and bad. Our staff works diligently to cover government, the schools, law enforcement, sports, events, the community. We're just ordinary citizens who do the best with the information available. If we make a mistake, please let us know immediately. We, too, want correct information in the paper. Our staff members are part of the community, and besides working a full day pounding out stories, selling advertising, designing ads, printing the paper, promoting, meeting the needs of subscribers, many also volunteer in the community. But, our overall goal is still to provide a good community paper that keeps our readers informed and works for our advertisers to promote their stores, products or services. This is National Newspaper Week and we're proud to be a part of the information superhighway. West Central Tribune, Willmar BSC Historical Society annual meeting set for Oct. 19 Mallard Point Supper Club will be the site of this year's annual meeting of the Big Stone County Historical Society, set for Tuesday, Oct. 19 at 6 p.m. Serving chicken and roast beef family style will start at 6:30. While some business must be conducted, it is a night meant for members throughout the county to come together for an evening of fun and entertainment. This year, a French Canadian fur trader who worked the St. Pierre's River (Minnesota River) in 6 early 1800's will be in attendance to visit with the group. His name is Babou and he looks a lot like Historical Society Vice President Don Felton. Please make reservations by Oct. 15 by calling the museum at 839- 3359. Those attending can meet at the museum at 5:30 to pool rides. (price $10). Prints of the prairie chickens will be available to purchase at the meeting, and the group also needs to update its list of volunteers, so please sign up if you could give some time on the weekends at the museum. "Post" drops F-- F-'7  14 , J .0 !5 26 !7 33 36 tl t5 51 52 53 59 82 65 Clues ACROSS 1. Fix 5, Conk 10. Czech river 14. About aviation 15. Marxist 16. Hungarian violinist 17. Bing Crosby song 20. Prominence 21. Portable stands for coffins 22. Born of 23. Cruciferous vegetable 25. Boxes 29, Most hard 33. Cargo vessel 34. Writing paper 35. Volt-ampere 36. Greet in a friendly way 38. Dover is the capital 41. The 7th letter of the Greek alphabet 42. Whale ship captain 44. Pains 45. Saloons 48, Bryophytes 49. Enough (archaic) 50. Pain unit 51. Carl , astronomer 54. Squiggle 59. Tense situations 62. Wager 63, Musical endings 64. Cookie 65. Made of fermented honey and water 66. White aspen 67. Tide Clues DOWN I. Impertinence 2. Pueblo people of New Mexico, 3. Plant part 4. Hindu symbol of a goddess 5. Prominences 6. Walk daintily 7. German woman's name 8. Referee declares 9. Supernatural being 10. More simplified 11. Sealing material 12. Take home 13. Strays 18. Classes or species 19. Competent 23. Slang for famous person 24. Rounded 25. Reciprocal of the sine (Math) 26. Long noosed rope 27.  Alda, actor 28. Shrub 29. Pops 30. Linda __, actress 31. Slang for sergeant 32. Hairdo 37. Hand (Spanish) 39. Son of Zeus 40. No longer is 43. The nictitating membrane of a horse 46. Combed out 47. Hostelries 48. Dour 50. Of a dukedom 51. Canned meat 52. Thomas , British composer, 1700 53. Clog 54. Give over 55. Representation 56. Wrap up 57. Fertilizer 58. Stock purchase plan 60. Arthropod genus 61. Pluck /ill onversations WITH TIlE " Van Der Pol  Copy this week from former OAHS Administrator Art Quance, now of Gettysburg, SD. We read the recent Odds and Ends Column decrying the farm article of another paper, which we did not see. We have been doing some work with the Census Bureau and are acquainted with the increasing number of farm auctions and farm abandonments. It is unfortunate that the greed of man has come to where corporate America now dictates the policies of Government - particularly in the Today's column is a little different. Because I think farmers often do not hear non- farmers, and because I hope that a few farmers do read this col- umn, I am offering this as an example of another point of view, one not heard often in the overheated hype sur- rounding our so- called "mission to feed the starving." I don't know Peter Rosset and I am not familiar with the Institute for Food and Development Policy. But this is interesting to me because I think we would be well advised to think long and carefully before we go full speed ahead into the biotech paradise planned for us by Monsanto and oth- ers to their own great profit. Read it and judge for yourself. AKLAND, Calif. -- In the debate over genetically altered foods, propo- nents like Senator Richard Luger, the Indiana Republican, argue that such products will be essential if we are to feed the world. But this claim rests on two persistent misconceptions about hunger: first, that people are hungry because of high population density, and second, that genetic engineering is the best or only way to meet our future needs. In fact, there is no relationship between the prevalence of hunger in a given country and its population. For every densely populated and hungry nation like Bangladesh, there is a sparsely populated and hungry nation like Brazil. The world today produces more food per inhabitant than ever before. Enough is available to provide 4.3 pounds to every person every day: two and a half pounds of grain, beans and nuts, about a pound of meat, milk and eggs, and another of fruits and veg- etables -- more than anyone could ever eat. The real problems are poverty and inequality. Too many people are too poor to buy the food that is available or lack land on which to grow it them- selves. The second misconception is that genetic engineering is the best way to boost food production. There are two principal technologies on the market. herbicide widely. Monsanto and several other com- panies also produce "Bt" seeds -- usu- ally corn, potatoes and cotton -- which are engineered so that each plant produces its own insecticide. Some researchers have shown that none of the genetically engineered seeds significantly increase the yield of crops. Indeed, in more than 8,200 field trials, the Roundup Ready seeds produced fewer bushels of soybeans than similar natural varieties, accord- ing to a study by Dr. Charles Benbrook, the former director of the Board on Agriculture at the National Academy of Sciences. Far from being a solution to the world's hunger problem, the rapid introduction of genetically engineered crops may actually threaten agricul- ture and food security. First, widespread adoption of her- bicide-resistant seeds may lead to greater use of chemicals that kill weeds. Yet, many noncrop plants are used by small farmers in the third world as supplemental food sources and as animal feed. In the United States, the Fish and Wildlife Service has found that Roundup already threatens 74 endangered plant species. Biological pollution from geneti- cally engineered organisms may be another problem. Monsanto is poised to acquire the rights to a genetic engi- neering technique that renders a crop's seeds sterile, insuring that farm- ers are dependent on Monsanto for new seed every year. Farming in the third world could be crippled if these genes contaminate other local crops that the poor depend on. And such genes could unintentionally sterilize other plants, according to a study by Martha Crouch, an associate professor of biology at Indiana University. Half the world's farmers rely on their own saved seed for each year's harvest. A true solution to the problem of hunger depends on attacking poverty and inequality among both producers and consumers of food. A food system increasingly dependent on genetically altered seeds takes us in the wrong direction. and Agriculture .... Defense Departments. Monsanto makes "Roundup Ready" Peter Rosset is director of the The small.farmer is (and has been) seeds, which are engineered to with- Institute for Food and Development stand its herbicide, Roundup. These Policy and , of "World the recipient of the governmental co-author policies which are being dictated by seeds -- usually soybeans, canola or Hunger: Twelve Myths.' the "big" boys through their hired cotton -- allow farmers to apply the "guns" of government. These Policy formulators are more often recent , w'4 "retirees" from the corporate world ovei" which they now dictate new policy. The politicians make the "show" of sympathy while they readily accept the gratuitous handouts from the corporations. In democracy dead in America? I fear it has died some many years ago, and we will soon see the results of what our "great" uncle has in mind for the mass of us "common" people. And it needs no reiteration that "as the small farm goes, so goes rural America." Keep your eyes open for further developments in this drama. There is a book which speaks of I , ) ]_  America dictating to the entire world through a new world organization. Are 1999 IIc,-eler pOll-Ilu41m,n C I.LC we already policemen of the world?  I *'"'d ,;"  ' " Keep fighting for rural America -- you can make a difference.  ?"" :" VanHout undergoes " Stroke of treatment in OK Markets 'tlae Brush Teresa VanHout of Big Stone City, SD, wife of Richard VanHout is now No. 1 Wheat ...................... 2.75 Big Stone Arts Council (BSAC) undergoing treatment for lung cancer Soybeans ........................... 4.19 would like to extend an open inTulsa, OK. Corn ................................... 1.30 invitation & welcome you along with Cards and letters may be sent to: Oct. 12, 1998 the public to join us at the B SAC Cancer Treatment Center of America, No. 1 Wheat ...................... 3.23 Annual Meeting being held Tuesday, 2408 E. 81st St. Suite 100, Tulsa, OK Soybeans ........................... 4.89 October 19th, 6:30 p.m. at the former 74137-4210. Corn ................................... 1.52 Masonic Hall Main Street in  : .-. , Ortonville. Join us as we celebrate Ortonviile's 125th Birthday with storytelling by area residents as we reminisce through the past. Bring a guest! Maybe you have or know of someone with area history to share with all that evening. Let us not forget the history of the Masonic Hall and other historic q buildings in the area. So bring a friend  as we stroll down memory lane bringing back memories of walks through the parks, catching that big fish off that special dock, smelling " , .... Grandma's homemade bread and  :' passing down the family's secret . recipe, sharing experiences of your : : childhood and your unique family traditions. : Help us blow out the candles on Ortonville's Birthday Cake at this special occasion. Support the area by becoming a member or renewing .... membership in the Big Stone Arts : Council. You may join or renew at this ::   celebration.  ........ da Amer!con Heort 00Associotion TABOR UNITED METHODIST CHURCH confirmed three students Sept. 12. Left to right are Vince Kellen, Rev. Karl Watkins, WE'RE FIC_.q-NG FORYOUR UFE Tina Athey and Heidi Hansen. Page 4 00INDEPENDENT 1 llll llll/ll II 1 I1 The Independent (U.S.P.S. 412-480) JEANETTE Publisher JAMES D. Managing EditOr SUZETTE Plant Manager Office Manager KATHIE Computer and Com TAMMIE Com RYAN Reporter/Ad BILL DWYER & Pressmen Camera NANCY ColIater Tues.,Oct. 12,1;;;a Vol, I Continuing Pubshed Evm PerW)dlcal Pom SUBSCRIP'I:ION I $25.00por year in Parle, Traverse and Minnesota, Grant and in South Dakota. counties in Minnesota Dakota. All others, $33.00 Postmaster: Send The Ortonville Ortonviile, -ALL SUBSCRIPTIONS A B,oStone, Lac qul Pade,' unties Roberts in South Fehruery .............. 25.00 March .................. 22.119 April .................... 20.111 May ..................... 18.73 June .................... 19.6S July ...................... 14.S7 February ............. 29.00 March .................. 26.61 Aprll .................... 24.19 May ...................... 21.77 June .................... 19.35 July ...................... 16.93 ALL AREA OUTSIDE OF MINN. February .............. 33.00 March .................. 30.2S April .................... 27.50 May ..................... 24.75 June ................... 22.00 July ..................... 19.2 "PUBLISHER'S LIABILITY | The Publisher shall not advertisement. The for other errors or connection with an strictly limited to advertisement in any or the refund of any advertisement. Church Display ads - Correspondenc Pictures - S p.m. Friday News - Fdday afternoon Classified ads (Any at classify OFFICE A Monday: 8 a.m.-5 p.m, 8 a.m.-12:301 8 a.m.-12 Letters to the community issues Letter writers should Independent reserves and/or condense paper also reserves publish letters that are which it might be held Letters should printed or address Addresses and not be published. Letter writers ere themselves to one Please keep letter over 350 words AD vs. The Ortonville is If an individual zation charges for event, for an item be considered words, newspaper. would cease to paper receives for paper used product. It no Ionq paper cost increases. cost of ink and a paper used. AdverUsin crops and products to the and any garticular usiness. ADS: We any advertising wH justify our decision. A News: Our as fully and staff's opinions opinion page. A Editorials: fpage, rom other source our readers. editor are her own those of other staff expressed In Items lions may own views, but are general Interest. Call 320-839-3761 to classified Ortonville Tuesday,