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October 12, 1999     The Ortonville Independent
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October 12, 1999
 

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Area news digest APPLETON-Appleton firemen battled a raging inferno by the time they arrived at a fire scene Wednesday afternoon, Sept. 29th. The fire call came from the turkey barns located midway between Appleton and Holloway. The fire progressed quickly from the eastern part of the building burning across the ceilings over the firemen. Approximately 40,000 turkey chicks were lost in the blaze. Appleton firemen were assisted by departments from Milan and Danvers. BENSON-Benson's Economic Development Administration voted recently to lend Pheasant Run Enterprises $23,000 toward the establishment of a dog kennel business. Swift County's Rural Development Authority also voted to recommend that the county board of commissioners provide $23,000 in economic development funds toward the project. Pheasant Run Enterprises, owned by Mary Lou Johnson, is seeking the $46,000 in economic development funds to build a kennel which can be used by both the City of Benson and Swift County for stray animals. Johnson plans to offer kennel services to the community as well, a service which isn't currently available locally. Johnson currently trains, breeds and sells Morgan horses as well as St. Bernards, boxers and Great Danes at her farm five and a half miles south of Benson. MONTEVIDEO-The soybean, corn and sugar beet harvest is in full swing in west central Minnesota. Last year, Chippewa County farmers produced record soybean and corn crops, which helped offset very low cash prices. Corn and bean prices are even lower this fall and while this year's crop will be another good one, yields won't match those of last year. "The better-than-average yields will help, but will not offset the reduced prices for corn and beans," said Bob Padula of the Chippewa County Extension Service. Padula estimated that the soybean harvest will be about half done by this weekend, while about 20 percent of the corn will be combined. "It's just the first week of October and the corn hasn't dried down enough. With the low prices, farmers don't want the added expense of drying." Big Stone City Gail Maxwell, 839-2207 Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Christensen visited Thursday morning, Oct. 7th with Rose Christensen in Odessa. Sunday, Oct. 3rd Adeline Overberg was a dinner guest of Joanne Thielke of Milbank. Adeline also visited with Joanne's sister Mary from Enumclaw, WA. Darrell and Ramona Hjalming from Watertown, SD were coffee guests of Ralph and Lavina Loeschke on Tuesday afternoon, Oct. 5th. Tuesday afternoon, Oct. 5th Bob and Jan Rollins visited Leo and Darlene Barnhardt. Wednesday afternoon, Oct. 6th Marilyn Athey visited Leo and Darlene Barnhardt. Connie Voeltz spent from Friday, Oct. I st to Monday, Oct. 4th in the Cities. She visited at the Larry Morton home and also the Mark Adolphsons. They all celebrated Connie's grandson Ryan Adolphson's 14th birthday at the Adolphson home. four people attended the senior citizen potluck dinner held at the Big Stone Center. Grace Van Hout went shopping with her granddaughter Kim Voeltz and her little daughter in Milbank Thursday, Oct. 7th. They went to visit Grace's other granddaughter Tammi Myers in the country. Mark and Mary Fredrick of Fairfield Glade, TN visited John and Jerri Van Hout. Wednesday, Oct. 6th Eldora Nelson's son Lynn Nelson of Fairmount, ND and her daughter Connie Voeltz had dinner in Milbank. Friday, Oct. 8th Adeline Overberg, Delores Bengtson and Lula Hagen were luncheon guests of Eldora Nelson. It is girls basketball season for the Big Stone City school girls. On Oct. 14th there will be a 4th and 5th grade girls game at the Big Stone City school auditorium with St. Lawrence at 6 p.m. On Oct. 16th there will be an Sunday afternoon, Oct. 3rd Mr. and away fourth through sixth grade girls Mrs. Raymond Stolpman .... of tournament m Bellingham at 9 a.m. Belligham and her granddatrghlel '  Oh OCt. 3 8th tldt will be a home Lexes visited Sally Roggenbuck at Northridge. Raymond's dad Frank and Sally's dad John were brothers. Calvin and Naomi Sandlin went to Minneapolis on Sunday, Oct. 3rd for surgery on Calvin's eye on Tuesday morning to correct the double vision problem resulting from a stroke suffered 2-1/2 years ago. While there they visited Naomi's sister and brother-in-law Edna and Clifford Kraayenbrink. They returned home Thursday evening. Mary Louise Paulsen of Azusa, Ca was here visiting for about a week with people in the area. On Tuesday, Oct. 5th about forty- game at the Big Stone City school auditorium with the 7th and 8th grade girls and Grant/Deuel at 5:30 p.m. On Oct. 19th there will be a fourth and fifth grade girls home game at the Big Stone City school auditorium with Bellingham at 6 p.m. Bob and Orla Onken recently visited with Don and Donna Onken in Rockford, IL and with Esther Boyce in Cissna Park. IL. From there Bob, Orla, Esther, and Thelma Reed attended a bridge tournament at the Canyon Inn Lodge in McCormick Creek State Park near Spencer, IN. On the way home the Onkens attended the woodworking show in St. Paul. Extension report I I Jean Kvols, County Extension Educator SUPPLEMENTS AND MUSCLE MASS A recent review examined all available studies on several popular nutritional supplements claimed to increase muscle mass. Included were the minerals chromium, vanadyl sulfate, and boron; the steroid DHEA, HMB; creatine; protein supplements; and amino acids. The study appeared in Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition. None of the minerals have shown any benefit in humans. Nor has DHEA. Preliminary work on HMB suggests a benefit, but there is only one human study available. Many studies with creatine have shown weight gain, but the authors concluded that this gain is most likely water retention. An article in the August 1999 issue of the Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise reports larger muscle fiber in young male iiiii i ' f I fl I I I ii QUALITY CLOCK REPAIR Antique Mantle 400 Day 4nniversary Striking Chiming CRAIG RANDLEMAN OffTONVILLK MN 320-839-2357 Minnesota Certified Clockmaker - Watchmaker Call After 6 p.m. for Estimates subjects doing lots of exercise and getting creatine compared to those exercnsmg but getting a placebo. Studies on amino acids do not support the claims that they-increase growth hormone or insulin secretion. PROTEIN- HOW MUCH IS ENOUGH'- - Many athletes are concerned about getting enough protein in their diet. Athletes need more protein than non-athletes. Fortunately, if an athlete knows their protein needs, they will find that the protein needs can be met by eating a variety of foods. According to Nancy Clark, a registered dietitian and sports nutrition expert, the goal is to have adequate protein, not excess protein, in the diet. But how much protein does an athlete need? Protein needs can be determined with a few easy calculations: 1. Using these choices of grams of protein/pound of body weight, select how many grams of protein a person should have per pound body weight. Sedentary adult 0.4, Active adult 0.4- 0.6, Growing athlete 0.6-0.9, Adult building muscle mass 0.6-0.9. 2. Multiply the person's body weight by the recommended grams of protein per pound to determine daily protein needs. 3. Example: A 170 pound growing teenage athlete needs between 0.6 and 0.9 grams of protein per day. 170 lb. x 0.6 to 0.9 g/lb. = 102 to 153 grams protein per day. Here's what you need to know: Although athletes need more protein than sedentary people, it is easily obtained from a typical diet. While it is unlikely most of these supplements are harmful in short term, the authors of the review suggest that athletes should be concerned about false claims, questionable quality control and long term safety. Source: Roselyn Biermaier, Extension Educator, University of Minnesota Extension Service, Yellow Medicine County. Dates To Remember: October 12,13, & 14 - Master Internet Volunteer Program at Morris High School (3:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. daily) October 16- Big Help Day October 18 - 4-H Federation meeting and committee meetings re- scheduled to October 25th October 21 - Cluster Extension Educators' meeting in Morris October 23 - State4-H Dog Show October 23 - Make A Difference Day October 25 - Rescheduled 4-H meetings at Clinton Memorial Building: Livestock Committee (6:30 p.m.) followed by Federation with officer training (7:30 p.m.) and Ambie meeting (9:30 p.m.) October 26 Afterschool Cloverbuds at Clinton/Graceville/Beardsley Elementary School in Clinton (3:30 p.m.) October 28 - "On-Site" Septic Treatment Satellite conference at Ag/Family Service Conference Room in Ortonviile (7:00 pm - 9:00 pm) October 31 - 4-H Hay Ride party Big Stone City senior citizens center news I By Evelyn Zahnow, Secretary Our October meeting of the Senior Citizens was held on the 5th with 43 attending a pot luck dinner, cards and bingo. We drew for many door prizes, sang happy birthday and the table prayer, also the pledge of allegiance before our noon meal. Our meeting was conducted by Janice in the absence of our President Orla. Secretary report was read and approved. The. subject of Amberg memorial was discussed. A motion was made and seconded to buying a ceiling fan. Erv is to check into prices, etc. and get back to us. Thanks to Evelyn and Geneve for setting our tables for Halloween. Lamoine and Eunice will set our tables for our Thanksgiving meeting on Tuesday, Nov. 2nd. Mildred and Evelyn and Mary read a few jokes. Bingo and cards were enjoyed after our meeting. Open House Baby Shower For Hoffmanns An open house baby shower for Bryce Wayne Hoffmann, infant son of Steve and Donnette Hoffmann will be held at Trinity Lutheran Church in Clinton on Saturday, Oct. 16 from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. All friends and relatives are invited to attend. Dr. Gregory J. Peterson Specializing in Back, Neck and Extremity Care for the Entire Family. Phone 320-839-2323 OFFICE HOURS: Mon., Wed., Fri. 8:30-5:00; Tues. & Thurs. 8:30-12:00; Sat. by appointment 215 SE 2nd Street Ortonville, MN 56278 Office (320) 839-2323 Home (320) 839-6246 SMAHC workshop I dare you. le= for all ages 00oot,w00s,00iooo00o,000000tsao00 award recupients na Humanities Council (SMAHC), in cooperation with the Southwest Minnesota Foundation, is offering a half day workshop, "The Arts for All Ages" to be repeated in Benson and Olivia on Wednesday, Oct. 27th and in Fulda on Oct. 28th. Special guest presenter Cornelia Davis, Director of the Intergenerational Arts and Education Program of Generations Together, the University of Pittsburgh, will speak on the basics and benefits of intergenerational arts programs and model programs for schools and communities. A panel of regional artists, local intergenerational arts planners, and SMAHC staff will provide project ideas and grant application information on ArtBridge, SMAHC's intergenerational residency program, as well as on SMAHC's regular school artist residency program. The workshop is provided free of charge for schools, senior facility personnel, artists, seniors, youth leaders and all community groups and individuals interested in bringing the generations together for art- making and relationship building. Two clock hours towards continuing education credits for Nursing Home Administrators are available. Scholarships for mileage, childcare and substitute teacher costs are available, if needed. Scholarships for all reimbursments, as well as funds for Dr. Davis' presentation are being provided through additional support from the Paul and Alma Schwan Aging Trust Fund of the Southwest MN Foundation. For more information and to register, contact SMAHC by Oct. 20 at 1-800-622-5284, 507-537-1471, 1501 State Street FA 221, SSU, Marshall MN 56258 or by e-mail: fd.smahc @starpoint.net. Randy Fitzner and Jeff Propp have been awarded the national I Dare You Leadership Award in recognition of personal integrity, balanced living and potential for leadership. The I Dare You Leadership Award is presented each year by the American Youth Foundation (AYF) in cooperation with principals, headmas- ters and 4-H coulaty agents/educators across the nation. The award was first offered in 1941 by the late William H. Danforth, founder of the Ralston Purina Company in St. Louis, who challenged young people to achieve their highest potential and to influ- ence others through lives of service. The award takes its name from the book, I Dare You, written by Danforth, in which he commends the balanced life of mental, physical, social and spiritual development as the backbone of leadership. In addition to a certificate of recognition each copy I Dare You and a tunity to attend Leadership in Michigan, Hampshire or California. Over and 4-H programs Dare You Leadership each year. In 1924 the American prominent which develops people. AYF dren and youth, as institutions that serve! information about Leadership Award and or call the AYE 1311 Louis, MO 63104. 772-2889. THE City Rural Dog Get ready l Buy Ice Only $1 Order Include i Ship to I I Name I I Address I I i City I I I P.O.Box 326, La Crosse, Wl 54601 I I 1-800-952-5866 o VISA or MasterCard | SHOE NOT INCLUDED Ileim mm= miD mm n  m m a mm mm ii  i State Zi St. James Ice Treads Cooperatives liieW, A IIIIIIlil H of ommun For over 150 years, cooperatives have been a part of the communities they viding their membersyou, your friends and neighborswith goods and it's more than that. Because cooperatives are owned by the people serve, eratives have become an actual part of our daily livesthey are at the hometowns. Why? Because cooperatives are committed to more than just building a bright for a small group of investors. Cooperatives are committed to building a bright for all the people who may use or need their services. That's because coo are member-owned. That means going the extra mile. It means local control. means investing in the kind of community development and human " will keep our hometowns alive and well in the years ahead. Concern for communityit's one of the principles that cooperatives believe in. wouldn't have it any other way. COOPERATIVE MONTH: October 1999 Clinton Farmers Co-op Elevator CLINTON Federated Telephone Cooperative. CHOKIO Beardsley Farmers Co-op Elevator BEARDSLEY NEW DUMPING LOCATION ALSO AT BARRY Agralite Cooperative BENSON Ortonville Co-op ORTONVILLE Big Stone Coo CLINTON - ORTONVILLE Western Consol Co-op HOLLOWAY - APPLETON - ODESSA "I WATSON - SUNBURG - SOUTH SHORE ' GRACEvlLLE Page 2b 00INDEPENDENT m II Ill Tuesday, O Area news digest APPLETON-Appleton firemen battled a raging inferno by the time they arrived at a fire scene Wednesday afternoon, Sept. 29th. The fire call came from the turkey barns located midway between Appleton and Holloway. The fire progressed quickly from the eastern part of the building burning across the ceilings over the firemen. Approximately 40,000 turkey chicks were lost in the blaze. Appleton firemen were assisted by departments from Milan and Danvers. BENSON-Benson's Economic Development Administration voted recently to lend Pheasant Run Enterprises $23,000 toward the establishment of a dog kennel business. Swift County's Rural Development Authority also voted to recommend that the county board of commissioners provide $23,000 in economic development funds toward the project. Pheasant Run Enterprises, owned by Mary Lou Johnson, is seeking the $46,000 in economic development funds to build a kennel which can be used by both the City of Benson and Swift County for stray animals. Johnson plans to offer kennel services to the community as well, a service which isn't currently available locally. Johnson currently trains, breeds and sells Morgan horses as well as St. Bernards, boxers and Great Danes at her farm five and a half miles south of Benson. MONTEVIDEO-The soybean, corn and sugar beet harvest is in full swing in west central Minnesota. Last year, Chippewa County farmers produced record soybean and corn crops, which helped offset very low cash prices. Corn and bean prices are even lower this fall and while this year's crop will be another good one, yields won't match those of last year. "The better-than-average yields will help, but will not offset the reduced prices for corn and beans," said Bob Padula of the Chippewa County Extension Service. Padula estimated that the soybean harvest will be about half done by this weekend, while about 20 percent of the corn will be combined. "It's just the first week of October and the corn hasn't dried down enough. With the low prices, farmers don't want the added expense of drying." Big Stone City Gail Maxwell, 839-2207 Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Christensen visited Thursday morning, Oct. 7th with Rose Christensen in Odessa. Sunday, Oct. 3rd Adeline Overberg was a dinner guest of Joanne Thielke of Milbank. Adeline also visited with Joanne's sister Mary from Enumclaw, WA. Darrell and Ramona Hjalming from Watertown, SD were coffee guests of Ralph and Lavina Loeschke on Tuesday afternoon, Oct. 5th. Tuesday afternoon, Oct. 5th Bob and Jan Rollins visited Leo and Darlene Barnhardt. Wednesday afternoon, Oct. 6th Marilyn Athey visited Leo and Darlene Barnhardt. Connie Voeltz spent from Friday, Oct. I st to Monday, Oct. 4th in the Cities. She visited at the Larry Morton home and also the Mark Adolphsons. They all celebrated Connie's grandson Ryan Adolphson's 14th birthday at the Adolphson home. four people attended the senior citizen potluck dinner held at the Big Stone Center. Grace Van Hout went shopping with her granddaughter Kim Voeltz and her little daughter in Milbank Thursday, Oct. 7th. They went to visit Grace's other granddaughter Tammi Myers in the country. Mark and Mary Fredrick of Fairfield Glade, TN visited John and Jerri Van Hout. Wednesday, Oct. 6th Eldora Nelson's son Lynn Nelson of Fairmount, ND and her daughter Connie Voeltz had dinner in Milbank. Friday, Oct. 8th Adeline Overberg, Delores Bengtson and Lula Hagen were luncheon guests of Eldora Nelson. It is girls basketball season for the Big Stone City school girls. On Oct. 14th there will be a 4th and 5th grade girls game at the Big Stone City school auditorium with St. Lawrence at 6 p.m. On Oct. 16th there will be an Sunday afternoon, Oct. 3rd Mr. and away fourth through sixth grade girls Mrs. Raymond Stolpman .... of tournament m Bellingham at 9 a.m. Belligham and her granddatrghlel '  Oh OCt. 3 8th tldt will be a home Lexes visited Sally Roggenbuck at Northridge. Raymond's dad Frank and Sally's dad John were brothers. Calvin and Naomi Sandlin went to Minneapolis on Sunday, Oct. 3rd for surgery on Calvin's eye on Tuesday morning to correct the double vision problem resulting from a stroke suffered 2-1/2 years ago. While there they visited Naomi's sister and brother-in-law Edna and Clifford Kraayenbrink. They returned home Thursday evening. Mary Louise Paulsen of Azusa, Ca was here visiting for about a week with people in the area. On Tuesday, Oct. 5th about forty- game at the Big Stone City school auditorium with the 7th and 8th grade girls and Grant/Deuel at 5:30 p.m. On Oct. 19th there will be a fourth and fifth grade girls home game at the Big Stone City school auditorium with Bellingham at 6 p.m. Bob and Orla Onken recently visited with Don and Donna Onken in Rockford, IL and with Esther Boyce in Cissna Park. IL. From there Bob, Orla, Esther, and Thelma Reed attended a bridge tournament at the Canyon Inn Lodge in McCormick Creek State Park near Spencer, IN. On the way home the Onkens attended the woodworking show in St. Paul. Extension report I I Jean Kvols, County Extension Educator SUPPLEMENTS AND MUSCLE MASS A recent review examined all available studies on several popular nutritional supplements claimed to increase muscle mass. Included were the minerals chromium, vanadyl sulfate, and boron; the steroid DHEA, HMB; creatine; protein supplements; and amino acids. The study appeared in Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition. None of the minerals have shown any benefit in humans. Nor has DHEA. Preliminary work on HMB suggests a benefit, but there is only one human study available. Many studies with creatine have shown weight gain, but the authors concluded that this gain is most likely water retention. An article in the August 1999 issue of the Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise reports larger muscle fiber in young male iiiii i ' f I fl I I I ii QUALITY CLOCK REPAIR Antique Mantle 400 Day 4nniversary Striking Chiming CRAIG RANDLEMAN OffTONVILLK MN 320-839-2357 Minnesota Certified Clockmaker - Watchmaker Call After 6 p.m. for Estimates subjects doing lots of exercise and getting creatine compared to those exercnsmg but getting a placebo. Studies on amino acids do not support the claims that they-increase growth hormone or insulin secretion. PROTEIN- HOW MUCH IS ENOUGH'- - Many athletes are concerned about getting enough protein in their diet. Athletes need more protein than non-athletes. Fortunately, if an athlete knows their protein needs, they will find that the protein needs can be met by eating a variety of foods. According to Nancy Clark, a registered dietitian and sports nutrition expert, the goal is to have adequate protein, not excess protein, in the diet. But how much protein does an athlete need? Protein needs can be determined with a few easy calculations: 1. Using these choices of grams of protein/pound of body weight, select how many grams of protein a person should have per pound body weight. Sedentary adult 0.4, Active adult 0.4- 0.6, Growing athlete 0.6-0.9, Adult building muscle mass 0.6-0.9. 2. Multiply the person's body weight by the recommended grams of protein per pound to determine daily protein needs. 3. Example: A 170 pound growing teenage athlete needs between 0.6 and 0.9 grams of protein per day. 170 lb. x 0.6 to 0.9 g/lb. = 102 to 153 grams protein per day. Here's what you need to know: Although athletes need more protein than sedentary people, it is easily obtained from a typical diet. While it is unlikely most of these supplements are harmful in short term, the authors of the review suggest that athletes should be concerned about false claims, questionable quality control and long term safety. Source: Roselyn Biermaier, Extension Educator, University of Minnesota Extension Service, Yellow Medicine County. Dates To Remember: October 12,13, & 14 - Master Internet Volunteer Program at Morris High School (3:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. daily) October 16- Big Help Day October 18 - 4-H Federation meeting and committee meetings re- scheduled to October 25th October 21 - Cluster Extension Educators' meeting in Morris October 23 - State4-H Dog Show October 23 - Make A Difference Day October 25 - Rescheduled 4-H meetings at Clinton Memorial Building: Livestock Committee (6:30 p.m.) followed by Federation with officer training (7:30 p.m.) and Ambie meeting (9:30 p.m.) October 26 Afterschool Cloverbuds at Clinton/Graceville/Beardsley Elementary School in Clinton (3:30 p.m.) October 28 - "On-Site" Septic Treatment Satellite conference at Ag/Family Service Conference Room in Ortonviile (7:00 pm - 9:00 pm) October 31 - 4-H Hay Ride party Big Stone City senior citizens center news I By Evelyn Zahnow, Secretary Our October meeting of the Senior Citizens was held on the 5th with 43 attending a pot luck dinner, cards and bingo. We drew for many door prizes, sang happy birthday and the table prayer, also the pledge of allegiance before our noon meal. Our meeting was conducted by Janice in the absence of our President Orla. Secretary report was read and approved. The. subject of Amberg memorial was discussed. A motion was made and seconded to buying a ceiling fan. Erv is to check into prices, etc. and get back to us. Thanks to Evelyn and Geneve for setting our tables for Halloween. Lamoine and Eunice will set our tables for our Thanksgiving meeting on Tuesday, Nov. 2nd. Mildred and Evelyn and Mary read a few jokes. Bingo and cards were enjoyed after our meeting. Open House Baby Shower For Hoffmanns An open house baby shower for Bryce Wayne Hoffmann, infant son of Steve and Donnette Hoffmann will be held at Trinity Lutheran Church in Clinton on Saturday, Oct. 16 from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. All friends and relatives are invited to attend. Dr. Gregory J. Peterson Specializing in Back, Neck and Extremity Care for the Entire Family. Phone 320-839-2323 OFFICE HOURS: Mon., Wed., Fri. 8:30-5:00; Tues. & Thurs. 8:30-12:00; Sat. by appointment 215 SE 2nd Street Ortonville, MN 56278 Office (320) 839-2323 Home (320) 839-6246 SMAHC workshop I dare you. le= for all ages 00oot,w00s,00iooo00o,000000tsao00 award recupients na Humanities Council (SMAHC), in cooperation with the Southwest Minnesota Foundation, is offering a half day workshop, "The Arts for All Ages" to be repeated in Benson and Olivia on Wednesday, Oct. 27th and in Fulda on Oct. 28th. Special guest presenter Cornelia Davis, Director of the Intergenerational Arts and Education Program of Generations Together, the University of Pittsburgh, will speak on the basics and benefits of intergenerational arts programs and model programs for schools and communities. A panel of regional artists, local intergenerational arts planners, and SMAHC staff will provide project ideas and grant application information on ArtBridge, SMAHC's intergenerational residency program, as well as on SMAHC's regular school artist residency program. The workshop is provided free of charge for schools, senior facility personnel, artists, seniors, youth leaders and all community groups and individuals interested in bringing the generations together for art- making and relationship building. Two clock hours towards continuing education credits for Nursing Home Administrators are available. Scholarships for mileage, childcare and substitute teacher costs are available, if needed. Scholarships for all reimbursments, as well as funds for Dr. Davis' presentation are being provided through additional support from the Paul and Alma Schwan Aging Trust Fund of the Southwest MN Foundation. For more information and to register, contact SMAHC by Oct. 20 at 1-800-622-5284, 507-537-1471, 1501 State Street FA 221, SSU, Marshall MN 56258 or by e-mail: fd.smahc @starpoint.net. Randy Fitzner and Jeff Propp have been awarded the national I Dare You Leadership Award in recognition of personal integrity, balanced living and potential for leadership. The I Dare You Leadership Award is presented each year by the American Youth Foundation (AYF) in cooperation with principals, headmas- ters and 4-H coulaty agents/educators across the nation. The award was first offered in 1941 by the late William H. Danforth, founder of the Ralston Purina Company in St. Louis, who challenged young people to achieve their highest potential and to influ- ence others through lives of service. The award takes its name from the book, I Dare You, written by Danforth, in which he commends the balanced life of mental, physical, social and spiritual development as the backbone of leadership. In addition to a certificate of recognition each copy I Dare You and a tunity to attend Leadership in Michigan, Hampshire or California. Over and 4-H programs Dare You Leadership each year. In 1924 the American prominent which develops people. AYF dren and youth, as institutions that serve! information about Leadership Award and or call the AYE 1311 Louis, MO 63104. 772-2889. THE City Rural Dog Get ready l Buy Ice Only $1 Order Include i Ship to I I Name I I Address I I i City I I I P.O.Box 326, La Crosse, Wl 54601 I I 1-800-952-5866 o VISA or MasterCard | SHOE NOT INCLUDED Ileim mm= miD mm n  m m a mm mm ii  i State Zi St. James Ice Treads Cooperatives liieW, A IIIIIIlil H of ommun For over 150 years, cooperatives have been a part of the communities they viding their membersyou, your friends and neighborswith goods and it's more than that. Because cooperatives are owned by the people serve, eratives have become an actual part of our daily livesthey are at the hometowns. Why? Because cooperatives are committed to more than just building a bright for a small group of investors. Cooperatives are committed to building a bright for all the people who may use or need their services. That's because coo are member-owned. That means going the extra mile. It means local control. means investing in the kind of community development and human " will keep our hometowns alive and well in the years ahead. Concern for communityit's one of the principles that cooperatives believe in. wouldn't have it any other way. COOPERATIVE MONTH: October 1999 Clinton Farmers Co-op Elevator CLINTON Federated Telephone Cooperative. CHOKIO Beardsley Farmers Co-op Elevator BEARDSLEY NEW DUMPING LOCATION ALSO AT BARRY Agralite Cooperative BENSON Ortonville Co-op ORTONVILLE Big Stone Coo CLINTON - ORTONVILLE Western Consol Co-op HOLLOWAY - APPLETON - ODESSA "I WATSON - SUNBURG - SOUTH SHORE ' GRACEvlLLE Page 2b 00INDEPENDENT m II Ill Tuesday, O