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October 12, 1999     The Ortonville Independent
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!CHAMPION DIANE HERMANSON was presented with her fire prevention poster contest - this toy fire truck. Shown he prize is Rev. Duane Hermanson of the Ortonville Fire I'ENTION POSTER WINNERS in grades 1-4 are pictured to right in front are first grade wrnners Ethan Cole (first), r (second) and Brandon karels (third). Second row, sec- Vinners Keven Berdan (first), Sean Watkins (second) and l(third). Next row, third grade winners include Mike Roe Abby Knutson (second) and Candice Rushford (third). In d champion, fourth grader Diane Hermanson, with other Winners Paulina Chaqoupka (first), Zach Larson (second) Thymian (third). talk about ... 839-2331.24 Hour Crisis Line 1-800-974-3359. Ls Domestic Violence anth. It is your business: blence is the business of trnmunity! What is the "arch in our society of ne puts it this way: le) is pastoral. Our arting. Families and e being destroyed by violence. Children are growing up believing that daddy (disrespecting) mommy is just the way things are. Many women live with the fact that their home is the most dangerous place for them to be. People need to know that they can come to their church for support and information and, when they come, they need to find church leaders prepared to I I EAST ORTHOPAEDIC " CENTER g N.E. South Dakota and Western Minnesota for 13 years flN LLZ4#,QURSA DI aing patients weekly at the Ortonville Hospital. ,ori Larson at 1-320-839-2502 for an appointment. WE NOW ACCEPT MEDICARE ASSIGNMENT  (so5) Ss2-2630 or 1-800-658-4763 Mallard Pointe Business Park Watertown, SO M.D. Miched J. Verier, M.D. Len B. Kolodyclmk, M.D. (knowledgeably) assist them. The second (role) is pragmatic. The issues of violence against women needs to be one of the priority of a peacemaking agreement because it is a social issue that is personal and immediate in our lives right here. The fact that women and girls in our culture learn early that (they) have no right to bodily integrity, that (they) have no right to be free from bodily harm is a fact that has long been accepted as normal." (taken from "Peacemaking in a Violent World"- by Presbyterian Peacemaking Program) A Policy Statement on Domestic Violence Couples Counseling Couples Counseling is not a viable therapeutic tool for use in violent family relationships. We define a violent family relationship as one in which physical or sexual assaults occur, when there are threats of violence and/or when a woman lives in an environment of fear caused by her partner. Couple counseling remains inappropriate even when both parties request it and/or want to maintain the couple relationship. Couple counseling is beneficial to work on marital problems. Wife (abuse) however is a violent criminal act, not a marital problem. It is illegal. It is a behavior that is solely the responsibility of the violent person, is chosen by him and he alone is capable of changing it. This is true regardless of the alleged provocation, since the behavior of one family member cannot compel another ... to be violent. Violent behavior must be addressed and stopped before couple counseling takes place. Couples counseling prior to admission and ongoing treatment for the batterer could: 1. further endanger the battered woman for revealing information during counseling--she is never to be put in the situation (of accountability for her partner) that could turn on her later 2. lend credence to the myth that battered women are responsible for the violence that their own behavior "asks for it" 3. detour from the goal of batterer accountability when the focus of counseling is on the couple- the pastor may ignore the denial, minimization and deception about the violence that occurs 4. give the message that the pastor condones the violence or that the violence is not important by focusing on other issues 5. reinforce stereotypic sex roles, thereby ignoring the battered woman's rights and responsibility to choose whether or not to (stay in) the relationship 6. increase the battered woman's sense of isolation, as she may (be silent) about the violence out of fear to speak. This may discourage her from taking any further action to protect herself. 7. imply that the battered woman has responsibility for seeing that the batterer gets help. Therapists need to be particularly wary of the manipulation inherent in a batterer's refusal of anything other then couple's treatment. Basic Ouestions To Ask Before Attempting To Counsel. Is the batterer going to ongoing treatment on his own to consolidate his behavior change and to prove his commitment to ending the violence? Is the batterer acknowledging his responsibility for his violent actions? Does he recognize his ability to control his actions and stop his violence towards his partner? Does he state clearly that he will not be violent in word or action towards her- and she validates in a separate (individual) session that he has not been violent but that he has affirmed to her his commitment never to be violent again (or act in such a way that she fears him) And has a significant period of time passed during which his individual, ongoing treatment continued and there is no further violence (approx. one year from onset of treatment) The batterer and the battered woman have two different problems. His problem is his violent behavior (and seeing his partner as property). Hers is that she is coupled with a batterer. These two distinct issues are safely and effectively dealt with in separate counseling. The Women's Advocacy Resource Center is asking all churches in Big Stone County to take a stand against domestic violence in October. During a service to recognize the victims among us- light a candle, have a moment of silent prayer, take a special offering, call abusive behavior what it is: violence against the image of God in womanhood. Let your voice combine with other religious groups during this month to stop the violence of word and deed. It is your business. Mobile meals Oct. 11 through Oct. 15: Lefty & Vi Mehlhop, Bud Knippen, Norm & Gen Davis Oct. 18 through Oct. 22: Ervin & Lamoine Herrmann; Howard & Vivian Janssen, Dorothy Gmiterko 4-H news I I LAKERS Trevor Karsky, Reporter At the Lakers 4-H meeting on Oct. 4th we talked about old and new business. There will be a hayride on Oct. 24th and on Oct. 25th there will be a Federation meeting. We received the traveling trophy top club award and blue ribbon in berdsmanship for horses. MINNESOTA Property Owners PAYABLE ON OR BEFORE FRIDAY, OCT. 15, 1999 (to avoid a late payment penalty) 2nd half of the Real Estate Taxes not classified as agricultural or mobile homes. CINDY NELSON, TREASURER Big Stone County - Ortonville, Minnesota Extension report Carrie Olson, County Extension Educator PATH TO BETTER GRADES AND BEHAVIOR: JOIN 4-H SAYS CORNELL STUDY I just came across this article and thought I should share. This past week was National 4-H week and this whole month 4-Hers are busy promoting the program and trying to recruit new members. If you'd like more information on how to join, contact the Big Stone County Extension Office at 839-2518 OR 1-800-279-2518 or any 4- H member or leader in the County. According to a two-year Cornell University study, young people who participate in New York state 4-H clubs do better in school, are more motivated to help others and achieve more than other kids who both do and do not participate in other kinds of group programs and clubs. Members of 4-H are also more educationally motivated, have higher levels of self esteem, place more emphasis on having a value system and communicate at more of an adult level, says the study conducted by June Mead, a program evaluator for Cornell Cooperative Extension; Eunice Rodriguez, an assistant professor in the Department of Policy Analysis and Management; and Tom Hirschl, a professor in the Department of Rural Sociology at Comell The findings from the study on how 4-H clubs make a difference in young people's lives are based on the "New York State 4-H Clubs: 'Members Only' " survey of almost 3,200 fifth-through 12th-graders (30 percent male, 70 percent female) in 50 New York counties, including New York City. Statewide, 4-H club enrollment is now about 10,600 males and 18,300 females. The Corneil researchers analyzed the data from the "Members Only" survey and then compared the data with the "Search Institute Profiles of Student Life: Attitudes and Behaviors" survey that included young people who were involved in some type of club or organized group program and those who were not. The research by the Search Institute of Minneapolis found that the more opportunities young people have to develop their capacities in positive ways, the less likely they are to engage in problem behaviors and the more likely they are to engage in positive, pro-social behaviors. Of the 254,400 young people in the Search Institute's survey, the 41 percent who participated in some type of club or organization similar to 4-H scored higher in almost all of the areas studied. Importantly, researchers also found that the longer young people are members of 4-H, the better they fare, Those in 4-H clubs for more than one year reported getting better grades and caring more about how well they did in school, and reported higher levels of involvement in community service projects and more time in volunteer work than those in 4-H less than a year. Hundreds of young people said that 4-H clubs provided enrichment activities, broadened their worldview and expanded what they learned in school. One youth wrote, "[My] 4-H experiences, such as public presentations and educational projects, have given me an edge in school. -- Most importantly, the leadership experiences that I have had through 4-H have helped me to become a more outgoing person, ready to take on all different sorts of responsibilities." Many young people reported that they had developed skills in leadership, public speaking, self-esteem, communication, and planning and that they have made lasting friendships through their club participation. One 4- Her reported, "I've had a lot of fun in 4- H, learned many new skills and learned that my little help can count. -- 4-H has given me opportunities to grow and have fun doing so. For this gift, 1 am very grateful." Another wrote: "Without 4-H, I don't know where I'd be." The full study can be found at: http://www.cce.cornell.edu/youth/4h/ne ws/index.html Information on 4-H in New York State can be found at: http://www.cce.cornell.edu/youth/4h/ For more information on this survey contact: Susan S. Lang at (607) 255- 3613 email: SSL4@cornell.edu http://www.news.corneli.edu Source: "Clover Corner News, " Internet Mailer, October 5, 1999 ASSET # 1 1 FIMILY IHIUNllARIES I:AMILY HAS CLEAR RULES AND CONSEQUENCES, AND MONITORS THE YOUNG PFRSON'S WHEREABOUTS. We drive up to a stop sign. We have a choice to make. If we choose to obey the law and stop each time, we will never think too much about the stop sign. If we choose not to stop, we cannot be surprised when we are in an accident or ticketed and face consequences because, of our decision not to stop. tt is very simple. Help build security and boundaries in your children by taking the time to communicate clear rules and consequences. It is part of your responsibility as a parent and you will be.amazed at how positive it, is for your kids. Only 67% of our local kids said that their parents have set standards to follow. Nationally, 76% of the youth surveyed had definitive standards to follow. Boundaries ........... A Lovinq Choice. 00OBER 27 WiN $10,000 CASH AND A 1999 REST ..... FORD MUSTANG AR CONVERTIBLE We're Giving Away SlO00 Every Friday! for 1 free entry at 8 for $200, 9 for $300 and 10pro for S500 the party. Live entertainment and great specials Lots of easy ways to qualify. Weekday Cash drawings every Monday, Tuesday, & Wednesday for S200 to S500 and entry for the Grand Prize. Grand Prize drawings October 27th starting at 6pro for a total of S10,O00 and the '99 Mustang. ,00aRACE BETTINGtoMagic Open Wednesday through Monday from llam to llpm The tracks being offered include Belmont & many more Both horse and dog racing I NO & tqOTt00L t. 12, 1999 INDEPENDENT Page 3b !CHAMPION DIANE HERMANSON was presented with her fire prevention poster contest - this toy fire truck. Shown he prize is Rev. Duane Hermanson of the Ortonville Fire I'ENTION POSTER WINNERS in grades 1-4 are pictured to right in front are first grade wrnners Ethan Cole (first), r (second) and Brandon karels (third). Second row, sec- Vinners Keven Berdan (first), Sean Watkins (second) and l(third). Next row, third grade winners include Mike Roe Abby Knutson (second) and Candice Rushford (third). In d champion, fourth grader Diane Hermanson, with other Winners Paulina Chaqoupka (first), Zach Larson (second) Thymian (third). talk about ... 839-2331.24 Hour Crisis Line 1-800-974-3359. Ls Domestic Violence anth. It is your business: blence is the business of trnmunity! What is the "arch in our society of ne puts it this way: le) is pastoral. Our arting. Families and e being destroyed by violence. Children are growing up believing that daddy (disrespecting) mommy is just the way things are. Many women live with the fact that their home is the most dangerous place for them to be. People need to know that they can come to their church for support and information and, when they come, they need to find church leaders prepared to I I EAST ORTHOPAEDIC " CENTER g N.E. South Dakota and Western Minnesota for 13 years flN LLZ4#,QURSA DI aing patients weekly at the Ortonville Hospital. ,ori Larson at 1-320-839-2502 for an appointment. WE NOW ACCEPT MEDICARE ASSIGNMENT  (so5) Ss2-2630 or 1-800-658-4763 Mallard Pointe Business Park Watertown, SO M.D. Miched J. Verier, M.D. Len B. Kolodyclmk, M.D. (knowledgeably) assist them. The second (role) is pragmatic. The issues of violence against women needs to be one of the priority of a peacemaking agreement because it is a social issue that is personal and immediate in our lives right here. The fact that women and girls in our culture learn early that (they) have no right to bodily integrity, that (they) have no right to be free from bodily harm is a fact that has long been accepted as normal." (taken from "Peacemaking in a Violent World"- by Presbyterian Peacemaking Program) A Policy Statement on Domestic Violence Couples Counseling Couples Counseling is not a viable therapeutic tool for use in violent family relationships. We define a violent family relationship as one in which physical or sexual assaults occur, when there are threats of violence and/or when a woman lives in an environment of fear caused by her partner. Couple counseling remains inappropriate even when both parties request it and/or want to maintain the couple relationship. Couple counseling is beneficial to work on marital problems. Wife (abuse) however is a violent criminal act, not a marital problem. It is illegal. It is a behavior that is solely the responsibility of the violent person, is chosen by him and he alone is capable of changing it. This is true regardless of the alleged provocation, since the behavior of one family member cannot compel another ... to be violent. Violent behavior must be addressed and stopped before couple counseling takes place. Couples counseling prior to admission and ongoing treatment for the batterer could: 1. further endanger the battered woman for revealing information during counseling--she is never to be put in the situation (of accountability for her partner) that could turn on her later 2. lend credence to the myth that battered women are responsible for the violence that their own behavior "asks for it" 3. detour from the goal of batterer accountability when the focus of counseling is on the couple- the pastor may ignore the denial, minimization and deception about the violence that occurs 4. give the message that the pastor condones the violence or that the violence is not important by focusing on other issues 5. reinforce stereotypic sex roles, thereby ignoring the battered woman's rights and responsibility to choose whether or not to (stay in) the relationship 6. increase the battered woman's sense of isolation, as she may (be silent) about the violence out of fear to speak. This may discourage her from taking any further action to protect herself. 7. imply that the battered woman has responsibility for seeing that the batterer gets help. Therapists need to be particularly wary of the manipulation inherent in a batterer's refusal of anything other then couple's treatment. Basic Ouestions To Ask Before Attempting To Counsel. Is the batterer going to ongoing treatment on his own to consolidate his behavior change and to prove his commitment to ending the violence? Is the batterer acknowledging his responsibility for his violent actions? Does he recognize his ability to control his actions and stop his violence towards his partner? Does he state clearly that he will not be violent in word or action towards her- and she validates in a separate (individual) session that he has not been violent but that he has affirmed to her his commitment never to be violent again (or act in such a way that she fears him) And has a significant period of time passed during which his individual, ongoing treatment continued and there is no further violence (approx. one year from onset of treatment) The batterer and the battered woman have two different problems. His problem is his violent behavior (and seeing his partner as property). Hers is that she is coupled with a batterer. These two distinct issues are safely and effectively dealt with in separate counseling. The Women's Advocacy Resource Center is asking all churches in Big Stone County to take a stand against domestic violence in October. During a service to recognize the victims among us- light a candle, have a moment of silent prayer, take a special offering, call abusive behavior what it is: violence against the image of God in womanhood. Let your voice combine with other religious groups during this month to stop the violence of word and deed. It is your business. Mobile meals Oct. 11 through Oct. 15: Lefty & Vi Mehlhop, Bud Knippen, Norm & Gen Davis Oct. 18 through Oct. 22: Ervin & Lamoine Herrmann; Howard & Vivian Janssen, Dorothy Gmiterko 4-H news I I LAKERS Trevor Karsky, Reporter At the Lakers 4-H meeting on Oct. 4th we talked about old and new business. There will be a hayride on Oct. 24th and on Oct. 25th there will be a Federation meeting. We received the traveling trophy top club award and blue ribbon in berdsmanship for horses. MINNESOTA Property Owners PAYABLE ON OR BEFORE FRIDAY, OCT. 15, 1999 (to avoid a late payment penalty) 2nd half of the Real Estate Taxes not classified as agricultural or mobile homes. CINDY NELSON, TREASURER Big Stone County - Ortonville, Minnesota Extension report Carrie Olson, County Extension Educator PATH TO BETTER GRADES AND BEHAVIOR: JOIN 4-H SAYS CORNELL STUDY I just came across this article and thought I should share. This past week was National 4-H week and this whole month 4-Hers are busy promoting the program and trying to recruit new members. If you'd like more information on how to join, contact the Big Stone County Extension Office at 839-2518 OR 1-800-279-2518 or any 4- H member or leader in the County. According to a two-year Cornell University study, young people who participate in New York state 4-H clubs do better in school, are more motivated to help others and achieve more than other kids who both do and do not participate in other kinds of group programs and clubs. Members of 4-H are also more educationally motivated, have higher levels of self esteem, place more emphasis on having a value system and communicate at more of an adult level, says the study conducted by June Mead, a program evaluator for Cornell Cooperative Extension; Eunice Rodriguez, an assistant professor in the Department of Policy Analysis and Management; and Tom Hirschl, a professor in the Department of Rural Sociology at Comell The findings from the study on how 4-H clubs make a difference in young people's lives are based on the "New York State 4-H Clubs: 'Members Only' " survey of almost 3,200 fifth-through 12th-graders (30 percent male, 70 percent female) in 50 New York counties, including New York City. Statewide, 4-H club enrollment is now about 10,600 males and 18,300 females. The Corneil researchers analyzed the data from the "Members Only" survey and then compared the data with the "Search Institute Profiles of Student Life: Attitudes and Behaviors" survey that included young people who were involved in some type of club or organized group program and those who were not. The research by the Search Institute of Minneapolis found that the more opportunities young people have to develop their capacities in positive ways, the less likely they are to engage in problem behaviors and the more likely they are to engage in positive, pro-social behaviors. Of the 254,400 young people in the Search Institute's survey, the 41 percent who participated in some type of club or organization similar to 4-H scored higher in almost all of the areas studied. Importantly, researchers also found that the longer young people are members of 4-H, the better they fare, Those in 4-H clubs for more than one year reported getting better grades and caring more about how well they did in school, and reported higher levels of involvement in community service projects and more time in volunteer work than those in 4-H less than a year. Hundreds of young people said that 4-H clubs provided enrichment activities, broadened their worldview and expanded what they learned in school. One youth wrote, "[My] 4-H experiences, such as public presentations and educational projects, have given me an edge in school. -- Most importantly, the leadership experiences that I have had through 4-H have helped me to become a more outgoing person, ready to take on all different sorts of responsibilities." Many young people reported that they had developed skills in leadership, public speaking, self-esteem, communication, and planning and that they have made lasting friendships through their club participation. One 4- Her reported, "I've had a lot of fun in 4- H, learned many new skills and learned that my little help can count. -- 4-H has given me opportunities to grow and have fun doing so. For this gift, 1 am very grateful." Another wrote: "Without 4-H, I don't know where I'd be." The full study can be found at: http://www.cce.cornell.edu/youth/4h/ne ws/index.html Information on 4-H in New York State can be found at: http://www.cce.cornell.edu/youth/4h/ For more information on this survey contact: Susan S. Lang at (607) 255- 3613 email: SSL4@cornell.edu http://www.news.corneli.edu Source: "Clover Corner News, " Internet Mailer, October 5, 1999 ASSET # 1 1 FIMILY IHIUNllARIES I:AMILY HAS CLEAR RULES AND CONSEQUENCES, AND MONITORS THE YOUNG PFRSON'S WHEREABOUTS. We drive up to a stop sign. We have a choice to make. If we choose to obey the law and stop each time, we will never think too much about the stop sign. If we choose not to stop, we cannot be surprised when we are in an accident or ticketed and face consequences because, of our decision not to stop. tt is very simple. Help build security and boundaries in your children by taking the time to communicate clear rules and consequences. It is part of your responsibility as a parent and you will be.amazed at how positive it, is for your kids. Only 67% of our local kids said that their parents have set standards to follow. Nationally, 76% of the youth surveyed had definitive standards to follow. Boundaries ........... A Lovinq Choice. 00OBER 27 WiN $10,000 CASH AND A 1999 REST ..... FORD MUSTANG AR CONVERTIBLE We're Giving Away SlO00 Every Friday! for 1 free entry at 8 for $200, 9 for $300 and 10pro for S500 the party. Live entertainment and great specials Lots of easy ways to qualify. Weekday Cash drawings every Monday, Tuesday, & Wednesday for S200 to S500 and entry for the Grand Prize. Grand Prize drawings October 27th starting at 6pro for a total of S10,O00 and the '99 Mustang. ,00aRACE BETTINGtoMagic Open Wednesday through Monday from llam to llpm The tracks being offered include Belmont & many more Both horse and dog racing I NO & tqOTt00L t. 12, 1999 INDEPENDENT Page 3b